Australian Curriculum Standards (ACARA) — Grade 2


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Based on the ACARA curriculum.


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ACELA.2.1.

Language variation and change

ACELA.2.1.1.1.

Identifying examples and features of different kinds of spoken, non-verbal, written and visual communication from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and from several Asian cultures within Australia, and associating those features with particular communities

ACELA.2.1.1.2.

Recognising some phrases in the languages of the class and community, for example greetings and expressions of politeness

ACELA.2.2.

Language for interaction

ACELA.2.2.1.1.

Exploring how terms of address are used to signal different kinds of relationships

ACELA.2.2.1.3.

Exploring culturally specific greetings and expressions of politeness

ACELA.2.2.2.1.

Exploring how language is used to express feelings including learning vocabulary to express a gradation of feeling, for example happy, joyful, pleased, contented

ACELA.2.2.2.2.

Exploring in stories, everyday and media texts moral and social dilemmas; such as right and wrong, fairness/unfairness, inclusion and exclusion; learning to use language to describe actions and consider consequences

ACELA.2.2.2.3.

Exploring how language is used to construct characters and settings in narratives, including choice of nouns such as girl, princess or orphan, and choice of adjectives such as gentle, timid or frightened

ACELA.2.3.

Text structure and organisation

ACELA.2.3.1.1.

Identifying the topic and type of a text through its visual presentation, for example cover design, packaging, title/subtitle and images

ACELA.2.3.1.2.

Becoming familiar with the typical stages of text types, for example simple narratives, instructions and expositions

ACELA.2.3.2.1.

Exploring how texts develop their themes and ideas, building information through connecting similar and contrasting dissimilar things

ACELA.2.3.2.2.

Mapping examples of word associations in texts, for example words that refer to the main character

ACELA.2.3.3.1.

Talking about how a comma can be used to separate two or more elements in a list, for example At the museum they saw a tiger, a dinosaur and two snakes

ACELA.2.3.4.2.

Learning about features of screen texts including menu buttons, drop down menus, links and live connections

ACELA.2.4.

Expressing and developing ideas

ACELA.2.4.2.1.

Exploring texts and identifying nouns that refer to characters, elements of the setting, and ideas

ACELA.2.4.2.2.

Exploring illustrations and noun groups/phrases in picture books to identify how the participants have been represented by an illustrator

ACELA.2.4.2.3.

Exploring names of people and places and how to write them using capital letters

ACELA.2.4.3.1.

Comparing two versions of the same story, for example Jack and the Beanstalk, identifying how a characters actions and reactions are depicted differently by different illustrators

ACELA.2.4.4.1.

Interpreting new terminology drawing on prior knowledge, analogies and connections with known words

ACELA.2.5.

Phonics and word knowledge

ACELA.2.5.1.1.

Blending and segmenting sounds in words, for example b-r-o-th-er or c-l-ou-d-y

ACELA.2.5.1.2.

Deleting and substituting sounds in spoken words to form new words, for example delete the scr in scratch, and then form new words catch, batch and hatch

ACELA.2.5.2.1.

Using knowledge of known words to spell unknown words, for example using the word thumb to spell the word crumb

ACELA.2.5.2.3.

Drawing on knowledge of letter-sound relationships, for example breaking a word into syllables, then recording the sounds heard and thinking about the letter patterns that represent the sounds

ACELA.2.5.4.1.

Using known words in writing and spelling unknown words using morphemic knowledge of letter patterns and morphemes, for example the words sometimes, something and anything

ACELA.2.5.4.2.

Using known words in writing and spelling unknown words using morphemic knowledge of letter patterns and morphemes, for example the words one, once, only and lone

ACELA.2.5.6.1.

Recognising sounds that can be produced by different letters, for example the long a sound in wait, stay, able and make

ACELT.2.1.

Literature and context

ACELT.2.1.1.1.

Exploring iconography of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures

ACELT.2.1.1.2.

Recognising recurring characters, settings and themes in Dreaming stories experienced through texts, films and online sources

ACELT.2.1.1.3.

Discussing moral and teaching stories from varied cultures, identifying and comparing their central messages

ACELT.2.2.

Responding to literature

ACELT.2.2.1.1.

Discussing each others preferences for stories set in familiar or unfamiliar worlds, or about people whose lives are like or unlike their own

ACELT.2.2.2.1.

Describing features of texts from different cultures including recurring language patterns, style of illustrations, elements of humour or drama, and identifying the features which give rise to their personal preferences

ACELT.2.2.2.2.

Connecting the feelings and behaviours of animals in anthropomorphic stories with human emotions and relationships

ACELT.2.2.2.3.

Drawing, writing and using digital technologies to capture and communicate favourite characters and events

ACELT.2.3.1.2.

Describing plots including beginnings (orientation), how the problem (complication) is introduced and solved (resolution), and considering how these features construct meanings

ACELT.2.3.1.3.

Identifying features of imaginary or fantasy texts, for example magic powers, shifts in time

ACELT.2.3.1.4.

Investigating Aboriginal stories, found from online sources, that explain physical features of the landscape and identify and describe the common features of language used

ACELT.2.3.1.5.

Comparing two or more versions of the same story by different authors or from different cultures, describing similarities and differences in authors points of view

ACELT.2.3.2.1.

Exploring poems, chants, rhymes or songs from different cultures which class members may bring from home

ACELT.2.3.2.2.

Learning to recite, sing or create interpretations of poems, chants, rhymes or songs from students own and other different cultures

ACELT.2.4.1.1.

Creating imaginative reconstructions of stories and poetry using a range of print and digital media

ACELT.2.4.1.2.

Telling known stories from a different point of view

ACELT.2.4.1.3.

Orally, in writing or using digital media, constructing a sequel to a known story

ACELT.2.4.2.1.

Inventing some speech, dialogue or behaviour of favourite or humorous characters through imagining an alternative event or outcome in the original text

ACELY.2.1.1.1.

Identifying examples and features of different kinds of spoken, non-verbal, written and visual communication from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and from several Asian cultures within Australia

ACELY.2.1.1.2.

Comparing two or more versions of the same topic by different authors or from different cultures, describing similarities and differences

ACELY.2.2.

Interacting with others

ACELY.2.2.1.1.

Using spoken language for problem solving, and exploring ideas and concepts

ACELY.2.2.1.3.

Listening to, remembering and responding to detailed instructions

ACELY.2.2.2.1.

Discussing appropriate conventions to use in group discussions

ACELY.2.2.2.3.

Participating in pair, group and class speaking and listening situations, including informal conversations, class discussions and presentations

ACELY.2.2.2.4.

Demonstrating appropriate listening behaviour, responding to and paraphrasing a partners contribution to a discussion, such as think/pair/share activities

ACELY.2.2.2.5.

Asking relevant questions and making connections with personal experiences and the contributions of others

ACELY.2.3.

Interpreting, analysing, evaluating

ACELY.2.3.2.1.

Using prior and learned knowledge and vocabulary to make and confirm predictions when reading text

ACELY.2.3.2.3.

Using knowledge of soundletter relationships and high frequency sight words when decoding text

ACELY.2.3.2.4.

Monitoring own reading and self-correcting when reading does not make sense, using illustrations, context, phonics, grammar knowledge and prior and learned topic knowledge

ACELY.2.3.2.5.

Using grammar and meaning to read aloud with fluency and intonation

ACELY.2.3.3.1.

Making connections between the text and students own experiences and experiences with other texts, comparing authors differing point of view on a topic

ACELY.2.3.3.2.

Making connections between information in print and images

ACELY.2.3.3.3.

Building on and using prior knowledge and vocabulary

ACELY.2.3.3.4.

Making valid inferences using information in a text and students own prior knowledge

ACELY.2.3.3.5.

Predicting, asking and answering questions as they read, and summarising and reviewing meaning

ACELY.2.4.1.1.

Learning how to plan spoken and written communications so that listeners and readers might follow the sequence of ideas or events

ACELY.2.4.1.2.

Sequencing content according to text structure

ACELY.2.4.2.1.

Reading their work and adding, deleting or changing words, prepositional phrases or sentences to improve meaning, for example replacing an everyday noun with a technical one in an informative text

ACELY.2.4.2.3.

Checking for inclusion of relevant punctuation including capital letters to signal names, as well as sentence beginnings, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks

ACELY.2.4.3.1.

Using correct pencil grip and posture

ACELY.2.4.3.2.

Writing sentences legibly and fluently using unjoined print script of consistent size

ACMMG.2.1.1.

Compare and order several shapes and objects based on length, area, volume, and capacity using appropriate uniform informal units (ACMMG037)

ACMMG.2.1.1.1.

Comparing lengths using finger length, hand span, or a piece of string

ACMMG.2.1.1.2.

Comparing areas using the palm of the hand or a stone

ACMMG.2.1.1.3.

Comparing capacities using a range of containers

ACMMG.2.1.2.

Compare masses of objects using balance scales (ACMMG038)

ACMMG.2.1.2.1.

Using balance scales to determine whether the mass of different objects is more, less or about the same, or to find out how many marbles are needed to balance a tub of margarine or a carton of milk

ACMMG.2.1.3.

Tell time to the quarter-hour, using the language of 'past' and 'to' (ACMMG039)

ACMMG.2.1.3.1.

Describing the characteristics of quarter-past times on an analogue clock, and identifying that the small hand is pointing just past the number and the big hand is pointing to the three

ACMMG.2.1.4.

Name and order months and seasons (ACMMG040)

ACMMG.2.1.4.1.

Investigating the seasons used by Aboriginal people, comparing them to those used in Western society and recognising the connection to weather patterns.

ACMMG.2.1.5.

Use a calendar to identify the date and determine the number of days in each month (ACMMG041)

ACMMG.2.1.5.1.

Using calendars to locate specific information, such as finding a given date on a calendar and saying what day it is, and identifying personally or culturally specific days

ACMMG.2.2.1.

Describe and draw two-dimensional shapes, with and without digital technologies (ACMMG042)

ACMMG.2.2.1.1.

Identifying key features of squares, rectangles, triangles, kites, rhombuses and circles, such as straight lines or curved lines, and counting the edges and corners

ACMMG.2.2.2.

Describe the features of three-dimensional objects (ACMMG043)

ACMMG.2.2.2.1.

Identifying geometric features such as the number of faces, corners or edges

ACMMG.2.3.1.

Interpret simple maps of familiar locations and identify the relative positions of key features (ACMMG044)

ACMMG.2.3.1.1.

Understanding that we use representations of objects and their positions, such as on maps, to allow us to receive and give directions and to describe place

ACMMG.2.3.1.2.

Constructing arrangements of objects from a set of directions

ACMMG.2.3.3.

Identify and describe half and quarter turns (ACMMG046)

ACMMG.2.3.3.1.

Predicting and reproducing a pattern based around half and quarter turns of a shape and sketching the next element in the pattern

ACMNA.2.1.1.

Investigate number sequences, initially those increasing and decreasing by twos, threes, fives and tens from any starting point, then moving to other sequences (ACMNA026)

ACMNA.2.1.1.1.

Developing fluency and confidence with numbers and calculations by saying number sequences

ACMNA.2.1.1.2.

Recognising patterns in number sequences, such as adding 10 always results in the same final digit

ACMNA.2.1.2.

Recognise, model, represent and order numbers to at least 1000 (ACMNA027)

ACMNA.2.1.2.1.

Recognising there are different ways of representing numbers and identifying patterns going beyond 100

ACMNA.2.1.2.2.

Developing fluency with writing numbers in meaningful contexts

ACMNA.2.1.3.

Group, partition and rearrange collections up to 1000 in hundreds, tens and ones to facilitate more efficient counting (ACMNA028)

ACMNA.2.1.3.2.

Understanding three-digit numbers as comprised of hundreds, tens and ones/units

ACMNA.2.1.3.3.

Demonstrating and using models such as linking blocks, sticks in bundles, place-value blocks and Aboriginal bead strings and explaining reasoning

ACMNA.2.1.5.

Solve simple addition and subtraction problems using a range of efficient mental and written strategies (ACMNA030)

ACMNA.2.1.5.1.

Becoming fluent with a range of mental strategies for addition and subtraction problems, such as commutatively for addition, building to 10, doubles, 10 facts and adding 10

ACMNA.2.1.5.2.

Modeling and representing simple additive situations using materials such as 10 frames, 20 frames and empty number lines

ACMNA.2.1.6.

Recognise and represent multiplication as repeated addition, groups and arrays (ACMNA031)

ACMNA.2.1.6.1.

Representing array problems with available materials and explaining reasoning

ACMNA.2.1.6.2.

Visualising a group of objects as a unit and using this to calculate the number of objects in several identical groups

ACMNA.2.1.7.

Recognise and represent division as grouping into equal sets and solve simple problems using these representations (ACMNA032)

ACMNA.2.1.7.1.

Dividing the class or a collection of objects into equal- sized groups

ACMNA.2.1.7.2.

Identifying the difference between dividing a set of objects into three equal groups and dividing the same set of objects into groups of three

ACMNA.2.2.1.

Recognise and interpret common uses of halves, quarters and eighths of shapes and collections (ACMNA033)

ACMNA.2.2.1.1.

Recognising that sets of objects can be partitioned in different ways to demonstrate fractions

ACMNA.2.2.1.2.

Relating the number of parts to the size of a fraction

ACMNA.2.3.1.

Count and order small collections of Australian coins and notes according to their value (ACMNA034)

ACMNA.2.3.1.1.

Identifying equivalent values in collections of coins or notes, such as two five-cent coins having the same value as one 10-cent coin

ACMNA.2.3.1.2.

Counting collections of coins or notes to make up a particular value, such as that shown on a price tag

ACMNA.2.4.1.

Describe patterns with numbers and identify missing elements (ACMNA035)

ACMNA.2.4.1.1.

Describing a pattern created by skip counting and representing the pattern on a number line

ACMNA.2.4.1.2.

Investigating features of number patterns resulting from adding twos, fives or 10s

ACMNA.2.4.2.

Solve problems by using number sentences for addition or subtraction (ACMNA036)

ACMNA.2.4.2.2.

Writing a word problem to represent a number sentence

ACMSP.2.1.1.

Identify practical activities and everyday events that involve chance. Describe outcomes as likely or unlikely and identify some events as certain or impossible (ACMSP047)

ACMSP.2.1.1.1.

Classifying a list of everyday events according to how likely they are to happen, using the language of chance, and explaining reasoning

ACMSP.2.2.2.

Collect, check and classify data (ACMSP049)

ACMSP.2.2.2.2.

Identifying categories of data and using them to sort data

ACMSP.2.2.3.

Create displays of data using lists, table and picture graphs and interpret them (ACMSP050)

ACMSP.2.2.3.1.

Creating picture graphs to represent data using one-to- one correspondence