Oregon Social Sciences Academic Content Standards — Grade 6


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6.1

Determine and explain the historical context of key people, cultures, products, events, and ideas over time including the examination of different perspectives from people involved including, but not limited to, Aztec, Maya, Inca, Inuit, early Native American cultures of North America, major explorers, colonizers of countries in the Western Hemisphere, and the Columbian Exchange.

6.11

Distinguish among different types of maps and use them to analyze an issue in the Western Hemisphere.

6.12

Collect and analyze data to describe regions of the Western Hemisphere.

6.13

Classify and analyze the types of connections between places in the Western Hemisphere.

6.14

Identify physical features of the Western Hemisphere and explain their effects on people and events.

6.15

Explain how people have adapted to or changed the physical environment in the Western Hemisphere.

6.16

Explain how technological developments, societal decisions, and personal practices influence sustainability in the Western Hemisphere.

6.17

Compare and contrast early forms of government via the study of early civilizations (tribal, monarchy, democracy, theocracy, and oligarchy) in the Western Hemisphere.

6.18

Describe current forms of government in countries in the Western Hemisphere.

6.19

Describe the role and function of prices in the economy.

6.2

Identify examples of the social, political, cultural, and economic development in key areas of the Western Hemisphere.

6.21

Clarify key aspects of an event, issue, or problem through inquiry and research.

6.22

Gather, interpret, document, and use information from multiple sources, distinguishing facts from opinions and recognizing points of view.

6.23

Interpret documents and data from multiple primary and secondary sources (art, artifacts, eyewitness accounts, letters and diaries, real or simulated historical sites, charts, graphs, diagrams, written texts).

6.3

Describe the rise; the political, technological, and cultural achievements; and the decline of ancient civilizations in Europe, Asia, and Africa prior to the Roman Empire.

6.4

Explain how different cultures in the Western Hemisphere record history.

6.5

Critique information to determine if it is sufficient to answer historical questions.

6.6

Create and compare timelines that identify major people, events and developments in the history of individual civilizations and/or countries that comprise the Americas.

6.7

Define and use the terms decade, century, and millennium, and compare alternative ways that historical periods and eras are designated by identifying the organizing principles upon which each is based.

6.8

Analyze cause-and-effect relationships, including the importance of individuals, ideas, human interests and beliefs.

6.9

Differentiate between fact and interpretation in historical accounts and explain the meaning of historical passages by identifying who was involved, what happened, where it happened, and relating them to outcomes that followed and gaps in the historical record.

7.1

Describe and compare the beliefs, the spread, and the influence of religions throughout Europe, Asia, and Africa, Islam, Crusades, Holy Roman Empire.

7.11

Describe the physical environment of places in the Eastern Hemisphere and how it influences trade, culture, and the economy.

7.12

Compare and analyze human characteristics (e.g., population, land use, language, and religion) of places and regions in the Eastern Hemisphere.

7.13

Describe the historical and current physical, cultural, and economic characteristics of eco-regions.

7.14

Explain how technological developments, societal decisions, and personal practices influence sustainability in the Eastern Hemisphere.

7.15

Determine and explain the interdependence of people around the world during significant eras or events.

7.16

Describe the role of citizens in various governments in the Eastern Hemisphere.

7.17

Compare and contrast early forms of government via the study of early civilizations (tribal, monarchy, democracy, theocracy, and oligarchy) in the Eastern Hemisphere.

7.18

Investigate current issues in the Eastern Hemisphere and how they relate to other countries, including the United States.

7.19

Analyze the significance of the Magna Carta, Hammurabis Code and other documents on the development of modern governments.

7.2

Examine the importance of trade routes and trace the rise of cultural centers and trade cities in Europe, Asia, and Africa.

7.21

Explain the function of imports and exports in the economy.

7.22

Explain outsourcing and describe the costs and benefits.

7.23

Explain the function of profit in the economy.

7.24

Analyze current and historical sources (e.g., artifacts, eyewitness accounts, letters and diaries, real or simulated historical sites, charts, graphs, diagrams, and written texts) for accuracy and point of view while forming questions.

7.25

Analyze evidence from multiple sources including those with conflicting information.

7.3

Analyze the interconnections of people, places and events in the economic, scientific and cultural exchanges of the European Renaissance that led to the Scientific Revolution, voyages of discovery and imperial conquest.

7.4

Explain how and why cultures in the Eastern Hemisphere record history in different ways

7.5

Create and compare timelines that identify major people and events and developments in the history of civilization and/or countries of Africa, Asia and the Southwest Pacific

7.6

Form historical questions and use a variety of information resources to find, summarize and evaluate historical data on the people places, events and developments that have played a part in the history of Africa, Asia and the Southwest Pacific.

7.7

Interpret documents and data from multiple primary and secondary sources (e.g., art, artifacts, eyewitness accounts, letters and diaries, real or simulated historical sites, charts, graphs, diagrams, written texts) while forming historical questions.

7.8

Use and evaluate maps, graphs, charts, models, and databases to analyze geographic distributions in the Eastern Hemisphere

7.9

Collect and analyze data to make geographic inferences and predictions regarding the Eastern Hemisphere.

8.1

Evaluate continuity and change over the course of United States history by analyzing examples of conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups, societies, or nations.

8.11

Identify and describe patterns and networks of economic interdependence, migration, and settlement.

8.12

Investigate how differing geographic perspectives apply to issues in U.S. History.

8.13

Explain how current and historical technological developments, societal decisions, and personal practices influence sustainability in the United States.

8.14

Explain rights and responsibilities of citizens.

8.15

Contrast the impact of the Articles of Confederation as a form of government to the U.S. Constitution.

8.16

Compare and contrast how European governments and the United States government interacted with Native American peoples.

8.17

Examine the development activities of political parties and interest groups and their affect on events, issues, and ideas.

8.18

Examine and analyze important United States documents, including (but not limited to) the Constitution, Bill of Rights, 13th-15th Amendments.

8.19

Examine important Supreme Court decisions prior to 1880 and the impact of the decisions on government practices, personal liberties, and property rights.

8.2

Evaluate continuity and change over the course of Unites States history, by analyzing key people and constitutional convention, age of Jefferson, industrial revolution, westward expansion, Civil War.

8.21

Analyze important political and ethical values such as freedom, democracy, equality, and justice embodied in documents such as the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

8.22

Distinguish among tariffs, quotas, and government policies as means to regulate trade.

8.23

Describe how industrialization changes production and how it creates shifts in the market.

8.24

Compare fictional portrayals of a time, place, or character to historical or other non-fictional sources relating to the same period.

8.25

Critique data for point of view, historical context, distortion, or propaganda and relevance.

8.26

Examine a controversial event, issue, or problem from more than one perspective.

8.27

Examine the various characteristics, causes, and effects of an event, issue, or problem.

8.28

Investigate a response or solution to an issue or problem and support or oppose, using research.

8.3

Examine social, political and economic factors that caused westward expansion from American Revolution through reconstruction.

8.4

Evaluate the impact of different factors, including gender, age, ethnicity and class on groups and individuals during this time period and the impact these groups and individuals have on events of the time.

8.5

Analyze the causes as outlined in the Declaration of Independence, and examine the major American and British leaders, key events, international support, and consequences of (e.g., Articles of Confederation, changes in trade relationships, achievement of independence by the United States) the American Revolution.

8.6

Use and interpret documents and other relevant primary and secondary sources pertaining to U.S. History from multiple perspectives.

8.7

Analyze evidence from multiple sources including those with conflicting accounts about specific events in U.S. History.

8.8

Evaluate information from a variety of sources and perspectives.

8.9

Construct or evaluate a written historical argument demonstrating an understanding of primary and secondary sources.