Missouri State Standards for Science — Grade 1


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1.1.1.A

Objects, and the materials they are made of, have properties that can be used to describe and classify them

1.1.1.A.a

Given an equal-arm balance and various objects, illustrate arrangements in which the beam is balanced

1.1.1.A.b

Measure and compare the mass of objects (more/less)

1.1.1.A.c

Order objects according to mass

1.1.2.A

Forms of energy have a source, a means of transfer (work and heat), and a receiver

1.1.2.A.a

Identify the source of energy that causes an increase in the temperature of an object (e.g., Sun, stove, flame, light bulb)

1.1.2.A.b

Compare the temperature of hot and cold objects using a simple thermometer

1.1.2.A.c

Describe the change in temperature of an object as warmer or cooler

1.1.2.C

Electromagnetic energy from the Sun (solar radiation) is a major source of energy on Earth

1.1.2.C.a

Identify light from the Sun as a basic need of most plants

1.2.1.A

The motion of an object is described as a change in position, direction, and speed relative to another object (frame of reference)

1.2.1.A.a

Compare the position of an object relative to another object (e.g., left of or right of)

1.2.1.A.b

Describe an objects motion as straight, circular, vibrating (back and forth), zigzag, stopping, starting, or falling

1.2.1.A.c

Compare the speeds (faster vs. slower) of two moving objects

1.2.2.A

Forces are classified as either contact (pushes, pulls, friction, buoyancy) or non-contact forces (gravity, magnetism), that can be described in terms of direction and magnitude

1.2.2.A.a

Identify the force (i.e., push or pull) required to do work (move an object)

1.2.2.D

Newtons Laws of Motion explain the interaction of mass and forces, and are used to predict changes in motion

1.2.2.D.a

Describe ways to change the motion of an object (i.e., how to cause an object to go slower, go faster, go farther, change direction, stop)

1.3.1.A

Organisms have basic needs for survival

1.3.1.A.a

Identify the basic needs of most animals (i.e., air, water, food, shelter)

1.3.1.A.b

Identify the basic needs of most plants (i.e., air, water, light)

1.3.1.A.c

Predict and investigate the growth of plants when growing conditions are altered (e.g., dark vs. light, water vs. no water)

1.3.1.D

Plants and animals have different structures that serve similar functions necessary for the survival of the organism

1.3.1.D.a

Identify and compare the physical structures of a variety of plants (e.g., stem, leaves, flowers, seeds, roots)

1.3.1.D.b

Identify and compare the physical structures of a variety of animals (e.g., sensory organs, beaks, appendages, body covering) (Do NOT assess terms: sensory organs, appendages)

1.3.1.D.c

Identify the relationships between the physical structures of plants and the function of those structures (e.g., absorption of water, absorption of light energy, support, reproduction)

1.3.1.D.d

Identify the relationships between the physical structures of animals and the function of those structures (e.g., taking in water, support, movement, obtaining food, reproduction)

1.3.1.E

Biological classifications are based on how organisms are related

1.3.1.E.a

Distinguish between plants and animals based on observable structures and behaviors

1.4.1.A

All populations living together within a community interact with one another and with their environment in order to survive and maintain a balanced ecosystem

1.4.1.A.a

Describe how the seasons affect the behavior of plants and animals

1.4.1.A.b

Describe how the seasons affect the everyday life of humans (e.g., clothing, activities

1.5.2.F

Climate is a description of average weather conditions in a given area due to the transfer of energy and matter through Earths systems

1.5.2.F.a

Observe, measure, record weather data throughout the year (i.e., cloud cover, temperature, precipitation, wind speed) by using thermometers, rain gauges, wind socks

1.5.2.F.b

Compare temperatures in different locations (e.g., inside, outside, in the sun, in the shade)

1.5.2.F.c

Compare weather data observed at different times throughout the year (e.g., hot vs. cold, cloudy vs. clear, types of precipitation, windy vs. calm)

1.5.2.F.d

Identify patterns indicating relationships between observed weather data and weather phenomena (e.g., temperature and types of precipitation, clouds and amounts of precipitation)

1.5.3.A

Earths materials are limited natural resources affected by human activity

1.5.3.A.a

Observe and describe ways water, both as a solid and liquid, is used in everyday activities at different times of the year (e.g., bathe, drink, make ice cubes, build snowmen, cook, swim)

1.7.1.A

Scientific inquiry includes the ability of students to formulate a testable question and explanation, and to select appropriate investigative methods in order to obtain evidence relevant to the explanation

1.7.1.A.a

Pose questions about objects, materials, organisms, and events in the environment

1.7.1.A.b

Plan and conduct a simple investigation (fair test) to answer a question

1.7.1.B

Scientific inquiry relies upon gathering evidence from qualitative and quantitative observations

1.7.1.B.a

Make qualitative observations using the five senses

1.7.1.B.b

Make observations using simple tools and equipment (e.g., magnifiers/hand lenses, magnets, equal arm balances, thermometers)

1.7.1.B.c

Measure length, mass, and temperature using standard and nonstandard units

1.7.1.B.d

Compare amounts/measurements

1.7.1.C

Scientific inquiry includes evaluation of explanations (laws/ principles, theories /models) in light of evidence (data) and scientific principles (understandings ) See CLEs: This concept became C, as the previous concept was eliminated and the GLEs were moved to this concept, and redundancy was eliminated

1.7.1.C.a

Use observations as support for reasonable explanations

1.7.1.C.b

Use observations to describe relationships and patterns and to make predictions to be tested

1.7.1.C.c

Compare explanations with prior knowledge

1.7.1.D

The nature of science relies upon communication of results and justification of explanations See CLEs: This concept became D, as the original C concept was eliminated

1.7.1.D.a

Communicate simple procedures and results of investigations and explanations through: oral presentations drawings and maps data tables graphs (bar, pictograph) writings

1.8.1.A

Designed objects are used to do things better or more easily and to do some things that could not otherwise be done at all

1.8.1.A.a

Observe and identify that some objects occur in nature (natural objects); others have been designed and made by people

1.8.1.B

Advances in technology often result in improved data collection and an increase in scientific information

1.8.1.B.a

Describe how tools have helped scientists make better observations (e.g., magnifiers, balances, thermometers)

1.8.3.A

People, alone or in groups, are always making discoveries about nature and inventing new ways to solve problems and get work done

1.8.3.A.a

Identify a question that was asked, or could be asked, or a problem that needed to be solved when given a brief scenario (fiction or nonfiction of individuals solving everyday problems or learning through discovery)

1.8.3.A.b

Work with a group to solve a problem, giving due credit to the ideas and contributions of each group member (Assess Locally)