Alaska Learning Standards for Science — Grade 4


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4.SA1.1

asking questions, predicting, observing, describing, measuring, classifying, making generalizations, inferring, and communicating*

4.SA1.2

observing, measuring, and collecting data from explorations and using this information to classify, predict, and communicate

4.SA2.1

supporting the students own ideas with observations and peer review (L)

4.SA3.1

identifying the local limiting factors (e.g., weather, human influence, species interactions) that determine which plants and/or animals survive (L)

4.SB1.1

identifying and comparing the characteristics of gases, liquids, and solids

4.SB2.1

investigating the effectiveness of different insulating and conducting materials with respect to heat flow and record the results (L)

4.SB3.1

explaining that temperature changes cause changes in phases of substances (e.g., ice changing to liquid water and liquid water to water vapor)

4.SB4.1

simulating that changes in speed or direction of motion are caused by forces (L)

4.SC1.1

showing the relationship between physical characteristics of Alaskan organisms and the environment in which they live

4.SC1.2

describing fossil evidence (e.g., casts, track ways, imprints, etc.) of extinct organisms

4.SC2.1

choosing appropriate tools (i.e., hand lens, microscopes, ruler, balance) to examine the basic structural components (e.g., stems, leaves, fish scales, wings) of living things

4.SC2.2

describing the basic characteristics and requirements of living things

4.SC3.1

identifying examples of living and non-living things and the relationship between them (e.g., living things need water, herbivores need plants)

4.SC3.2

identifying a simple food chain of familiar plants and animals, diagramming how energy flows through it; describing the effects of removing one link

4.SD1.1

describing that most smaller rocks come from the breaking and weathering of larger rocks as part of the rock cycle

4.SD1.2

recognizing the physical properties of water as they relate to the rock cycle

4.SD2.1

observing models of how waves, wind, water, and ice shape and reshape the Earths surface by eroding rock and soil (L)

4.SD2.2

identifying causes (i.e., earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, floods, landslides, and avalanches) of rapid changes on the surface

4.SD3.1

recognizing changes to length of daylight over time and its relationship to seasons

4.SD3.2

observing that heat flows from one object to another (L)

4.SD4.1

recognizing that stars are like the sun but are so far away that they look like points of light

4.SD4.2

recognizing that objects have properties, locations, and movements that can be observed and described*

4.SD4.3

recognizing and using appropriate instruments of magnification (e.g., binoculars and telescopes)* (L)

4.SE1.1

recognizing that tools (e.g., spear, hammer, hand lens, kayak, computer) and processes (e.g., drying fish, sewing, photography) are an important part of human cultures

4.SE2.1

identifying the function of a variety of tools (e.g., spear, hammer, hand lens, kayak, computer)

4.SE2.2

identifying multiple explanations (e.g., oral traditions, folklore, scientific theory) of everyday events (e.g., weather, seasonal changes) (L)

4.SE3.1

listing the positive and negative effects of a scientific discovery

4.SF1.1

connecting observations of nature to a local or traditional story that explains a natural event (e.g., animal adaptation, weather, rapid changes to Earths surface) (L) Cross referenced with SA3.1.

4.SG2.1

recognizing the need for repeated measurements

4.SG4.1

using an account of a discovery to recognize that an individuals (e.g., George Washington Carver, Marie Curie) curiosity led to advancements in science