Australian Curriculum Standards (ACARA) — Grade 3


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Based on the ACARA curriculum.


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ACELA.3.2.

Language for interaction

ACELA.3.2.1.1.

Identifying roles and collaborative patterns in students own groups and pair work (for example initiating a topic, changing a topic through negotiation, affirming other speakers and building on their comments, asking relevant questions, providing useful feedback, prompting and checking individual and group understanding)

ACELA.3.2.2.1.

Exploring how modal verbs, for example must, might, or could indicate degrees of probability or obligation

ACELA.3.2.2.2.

Distinguishing how choice of adverbs, nouns and verbs present different evaluations of characters in texts

ACELA.3.3.

Text structure and organisation

ACELA.3.3.1.1.

Becoming familiar with typical structural stages and language features of various types of text, for example narratives, procedures, reports, reviews and expositions

ACELA.3.3.3.1.

Recognising both grammatically accurate and inaccurate usage of the apostrophe in everyday texts such as signs in the community and newspaper advertisements

ACELA.3.4.

Expressing and developing ideas

ACELA.3.4.2.1.

Identifying different types of verbs and the way they add meaning to a sentence

ACELA.3.4.2.2.

Exploring 'doing' and 'saying' verbs in narrative texts to show how they give information about what characters do and say

ACELA.3.4.2.3.

Exploring the use of sensing verbs and how they allow readers to know what characters think and feel

ACELA.3.4.2.4.

Exploring the use of relating verbs in constructing definitions and descriptions

ACELA.3.4.2.5.

Learning how time is represented through the tense of a verb, for example 'She arrived, She is arriving and adverbials of time, for example She arrived yesterday, She is arriving in the morning

ACELA.3.4.3.1.

Noting how the relationship between characters can be depicted in illustrations through: the positioning of the characters (for example facing each other or facing away from each other); the distance between them; the relative size; one character looking up (or down) at the other (power relationships); facial expressions and body gesture

ACELA.3.4.3.2.

Observing how images construct a relationship with the viewer through such strategies as: direct gaze into the viewer's eyes, inviting involvement and how close ups are more engaging than distanced images, which can suggest alienation or loneliness

ACELA.3.4.4.1.

Exploring examples of language which demonstrate a range of feelings and positions, and building a vocabulary to express judgments about characters or events, acknowledging that language and judgments might differ depending on the cultural context

ACELA.3.5.

Phonics and word knowledge

ACELA.3.5.1.1.

Using sound and visual spelling strategies to explore less common letter patterns after a short vowel, for example words that end in dge such as badge, edge, fridge, dodge and smudge

ACELA.3.5.1.2.

Using sound and visual spelling strategies to spell words with three-letter blends, for example str-ip

ACELA.3.5.2.1.

Drawing on meaning and context to spell single-syllable homophones, for example break or brake and ate or eight

ACELA.3.5.4.1.

Exploring generalisations for adding a suffix to a base word to form a plural or past tense, for example to make a word plural when it ends in ss, sh, ch or z, add es

ACELT.3.1.

Literature and context

ACELT.3.1.1.1.

Reading texts in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children/young people are the central characters/protagonists and making links to students own lives, noting similarities

ACELT.3.1.1.2.

Exploring the ways that the same story can be told in many cultures, identifying variations in the storyline and in music (for example The Ramayana story which is told to children in India, Indonesia, Thailand, Cambodia, Burma, Laos, Tibet and Malaysia)

ACELT.3.2.

Responding to literature

ACELT.3.2.1.1.

Discussing relevant prior knowledge and past experiences to make meaningful connections to the people, places, events, issues and ideas in the text

ACELT.3.2.1.2.

Exploring texts that highlight issues and problems in making moral decisions and discussing these with others

ACELT.3.2.1.3.

Drawing on literature from Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander or Asian cultures, to explore commonalities of experience and ideas as well as recognising difference in lifestyle and world view

ACELT.3.2.2.1.

Building a conscious understanding of preference regarding topics and genres of personal interest (for example humorous short stories, school and family stories, mysteries, fantasy and quest, series books)

ACELT.3.2.2.2.

Selecting and discussing favourite texts and explaining their reasons for assigning greater or lesser merit to particular texts or types of texts

ACELT.3.3.1.1.

Identifying and discussing the use of descriptive adjectives (in the middle of a vast, bare plain) to establish setting and atmosphere (the castle loomed dark and forbidding) and to draw readers into events that follow

ACELT.3.3.1.2.

Discussing the language used to describe the traits of characters in stories, their actions and motivations: Claire was so lonely; she desperately wanted a pet and she was afraid she would do anything, just anything, to have one to care for

ACELT.3.3.2.1.

Identifying the effect of imagery in texts, for example the use of imagery related to nature in haiku poems

ACELT.3.3.2.2.

Exploring how rhythm, onomatopoeia and alliteration give momentum to poetry and prose read aloud, and enhance enjoyment

ACELT.3.4.1.1.

Drawing on literary texts read, viewed and listened to for inspiration and ideas, appropriating language to create mood and characterisation

ACELT.3.4.1.2.

Innovating on texts read, viewed and listened to by changing the point of view, revising an ending or creating a sequel

ACELT.3.4.2.1.

Creating visual and multimodal texts based on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander or Asian literature, applying one or more visual elements to convey the intent of the original text

ACELY.3.1.1.1.

Discussing how a text presents the point of view of the main character, and speculating on what other characters might think or feel

ACELY.3.1.1.2.

Recognising that there is more than one way of looking at the same event and that stories seen through the eyes of one character privileges some aspects of the story over others

ACELY.3.1.1.3.

Speculating about what other characters might think or feel and retelling the story from other perspectives (for example Cinderella from the view of the Ugly Sisters)

ACELY.3.2.

Interacting with others

ACELY.3.2.1.1.

Participating in collaborative discussions, building on and connecting ideas and opinions expressed by others, and checking students own understanding against group views

ACELY.3.2.3.1.

Participating in pair, group and class speaking and listening situations, including informal conversations, class discussions and presentations

ACELY.3.2.3.4.

Acquiring new vocabulary in all curriculum areas through listening, reading, viewing and discussion and using this vocabulary in specific ways such as describing people, places, things and processes

ACELY.3.2.3.6.

Experimenting with voice effects in formal presentations such as tone, volume and pace

ACELY.3.3.

Interpreting, analysing, evaluating

ACELY.3.3.1.1.

Identifying the authors point of view on a topic and key words and images that seem intended to persuade listeners, viewers or readers to agree with the view presented

ACELY.3.3.2.1.

Combining different types of knowledge (for example word knowledge, vocabulary, grammar, phonics) to make decisions about unknown words, reading on, reviewing and summarising meaning

ACELY.3.3.2.2.

Analysing the way illustrations help to construct meaning and interpreting different types of illustrations and graphics

ACELY.3.3.2.3.

Reading text types from a students culture to enhance confidence in building reading strategies

ACELY.3.3.2.4.

Reading aloud with fluency and intonation

ACELY.3.3.2.5.

Reading a wider range of texts, including chapter books and informative texts, for pleasure

ACELY.3.3.3.1.

Making connections between the text and students own experience and other texts

ACELY.3.3.3.2.

Making connections between the information in print and images

ACELY.3.3.3.3.

Making predictions and asking and answering questions about the text drawing on knowledge of the topic, subject-specific vocabulary and experience of texts on the same topic

ACELY.3.3.3.4.

Using text features and search tools to locate information in written and digital texts efficiently

ACELY.3.3.3.5.

Determining important ideas, events or details in texts commenting on things learned or questions raised by reading, referring explicitly to the text for verification

ACELY.3.3.3.6.

Making considered inferences taking into account topic knowledge or a characters likely actions and feelings

ACELY.3.4.1.1.

Using print and digital resources to gather information about a topic

ACELY.3.4.1.2.

Selecting appropriate text structure for a writing purpose and sequencing content for clarity and audience impact

ACELY.3.4.1.4.

Using vocabulary, including technical vocabulary, relevant to the text type and purpose, and appropriate sentence structures to express and combine ideas

ACELY.3.4.2.1.

Using glossaries, print and digital dictionaries and spell check to edit spelling, realising that spell check accuracy depends on understanding the word function, for example there/their; rain/reign

ACELY.3.4.3.1.

Practising how to join letters to construct a fluent handwriting style

ACELY.3.4.4.1.

Using features of relevant technologies to plan, sequence, compose and edit multimodal texts

ACMMG.3.1.1.

Measure, order and compare objects using familiar metric units of length, mass and capacity (ACMMG061)

ACMMG.3.1.1.1.

Recognising the importance of using common units of measurement

ACMMG.3.1.1.2.

Recognising and using centimetres and metres, grams and kilograms, and millilitres and litres

ACMMG.3.1.2.

Tell time to the minute and investigate the relationship between units of time (ACMMG062)

ACMMG.3.1.2.1.

Recognising there are 60 minutes in an hour and 60 seconds in a minute

ACMMG.3.2.1.

Make models of three-dimensional objects and describe key features (ACMMG063)

ACMMG.3.2.1.1.

Exploring the creation of three-dimensional objects using origami, including prisms and pyramids

ACMMG.3.3.1.

Create and interpret simple grid maps to show position and pathways (ACMMG065)

ACMMG.3.3.1.1.

Creating a map of the classroom or playground

ACMMG.3.3.2.

Identify symmetry in the environment (ACMMG066)

ACMMG.3.3.2.1.

Identifying symmetry in Aboriginal rock carvings or art

ACMMG.3.3.2.2.

Identifying symmetry in the natural and built environment

ACMMG.3.3.3.

Identify angles as measures of turn and compare angle sizes in everyday situations

ACMMG.3.3.3.2.

Recognising that analogue clocks use the turning of arms to indicate time, and comparing the size of angles between the arms for familiar times

ACMNA.3.1.1.

Investigate the conditions required for a number to be odd or even and identify odd and even numbers (ACMNA051)

ACMNA.3.1.1.1.

Identifying even numbers using skip counting by twos or by grouping even collections of objects in twos

ACMNA.3.1.1.2.

Explaining why all numbers that end in the digits 0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 are even and that numbers ending in 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 are odd

ACMNA.3.1.2.

Recognise, model, represent and order numbers to at least 10 000 (ACMNA052)

ACMNA.3.1.2.1.

Placing four-digit numbers on a number line using an appropriate scale

ACMNA.3.1.2.2.

Reproducing numbers in words using their numerical representations and vice versa

ACMNA.3.1.3.

Apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to at least 10 000 to assist calculations and solve problems (ACMNA053)

ACMNA.3.1.3.1.

Recognising that 10 000 equals 10 thousands, 100 hundreds, 1000 tens and 10 000 ones

ACMNA.3.1.3.2.

Justifying choices about partitioning and regrouping numbers in terms of their usefulness for particular calculations

ACMNA.3.1.4.

Recognise and explain the connection between addition and subtraction (ACMNA054)

ACMNA.3.1.4.1.

Demonstrating the connection between addition and subtraction using partitioning or by writing equivalent number sentences

ACMNA.3.1.5.

Recall addition facts for single-digit numbers and related subtraction facts to develop increasingly efficient mental strategies for computation (ACMNA055)

ACMNA.3.1.5.1.

Recognising that certain single-digit number combinations always result in the same answer for addition and subtraction, and using this knowledge for addition and subtraction of larger numbers

ACMNA.3.1.5.2.

Combining knowledge of addition and subtraction facts and partitioning to aid computation (for example 57 + 19 = 57 + 20 1)

ACMNA.3.1.6.

Recall multiplication facts of two, three, five and ten and related division facts (ACMNA056)

ACMNA.3.1.6.1.

Establishing multiplication facts using number sequences

ACMNA.3.1.7.

Represent and solve problems involving multiplication using efficient mental and written strategies and appropriate digital technologies (ACMNA057)

ACMNA.3.1.7.1.

Writing simple word problems in numerical form and vice versa

ACMNA.3.2.1.

Model and represent unit fractions including 1/2, 1/4, 1/3, 1/5 and their multiples to a complete whole (ACMNA058)

ACMNA.3.2.1.1.

Partitioning areas, lengths, and collections to create halves, thirds, quarters, and fifths, such as folding the same sized sheets of paper to illustrate different unit fractions and comparing the number of parts with their sizes

ACMNA.3.2.1.2.

Locating unit fractions on a number line

ACMNA.3.2.1.3.

Recognising that in English the term one third is used (order: numerator, denominator) but that in other languages this concept may be expressed as three parts, one of them (order: denominator, numerator) for example Japanese

ACMNA.3.3.1.

Represent money values in multiple ways and count the change required for simple transactions to the nearest five cents (ACMNA059)

ACMNA.3.3.1.1.

Recognising the relationship between dollars and cents, and that not all countries use these denominations and divisions

ACMNA.3.4.1.

Describe, continue, and create number patterns resulting from performing addition or subtraction (ACMNA060)

ACMNA.3.4.1.1.

Identifying and writing the rules for number patterns

ACMNA.3.4.1.2.

Describing a rule for a number pattern, then creating the pattern

ACMSP.3.1.1.

Conduct chance experiments, identify and describe possible outcomes and recognise variation in results (ACMSP067)

ACMSP.3.1.1.1.

Conducting repeated trials of chance experiments such as tossing a coin or drawing a ball from a bag and identifying the variations between trials

ACMSP.3.2.2.

Collect data, organise into categories and create displays using lists, tables, picture graphs and simple column graphs, with and without the use of digital technologies (ACMSP069)

ACMSP.3.2.2.1.

Exploring meaningful and increasingly efficient ways to record data, and representing and reporting the results of investigations

ACMSP.3.2.2.2.

Collecting data to investigate features in the natural environment

ACMSP.3.2.3.

Interpret and compare data displays (ACMSP070)

ACMSP.3.2.3.1.

Comparing various student-generated data representations and describing their similarities and differences