Washington State K-12 Social Studies Learning Standards — Grade 11


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11.1.1.1

Analyzes and evaluates the ways in which the U.S. Constitution and other fundamental documents promote key ideals and principles. Examples: Examines how arguments made in the Federalist Papers justify the principles of limited government, separation of powers, checks and balances, and federalism. Critiques how well Article I of the Constitution limits Congressional powers. Examines how the Preamble guides the application of the constitutional principles. Examines how the Brown v. Board of Education decision promotes equality as one of the goals of our nation. Examines how the Letter from a Birmingham Jail promotes equality as one of the goals of our nation. Examines how the Civil Rights Act sought to extend democratic ideals. Suggested Unit: U.S.Our Foundations (17761791) OSPI-developed Assessments: Constitutional Issues

11.1.2.2

Evaluates the effectiveness of the system of checks and balances during a particular administration, court, Congress, or legislature. Examples: Critiques the effectiveness of checks and balances during the administration of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his attempts to implement New Deal policies and increase the number of Supreme Court justices. Critiques the effectiveness of checks and balances during the Taft Court (1921 1930). Critiques the effectiveness of checks and balances during Lyndon Johnsons tenure as the Senate Majority Leader (19541961). Page 98 Suggested Unit: U.S.Reform, Prosperity, and the Great Depression (19181939) OSPI-developed Assessment: Checks and Balances

11.1.3.1

Analyzes and evaluates the causes and effects of U.S. foreign policy on people in the United States and the world in the past or present. Examples: Examines why the United States policy of the Truman Doctrine was implemented and critiques the costs and benefits for Korea. Examines why the United States was involved in Vietnam between 1950 and 1975 and critiques the costs and benefits of this policy for the United States and the world. Suggested Unit: U.S.World War II, the Cold War, and International Relations (19451991) OSPI-developed Assessment: U.S. Foreign Policy

11.1.4.1

Analyzes and evaluates ways of influencing national governments to preserve individual rights and promote the common good. Examples: Using examples of different groups of people in American society, analyzes instances in which unalienable rights were denied and evaluates the effectiveness of the struggles that ensued to guarantee those rights. Evaluates the effectiveness of the campaigns in preserving individual rights and promoting the common good (for example Sex, Race/Color, Creed/Religion, National origin, Sexual orientation, Disability, or military status). Suggested Unit: U.S.Entering a New Era (1991present) OSPI-developed Assessments: Constitutional Issues

11.2.1.1

Analyzes the incentives for peoples economic choices in the United States in the past or present. Examples: Examines what economic incentives caused people to join labor unions in large numbers during the Great Depression. Page 99 Examines how the overproduction of agricultural products led farmers to destroy their supply to boost prices at the beginning of the Great Depression. Examines how automobile producers set prices in the 1920s to generate sustainable demand among middle-class Americans. Examines what economic incentives caused the U.S. government to institute the Bracero program Suggested Unit: U.S.Reform, Prosperity, and the Great Depression (19181939)

11.2.2.1

Understands that nations have competing philosophies about how best to produce, distribute, and consume goods, services, and resources. Examples: Compares the economic systems of the United States to the U.S.S.R. during the Cold War. Compares the differing economic philosophies in the United States and Japan in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. Suggested Unit: U.S.World War II, the Cold War, and International Relations (19391991)

11.2.2.2

Analyzes how comparative advantage has affected U.S. imports and exports in the past or present. Examples: Examines the effects of the United States perceived loss of comparative advantage in the manufacturing of textiles. Examines the effects of the United States comparative advantage in pharmaceutical research on the export of prescription drugs. Examines how transnational companies have shifted manufacturing in response to perceived changes in comparative advantage. Examines how perceived loss of comparative advantage led Ford Motor Company to shift automobile manufacturing outside of the United States. Suggested Unit: U.S.World War II, the Cold War, and International Relations (19391991)

11.2.3.1

Evaluates the role of the U.S. government in regulating a market economy in the past or present. Examples: Critiques the effectiveness of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act in ensuring competition in the market. Critiques the effectiveness of the Federal Reserve Board in helping to control inflation through the regulation of interest rates. Suggested Unit: U.S.Industrialization and the Emergence of the United States as a World Power (18901918)

11.2.4.1

Analyzes and evaluates how people in the United States have addressed issues involved with the distribution of resources and sustainability in the past or present. Examples: Critiques how entitlement programs in the United States have affected the distribution of resources to people living below the poverty level. Critiques how well dam development in the Pacific Northwest has contributed to sustainable economic growth. Critiques the role of entrepreneurship in the United States in sustaining economic growth and raising the standard of living for its residents. Suggested Unit: U.S. Movements and Issues at Home (19451991

11.3.1.1

Analyzes information from geographic tools, including computer-based mapping systems, to draw conclusions on an issue or event. Examples: Examines maps of the United States using a Geographic Information System (GIS) to draw conclusions on how the development of railroads led to Chicagos industrialization. Examines maps of the Puget Sound using a Geographic Information System (GIS) to draw conclusions on why Seattle became Washington States largest city and port. Suggested Unit: U.S.Industrialization and the Emergence of the United States as a World Power (18901918)

11.3.1.2

Analyzes how differences in regions and spatial patterns have emerged in the United States from natural processes and human activities. Examples: Examines why cultural, political, and economic factors distinguish regions of the US. Examines why most people in the United States live within fifty miles of a coast and how this settlement causes coastal regions to differ from the countrys interior. Suggested Unit: U.S.Movements and Issues at Home (19451991)

11.3.2.1

Analyzes and evaluates human interaction with the environment in the United States in the past or present. Page 101 Examples: Weighs the benefits and negative consequences of the damming of the Colorado and Columbia Rivers. Examines the conditions leading to the passage of the Clean Air Act. Examines the interaction between geographic factors and the social, economic, and cultural aspects of a historical question. Suggested Unit: U.S.Movements and Issues at Home (19451991)

11.3.2.2

Analyzes cultural interactions. Examples: Examines the cultural interactions between Puerto Rican migrants and other ethnic groups of New York City. Explores the concept of model minority in the United States and how it affects the publics perceptions of race and class. Examines cultural interactions between residents in Los Angeles Watts neighborhood and members of the Los Angeles Police Department before and after the 1965 riots. Examines cultural interactions in Washington State resulting from the arrival of Southeast Asian refugees in the 1970s and 1980s. Suggested Unit: U.S.Movements and Issues at Home (19451991)

11.3.2.3

Analyzes the causes and effects of voluntary and involuntary migration in the United States in the past or present. Examples: Examines the factors leading to Italian immigration to the United States and its effects on U.S. society. Examines the factors leading to Japanese immigration to the United States and its effects on U.S. society. Suggested Unit: U.S.Industrialization and the Emergence of the United States as a World Power (18901918)

11.3.3.1

Analyzes and evaluates elements of geography to trace the emergence of the United States as a global economic and political force in the past or present. Examples: Examines how proximity between the United States and Central America led to U.S. economic dominance of the region. Examines how the passage of NAFTA affects the economic geography of Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Suggested Unit: U.S.Reform, Prosperity, and the Great Depression (19181939)

11.4.1.2

Understands how the following themes and developments help to define eras in U.S. history: Industrialization and the emergence of the United States as a world power (18901918). Reform, prosperity, and the Great Depression (19181939). World War II, the Cold War, and international relations (19391991). Movements and domestic issues (19451991). Entering a new era (1991present). Examples: Explains how the Roosevelt Corollary helps to define the early 20th century as a time when the United States was emerging as a world power. Explains how the 19th Amendment and the New Deal Policy define U.S. history following World War I as period of reform. Explains how atomic weapons help to define the decades after World War II as the Cold War era. Explains how the United Farm Workers, Civil Rights Movement, and Feminist Movement help to define U.S. history after World War II as a time of social movements. Explains how the Oklahoma City bombing and 9/11 attacks have defined a new era in U.S. domestic and foreign policy.

11.4.2.1

Evaluates how individuals and movements have shaped the United States (1890present). Examples: Weighs the costs and benefits of immigrant labor on the industrialization of the United States. Weighs the costs and benefits of the Progressive Movement on the Labor Movement. Suggested Unit: U.S.Industrialization and the Emergence of the United States as a World Power (18901918)

11.4.2.2

Analyzes how cultures and cultural groups have shaped the United States (1890 present). Examples: Examines how African Americans used the court system to influence civil rights legislation. Examines the way that migrant workers impacted agricultural labor. Examines how diverse cultures influenced current popular culture as evidenced by the popularity of hip-hop, rap, and salsa. Examines how the use of boycotts and demonstrations led by various ethnic groups resulted in social change in the United States. Examines how local tribes used the court system to regain their sovereign rights. Page 103 Suggested Unit: U.S.Movements and Issues at Home (19451991)

11.4.2.3

Analyzes and evaluates how technology and ideas have shaped U.S. history (1890present). Examples: Analyzes the costs, benefits, and long-term significance of the Green Revolution on U.S. foreign policy in Southeast Asia. Analyzes the costs, benefits, and long-term significance of fair trade and free trade on workers, consumers, and investors in the United States. Suggested Unit: U.S.World War II, the Cold War, and International Relations (19391991)

11.4.3.1

Analyzes differing interpretations of events in U.S. history (1890present). Examples: Develops a position after examining competing historical interpretations of the effect Malcolm X had on the Civil Rights Movement. Develops a position after examining competing historical interpretations of the longterm effects of the Feminist Movement. Develops a position after examining competing historical interpretations of the causes of the Great Depression. Develops a position after examining competing historical interpretations of the failed social and legislative attempt of Prohibition. Develops a position after examining competing historical interpretations of the cultural contributions of the Harlem Renaissance. Suggested Unit: U.S. Movements and Issues at Home (19451991) OSPI-developed Assessment: Dig DeepAnalyzing Sources

11.4.3.2

Analyzes multiple causes of events in U.S. history, distinguishing between proximate and long-term causal factors (1890present). Examples: Examines multiple interpretations of the causal factors of the Vietnam War. Examines multiple interpretations of the causal factors of the Bay of Pigs Invasion. Suggested Unit: U.S.World War II, the Cold War, and International Relations, (1939 1991)

11.4.4.1

Analyzes how an understanding of United States history can help us prevent problems today. Page 104 Examples: Examines the United States ability to meet the challenge of global climate change based on responses to environmental challenges in the past. Examines how understanding the history of immigration laws in the United States can help us decide how to regulate immigration today. Examines how studying peoples experiences at Indian boarding schools helps us understand the current efforts of tribal schools. Suggested Unit: U.S.Entering a New Era (1991present)

11.5.1.1

Analyzes the underlying assumptions of positions on an issue or event. Examples: Examines underlying assumptions of U.S. involvement in Vietnam between 1950 and 1975. Examines underlying assumptions of U.S. involvement in the 1977 EgyptIsrael Peace Accords. Examines the underlying assumptions of President Franklin D. Roosevelts decision to incarcerate Japanese Americans during World War II. Suggested Unit: U.S.World War II, the Cold War, and International Relations (19391991)

11.5.1.2

Evaluates the depth of a position on an issue or event. Examples: Critiques how well a position on U.S. involvement in Vietnam addresses the complexities of this conflict. Critiques how well a position on U.S. involvement in the 1977 EgyptIsrael Peace Accords addresses the complexities of relations in the Middle East. Suggested Unit: U.S.World War II, the Cold War, and International Relations (19391991) OSPI-developed Assessment: U.S. Foreign Policy

11.5.2.1

Evaluates and revises research questions to refine inquiry on an issue or event. Examples: After completing initial research on the Bay of Pigs Invasion, critiques and revises a research question on the power of the United States in Latin America. Suggested Unit: U.S.Movements and Issues at Home (19451991) Page 105 OSPI-developed Assessment: Dig Deep Analyzing Sources

11.5.2.2

Evaluates the validity, reliability, and credibility of sources when researching an issue or event. Examples: Critiques the validity, reliability, and credibility of documents from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Administration when researching the justification of New Deal programs. Critiques the validity, reliability, and credibility of documents from the Franklin D. Roosevelt Administration when researching the justification of the Good Neighbor Policy. Suggested Unit: U.S.Reform, Prosperity, and the Great Depression (19181939) OSPI-developed Assessments: U.S. Foreign Policy; Dig Deep Analyzing Sources

11.5.3.1

Creates and articulates possible alternative resolutions to public issues and evaluates these resolutions using criteria that have been identified in the context of a discussion. Examples: Engages in a small-group dialogue where each student presents two or more possible resolutions to the United States use of the atomic bomb in World War II and evaluates others alternative resolutions. Engages in a small-group dialogue where each student presents two or more possible resolutions to the threat of climate change and evaluates others alternative resolutions. Evaluates in a Socratic Seminar possible alternatives to U.S. involvement in Vietnam. Suggested Unit: U.S.Entering a New Era (1991present) OSPI-developed Assessment: U.S. Foreign Policy

11.5.4.1

Evaluates and interprets other points of view on an issue within a paper or presentation. Examples: Evaluates and interprets other points of view on Americas role in developing the Panama Canal. Evaluates and interprets other points of view on why the womens suffrage movement succeeded. Suggested Unit: U.S.Industrialization and the Emergence of the United States as a World Power (18901918) OSPI-developed Assessments: U.S. Foreign Policy; Dig Deep Analyzing Sources