Alaska Learning Standards for Science — Grade 9


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9.SA1.1

asking questions, predicting, observing, describing, measuring, classifying, making generalizations, inferring, and communicating*

9.SA1.2

hypothesizing, designing a controlled experiment, making qualitative and quantitative observations, interpreting data, and using this information to communicate conclusions

9.SA2.1

formulating conclusions that are logical and supported by evidence

9.SB1.1

describing atoms and their base components (i.e., protons, neutrons, electrons)

9.SB2.1

applying the concepts of heat transfer (i.e., conduction, convection, radiation) to Alaskan dwellings

9.SB2.2

recognizing simple electrical circuits

9.SB3.1

recognizing that a chemical reaction has taken place

9.SB3.2

explaining that in chemical and nuclear reactions, energy (e.g., heat, light, mechanical, and electrical) is transferred into and out of a system

9.SB3.3

recognizing that atoms emit and absorb electromagnetic radiation

9.SB4.1

explaining the relationship of motion to an objects mass and the applied force

9.SB4.2

recognizing that the gravitational attraction between objects is proportional to their masses and decreasing with their distance

9.SB4.3

describing the interactions of waves (i.e., reflection, refraction, wave addition)

9.SC1.1

recognizing that all organisms have chromosomes made of DNA and that DNA determines traits

9.SC1.2

using probabilities to recognize patterns of inheritance (e.g., Punnett Squares)

9.SC1.3

inferring evolutionary pathways from evidence (e.g., fossils, geologic samples, recorded history)

9.SC2.1

describing and comparing the characteristics of phyla/divisions from each kingdom

9.SC2.3

stating the function of major physiological systems (i.e., circulatory, excretory, digestive, respiratory, reproductive, nervous, immune, endocrine, musculoskeletal, and integumentary)

9.SC3.1

describing the carbon and nitrogen cycle within an ecosystem and how the continual input of energy from sunlight keeps the process going (L)

9.SC3.3

identifying dynamic factors (e.g., carrying capacity, limiting factors, biodiversity, and productivity) that affect population size

9.SD1.1

using a model to demonstrate the rock cycle (L)

9.SD1.2

applying knowledge of the water cycle to explain changes in the Earths surface*

9.SD2.1

recognizing the dynamic interaction of erosion and deposition including human causes

9.SD2.2

describing how the theory of plate tectonics explains the dynamic nature of its surface

9.SD3.1

recognizing the effect of the moon and sun on tides

9.SD3.2

explaining the phenomena of the aurora

9.SD4.1

recognizing that a star changes over time

9.SD4.2

explaining that the position of stars changes in the expanding universe

9.SD4.4

identifying the Big Bang Theory

9.SE1.1

recognizing that the value of any given technology may be different for different groups of people and at different points in time (e.g., different uses of snow machines in different regions of Alaska)

9.SE2.1

questioning, researching, modeling, simulating, and testing a solution to a problem (L)

9.SE3.1

predicting and evaluating the possible effects of a recent scientific discovery, invention, or scientific breakthrough (L)

9.SF1.1

describing the scientific principles involved in a subsistence activity (e.g., hunting, fishing, gardening) (L). Cross referenced with SA3.1.

9.SG1.1

identifying those perspectives (i.e., cultural, political, religious, philosophical) that have impacted the advancement of science

9.SG2.1

explaining the importance of innovations (i.e., microscope, immunization, computer)

9.SG3.1

describing the role of serendipity in scientific discoveries