Australian Curriculum Standards (ACARA) — Grade 4


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Based on the ACARA curriculum.


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ACELA.4.1.

Language variation and change

ACELA.4.1.1.1.

Identifying words used in Standard Australian English that are derived from other languages, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander languages, and determining if the original meaning is reflected in English usage, for example kangaroo, tsunami, typhoon, amok, orangutan

ACELA.4.1.1.2.

Identifying commonly used words derived from other cultures

ACELA.4.1.2.2.

Recognising that language is adjusted in different contexts, for example in degree of formality when moving between group discussions and presenting a group report

ACELA.4.1.2.3.

Understanding how age, status, expertise and familiarity influence the ways in which we interact with people and how these codes and conventions vary across cultures

ACELA.4.1.3.1.

Identifying ways thinking verbs are used to express opinion, for example I think, I believe, and ways summary verbs are used to report findings, for example we concluded

ACELA.4.2.

Text structure and organisation

ACELA.4.2.1.1.

Becoming familiar with the typical stages and language features of such text types as: simple narrative, procedure, simple persuasion texts and information reports

ACELA.4.2.2.1.

Knowing how authors construct texts that are cohesive and coherent through the use of: pronouns that link to something previously mentioned; determiners (for example this, that, these, those, the,); text connectives that create links between sentences (for example however, therefore, nevertheless, in addition, by contrast, in summary)

ACELA.4.2.2.2.

Identifying how participants are tracked through a text by, for example, using pronouns to refer back to noun groups/phrases

ACELA.4.2.2.3.

Describing how text connectives link sections of a text providing sequences through time, for example firstly, then, next, and finally

ACELA.4.2.3.1.

Exploring texts to identify the use of quotation marks

ACELA.4.2.3.2.

Experimenting with the use of quotation marks in students own writing

ACELA.4.2.4.1.

Participating in online searches for information using navigation tools and discussing similarities and differences between print and digital information

ACELA.4.3.

Expressing and developing ideas

ACELA.4.3.5.1.

Building etymological knowledge about word origins (for example 'thermometer') and building vocabulary from research about technical and subject specific topics

ACELA.4.3.6.2.

Building morphemic word families and exploring word origins, for example the prefix nat means source, birth or tribe in nature, natural and native

ACELA.4.3.6.3.

Building morphemic word families and exploring word origins, for example tricycle, triangle and triple

ACELA.4.3.6.4.

Using knowledge of common prefixes and suffixes to spell words and explore their meaning, for example friendly, calmly and cleverly and misfortune

ACELA.4.3.7.1.

Using meaning and context to determine the spelling of homophones, for example there and their; no and know

ACELA.4.3.8.3.

Using knowledge of sounds and visual patterns to read and write more complex letter combinations that have multiple representations in writing, for example boy and boil, howl and foul, taught and saw

ACELT.4.1.

Literature and context

ACELT.4.1.1.1.

Commenting on how authors have established setting and period in different cultures and times and the relevance of characters, actions and beliefs to their own time

ACELT.4.1.1.2.

Comparing different authors treatment of similar themes and text patterns, for example comparing fables and allegories from different cultures and quest novels by different authors

ACELT.4.1.2.2.

Drawing comparisons between multiple texts and students own experiences. Commenting orally, in written form and in digital reviews on aspects such as: 'Do I recognise this in my own world?'; 'How is this text similar to or different from other texts Ive read?'; 'How common is it to human experience in the real world?'; 'What new ideas does it bring?'; How do they fit with what I believe?'

ACELT.4.1.3.1.

Examining the authors description of a characters appearance, behaviour and speech and noting how the characters development is evident through his or her dialogue and changing relationships and the reactions of other characters to him or her

ACELT.4.1.3.2.

Sharing views using appropriate metalanguage (for example The use of the adjectives in describing the character really helps to create images for the reader)

ACELT.4.2.1.1.

Examining the authors description of a characters appearance, behaviour and speech and noting how the characters development is evident through his or her dialogue and changing relationships and the reactions of other characters to him or her

ACELT.4.2.1.2.

Identifying pivotal points in the plot where characters are faced with choices and commenting on how the author makes us care about their decisions and consequences

ACELT.4.2.2.1.

Defining spoonerisms, neologisms and puns and exploring how they are used by authors to create a sense of freshness, originality and playfulness

ACELT.4.2.2.2.

Discussing poetic language, including unusual adjectival use and how it engages us emotionally and brings to life the poets subject matter, for example He grasps the crag with crooked hands (Alfred, Lord Tennyson); Wee ... timrous beastie (Robert Burns)

ACELT.4.3.1.1.

Drawing upon literary texts students have encountered and experimenting with changing particular aspects, for example the time or place of the setting, adding characters or changing their personalities, or offering an alternative point of view on key ideas

ACELT.4.3.2.1.

Collaboratively plan, compose, sequence and prepare a literary text along a familiar storyline, using film, sound and images to convey setting, characters and points of drama in the plot

ACELY.4.1.1.1.

Viewing documentaries and news footage from different periods, comparing the style of presentation, including costumes and iconography with contemporary texts on similar topics and tracking changing views on issues, for example war, race, gender

ACELY.4.2.

Interacting with others

ACELY.4.2.1.1.

Making notes about a task, asking questions to clarify or follow up information, and seeking assistance if required

ACELY.4.2.1.2.

Discussing levels of language slang, colloquial (everyday) and formal language and how their appropriateness changes with the situation and audience. Presenting ideas and opinions at levels of formality appropriate to the context and audience

ACELY.4.2.2.1.

Participating in pair, group, class and school speaking and listening situations, including informal conversations, class discussions and presentations

ACELY.4.2.2.2.

Developing appropriate speaking and listening behaviours including acknowledging and extending others contributions, presenting ideas and opinions clearly and coherently

ACELY.4.2.2.4.

Exploring the effects of changing voice tone, volume, pitch and pace in formal and informal contexts

ACELY.4.3.

Interpreting, analysing, evaluating

ACELY.4.3.1.1.

Describing the language which authors use to create imaginary worlds; how textual features such as headings, subheadings, bold type and graphic organisers are used to order and present information, and how visual codes are used, for example those used in advertising to represent children and families so that viewers identify with them

ACELY.4.3.2.1.

Reading new and different kinds of texts with the use of established word identification strategies, including knowledge of the topic and of text type together with self-monitoring strategies; including rereading, self-questioning and pausing, and including self-correction strategies such confirming and cross-checking

ACELY.4.3.2.2.

Reading aloud with fluency and expression

ACELY.4.3.2.3.

Reading a wide range of different types of texts for pleasure

ACELY.4.3.3.1.

Making connections between the text and students own experience and other texts

ACELY.4.3.3.2.

Making connections between information in print and images

ACELY.4.3.3.3.

Building and using prior knowledge and vocabulary

ACELY.4.3.3.4.

Finding specific literal information

ACELY.4.3.3.5.

Asking and answering questions

ACELY.4.3.3.7.

Finding the main idea of a text

ACELY.4.3.3.8.

Inferring meaning from the ways communication occurs in digital environments including the interplay between words, images, and sounds

ACELY.4.3.3.9.

Bringing subject and technical vocabulary and concept knowledge to new reading tasks, selecting and using texts for their pertinence to the task and the accuracy of their information

ACELY.4.4.1.1.

Using research from print and digital resources to gather ideas, integrating information from a range of sources; selecting text structure and planning how to group ideas into paragraphs to sequence content, and choosing vocabulary to suit topic and communication purpose

ACELY.4.4.1.3.

Using grammatical features including different types of verb groups/phrases, noun groups/phrases, adverb groups/phrases and prepositional phrases for effective descriptions as related to purpose and context (for example, development of a characters actions or a description in a report)

ACELY.4.4.2.1.

Revising written texts: editing for grammatical and spelling accuracy and clarity of the text, to improve the connection between ideas and the overall flow of the piece

ACELY.4.4.3.1.

Using handwriting fluency with speed for a wide range of tasks

ACELY.4.4.4.1.

Identifying and selecting appropriate software programs for constructing text

ACMMG.4.1.1.

Use scaled instruments to measure and compare lengths, masses, capacities and temperatures (ACMMG084)

ACMMG.4.1.1.1.

Reading and interpreting the graduated scales on a range of measuring instruments to the nearest graduation

ACMMG.4.1.2.

Compare objects using familiar metric units of area and volume (ACMMG290)

ACMMG.4.1.2.1.

Comparing areas using grid paper

ACMMG.4.1.2.2.

Comparing volume using centicubes

ACMMG.4.1.2.3.

Recognising that metric units are not the only units used throughout the world, for example measuring the area of floor space using tatami mats (Japan), using squares for room and house area (Australia)

ACMMG.4.1.3.

Convert between units of time (ACMMG085)

ACMMG.4.1.3.1.

Identifying and using the correct operation for converting units of time

ACMMG.4.1.4.

Use am and pm notation and solve simple time problems (ACMMG086)

ACMMG.4.1.4.1.

Calculating the time spent at school during a normal school day

ACMMG.4.1.4.2.

Calculating the time required to travel between two locations

ACMMG.4.1.4.3.

Determining arrival time given departure time

ACMMG.4.2.1.

Compare the areas of regular and irregular shapes by informal means (ACMMG087)

ACMMG.4.2.1.1.

Comparing areas using metric units, such as counting the number of square centimetres required to cover two areas by overlaying the areas with a grid of centimetre squares

ACMMG.4.2.2.

Compare and describe two-dimensional shapes that result from combining and splitting common shapes, with and without the use of digital technologies (ACMMG088)

ACMMG.4.2.2.1.

Identifying common two-dimensional shapes that are part of a composite shape by re-creating it from these shapes

ACMMG.4.2.2.2.

Creating a two-dimensional shapes from verbal or written instructions

ACMMG.4.3.1.

Use simple scales, legends and directions to interpret information contained in basic maps (ACMMG090)

ACMMG.4.3.1.1.

Identifying the scale used on maps of cities and rural areas in Australia and a city in Indonesia and describing the difference

ACMMG.4.3.1.2.

Using directions to find features on a map

ACMMG.4.4.1.

Compare angles and classify them as equal to, greater than, or less than, a right angle (ACMMG089)

ACMMG.4.4.1.1.

Creating angles and comparing them to a right angle using digital technologies

ACMNA.4.1.1.

Investigate and use the properties of odd and even numbers (ACMNA071)

ACMNA.4.1.1.1.

Using the four operations with pairs of odd or even numbers or one odd and one even number, then using the relationships established to check the accuracy of calculations

ACMNA.4.1.2.

Recognise, represent and order numbers to at least tens of thousands (ACMNA072)

ACMNA.4.1.2.1.

Reproducing five-digit numbers in words using their numerical Representations, and vice versa

ACMNA.4.1.3.

Apply place value to partition, rearrange and regroup numbers to at least tens of thousands to assist calculations and solve problems (ACMNA073)

ACMNA.4.1.3.1.

Recognising and demonstrating that the place-value pattern is built on the operations of multiplication or division of tens

ACMNA.4.1.4.

Investigate number sequences involving multiples of 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, and 9 (ACMNA074)

ACMNA.4.1.4.1.

Recognising that number sequences can be extended indefinitely, and determining any patterns in the sequences

ACMNA.4.1.5.

Recall multiplication facts up to 10 10 and related division facts (ACMNA075)

ACMNA.4.1.5.1.

Using known multiplication facts to calculate related division facts

ACMNA.4.1.6.

Develop efficient mental and written strategies and use appropriate digital technologies for multiplication and for division where there is no remainder (ACMNA076)

ACMNA.4.1.6.1.

Using known facts and strategies, such as commutatively, doubling and halving for multiplication, and connecting division to multiplication when there is no remainder

ACMNA.4.2.1.

Investigate equivalent fractions used in contexts (ACMNA077)

ACMNA.4.2.1.1.

Exploring the relationship between families of fractions (halves, quarters and eighths or thirds and sixths) by folding a series of paper strips to construct a fraction wall

ACMNA.4.2.2.

Count by quarters halves and thirds, including with mixed numerals. Locate and represent these fractions on a number line (ACMNA078)

ACMNA.4.2.2.1.

Converting mixed numbers to improper fractions and vice versa

ACMNA.4.2.3.

Recognise that the place value system can be extended to tenths and hundredths. Make connections between fractions and decimal notation (ACMNA079)

ACMNA.4.2.3.1.

Using division by 10 to extend the place-value system

ACMNA.4.2.3.2.

Using knowledge of fractions to establish equivalences between fractions and decimal notation (ACMNA080)

ACMNA.4.3.1.

Solve problems involving purchases and the calculation of change to the nearest five cents with and without digital technologies (ACMNA080)

ACMNA.4.3.1.2.

Carrying out calculations in another currency as well as in dollars and cents, and identifying both as decimal systems

ACMNA.4.4.1.

Explore and describe number patterns resulting from performing multiplication (ACMNA081)

ACMNA.4.4.1.1.

Identifying examples of number patterns in everyday life

ACMNA.4.4.2.

Solve word problems by using number sentences involving multiplication or division where there is no remainder (ACMNA082)

ACMNA.4.4.2.1.

Representing a word problem as a number sentence

ACMNA.4.4.2.2.

Writing a word problem using a given number sentence

ACMNA.4.4.3.

Find unknown quantities in number sentences involving addition and subtraction and identify equivalent number sentences involving addition and subtraction (ACMNA083)

ACMNA.4.4.3.1.

Writing number sentences to represent and answer questions such as: When a number is added to 23 the answer is the same as 57 minus 19. What is the number?

ACMNA.4.4.3.2.

Using partitioning to find unknown quantities in number sentences

ACMSP.4.1.1.

Describe possible everyday events and order their chances of occurring (ACMSP092)

ACMSP.4.1.1.1.

Using lists of events familiar to students and ordering them from least likely to most likely to occur

ACMSP.4.1.1.2.

Using examples such as weather, which cannot be dry and wet at the same time

ACMSP.4.1.1.3.

Explaining why the probability of a new baby being either a boy or a girl does not depend on the sex of the previous baby

ACMSP.4.1.2.

Identify everyday events where one cannot happen if the other happens (ACMSP093)

ACMSP.4.1.3.

Identify events where the chance of one will not be affected by the occurrence of the other (ACMSP094)

ACMSP.4.2.1.

Select and trial methods for data collection, including survey questions and recording sheets (ACMSP095)

ACMSP.4.2.1.1.

Comparing the effectiveness of different methods of collecting data

ACMSP.4.2.1.2.

Choosing the most effective way to collect data for a given investigation

ACMSP.4.2.2.

Construct suitable data displays, with and without the use of digital technologies, from given or collected data. Include tables, column graphs and picture graphs where one picture can represent many data values (ACMSP096)

ACMSP.4.2.2.1.

Exploring ways of presenting data and showing the results of investigations

ACMSP.4.2.2.2.

Investigating data displays using many-to-one correspondence

ACMSP.4.2.3.

Evaluate the effectiveness of different displays in illustrating data features including variability (ACMSP097)

ACMSP.4.2.3.2.

Suggesting questions that can be answered by a given data display and using the display to answer questions