New Hampshire Curriculum Framework Social Studies — Grade 5


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SS:CV:5

The Nature and Purpose of Government Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of governments, and the fundamental ideals of government of the United States.

SS:CV:5:1.1

Apply the ideals and principles of the American system of government to historic and contemporary examples, e.g. , individual rights and responsibilities, minority rights, or equality of opportunity and equal protection under the law. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)

SS:CV:5:1.2

Identify the core ideals and principles of American government by citing documents, e.g., the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, or the Bill of Rights. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:CV:5:1.3

Apply criteria for evaluating the effectiveness and fairness of rules and laws at the local, state, or federal levels. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:CV:5:1.4

Differentiate among the major forms of limited and unlimited governments, e.g., monarchy, oligarchy, or democracy. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, F: Global Transformation, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)

SS:CV:5:2.1

Illustrate ways in which government in the United States is founded on the conviction that Americans are united by the principles they share, e.g., life, liberty, and property. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:CV:5:2.2

Identify and illustrate the heritage that early settlers brought to the development and establishment of American democracy, e.g., political, legal, philosophical, or religious traditions. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:CV:5:3.1

Identify other countries in the world and their different forms of government, e.g. , monarchy, oligarchy, or democracy. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, F: Global Transformation)

SS:CV:5:3.2

Describe ways in which countries interact with each other culturally, economically, diplomatically, or militarily. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, F: Global Transformation)

SS:CV:5:3.3

Discuss the reasons for conflicts between and among countries and peoples, e.g. , natural resources or religion. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, D: Material Wants and Needs, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:CV:5:4.1

Evaluate those characteristics that promote good citizenship, e.g., individual responsibility or respect for the rights and decisions of others. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement)

SS:EC:5

Economics and the Individual Students will learn about their role in a free market, how decisions that they make affect the economy, and how changes in the economy can affect them.

SS:EC:5:1.1

Identify the role of the individual in factor and product markets. (Themes: D: Material Wants and Needs)

SS:EC:5:1.2

Explain how specialization and productivity are related. (Themes: D: Material Wants and Needs, G: Science, Technology, and Society)

SS:EC:5:1.3

Recognize the relationship between productivity and wages, and between wages and standard of living. (Themes: D: Material Wants and Needs, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)

SS:EC:5:2.1

Determine the opportunity cost of decisions, e.g., the purchase of an item or the expenditure of time. (Themes: D: Material Wants and Needs)

SS:EC:5:2.2

Identify the factors of production, e.g., entrepreneurship, human resources, capital resources, and natural resources. (Themes: D: Material Wants and Needs, G: Science, Technology, and Society)

SS:EC:5:2.3

Recognize that shortage and surplus affect the price and availability of goods and services, e.g., swimsuits in bad weather, seasonal sales, or fads. (Themes: D: Material Wants and Needs, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)

SS:EC:5:3.1

Describe gross domestic product and its components, e.g., the difference between imports and exports. (Themes: D: Material Wants and Needs, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:EC:5:3.2

Recognize the effects of inflation on people under different circumstances, e.g., limited resources including food, fuel or housing. (Themes: D: Material Wants and Needs, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:GE:5

The World in Spatial Terms Students will demonstrate the ability to use maps, mental maps, globes, and other graphic tools and technologies to acquire, process, report, and analyze geographic information.

SS:GE:5:1.1

Translate mental maps into appropriate graphics to display geographic information and answer geographic questions, e.g., countries through which a person would travel between Cairo and Nairobi. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:GE:5:1.2

Apply the spatial concepts of location, distance, direction, scale, movement, and region, e.g., the relative and absolute location of the student's community, or the diffusion of the English language to the United States. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, F: Global Transformation)

SS:GE:5:1.3

Utilize maps, globes, graphs, charts, models, and databases to analyze spatial distributions and patterns, e.g., climate zones, natural resources, or population density. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment)

SS:GE:5:2.1

Describe the ways in which regions change, e.g., the degradation of the Aral Sea or the westward expansion of the United States. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, G: Science, Technology, and Society)

SS:GE:5:2.2

Describe how places and regions preserve culture, e.g., songs or traditions. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:GE:5:3.1

Describe how physical processes shape patterns in the physical environment, e.g., El Nino or erosion. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment)

SS:GE:5:3.2

Identify the components of Earth's physical system, e.g., the lithosphere or hydrosphere. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment)

SS:GE:5:3.3

Illustrate how physical processes produce changes in ecosystems, e.g., the process of succession after a forest fire or decertification. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, F: Global Transformation)

SS:GE:5:3.4

Explain how human activities influence changes in ecosystems, e.g., the introduction of exotic species. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, G: Science, Technology, and Society)

SS:GE:5:4.1

Recognize the demographic structure of a population and its underlying causes, e.g., birth rate, ethnic composition, or distribution of wealth. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, D: Material Wants and Needs, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:GE:5:4.2

Know the types and historical patterns of human migration, e.g., ethnic cleansing, overcoming physical barriers, or famine. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, C: People, Places and Environment, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:GE:5:4.3

Understand the effects of movement on the characteristics of places, e.g., acculturation, assimilation, or movement. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:GE:5:4.4

Analyze the spatial patterns of settlement, e.g., urbanization along river, agriculture on fertile plains, or nomadic lifestyles in steppes and deserts. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:GE:5:4.5

Know the functions, sizes, and spatial arrangements of settlement, e.g., urban, suburban and rural. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:GE:5:5.1

Understand the consequences of human modification of the physical environment, e.g., coastal development or forest management. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, G: Science, Technology, and Society)

SS:GE:5:5.2

Examine the role of technology in the human modification of the physical environment, e.g., work animals or electrical production. (Themes: G: Science, Technology, and Society)

SS:GE:5:5.3

Appreciate how characteristics of different physical environments provide opportunities human activities or place constraints on human activities, e.g., winter sports tourism or annual flood patterns. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment)

SS:GE:5:5.4

Assess why people have different viewpoints regarding resource use, e.g., water rationing or recycling. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:HI:5

Political Foundations and Development Students will demonstrate an understanding of the major ideas, issues and events pertaining to the history of governance in our state and nation.

SS:HI:5:1.1

Explain how and why people have developed forms of self-government, e.g., the Mayflower Compact or the Iroquois League. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:HI:5:1.2

Explain how the foundations of American democracy are rooted in European, Native American and colonial traditions, experiences and institutions. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:HI:5:3.1

Examine how the art, music and literature of our nation has been enhanced by groups, e.g., immigrants or abolitionists. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:HI:5:4.1

Demonstrate an understanding of major developments and changes in American economic productivity, e.g., piece work, interchangeable parts, or the assembly line. (Themes: D: Material Wants and Needs, G: Science, Technology, and Society)

SS:HI:5:4.2

Evaluate the importance of technological inventions and inventors and their impact on American life, e.g., household appliances or communication technologies. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, G: Science, Technology, and Society)

SS:HI:5:4.3

Demonstrate an understanding of how westward movement led to personal opportunities and a more diverse economy as seen in events, e.g., the Louisiana Purchase or the Homestead Act (1862). (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, D: Material Wants and Needs, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)

SS:HI:5:5.1

Explain the impact ethnic and religious groups have had on the development of the United States, e.g., the Irish or the Mormons. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:HI:5:5.2

Describe the impact of major national and state events on everyday life, e.g., the Industrial Revolution or the World War II home front. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:HI:5:5.3

Examine changes in the roles and lives of women and their impact on society, e.g., the family or the workplace. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:HI:5:5.4

Describe similarities and differences in the immigrant experience for various ethnic groups, e.g., the English or Chinese. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:WH:5

Political Foundations and Developments Students will demonstrate an understanding of major events, ideas and issues pertaining to the history of governance.

SS:WH:5:1.1

Describe different types of political systems created by people, e.g., the tribe, the empire or the nation-state. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:WH:5:1.2

Explore the use and abuse of power. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, F: Global Transformation, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:WH:5:2.1

Describe the impact of land and water routes on trade, e.g., the Silk Roads, the Atlantic Triangular Trade, or the Suez Canal. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, F: Global Transformation

SS:WH:5:2.2

Explore the spread and impact of ideas and technology, e.g., the concept of zero, gunpowder or the transistor. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, G: Science, Technology, and Society)

SS:WH:5:2.3

Describe major migrations, e.g., the first humans from Africa to the rest of the world, the Huns into China and Europe, or the Bantu across Africa. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:WH:5:2.4

Examine how military encounters have led to cultural exchange, e.g., Alexander of Macedonia, conquistadors in the New World, or 20th century Japanese imperialism in Asia (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, F: Global Transformation, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:WH:5:3.1

Differentiate the spread of world religions, e.g., Judaism, Christianity, or Islam. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:WH:5:3.2

Explore the development of education and its impact on societies, e.g., medicine in ancient Egypt or ancient Greece. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:WH:5:4.1

Analyze the impact of the agricultural revolution on humans using examples, e.g., the role of women, specialization of labor, or population density. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, G: Science, Technology, and Society, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:WH:5:4.2

Understand the tension over land use between settled farmers and nomadic herders using examples, e.g., ancient Mesopotamia, Asian steppe lands, or 20th Century Africa. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, C: People, Places and Environment, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)

SS:WH:5:4.3

Analyze the impact of inventions and new technologies on the agricultural system using examples, e.g., the invention of the hoe, irrigation, or genetic engineering of crops. (Themes: G: Science, Technology, and Society)

SS:WH:5:4.4

Trace improvements in communication, e.g., the Sumerian development of writing, Chinese printing, or the creation of the Internet. (Themes: G: Science, Technology, and Society, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:WH:5:5.1

Trace the rise and impact of cities on daily life, e.g., Timbuktu, Rome, or Mexico City. (Themes: C: People, Places and Environment, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)

SS:WH:5:5.2

Understand how societies have educated their members, e.g., the oral tradition of elders, apprenticeships, or classroom schooling. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:WH:5:5.3

Explain the impact of ethnic and religious groups on the development and stability of empires and nation-states, e.g., the Ancient Persia, the Ottoman Empire, or Nigeria. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, F: Global Transformation, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:WH:5:5.4

Examine forms of entertainment and leisure time activity, e.g., religious festivals, sporting events, or theatre. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, J: Human Expression and Communication)

SS:WH:5:5.5

Describe the types of families that various societies have created, e.g., the extended, matrilineal, or nuclear. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)