Washington State K-12 Social Studies Learning Standards — Grade 9


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9.1.1.1

This component is addressed in grades K, 2 5, 7, 8, 11, and 12.

9.1.2.3

Evaluates the impact of various forms of government on people in the past or present. Examples: Weighs the impact of the Qing Dynasty government on the people of China as compared with life under communist rule. Weighs the impact of the British occupation of Hong Kong compared with life under Chinas one-country, two systems control. Suggested Unit: WorldInternational Conflicts (1870present)

9.1.3.1

Analyzes the relationships and tensions between national interests and international issues in the world in the past or present.

9.1.4.1

This component is addressed in grades 2, 4-8, and 11-12.

9.2.1.1

Analyzes how the costs and benefits of economic choices have shaped events in the world in the past or present.

9.2.2.1

Understands and analyzes how planned and market economies have shaped the production, distribution, and consumption of goods, services, and resources around the world in the past or present.

9.2.2.2

Analyzes how and why countries have specialized in the production of particular goods and services in the past or present.

9.2.3.1

Analyzes the costs and benefits of government trade policies from around the world in the past or present.

9.2.4.1

Analyzes and evaluates how people across the world have addressed issues involved with the distribution of resources and sustainability in the past or present.

9.3.1.2

Identifies major world regions and understands their cultural roots. Examples: Compares the political regimes of the Middle East, including those of Palestine and Israel. Describes Latin America based on its colonial history. Page 90 Suggested Unit: WorldGlobal Expansion and Encounter (14501750)

9.3.2.1

Analyzes and evaluates human interaction with the environment across the world in the past or present.

9.3.2.2

Understands and analyzes examples of ethnocentrism.

9.3.2.3

Understands the causes and effects of voluntary and involuntary migration in the world in the past or present.

9.3.3.1

Understands how the geography of expansion and encounter has shaped global politics and economics in the past or present.

9.4.1.1

Analyzes change and continuity within a historical time period.

9.4.1.2

Understands how the following themes and developments help to define eras in world history:

9.4.2.1

Analyzes how individuals and movements have shaped world history (1450present).

9.4.2.2

Analyzes how cultures and cultural groups have shaped world history (1450-present).

9.4.2.3

Analyzes and evaluates how technology and ideas have shaped world history (1450present).

9.4.3.1

Analyzes and interprets historical materials from a variety of perspectives in world history (1450present).

9.4.3.2

Analyzes the multiple causal factors of conflicts in world history (1450 present).

9.4.4.1

Analyzes how an understanding of world history can help us prevent problems today.

9.5.1.1

Analyzes consequences of positions on an issue or event.

9.5.1.2

Evaluates the precision of a position on an issue or event.

9.5.2.1

Creates and uses research questions that are tied to an essential question to focus inquiry on an idea, issue, or event.

9.5.2.2

Evaluates the validity, reliability, and credibility of sources when researching an issue or event.

9.5.3.1

Evaluates ones own viewpoint and the viewpoints of others in the context of a discussion.

9.5.4.1

Evaluates multiple reasons or factors to develop a position paper or presentation.

9.5.4.2

Creates strategies to avoid plagiarism and respects intellectual property when developing a paper or presentation.

9.RH.9-10.1

Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.

9.RH.9-10.10

By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

9.RH.9-10.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

9.RH.9-10.3

Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.

9.RH.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.

9.RH.9-10.5

Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis

9.RH.9-10.6

Compare the point of view of two or more authors for how they treat the same or similar topics, including which details they include and emphasize in their respective accounts.

9.RH.9-10.7

Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text.

9.RH.9-10.8

Assess the extent to which the reasoning and evidence in a text support the author's claims.

9.RH.9-10.9

Compare and contrast treatments of the same topic in several primary and secondary sources.

9.WHST.9-10.1

Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.

9.WHST.9-10.10

Write routinely over extended time frames (time for reflection and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

9.WHST.9-10.1a

Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among the claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.

9.WHST.9-10.1b

Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying data and evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both claim(s) and counterclaims in a discipline-appropriate form and in a manner that anticipates the audience's knowledge level and concerns.

9.WHST.9-10.1c

Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.

9.WHST.9-10.1d

Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

9.WHST.9-10.1e

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from or supports the argument presented.

9.WHST.9-10.2

Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/ experiments, or technical processes.

9.WHST.9-10.2a

Introduce a topic and organize ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.

9.WHST.9-10.2b

Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience's knowledge of the topic.

9.WHST.9-10.2c

Use varied transitions and sentence structures to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among ideas and concepts.

9.WHST.9-10.2d

Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic and convey a style appropriate to the discipline and context as well as to the expertise of likely readers.

9.WHST.9-10.2e

Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.

9.WHST.9-10.2f

Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic).

9.WHST.9-10.3

(See note; not applicable as a separate requirement)

9.WHST.9-10.3a

Note: Students' narrative skills continue to grow in these grades. The Standards require that students be able to incorporate narrative elements effectively into arguments and informative/explanatory texts. In history/social studies, students must be able to incorporate narrative accounts into their analyses of individuals or events of historical import.

9.WHST.9-10.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

9.WHST.9-10.5

Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

9.WHST.9-10.6

Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology's capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

9.WHST.9-10.7

Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

9.WHST.9-10.8

Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

9.WHST.9-10.9

Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.