Australian Curriculum Standards (ACARA) — Grade 6


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Based on the ACARA curriculum.


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ACELA.6.1.

Language variation and change

ACELA.6.1.1.1.

Recognising that there are more than 150 Aboriginal languages and two Torres Strait Islander languages and that they relate to geographic areas in Australia

ACELA.6.1.1.2.

Recognising that all languages and dialects are of equal value, although we use different ones in different contexts, for example the use of Standard Australian English, Aboriginal English and forms of Creole used by some Torres Strait Islander groups and some of Australias near neighbours

ACELA.6.2.

Language for interaction

ACELA.6.2.1.1.

Identify and appreciate differences in language used in diverse family settings

ACELA.6.2.2.1.

Understanding when it is appropriate to share feelings and opinions (for example in a personal recount) and when it is appropriate to remain more objective (for example in a factual recount)

ACELA.6.2.2.2.

Differentiating between reporting the facts (for example in a news story) and providing a commentary (for example in an editorial)

ACELA.6.3.

Text structure and organisation

ACELA.6.3.1.1.

Exploring a range of everyday, community, literary and informative texts discussing elements of text structure and language features and comparing the overall structure and effect of authors choices in two or more texts

ACELA.6.3.1.2.

Examining different works by an author who specialises in humour or pathos to identify strategies such as exaggeration and character embarrassment to amuse and to offer insights into characters feelings, so building empathy with their points of view and concern for their welfare

ACELA.6.3.2.1.

Noting how a general word is often used for a more specific word already mentioned, for example Look at those apples. Can I have one?'

ACELA.6.3.2.3.

Observing how relationships between concepts can be represented visually through similarity, contrast, juxtaposition, repetition, class-subclass diagrams, part-whole diagrams, cause-and-effect figures, visual continuities and discontinuities

ACELA.6.3.3.1.

Identifying different uses of commas in texts

ACELA.6.4.

Expressing and developing ideas

ACELA.6.4.1.1.

Investigating how the choice of conjunctions enables the construction of complex sentences to extend, elaborate and explain ideas, for example the town was flooded when the river broke its banks and the town was flooded because the river broke its banks

ACELA.6.4.2.1.

Knowing that verbs often represent actions and that the choice of more expressive verbs makes an action more vivid (for example 'She ate her lunch' compared to 'She gobbled up her lunch')

ACELA.6.4.2.3.

Knowing the difference between the simple present tense (for example 'Pandas eat bamboo.') and the simple past tense (for example 'She replied.')

ACELA.6.4.2.4.

Knowing that the simple present tense is typically used to talk about either present states (for example, He lives in Darwin) or actions that happen regularly in the present (for example, He watches television every night) or that represent timeless happenings, as in information reports (for example, Bears hibernate in winter)

ACELA.6.4.2.5.

Knowing that there are various ways in English to refer to future time, for example auxiliary will, as in She will call you tomorrow; present tense, as in Tomorrow I leave for Hobart; and adverbials of time, as in She arrives in the morning

ACELA.6.4.3.1.

Observing how sequential events can be represented visually by a series of images, including comic strips, timelines, photo stories, procedure diagrams and flowcharts, life-cycle diagrams, and the flow of images in picture books

ACELA.6.4.3.2.

Observing how concepts, information and relationships can be represented visually through such images as tables, maps, graphs, diagrams, and icons

ACELA.6.4.4.1.

Identifying (for example from reviews) the ways in which evaluative language is used to assess the qualities of the various aspects of the work in question

ACELA.6.5.

Phonics and word knowledge

ACELA.6.5.1.1.

Using a dictionary to explore and use knowledge of word origins, including some Greek roots, to spell words. For example, the Greek roots: ath meaning contest or outstanding skill, pent meaning the number five, and dec meaning the number ten, inform the spelling and meaning of the words athlete, decathlon and pentathlon

ACELA.6.5.1.3.

Expanding knowledge of prefixes and suffixes and exploring meaning relationships between words for example disappearance, submarine, subterranean, poisonous and nervous

ACELA.6.5.1.4.

Applying accumulated knowledge of a wide range of letter patterns and spelling generalisations to spell new words, for example knowing how and why these words are spelt as follows: reliability, handkerchief receive, lollies, trolleys, climbing, designed and emergency

ACELA.6.5.1.5.

Spelling technical words by applying morphemic knowledge, for example metaphorical, biology and biodegradable

ACELA.6.5.1.6.

Learning about words from other languages, for example umbrella comes from the Italian word ombrello, and the word for yabby is derived from the Aboriginal word yabij

ACELA.6.5.2.1.

Using phonic generalisations to read and write complex words with uncommon letter patterns, for example pneumonia, resuscitate and vegetation

ACELT.6.1.

Literature and context

ACELT.6.1.1.1.

Recognising the influence our different historical, social and cultural experiences may have on the meaning we make from the text and the attitudes we may develop towards characters, actions and events

ACELT.6.2.

Responding to literature

ACELT.6.2.1.1.

Exploring texts on a similar topic by authors with very different styles, for example comparing fantasy quest novels or realistic novels on a specific theme, identifying differences in the use of narrator, narrative structure and voice and language style and register

ACELT.6.2.2.1.

Noting how degrees of possibility are opened up through the use of modal verbs (for example, It may be a solution as compared to It could be a solution), as well as through other resources such as adverbs (for example, Its possibly/probably/certainly a solution), adjectives (for example, Its a possible/probable/certain solution); and nouns (for example, Its a possibility/probability)

ACELT.6.3.1.1.

Exploring two or more texts by the same author, drawing out the similarities, for example subject or theme, characterisation, text structure, plot development, tone, vocabulary, sense of voice, narrative point of view, favoured grammatical structures and visual techniques in sophisticated picture books

ACELT.6.3.2.1.

Identifying how language choice and imagery build emotional connection and engagement with the story or theme

ACELT.6.3.2.2.

Describing how a characters experience expressed through a verse novel impacts on students personally, how the author controls the revelation of the experiences and how the verse story builds meaning to its climax when we understand the whole

ACELT.6.4.1.1.

Creating narratives in written, spoken or multimodal/digital format for more than one specified audience, requiring adaptation of narrative elements and language features

ACELT.6.4.1.2.

Planning and creating texts that entertain, inform, inspire and/or emotionally engage familiar and less-familiar audiences

ACELT.6.4.2.1.

Selecting and using sensory language to convey a vivid picture of places, feelings and events in a semi-structured verse form

ACELY.6.1.1.1.

Identifying and exploring news reports of the same event, and discuss the language choices and point of view of the writers

ACELY.6.1.1.2.

Using display advertising as a topic vehicle for close analysis of the ways images and words combine for deliberate effect including examples from the countries of Asia (for example comparing Hollywood film posters with Indian Bollywood film posters)

ACELY.6.2.

Interacting with others

ACELY.6.2.1.1.

Using strategies, for example pausing, questioning, rephrasing, repeating, summarising, reviewing and asking clarifying questions

ACELY.6.2.1.2.

Exploring personal reasons for acceptance or rejection of opinions offered and linking the reasons to the way our cultural experiences can affect our responses

ACELY.6.2.1.3.

Recognising that closed questions ask for precise responses while open questions prompt a speaker to provide more information

ACELY.6.2.2.1.

Participating in pair, group, class, school and community speaking and listening situations, including informal conversations, discussions, debates and presentations

ACELY.6.2.2.2.

Using effective strategies for dialogue and discussion in range of familiar and new contexts, including speaking clearly and coherently and at appropriate length, acknowledging and extending the contributions of others, asking pertinent questions and answering others questions

ACELY.6.2.2.3.

Choosing vocabulary and spoken text and sentence structures for particular purposes and audiences, adapting language choices to meet the perceived audience needs, such as recounting an excursion to a younger class or welcoming a visitor to a school function

ACELY.6.2.2.4.

Experimenting with voice effects for different audiences and purposes, such as tone, volume, pitch and pace, recognising the effects these have on audience understanding and engagement

ACELY.6.2.3.1.

Using technologies to collaboratively prepare a humorous, dynamic group view on a debatable topic, such as Kids should be allowed to read and view what they like, to be presented to teachers and parents

ACELY.6.3.

Interpreting, analysing, evaluating

ACELY.6.3.1.1.

Comparing the structures and features of different texts, including print and digital sources on similar topics, and evaluating which features best aid navigation and clear communication about the topic

ACELY.6.3.2.1.

Bringing subject and technical vocabulary and concept knowledge to new reading tasks, selecting, evaluating and using texts for their pertinence to the task and the accuracy of their information

ACELY.6.3.2.2.

Using word identification, self-monitoring and self-correcting strategies

ACELY.6.3.2.3.

Using research skills including identifying research purpose, locating texts, gathering and organising information, evaluating and using information

ACELY.6.3.2.4.

Identifying and using texts for a wide range of purposes, selecting texts by favourite authors and trying new ones

ACELY.6.3.3.1.

Making connections between the text and students own experience or other texts

ACELY.6.3.3.2.

Making connections between information in print and images

ACELY.6.3.3.3.

Finding specific literal information

ACELY.6.3.3.6.

Finding the main idea of a text

ACELY.6.3.4.1.

Identify how authors use language to position the reader and give reasons

ACELY.6.3.5.1.

Creating informative texts for two different audiences, such as a visiting academic and a Year 3 class, that explore an aspect of biodiversity

ACELY.6.3.5.2.

Using rhetorical devices, images, surprise techniques and juxtaposition of people and ideas and modal verbs and modal auxiliaries to enhance the persuasive nature of a text, recognising and exploiting audience susceptibilities

ACELY.6.3.6.1.

Editing for coherence, sequence, effective choice of vocabulary, opening devices, dialogue and description, humour and pathos, as appropriate to the task and audience

ACELY.6.3.8.1.

Selecting and combining software functions as needed to create texts

ACMMG.6.1.1.

Connect decimal representations to the metric system (ACMMG135)

ACMMG.6.1.1.1.

Recognising the equivalence of measurements such as 1.25 metres and 125 centimetres

ACMMG.6.1.2.

Convert between common metric units of length, mass and capacity (ACMMG136)

ACMMG.6.1.2.1.

Identifying and using the correct operations when converting units including millimetres, centimetres, metres, kilometres, milligrams, grams, kilograms, tonnes, millilitres, litres, kilolitres and megalitres

ACMMG.6.1.2.2.

Recognising the significance of the prefixes in units of measurement

ACMMG.6.1.3.

Solve problems involving the comparison of lengths and areas using appropriate units (ACMMG137)

ACMMG.6.1.3.1.

Recognising and investigating familiar objects using concrete materials and digital technologies

ACMMG.6.1.4.

Connect volume and capacity and their units of measurement (ACMMG138)

ACMMG.6.1.4.1.

Recognising that 1ml is equivalent to 1cm3

ACMMG.6.1.5.

Interpret and use timetables (ACMMG139)

ACMMG.6.1.5.1.

Planning a trip involving one or more modes of public transport

ACMMG.6.1.5.2.

Developing a timetable of daily activities

ACMMG.6.2.1.

Construct simple prisms and pyramids (ACMMG140)

ACMMG.6.2.1.1.

Considering the history and significance of pyramids from a range of cultural perspectives including those structures found in China, Korea and Indonesia

ACMMG.6.2.1.2.

Constructing prisms and pyramids from nets, and skeletal models

ACMMG.6.3.1.

Investigate combinations of translations, reflections and rotations, with and without the use of digital technologies (ACMMG142)

ACMMG.6.3.1.2.

Understanding that translations, rotations and reflections can change the position and orientation but not shape or size

ACMMG.6.3.2.

Introduce the Cartesian coordinate system using all four quadrants (ACMMG143)

ACMMG.6.3.2.1.

Understanding that the Cartesian plane provides a graphical or visual way of describing location

ACMMG.6.4.1.

Investigate, with and without digital technologies, angles on a straight line, angles at a point and vertically opposite angles. Use results to find unknown angles (ACMMG141)

ACMMG.6.4.1.1.

Identifying the size of a right angle as 90 and defining acute, obtuse, straight and reflex angles

ACMMG.6.4.1.2.

Measuring, estimating and comparing angles in degrees and classifying angles according to their sizes

ACMMG.6.4.1.4.

Recognising and using the two alternate conventions for naming angles

ACMNA.6.1.1.

Identify and describe properties of prime, composite, square and triangular numbers (ACMNA122)

ACMNA.6.1.1.1.

Understanding that some numbers have special properties and that these properties can be used to solve problems

ACMNA.6.1.1.2.

Representing composite numbers as a product of their prime factors and using this form to simplify calculations by cancelling common primes

ACMNA.6.1.1.3.

Understanding that if a number is divisible by a composite number then it is also divisible by the prime factors of that number (for example 216 is divisible by 8 because the number represented by the last three digits is divisible by 8, and hence 216 is also divisible by 2 and 4)

ACMNA.6.1.2.

Select and apply efficient mental and written strategies and appropriate digital technologies to solve problems involving all four operations with whole numbers (ACMNA123)

ACMNA.6.1.2.1.

Applying strategies already developed for solving problems involving small numbers to those involving large numbers

ACMNA.6.1.2.2.

Applying a range of strategies to solve realistic problems and commenting on the efficiency of different strategies

ACMNA.6.1.3.

Investigate everyday situations that use integers. Locate and represent these numbers on a number line (ACMNA124)

ACMNA.6.1.3.1.

Understanding that integers are ...-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3,.....

ACMNA.6.1.3.3.

Investigating everyday situations that use integers, such as temperatures

ACMNA.6.1.3.4.

Using number lines to position and order integers around zero

ACMNA.6.2.1.

Compare fractions with related denominators and locate and represent them on a number line (ACMNA125)

ACMNA.6.2.1.1.

Demonstrating equivalence between fractions using drawings and models

ACMNA.6.2.2.

Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions with the same or related denominators (ACMNA126)

ACMNA.6.2.2.1.

Understanding the processes for adding and subtracting fractions with related denominators and fractions as an operator, in preparation for calculating with all fractions

ACMNA.6.2.2.2.

Solving realistic additive (addition and subtraction) problems involving fractions to develop understanding of equivalent fractions and the use of fractions as operators

ACMNA.6.2.2.3.

Modeling and solving additive problems involving fractions by using methods such as jumps on a number line, or by making diagrams of fractions as parts of shapes

ACMNA.6.2.3.

Find a simple fraction of a quantity where the result is a whole number, with and without digital technologies (ACMNA127)

ACMNA.6.2.3.1.

Recognising that finding one third of a quantity is the same as dividing by 3

ACMNA.6.2.4.

Add and subtract decimals, with and without digital technologies, and use estimation and rounding to check the reasonableness of answers (ACMNA128)

ACMNA.6.2.4.1.

Extending whole-number strategies to explore and develop meaningful written strategies for addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to thousandths

ACMNA.6.2.4.2.

Exploring and practising efficient methods for solving problems requiring operations on decimals, to gain fluency with calculating with decimals and with recognising appropriate operations

ACMNA.6.2.5.

Multiply decimals by whole numbers and perform divisions by non-zero whole numbers where the results are terminating decimals, with and without digital technologies (ACMNA129)

ACMNA.6.2.5.1.

Interpreting the results of calculations to provide an answer appropriate to the context

ACMNA.6.2.6.

Multiply and divide decimals by powers of 10 (ACMNA130)

ACMNA.6.2.6.1.

Multiplying and dividing decimals by multiples of powers of 10

ACMNA.6.2.7.

Make connections between equivalent fractions, decimals and percentages (ACMNA131)

ACMNA.6.2.7.1.

Connecting fractions, decimals and percentages as different representations of the same number, moving fluently between representations and choosing the appropriate one for the problem being solved

ACMNA.6.4.1.

Continue and create sequences involving whole numbers, fractions and decimals. Describe the rule used to create the sequence (ACMNA133)

ACMNA.6.4.1.1.

Identifying and generalising number patterns

ACMNA.6.4.1.2.

Investigating additive and multiplicative patterns such as the number of tiles in a geometric pattern, or the number of dots or other shapes in successive repeats of a strip or border pattern looking for patterns in the way the numbers increase/decrease

ACMNA.6.4.2.

Explore the use of brackets and order of operations to write number sentences (ACMNA134)

ACMNA.6.4.2.1.

identifying and using the correct operations when converting units including millimetres, centimetres, metres, kilometres, milligrams, grams, kilograms, tonnes, millilitres, litres, kilolitres and megalitres

ACMNA.6.4.2.2.

recognising the significance of the prefixes in units of measurement

ACMSP.6.1.1.

Describe probabilities using fractions, decimals and percentages (ACMSP144)

ACMSP.6.1.1.1.

Investigating games of chance popular in different cultures and evaluating the relative benefits to the organisers and participants (for example Pachinko)

ACMSP.6.1.2.

Conduct chance experiments with both small and large numbers of trials using appropriate digital technologies (ACMSP145)

ACMSP.6.1.2.1.

Conducting repeated trials of chance experiments, identifying the variation between trials and realising that the results tend to the prediction with larger numbers of trials

ACMSP.6.1.3.

Compare observed frequencies across experiments with expected frequencies (ACMSP146)

ACMSP.6.1.3.1.

Predicting likely outcomes from a run of chance events and distinguishing these from surprising results

ACMSP.6.2.1.

Interpret and compare a range of data displays, including side-by-side column graphs for two categorical variables (ACMSP147)

ACMSP.6.2.1.1.

Comparing different student-generated diagrams, tables and graphs, describing their similarities and differences and commenting on the usefulness of each representation for interpreting the data

ACMSP.6.2.1.2.

Understanding that data can be represented in different ways, sometimes with one symbol representing more than one piece of data, and that it is important to read all information about a representation before making judgments

ACMSP.6.2.2.

Interpret secondary data presented in digital media and elsewhere (ACMSP148)

ACMSP.6.2.2.1.

Investigating data representations in the media and discussing what they illustrate and the messages the people who created them might want to convey

ACMSP.6.2.2.2.

Identifying potentially misleading data representations in the media, such as graphs with broken axes or non-linear scales, graphics not drawn to scale, data not related to the population about which the claims are made, and pie charts in which the whole pie does not represent the entire population about which the claims are made