Alaska Learning Standards for Science — Grade 5


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5.SA1.1

asking questions, predicting, observing, describing, measuring, classifying, making generalizations, inferring, and communicating*

5.SA1.2

using quantitative and qualitative observations to create inferences and predictions

5.SA2.1

supporting the students own statements with facts from a variety of resources and by identifying their sources (L)

5.SA3.1

identifying the limiting factors (e.g., weather, human influence, species interactions) that determine which plants and/or animals survive

5.SB1.1

comparing models that represent matter as solids, liquids, or gases and the changes from one state to another) (L)

5.SB2.1

classifying the changes (i.e., heat, light, sound, and motion) that electrical energy undergoes in common household appliances (i.e., toaster, blender, radio, light bulb, heater)

5.SB3.1

identifying physical and chemical changes based on observable characteristics (e.g., tearing paper vs. burning paper)

5.SB4.1

investigating that the greater the force acting on an object, the greater the change in motion will be (L)

5.SC1.1

contrasting inherited traits (e.g., flower color, number of limbs) with those that are not (riding a bike, scar from an accident)

5.SC1.2

making reasonable inferences about fossil organisms based on physical evidence

5.SC2.1

identifying and sorting animals into groups using basic external and internal features

5.SC2.2

explaining how external features and internal systems (i.e., respiratory, excretory, skeletal, circulatory, and digestive) of plants and animals may help them grow, survive, and reproduce

5.SC2.3

recognizing that organisms are composed of cells

5.SC3.1

diagramming how matter and energy are transferred within and between living and nonliving things

5.SC3.2

organizing a simple food chain of familiar plants and animals that traces the source of the energy back to sunlight

5.SD1.1

observing a model of the rock cycle showing that smaller rocks come from the breaking and weathering of larger rocks and that smaller rocks (e.g., sediments and sands) may combine with plant materials to form soils (L)

5.SD2.1

describing how wind and water tear down and build up the Earths surface resulting in new land formations (i.e., deltas, moraines, and canyons)

5.SD3.1

observing a model that shows how the regular and predictable motion of the Earth and moon determine the apparent shape (phases) of the moon over time (L)

5.SD3.2

comparing heat absorption and loss by land and water

5.SD4.1

distinguishing among stars, planets, moons, comets, and meteors (L)

5.SD4.2

recognizing that the Earth is in regular and predictable motion and this motion explains the length of a day and a year

5.SD4.3

recognizing and using appropriate instruments of magnification (e.g., binoculars and telescopes)* (L)

5.SE1.1

identifying a community problem or issue and describing the information needed to develop a scientific solution (L)

5.SE2.1

investigating a problem or project over a specified period of time and identifying the tools and processes used in that project (L)

5.SE2.2

comparing multiple explanations (e.g., oral traditions, folklore, scientific theory) of everyday events (e.g., weather, seasonal changes) (L)

5.SE3.1

describing the various effects of an innovation (e.g., snow machines, airplanes, immunizations) on the safety, health, and environment of the local community (L)

5.SF3.1

telling a local or traditional story that explains a natural event (e.g., animal adaptation, weather, rapid changes to Earths surface) and relating it to a scientific explanation*(L) Cross referenced with SA3.1.

5.SG2.1

reviewing and recording results of investigations into the natural world

5.SG4.1

investigating that scientists curiosity led to advancements in science (L)