Virginia Mathematics Standards of Learning — Grade 12


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A.1

The student will represent verbal quantitative situations algebraically and evaluate these expressions for given replacement values of the variables.

A.10

The student will compare and contrast multiple univariate data sets, using box-and-whisker plots.

A.11

The student will collect and analyze data, determine the equation of the curve of best fit in order to make predictions, and solve real-world problems, using mathematical models. Mathematical models will include linear and quadratic functions.

A.2

The student will perform operations on polynomials, including a) applying the laws of exponents to perform operations on expressions; b) adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing polynomials; and c) factoring completely first- and second-degree binomials and trinomials in one or two variables. Graphing calculators will be used as a tool for factoring and for confirming algebraic factorizations.

A.3

The student will express the square roots and cube roots of whole numbers and the square root of a monomial algebraic expression in simplest radical form.

A.4

The student will solve multistep linear and quadratic equations in two variables, including a) solving literal equations (formulas) for a given variable; b) justifying steps used in simplifying expressions and solving equations, using field properties and axioms of equality that are valid for the set of real numbers and its subsets; c) solving quadratic equations algebraically and graphically; d) solving multistep linear equations algebraically and graphically; e) solving systems of two linear equations in two variables algebraically and graphically; and f) solving real-world problems involving equations and systems of equations. Graphing calculators will be used both as a primary tool in solving problems and to verify algebraic solutions.

A.5

The student will solve multistep linear inequalities in two variables, including a) solving multistep linear inequalities algebraically and graphically; b) justifying steps used in solving inequalities, using axioms of inequality and properties of order that are valid for the set of real numbers and its subsets; c) solving real-world problems involving inequalities; and d) solving systems of inequalities.

A.6

The student will graph linear equations and linear inequalities in two variables, including a) determining the slope of a line when given an equation of the line, the graph of the line, or two points on the line. Slope will be described as rate of change and will be positive, negative, zero, or undefined; and b) writing the equation of a line when given the graph of the line, two points on the line, or the slope and a point on the line.

A.7

The student will investigate and analyze function (linear and quadratic) families and their characteristics both algebraically and graphically, including a) determining whether a relation is a function; b) domain and range; c) zeros of a function; d) x- and y-intercepts; e) finding the values of a function for elements in its domain; and f) making connections between and among multiple representations of functions including concrete, verbal, numeric, graphic, and algebraic.

A.8

The student, given a situation in a real-world context, will analyze a relation to determine whether a direct or inverse variation exists, and represent a direct variation algebraically and graphically and an inverse variation algebraically.

A.9

The student, given a set of data, will interpret variation in real-world contexts and calculate and interpret mean absolute deviation, standard deviation, and z-scores.

AFDA.1

The student will investigate and analyze function (linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic) families and their characteristics. Key concepts include a) continuity; b) local and absolute maxima and minima; c) domain and range; d) zeros; e) intercepts; f) intervals in which the function is increasing/decreasing; g) end behaviors; and h) asymptotes.

AFDA.2

The student will use knowledge of transformations to write an equation, given the graph of a function (linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic).

AFDA.3

The student will collect data and generate an equation for the curve (linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic) of best fit to model real-world problems or applications. Students will use the best fit equation to interpolate function values, make decisions, and justify conclusions with algebraic and/or graphical models.

AFDA.4

The student will transfer between and analyze multiple representations of functions, including algebraic formulas, graphs, tables, and words. Students will select and use appropriate representations for analysis, interpretation, and prediction.

AFDA.5

The student will determine optimal values in problem situations by identifying constraints and using linear programming techniques.

AFDA.6

The student will calculate probabilities. Key concepts include a) conditional probability; b) dependent and independent events; c) addition and multiplication rules; d) counting techniques (permutations and combinations); and e) Law of Large Numbers.

AFDA.7

The student will analyze the normal distribution. Key concepts include a) characteristics of normally distributed data; b) percentiles; c) normalizing data, using z-scores; and d) area under the standard normal curve and probability.

AFDA.8

The student will design and conduct an experiment/survey. Key concepts include a) sample size; b) sampling technique; c) controlling sources of bias and experimental error; d) data collection; and e) data analysis and reporting.

AII.1

The student, given rational, radical, or polynomial expressions, will a) add, subtract, multiply, divide, and simplify rational algebraic expressions; b) add, subtract, multiply, divide, and simplify radical expressions containing rational numbers and variables, and expressions containing rational exponents; c) write radical expressions as expressions containing rational exponents and vice versa; and d) factor polynomials completely.

AII.10

The student will identify, create, and solve real-world problems involving inverse variation, joint variation, and a combination of direct and inverse variations.

AII.11

The student will identify properties of a normal distribution and apply those properties to determine probabilities associated with areas under the standard normal curve.

AII.12

The student will compute and distinguish between permutations and combinations and use technology for applications.

AII.2

The student will investigate and apply the properties of arithmetic and geometric sequences and series to solve real-world problems, including writing the first n terms, finding the nth term, and evaluating summation formulas. Notation will include and an. *Standard AII.2 will be assessed in the Functions and Statistics reporting category. (Revised March 2011)

AII.3

The student will perform operations on complex numbers, express the results in simplest form using patterns of the powers of i, and identify field properties that are valid for the complex numbers.

AII.4

The student will solve, algebraically and graphically, a) absolute value equations and inequalities; b) quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers; c) equations containing rational algebraic expressions; and d) equations containing radical expressions. Graphing calculators will be used for solving and for confirming the algebraic solutions.

AII.5

The student will solve nonlinear systems of equations, including linear-quadratic and quadratic- quadratic, algebraically and graphically. Graphing calculators will be used as a tool to visualize graphs and predict the number of solutions.

AII.6

The student will recognize the general shape of function (absolute value, square root, cube root, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic) families and will convert between graphic and symbolic forms of functions. A transformational approach to graphing will be employed. Graphing calculators will be used as a tool to investigate the shapes and behaviors of these functions.

AII.7

The student will investigate and analyze functions algebraically and graphically. Key concepts include a) domain and range, including limited and discontinuous domains and ranges; b) zeros; c) x- and y-intercepts; d) intervals in which a function is increasing or decreasing; e) asymptotes; f) end behavior; g) inverse of a function; and h) composition of multiple functions. Graphing calculators will be used as a tool to assist in investigation of functions.

AII.8

The student will investigate and describe the relationships among solutions of an equation, zeros of a function, x-intercepts of a graph, and factors of a polynomial expression.

AII.9

The student will collect and analyze data, determine the equation of the curve of best fit, make predictions, and solve real-world problems, using mathematical models. Mathematical models will include polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

AII/T.1

The student, given rational, radical, or polynomial expressions, will a) add, subtract, multiply, divide, and simplify rational algebraic expressions; b) add, subtract, multiply, divide, and simplify radical expressions containing rational numbers and variables, and expressions containing rational exponents; c) write radical expressions as expressions containing rational exponents and vice versa; and d) factor polynomials completely.

AII/T.10

The student will identify, create, and solve real-world problems involving inverse variation, joint variation, and a combination of direct and inverse variations.

AII/T.11

The student will identify properties of a normal distribution and apply those properties to determine probabilities associated with areas under the standard normal curve.

AII/T.12

The student will compute and distinguish between permutations and combinations and use technology for applications.

AII/T.13

The student, given a point other than the origin on the terminal side of an angle, will use the definitions of the six trigonometric functions to find the sine, cosine, tangent, cotangent, secant, and cosecant of the angle in standard position. Trigonometric functions defined on the unit circle will be related to trigonometric functions defined in right triangles.

AII/T.14

The student, given the value of one trigonometric function, will find the values of the other trigonometric functions, using the definitions and properties of the trigonometric functions.

AII/T.15

The student will find, without the aid of a calculator, the values of the trigonometric functions of the special angles and their related angles as found in the unit circle. This will include converting angle measures from radians to degrees and vice versa.

AII/T.16

The student will find, with the aid of a calculator, the value of any trigonometric function and inverse trigonometric function.

AII/T.17

The student will verify basic trigonometric identities and make substitutions, using the basic identities.

AII/T.18

The student, given one of the six trigonometric functions in standard form, will a) state the domain and the range of the function; b) determine the amplitude, period, phase shift, vertical shift, and asymptotes; c) sketch the graph of the function by using transformations for at least a two-period interval; and d) investigate the effect of changing the parameters in a trigonometric function on the graph of the function.

AII/T.19

The student will identify the domain and range of the inverse trigonometric functions and recognize the graphs of these functions. Restrictions on the domains of the inverse trigonometric functions will be included.

AII/T.2

The student will investigate and apply the properties of arithmetic and geometric sequences and series to solve real-world problems, including writing the first n terms, finding the nth term, and evaluating summation formulas. Notation will include S and an.

AII/T.20

The student will solve trigonometric equations that include both infinite solutions and restricted domain solutions and solve basic trigonometric inequalities.

AII/T.21

The student will identify, create, and solve real-world problems involving triangles. Techniques will include using the trigonometric functions, the Pythagorean Theorem, the Law of Sines, and the Law of Cosines.

AII/T.3

The student will perform operations on complex numbers, express the results in simplest form using patterns of the powers of i, and identify field properties that are valid for the complex numbers.

AII/T.4

The student will solve, algebraically and graphically, a) absolute value equations and inequalities; b) quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers; c) equations containing rational algebraic expressions; and d) equations containing radical expressions. Graphing calculators will be used for solving and for confirming the algebraic solutions.

AII/T.5

The student will solve nonlinear systems of equations, including linear-quadratic and quadratic-quadratic, algebraically and graphically. Graphing calculators will be used as a tool to visualize graphs and predict the number of solutions.

AII/T.6

The student will recognize the general shape of function (absolute value, square root, cube root, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic) families and will convert between graphic and symbolic forms of functions. A transformational approach to graphing will be employed. Graphing calculators will be used as a tool to investigate the shapes and behaviors of these functions.

AII/T.7

The student will investigate and analyze functions algebraically and graphically. Key concepts include a) domain and range, including limited and discontinuous domains and ranges; b) zeros; c) x- and y-intercepts; d) intervals in which a function is increasing or decreasing; e) asymptotes; f) end behavior; g) inverse of a function; and h) composition of multiple functions. Graphing calculators will be used as a tool to assist in the investigation of functions.

AII/T.8

The student will investigate and describe the relationships among solutions of an equation, zeros of a function, x-intercepts of a graph, and factors of a polynomial expression.

AII/T.9

The student will collect and analyze data, determine the equation of the curve of best fit, make predictions, and solve real-world problems, using mathematical models. Mathematical models will include polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

COM.1

The student will apply programming techniques and skills to solve practical real-world problems in mathematics arising from consumer, business, and other applications in mathematics. Problems will include opportunities for students to analyze data in charts, graphs, and tables and to use their knowledge of equations, formulas, and functions to solve these problems.

COM.10

The student will use appropriate variable data types, including integer, real (fixed and scientific notation), character, string, and Boolean. This will also include variables representing structured data types.

COM.11

The student will describe the way the computer stores, accesses, and processes variables, including the following topics: the use of variables versus constants, variables addresses, pointers, parameter passing, scope of variables, and local versus global variables.

COM.12

The student will translate a mathematical expression into a computer statement, which involves writing assignment statements and using the order of operations.

COM.13

The student will select and implement built-in (library) functions in processing data.

COM.14

The student will implement conditional statements that include if/then statements, if/then/else statements, case statements, and Boolean logic.

COM.15

The student will implement loops, including iterative loops. Other topics will include single entry point, single exit point, preconditions, and postconditions.

COM.16

The student will select and implement appropriate data structures, including arrays (one-dimensional and/or multidimensional), files, and records. Implementation will include creating the data structure, putting information into the structure, and retrieving information from the structure.

COM.17

The student will implement pre-existing algorithms, including sort routines, search routines, and simple animation routines.

COM.18

The student will test a program, using an appropriate set of data. The set of test data should be appropriate and complete for the type of program being tested.

COM.19

The student will debug a program, using appropriate techniques (e.g., appropriately placed controlled breaks, the printing of intermediate results, other debugging tools available in the programming environment), and identify the difference between syntax errors and logic errors.

COM.2

The student will design, write, test, debug, and document a program. Programming documentation will include preconditions and postconditions of program segments, input/output specifications, the step-by-step plan, the test data, a sample run, and the program listing with appropriately placed comments.

COM.20

The student will design, write, test, debug, and document a complete structured program that requires the synthesis of many of the concepts contained in previous standards.

COM.3

The student will write program specifications that define the constraints of a given problem. These specifications will include descriptions of preconditions, postconditions, the desired output, analysis of the available input, and an indication as to whether or not the problem is solvable under the given conditions.

COM.4

The student will design a step-by-step plan (algorithm) to solve a given problem. The plan will be in the form of a program flowchart, pseudo code, hierarchy chart, and/or data-flow diagram.

COM.5

The student will divide a given problem into manageable sections (modules) by task and implement the solution. The modules will include an appropriate user-defined function, subroutines, and procedures. Enrichment topics might include user-defined libraries (units) and object-oriented programming.

COM.6

The student will design and implement the input phase of a program, which will include designing screen layout and getting information into the program by way of user interaction, data statements, and/or file input. The input phase will also include methods of filtering out invalid data (error trapping).

COM.7

The student will design and implement the output phase of a computer program, which will include designing output layout, accessing a variety of output devices, using output statements, and labeling results.

COM.8

The student will design and implement computer graphics, which will include topics appropriate for the available programming environment as well as student background. Students will use graphics as an end in itself, as an enhancement to other output, and as a vehicle for reinforcing programming techniques.

COM.9

The student will define simple variable data types that include integer, real (fixed and scientific notation), character, string, and Boolean.

DM.1

The student will model problems, using vertex-edge graphs. The concepts of valence, connectedness, paths, planarity, and directed graphs will be investigated. Adjacency matrices and matrix operations will be used to solve problems (e.g., food chains, number of paths).

DM.10

The student will use the recursive process and difference equations with the aid of appropriate technology to generate a) compound interest; b) sequences and series; c) fractals; d) population growth models; and e) the Fibonacci sequence.

DM.11

The student will describe and apply sorting algorithms and coding algorithms used in sorting, processing, and communicating information. These will include a) bubble sort, merge sort, and network sort; and b) ISBN, UPC, zip, and banking codes.

DM.12

The student will select, justify, and apply an appropriate technique to solve a logic problem. Techniques will include Venn diagrams, truth tables, and matrices.

DM.13

The student will apply the formulas of combinatorics in the areas of a) the Fundamental (Basic) Counting Principle; b) knapsack and bin-packing problems; c) permutations and combinations; and d) the pigeonhole principle.

DM.2

The student will solve problems through investigation and application of circuits, cycles, Euler Paths, Euler Circuits, Hamilton Paths, and Hamilton Circuits. Optimal solutions will be sought using existing algorithms and student-created algorithms.

DM.3

The student will apply graphs to conflict-resolution problems, such as map coloring, scheduling, matching, and optimization. Graph coloring and chromatic number will be used.

DM.4

The student will apply algorithms, such as Kruskals, Prims, or Dijkstras, relating to trees, networks, and paths. Appropriate technology will be used to determine the number of possible solutions and generate solutions when a feasible number exists.

DM.5

The student will use algorithms to schedule tasks in order to determine a minimum project time. The algorithms will include critical path analysis, the list-processing algorithm, and student-created algorithms.

DM.6

The student will solve linear programming problems. Appropriate technology will be used to facilitate the use of matrices, graphing techniques, and the Simplex method of determining solutions.

DM.7

The student will analyze and describe the issue of fair division (e.g., cake cutting, estate division). Algorithms for continuous and discrete cases will be applied.

DM.8

The student will investigate and describe weighted voting and the results of various election methods. These may include approval and preference voting as well as plurality, majority, run-off, sequential run-off, Borda count, and Condorcet winners.

DM.9

The student will identify apportionment inconsistencies that apply to issues such as salary caps in sports and allocation of representatives to Congress. Historical and current methods will be compared.

G.1

The student will construct and judge the validity of a logical argument consisting of a set of premises and a conclusion. This will include a) identifying the converse, inverse, and contrapositive of a conditional statement; b) translating a short verbal argument into symbolic form; c) using Venn diagrams to represent set relationships; and d) using deductive reasoning.

G.10

The student will solve real-world problems involving angles of polygons.

G.11

The student will use angles, arcs, chords, tangents, and secants to a) investigate, verify, and apply properties of circles; b) solve real-world problems involving properties of circles; and c) find arc lengths and areas of sectors in circles.

G.12

The student, given the coordinates of the center of a circle and a point on the circle, will write the equation of the circle.

G.13

The student will use formulas for surface area and volume of three-dimensional objects to solve real-world problems.

G.14

The student will use similar geometric objects in two- or three-dimensions to a) compare ratios between side lengths, perimeters, areas, and volumes; b) determine how changes in one or more dimensions of an object affect area and/or volume of the object; c) determine how changes in area and/or volume of an object affect one or more dimensions of the object; and d) solve real-world problems about similar geometric objects.

G.2

The student will use the relationships between angles formed by two lines cut by a transversal to a) determine whether two lines are parallel; b) verify the parallelism, using algebraic and coordinate methods as well as deductive proofs; and c) solve real-world problems involving angles formed when parallel lines are cut by a transversal.

G.3

The student will use pictorial representations, including computer software, constructions, and coordinate methods, to solve problems involving symmetry and transformation. This will include a) investigating and using formulas for finding distance, midpoint, and slope; b) applying slope to verify and determine whether lines are parallel or perpendicular; c) investigating symmetry and determining whether a figure is symmetric with respect to a line or a point; and d) determining whether a figure has been translated, reflected, rotated, or dilated, using coordinate methods.

G.4

The student will construct and justify the constructions of a) a line segment congruent to a given line segment; b) the perpendicular bisector of a line segment; c) a perpendicular to a given line from a point not on the line; d) a perpendicular to a given line at a given point on the line; e) the bisector of a given angle, f) an angle congruent to a given angle; and g) a line parallel to a given line through a point not on the given line.

G.5

The student, given information concerning the lengths of sides and/or measures of angles in triangles, will a) order the sides by length, given the angle measures; b) order the angles by degree measure, given the side lengths; c) determine whether a triangle exists; and d) determine the range in which the length of the third side must lie. These concepts will be considered in the context of real-world situations.

G.6

The student, given information in the form of a figure or statement, will prove two triangles are congruent, using algebraic and coordinate methods as well as deductive proofs.

G.7

The student, given information in the form of a figure or statement, will prove two triangles are similar, using algebraic and coordinate methods as well as deductive proofs.

G.8

The student will solve real-world problems involving right triangles by using the Pythagorean Theorem and its converse, properties of special right triangles, and right triangle trigonometry.

G.9

The student will verify characteristics of quadrilaterals and use properties of quadrilaterals to solve real-world problems.

MA.1

The student will investigate and identify the characteristics of polynomial and rational functions and use these to sketch the graphs of the functions. This will include determining zeros, upper and lower bounds, y-intercepts, symmetry, asymptotes, intervals for which the function is increasing or decreasing, and maximum or minimum points. Graphing utilities will be used to investigate and verify these characteristics.

MA.10

The student will investigate and identify the characteristics of the graphs of polar equations, using graphing utilities. This will include classification of polar equations, the effects of changes in the parameters in polar equations, conversion of complex numbers from rectangular form to polar form and vice versa, and the intersection of the graphs of polar equations.

MA.11

The student will perform operations with vectors in the coordinate plane and solve real-world problems, using vectors. This will include the following topics: operations of addition, subtraction, scalar multiplication, and inner (dot) product; norm of a vector; unit vector; graphing; properties; simple proofs; complex numbers (as vectors); and perpendicular components.

MA.12

The student will use parametric equations to model and solve application problems.

MA.13

The student will identify, create, and solve real-world problems involving triangles. Techniques will include using the trigonometric functions, the Pythagorean Theorem, the Law of Sines, and the Law of Cosines.

MA.14

The student will use matrices to organize data and will add and subtract matrices, multiply matrices, multiply matrices by a scalar, and use matrices to solve systems of equations.

MA.2

The student will apply compositions of functions and inverses of functions to real-world situations. Analytical methods and graphing utilities will be used to investigate and verify the domain and range of resulting functions.

MA.3

The student will investigate and describe the continuity of functions, using graphs and algebraic methods.

MA.4

The student will expand binomials having positive integral exponents through the use of the Binomial Theorem, the formula for combinations, and Pascals Triangle.

MA.5

The student will find the sum (sigma notation included) of finite and infinite convergent series, which will lead to an intuitive approach to a limit.

MA.6

The student will use mathematical induction to prove formulas and mathematical statements.

MA.7

The student will find the limit of an algebraic function, if it exists, as the variable approaches either a finite number or infinity. A graphing utility will be used to verify intuitive reasoning, algebraic methods, and numerical substitution.

MA.8

The student will investigate and identify the characteristics of conic section equations in (h, k) and standard forms. Transformations in the coordinate plane will be used to graph conic sections.

MA.9

The student will investigate and identify the characteristics of exponential and logarithmic functions in order to graph these functions and solve equations and real-world problems. This will include the role of e, natural and common logarithms, laws of exponents and logarithms, and the solution of logarithmic and exponential equations.

PS.1

The student will analyze graphical displays of univariate data, including dotplots, stemplots, and histograms, to identify and describe patterns and departures from patterns, using central tendency, spread, clusters, gaps, and outliers. Appropriate technology will be used to create graphical displays.

PS.10

The student will plan and conduct an experiment. The plan will address control, randomization, and measurement of experimental error.

PS.11

The student will identify and describe two or more events as complementary, dependent, independent, and/or mutually exclusive.

PS.12

The student will find probabilities (relative frequency and theoretical), including conditional probabilities for events that are either dependent or independent, by applying the Law of Large Numbers concept, the addition rule, and the multiplication rule.

PS.13

The student will develop, interpret, and apply the binomial probability distribution for discrete random variables, including computing the mean and standard deviation for the binomial variable.

PS.14

The student will simulate probability distributions, including binomial and geometric.

PS.15

The student will identify random variables as independent or dependent and find the mean and standard deviations for sums and differences of independent random variables.

PS.16

The student will identify properties of a normal distribution and apply the normal distribution to determine probabilities, using a table or graphing calculator.

PS.17

The student, given data from a large sample, will find and interpret point estimates and confidence intervals for parameters. The parameters will include proportion and mean, difference between two proportions, and difference between two means (independent and paired).

PS.18

The student will apply and interpret the logic of a hypothesis-testing procedure. Tests will include large sample tests for proportion, mean, difference between two proportions, and difference between two means (independent and paired) and Chi-squared tests for goodness of fit, homogeneity of proportions, and independence.

PS.19

The student will identify the meaning of sampling distribution with reference to random variable, sampling statistic, and parameter and explain the Central Limit Theorem. This will include sampling distribution of a sample proportion, a sample mean, a difference between two sample proportions, and a difference between two sample means.

PS.2

The student will analyze numerical characteristics of univariate data sets to describe patterns and departures from patterns, using mean, median, mode, variance, standard deviation, interquartile range, range, and outliers.

PS.20

The student will identify properties of a t-distribution and apply t-distributions to single-sample and two-sample (independent and matched pairs) t-procedures, using tables or graphing calculators.

PS.3

The student will compare distributions of two or more univariate data sets, analyzing center and spread (within group and between group variations), clusters and gaps, shapes, outliers, or other unusual features.

PS.4

The student will analyze scatterplots to identify and describe the relationship between two variables, using shape; strength of relationship; clusters; positive, negative, or no association; outliers; and influential points.

PS.5

The student will find and interpret linear correlation, use the method of least squares regression to model the linear relationship between two variables, and use the residual plots to assess linearity.

PS.6

The student will make logarithmic and power transformations to achieve linearity.

PS.7

The student, using two-way tables, will analyze categorical data to describe patterns and departure from patterns and to find marginal frequency and relative frequencies, including conditional frequencies.

PS.8

The student will describe the methods of data collection in a census, sample survey, experiment, and observational study and identify an appropriate method of solution for a given problem setting.

PS.9

The student will plan and conduct a survey. The plan will address sampling techniques (e.g., simple random, stratified) and methods to reduce bias.

T.1

The student, given a point other than the origin on the terminal side of an angle, will use the definitions of the six trigonometric functions to find the sine, cosine, tangent, cotangent, secant, and cosecant of the angle in standard position. Trigonometric functions defined on the unit circle will be related to trigonometric functions defined in right triangles.

T.2

The student, given the value of one trigonometric function, will find the values of the other trigonometric functions, using the definitions and properties of the trigonometric functions.

T.3

The student will find, without the aid of a calculator, the values of the trigonometric functions of the special angles and their related angles as found in the unit circle. This will include converting angle measures from radians to degrees and vice versa.

T.4

The student will find, with the aid of a calculator, the value of any trigonometric function and inverse trigonometric function.

T.5

The student will verify basic trigonometric identities and make substitutions, using the basic identities.

T.6

The student, given one of the six trigonometric functions in standard form, will a) state the domain and the range of the function; b) determine the amplitude, period, phase shift, vertical shift, and asymptotes; c) sketch the graph of the function by using transformations for at least a two-period interval; and d) investigate the effect of changing the parameters in a trigonometric function on the graph of the function.

T.7

The student will identify the domain and range of the inverse trigonometric functions and recognize the graphs of these functions. Restrictions on the domains of the inverse trigonometric functions will be included.

T.8

The student will solve trigonometric equations that include both infinite solutions and restricted domain solutions and solve basic trigonometric inequalities.

T.9

The student will identify, create, and solve real-world problems involving triangles. Techniques will include using the trigonometric functions, the Pythagorean Theorem, the Law of Sines, and the Law of Cosines.