Alaska Learning Standards for Science — Grade 11


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11.SA1.1

asking questions, predicting, observing, describing, measuring, classifying, making generalizations, analyzing data, developing models, inferring, and communicating*

11.SA1.2

recognizing and analyzing multiple explanations and models, using this information to revise students own explanation or model if necessary (L)

11.SA2.1

evaluating the credibility of cited sources when conducting the students own scientific investigation (L)

11.SA3.1

conducting research and communicating results to solve a problem (e.g., fish and game management, building permits, mineral rights, land use policies) (L)

11.SB1.1

predicting the properties of an element (i.e., reactivity, metal, non-metal) using the periodic table and verifying the predictions through experimentation (L)

11.SB2.1

demonstrating energy (e.g., nuclear, electromagnetic, chemical, mechanical, thermal) transfers and transformations by comparing useful energy to total energy (entropy) (L)

11.SB3.1

predicting how an atom can interact with other atoms based on its electron configuration and verifying the results (L)

11.SB3.2

researching applications of nuclear reactions in which a small amount of matter is converted directly into a huge amount of energy (i.e., E=MC2 ) (L)

11.SB4.1

conducting an experiment to demonstrate that when one thing exerts a force on another, an equal amount of force is exerted back on it (L)

11.SB4.2

conducting an experiment to explore the relationship between magnetic forces and electric forces to show that they can be thought of as different aspects of a single electromagnetic force (e.g., generators and motors) (L)

11.SC1.1

relating the structure of DNA to characteristics of an organism

11.SC1.2

researching how the processes of natural selection cause changes in species over time (L)

11.SC2.1

describing the structure-function relationship*

11.SC2.2

describing the learned behaviors (e.g., classical conditioning, imprinting, trial and error) that are utilized by living organisms to meet the requirements of life

11.SC2.3

describing the learned behaviors (e.g., classical conditioning, imprinting, trial and error) that are utilized by living organisms to meet the requirements of life

11.SC3.1

relating the carbon cycle to global climate change*

11.SC3.2

analyzing the potential impacts of changes (e.g., climate change, habitat loss/gain, cataclysms, human activities) within an ecosystem

11.SD1.1

creating a model to demonstrate the rock cycle (L)

11.SD1.2

integrating knowledge of the water cycle and biogeochemical cycling to explain changes in the Earths surface (L)

11.SD2.1

recognizing the dynamic interaction of erosion and deposition including human causes*

11.SD2.2

describing how the theory of plate tectonics explains the dynamic nature of its surface*

11.SD3.1

describing causes, effects, preventions, and mitigations of human impact on climate*

11.SD3.2

exploring causes and effects related to phenomena (e.g., the aurora, solar winds, Coriolis Effect) (L)

11.SD4.1

describing phenomena in the universe (i.e., black holes, nebula)

11.SD4.2

using evidence to explain how the position of stars changes in the expanding universe

11.SD4.4

describing the Big Bang Theory and exploring the evidence that supports it (L)

11.SE1.1

researching how social, economic, and political forces strongly influence which technology will be developed and used (L)

11.SE2.1

questioning, researching, modeling, simulating, and testing multiple solutions to a problem* (L)

11.SE3.1

researching a current problem, identifying possible solutions, and evaluating the impact of each solution* (L)

11.SF1.1

investigating the influences of societal and/or cultural beliefs on science (L). Cross referenced with SA3.1.

11.SG2.1

describing the importance of logical arguments (i.e., thought experiments by Einstein, Hawking, Newton)

11.SG3.1

investigating instances when scientists observations were not in accord with prevailing ideas of the time (L)