Missouri Learning Standards 2017 — Grade 12


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12.RI.1.A

Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.

12.RI.1.B

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative, connotative, and content-specific meanings using context, affixes, or reference materials.

12.RI.1.C

Interpret visual elements of a text including those from different media and draw conclusions from them (when applicable).

12.RI.1.D

Explain two or more central/main ideas in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the central ideas to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.

12.RI.2.A

Evaluate how an author's choices to structure specific parts of a text contribute to a text's overall meaning and its aesthetic impact.

12.RI.2.B

Analyze a text in which the author's point of view is not obvious and requires distinguishing what is directly stated from what is implied.

12.RI.2.C

Evaluate how the author's word choice and use of syntax contribute to a text's overall meaning and tone.

12.RI.2.D

Evaluate an author's argument and reasoning for effectiveness, validity, logic, credibility, and relevance of the evidence.

12.RI.3.A

Analyze the representation of a subject in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.

12.RI.3.B

Synthesize information from two or more texts about similar ideas/topics to articulate the complexity of the issue.

12.RI.3.C

Evaluate how an author's work reflects his or her historical/cultural perspective.

12.RI.3.D

Read and comprehend informational text independently and proficiently.

12.RL.1.A

Draw conclusions, infer, and analyze by citing relevant and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including where the text leaves matters uncertain.

12.RL.1.B

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings using context, affixes, or reference materials.

12.RL.1.C

Interpret visual elements of a text and draw conclusions from them (when applicable).

12.RL.1.D

Using appropriate text, determine two or more themes in a text, analyze their development throughout the text, and relate the themes to human nature and the world; provide an objective and concise summary of the text.

12.RL.2.A

Evaluate how an author's choices to structure specific parts of a text contribute to a text's overall meaning and its aesthetic impact.

12.RL.2.B

Analyze a case in which recognizing point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is implied.

12.RL.2.C

Evaluate how the author's word choices and use of syntax contribute to a text's overall meaning, tone, and aesthetic impact.

12.RL.2.D

Evaluate the impact of the authors choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a text.

12.RL.3.A

Analyze the representation of a subject in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.

12.RL.3.B

Synthesize ideas from two or more texts about similar themes or topics to articulate the complexity of the theme.

12.RL.3.C

Evaluate how an author's work reflects his or her historical/cultural perspective.

12.RL.3.D

Read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, independently and proficiently.

12.SL.1.A

Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.

12.SL.1.B

Delineate a speakers argument and claims evaluating the speakers point of view, reasoning, stance, and evidence in order to propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

12.SL.1.C

Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives including those presented in diverse media; synthesize claims made on all sides of an issue, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

12.SL.2.A

Speak audibly and to the point, using conventions of language as appropriate to task, purpose, and audience when presenting including fluent and clear articulation, strategically varying volume, pitch, and pace to consistently engage listeners.

12.SL.2.B

Make consistent eye contact with a range of listeners when speaking, using a range of gestures or movement to emphasize aspects of speech while avoiding body language or mannerisms that might be distracting to the audience.

12.SL.2.C

Plan and deliver appropriate presentations based on the task, audience, and purpose making strategic use of multimedia in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest conveying a clear and distinct perspective.

12.W.1.A

Conduct research to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; gather multiple relevant, credible sources, print and digital; integrate information using a standard citation system.

12.W.2.A

Follow a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, style, and voice are appropriate to the task, purpose, and audience; self-select and blend (when appropriate) previously learned narrative, expository, and argumentative writing techniques.

12.W.3.A.a

Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience. Organization and content: Introduce the topic, maintain a clear focus throughout the text,and provide a conclusion that follows from the text

12.W.3.A.b

Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience. Word choice, syntax, and style: Choose precise language and make syntactical choices to reflect an understanding of how language functions in different contexts and enhance the reader's understanding of the text

12.W.3.A.c

Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience. Conventions of standard English and usage: Demonstrate a command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage, including spelling and punctuation

12.W.3.A.d

Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience. Use a variety of appropriate transitions to clarify relationships, connect ideas and claims, and signal time shifts

12.W.3.A.e

Review, revise, and edit writing with consideration for the task, purpose, and audience. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information

9-12.AH.1.CC.A

Create and use tools to analyze a chronological sequence of related events in United States history.

9-12.AH.1.CC.B

Explain connections between historical context and peoples perspectives at the time in United States history.

9-12.AH.1.CC.C

Develop a research plan, identify appropriate resources for investigating social studies topics, and create and present a research product which applies an aspect of United States history post c. 1870 to a contemporary issue.

9-12.AH.1.CC.D

Using an inquiry lens, develop compelling questions about United States history post c. 1870 to determine helpful resources and consider multiple points of views represented in the resources.

9-12.AH.1.CC.E

Analyze the causes and consequences of a specific problem in United States history post c. 1870 as well as the challenges and opportunities faced by those trying to address the problem.

9-12.AH.1.EC.A

Using a United States historical lens, analyze the opportunity costs and benefits of economic decisions on society as a whole as well as on individuals post c. 1870.

9-12.AH.1.G.A

Create and use maps and other graphic representations in order to explain relationships and reveal patterns or trends in United States history c. 1870-2010

9-12.AH.1.G.B

Analyze how the physical and human characteristics of regions in the United States post C. 1870 are connected to changing identity and culture.

9-12.AH.1.G.C

Locate major cities of Missouri, the United States, and the world; states of the United States and key world nations; the worlds continents, and oceans; and major topographical features of the United States.

9-12.AH.1.GS.A

Analyze laws, policies, and processes to determine how governmental systems affect individuals and groups in society in United States history c.1870-2010.

9-12.AH.1.GS.B

Predict the consequences which can occur when individuals fail to carry out their personal responsibilities.

9-12.AH.1.GS.C

Predict the consequences which can occur when institutions fail to meet the needs of individuals and groups.

9-12.AH.1.PC.A

Using a United States historical lens, describe how peoples perspectives shaped the sources/artifacts they created.

9-12.AH.1.PC.B

Using a United States historical lens, examine the origins and impact of social structures and stratification on societies and relationships between peoples.

9-12.AH.2.CC.A

Compare and contrast the plans for and results of political reintegration of Southern states after the Civil War.

9-12.AH.2.CC.B

Describe the purpose, challenges, and economic incentives that impacted expansion and Westward movement.

9-12.AH.2.CC.C

Trace the contributions of individuals and institutions on social, political, artistic and economic development.

9-12.AH.2.EC.A

Evaluate how the goals of Reconstruction impacted the economic recovery and growth of regions.

9-12.AH.2.EC.B

Explain how the expansion of industrialization, transportation and technological developments influenced different regions and the relationship between those regions.

9-12.AH.2.EC.C

Apply the concepts of natural resources, capital, labor, investment, profit, and laissez-fairepolicies to explain the growth of American industry.

9-12.AH.2.EC.D

Analyze the developing interconnectedness among people, big business, labor unions and governments to determine their effect on individuals, society, and public policy.

9-12.AH.2.G.A

Evaluate the causes, patterns, and outcomes of internal migrations and urbanization.

9-12.AH.2.G.B

Evaluate the effects of Westward expansion on the production, distribution, and allocation of resources and on the environment.

9-12.AH.2.GS.A

Analyze the period of Reconstruction to determine its effect on separation of powers checks and balances power of the central government.

9-12.AH.2.GS.B

Evaluate the effectiveness of major legislation, Constitutional amendments, and court decisions relating to freed slaves.

9-12.AH.2.GS.C

Analyze the expansion of political parties, interest groups and political machines to determine their effect on American government and policy.

9-12.AH.2.PC.A

Analyze patterns of immigration to determine their effects on economic, cultural, and political developments.

9-12.AH.2.PC.B

Evaluate the short and long-term impact of western expansion on native populations.

9-12.AH.2.PC.C

Evaluate laws, events, and perspectives to determine the extent to which individuals and groups could participate in, and realize, the promise of American ideals.

9-12.AH.2.PC.D

Explain the varying impact of industrialization on culture, work, education and other social institutions.

9-12.AH.2.PC.E

Trace the changing motivations for, nationalities of, and responses to immigration and to immigrants coming to the United States.

9-12.AH.3.CC.A

Describe the causes and consequences of United States imperialism at home and abroad.

9-12.AH.3.CC.B

Evaluate the motivations for United States entry into WWI.

9-12.AH.3.CC.C

Evaluate the impact of U.S. participation in WWI and the resulting peace efforts.

9-12.AH.3.CC.D

Evaluate the responses of United States leaders to the challenges of the period.

9-12.AH.3.EC.A

Analyze emerging American involvement in world trade to determine its influence on foreign policy and government actions.

9-12.AH.3.EC.B

Apply the economic concepts of natural resources, markets, supply and demand, labor, and capital to analyze the costs and benefits of imperialism.

9-12.AH.3.EC.C

Trace the changing relationship between government and business through economic regulation and deregulation.

9-12.AH.3.G.A

Describe how the expansion of transportation and technological developments influenced acquisition of new territories.

9-12.AH.3.G.C

Locate major cities of Missouri, the United States, and the world; states of the United States and many of the world nations; the worlds continents, and oceans; and major topographical features of the United States.

9-12.AH.3.GS.A

Analyze how political developments and Constitutional Amendments of the period altered the relationship between government and people.

9-12.AH.3.GS.B

Describe the intended and unintended consequences of progressive reforms and government responses in the first three decades of the twentieth century.

9-12.AH.3.GS.C

Analyze the changing social norms and conflicting mores which emerged during the first three decades of the twentieth century.

9-12.AH.3.PC.A

Explain the motivation for social and political reforms and their impact on the ability of individuals and groups to realize the promise of American ideals.

9-12.AH.3.PC.B

Analyze the changing relationship between individuals and their place in society including women, minorities, and children.

9-12.AH.3.PC.C

Analyze the technological, artistic, intellectual, economic, and cultural changes of the first three decades of the 20thcentury to determine their effects on individuals and groups.

9-12.AH.3.PC.D

Assess the impact of WWI related events,on the formation of patriotic groups, pacifist organizations, and the struggles for and against racial equality, and diverging womens roles in the United States.

9-12.AH.4.CC.A

Trace the significant eventsand developments of the Great Depression and WWII.

9-12.AH.4.CC.B

Evaluate the responses of United States leaders to the challenges of the Great Depression and World War II.

9-12.AH.4.CC.C

Describe critical developments and turning points in WWII including major battles.

9-12.AH.4.CC.D

Evaluate the motivations for United States abandonment of isolationism and entry into WWII.

9-12.AH.4.CC.E

Evaluate the impact of U.S. participation in WWII and the resulting new role in the post-war world home and abroad

9-12.AH.4.EC.A

Apply the economic concepts of innovation, supply and demand, barriers to trade, labor, business cycle, credit, and wage gap to explain the causes of the Great Depression.

9-12.AH.4.EC.B

Describe the possible consequences, both intended and unintended, of government policies to improve economic conditions and increase productivity.

9-12.AH.4.G.A

Describe the consequences, both intended and unintended, of environmental decisions.

9-12.AH.4.G.B

Analyze the impact of geography in the European and Pacific theaters during WWII to compare war efforts and strategies.

9-12.AH.4.GS.A

Analyze the relationships among the branches of government to explain conflicts and the changing power of each.

9-12.AH.4.GS.B

Evaluate how the programs and policies of the New Deal and WWII changed the relationships among the government, groups, and individuals.

9-12.AH.4.GS.C

Determine the lasting impact of the New Deal and WWII on principles of government, including separation of powers, checks and balances judicial review, and limited government.

9-12.AH.4.PC.A

Analyze the artistic and intellectual achievements of the 1930s to understand the human costs of the Great Depression.

9-12.AH.4.PC.B

Assess the impact of war-related events on womens roles, family structures, religious. identity, education, commerce, entertainment, agriculture and other elements of the home front.

9-12.AH.4.PC.C

Evaluate the effects of the Great Depression and WWII on women, families, and minorities.

9-12.AH.4.PC.D

Analyze the impact of the Great Depression and World War II on the arts and culture.

9-12.AH.5.CC.A

Describe the causes, major conflicts, consequences, and enduring legacy of the Cold War.

9-12.AH.5.CC.B

Evaluate the responses of United States leaders to the challenges of global tensions.

9-12.AH.5.CC.C

Trace changes in military strategies and technologies as a response to the challenges of the Cold War.

9-12.AH.5.CC.D

Analyze the origins, goals, and key events of the continuing U.S. movements to realize equal rights for women and other minorities.

9-12.AH.5.EC.A

Trace the developing complexities of the American economy in the second half of the twentieth century.

9-12.AH.5.EC.B

Compare the role of governments in various. economic systems to explain competing world views.

9-12.AH.5.EC.C

Describe the consequences, both intended and unintended, of government policies to improve individual and societal conditions.

9-12.AH.5.G.A

Evaluate the causes and consequences of demographic shifts and internal migrations.

9-12.AH.5.G.B

Explain how the physical and human characteristics of places determined their influence on or importance to Cold War events.

9-12.AH.5.GS.A

Analyze treaties, agreements, and international organizations to determine their impact on world challenges along with national and international order.

9-12.AH.5.GS.B

Determine the lasting impact of shifting interpretations of governmental and constitutional principles including separation of powers, checks and balances, rule of law, judicial review, and limited government.

9-12.AH.5.GS.D

Analyze the motivations for and results of changing concepts of the federal government in post-Civil War America.

9-12.AH.5.PC.A

Evaluate the effect of the internal tensions caused by the Cold War on societal groups, organizations, and government.

9-12.AH.5.PC.B

Analyze the scientific, technological, artistic, intellectual, economic, political, and cultural changes of the post-WWII period to determine their effects on individuals and groups.

9-12.AH.5.PC.C

Evaluate social reforms to determine their impact on the ability of individuals and groups to realize the promise of American ideals.

9-12.AH.5.PC.D

Analyze push-pull factors to explain changing immigration patterns and their continuing effects on the United States.

9-12.AH.5.PC.E

Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of citizens and institutions to address and solve United States problems c. post 1750.

9-12.AH.5GS.C

Evaluate the extent to which Supreme Court cases and legislation served to expand equal rights during this era.

9-12.AH.6.CC.A

Analyze the fall of the Soviet Union to determine its effect on U.S. foreign policy and its relationships with the rest of the world.

9-12.AH.6.CC.B

Trace the origins of twenty-first century conflicts to understand U.S. policies and actions.

9-12.AH.6.CC.C

Evaluate the responses of United States leaders to the challenges of global tensions.

9-12.AH.6.CC.D

Evaluate how the ability to access and distribute information affects individuals, groups, industry, and governments in the latter 20thand early 21stcenturies.

9-12.AH.6.EC.A

Apply the economic concepts of innovation, supply and demand, international trade, labor, business cycle, and credit to evaluate global interdependence along with economic and security challenges.

9-12.AH.6.G.A

Analyze physical geography to understand the availability and movement of resources in this era.

9-12.AH.6.G.B

Evaluate the relationship between technological and scientific advancements and increasing global interaction in this era.

9-12.AH.6.GS.A

Evaluate the effectiveness of organizations, groups, agreements, and treaties to promote cooperation and maintain international order.

9-12.AH.6.GS.B

Determine the lasting impact of this period on principles of government including separation of powers, executive orders, checks and balances, rule of law, judicial review, and limited government.

9-12.AH.6.GS.C

Evaluate the changing roles and influence of political parties and interest groups on governmental decision-making.

9-12.AH.6.PC.A

Analyze scientific, technological, artistic, intellectual, economic, political, and cultural changes to determine their effect on individuals, groups and society.

9-12.AH.6.PC.B

Analyze push-pull factors to explain changing immigration patterns and their continuing effects on the United States.

9-12.AH.6.PC.C

Assess the response of individuals, groups, and the government to societal challenges to understand how systems change and evolve over time

9-12.ESS1.A.1

Develop a model based on evidence to illustrate the life span of the Sun and the role of nuclear fusion in the Suns core to release energy in the form of radiation. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the energy transfer mechanisms that allow energy from nuclear fusion in the Suns core to reach Earth. Examples of evidence for the model include observations of the masses and lifetimes of other stars, as well as the ways that the Suns radiation varies due to sudden solar flares (space weather).]

9-12.ESS1.A.2

Construct an explanation of the Big Bang theory based on astronomical evidence of light spectra, motion of distant galaxies, and composition of matter in the universe. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the astronomical evidence of the red shift of light from galaxies as an indication that the universe is currently expanding, the cosmic microwave background as the remnant radiation from the Big Bang, and the observed composition of ordinary matter of the universe, primarily found in stars and interstellar gases (from the spectra of electromagnetic radiation from stars), which matches that predicted by the Big Bang theory (3/4 hydrogen and 1/4 helium).]

9-12.ESS1.A.3

Communicate scientific ideas about the way stars, over their life cycle, produce elements. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the way nucleosynthesis, and therefore the different elements created, varies as a function of the mass of a star and the stage of its lifetime.]

9-12.ESS1.B.1

Use Keplers Law to predict the motion of orbiting objects in the solar system. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on Newtonian gravitational laws governing orbital motions, which apply to human-made satellites as well as planets and moons

9-12.ESS1.C.1

Evaluate evidence of the past and current movements of continental and oceanic crust, the theory of plate tectonics, and relative densities of oceanic and continental rocks to explain why continental rocks are generally much older than rocks of the ocean floor. [Clarification Statement: Examples include the ages of oceanic crust increasing with distance from mid-ocean ridges (a result of plate spreading) and the ages of North American continental crust increasing with distance away from a central ancient core (a result of past plate interactions).]

9-12.ESS1.C.2

Apply scientific reasoning and evidence from ancient Earth materials, meteorites, and other planetary surfaces to construct an account of Earths formation and early history. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on using available evidence within the solar system to reconstruct the early history of Earth, which formed along with the rest of the solar system 4.6 billion years ago. Examples of evidence include the absolute ages of ancient materials (obtained by radiometric dating of meteorites, moon rocks, and Earths oldest minerals), the sizes and compositions of solar system objects, and the impact cratering record of planetary surfaces.]

9-12.ESS2.A.1

Develop a model to illustrate how Earths interior and surface processes (constructive and destructive) operate at different spatial and temporal scales to form continental and ocean-floor features. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on how the appearance of land features (such as mountains, valleys, and plateaus) and sea-floor features (such as trenches, ridges, and seamounts) are a result of both constructive forces (such as volcanism, tectonic uplift, and orogeny) and destructive mechanisms (such as weathering, mass wasting, and coastal erosion).]

9-12.ESS2.A.2

Analyze geoscientific data to make the claim that one change to Earth's surface can create changes to other Earth System.

9-12.ESS2.A.3

Develop a model based on evidence of Earths interior to describe the cycling of matter by thermal convection. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on both a one-dimensional model of Earth, with radial layers determined by density, and a three-dimensional model, which is controlled by mantle convection and the resulting plate tectonics. Examples of evidence include maps of Earths three-dimensional structure obtained from seismic waves, records of the rate of change of Earths magnetic field (as constraints on convection in the outer core), and identification of the composition of Earths layers from high-pressure laboratory experiments.

9-12.ESS2.A.4

Use a model to describe how variations in the flow of energy into and out of Earth's System result in changes in climate.

9-12.ESS2.C.1

Plan and conduct an investigation of the properties of water and its effects on Earth materials and surface processes. Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on mechanical and chemical investigations with water and a variety of solid materials to provide the evidence for connections between the hydrologic cycle and system interactions commonly known as the rock cycle. Examples of mechanical investigations include stream transportation and deposition using a stream table, erosion using variations in soil moisture content, or ice wedging by the expansion of water as it freezes. Examples of chemical investigations include chemical weathering and recrystallization (by testing the solubility of different materials) or melt generation (by examining how water lowers the melting temperature of most solids).]

9-12.ESS2.D.1

Develop a quantitative model to describe the cycling of carbon among the hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, and biosphere. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on modeling biogeochemical cycles that include the cycling of carbon through the ocean, atmosphere, soil, and biosphere (including humans), providing the foundation for living Organisms.]

9-12.ESS2.E.1

Construct an argument based on evidence about the simultaneous co evolution of Earth's System and life on Earth. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the dynamic causes, effects, and feedbacks between the biosphere and Earths other System, whereby geoscience factors control the evolution of life, which in turn continuously alters Earths surface. Examples of co evolution include how photosynthetic life altered the atmosphere through the production of oxygen, which in turn increased weathering rates and allowed for the evolution of animal life; how microbial life on land increased the formation of soil, which in turn allowed for the evolution of land plants; or how the evolution of corals created reefs that altered patterns of erosion and deposition along coastlines and provided habitats for new life.]

9-12.ESS3.A.1

Construct an explanation based on evidence for how the availability of natural resources, occurrence of natural hazards, and changes in climate have influenced human activity. [Clarification Statement: Examples of key natural resources include access to fresh water, regions of fertile soils such as river deltas, and high concentrations of minerals and fossil fuels. Examples of natural hazards can be from interior processes (such as volcanic eruptions and earthquakes), surface processes (such as tsunamis, mass wasting and soil erosion), and severe weather. Examples of the results of changes in climate that can affect populations or drive mass migrations include changes to sea level, regional patterns of temperature and precipitation, and the types of crops and livestock that can be raised.]

9-12.ESS3.A.2

Evaluate competing design solutions for developing, managing, and utilizing energy and mineral resources based on economic, social, and environmental cost-benefit ratios. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the conservation, recycling, and reuse of resources (such as minerals and metals) where possible, and on minimizing impacts where it is not. Examples include developing best practices for agricultural soil use, mining (for coal, tar sands, and oil shale), and pumping (for petroleum and natural gas). Science knowledge indicates what can happen in natural Systemnot what should happen.]

9-12.ESS3.C.1

Create a computational simulation to illustrate the relationships among management of natural resources, the sustainability of human populations, and biodiversity. [Clarification Statement: Examples of factors that affect the management of natural resources include costs of resource extraction and waste management, per-capita consumption, and the development of new technologies. Examples of factors that affect human sustainability include agricultural efficiency, levels of conservation, and urban planning.]

9-12.ESS3.C.2

Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural System in order to restore stability and or biodiversity of the ecosystem as well as prevent their reoccurrences. [Clarification Statement: Examples of human activities could include forest fires, acid rain, flooding, urban development, pollution, deforestation, and introduction of an invasive species.]

9-12.ESS3.D.1

Analyze geoscientific data and the results from global climate models to make an evidence-based forecast of the current rate of global or regional climate change and associated future impacts to Earth System. [Clarification Statement: Examples of evidence, for both data and climate model outputs, are for climate changes (such as precipitation and temperature) and their associated impacts (such as on sea level, glacial ice volumes, or atmosphere and ocean composition).]

9-12.ESS3.D.2

Predict how human activity affects the relationships between Earth System in both positive and negative ways. [Clarification Statement: Examples of Earth System to be considered are the hydrosphere, atmosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and/or biosphere.]

9-12.ETS1.A.1

Analyze a major global challenge to specify qualitative and quantitative criteria and constraints for solutions that account for societal needs and wants.

9-12.ETS1.A.2

Design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.

9-12.ETS1.B.1

Evaluate a solution to a complex real-world problem based on prioritized criteria and trade-offs that account for a range of constraints, including cost, safety, reliability, and aesthetics as well as possible social, cultural, and environmental impacts.

9-12.ETS1.B.2

Use a computer simulation to model the impact of proposed solutions to a complex real-world problem with numerous criteria and constraints on interactions within and between System relevant to the problem.

9-12.GV.1.CC.A

Create and use tools to analyze a chronological sequence of events related to a study of government.

9-12.GV.1.CC.B

Explain connections between historical context and peoples perspectives about government at the time.

9-12.GV.1.CC.C

Develop a research plan, identify appropriate resources for investigating social studies topics, and create and present a research product which applies an aspect of government to a contemporary issue.

9-12.GV.1.CC.D

Using an inquiry lens, develop compelling questions about government, determine helpful resources and consider multiple points of views represented in the resources.

9-12.GV.1.CC.E

Analyze the causes and consequences of a specific issue tied to government as well as the challenges and opportunities faced by those trying to address the problem.

9-12.GV.1.EC.A

Examine the opportunity costs and benefits of economic decisions on society as a whole as well as on individuals and governments.

9-12.GV.1.G.A

Create and use maps and other graphic representations in order to explain relationships and reveal patterns or trends about government.

9-12.GV.1.G.B

Analyze the relationship between of the geography of the original 13 colonies on the formation of United States government.

9-12.GV.1.GS.A

Analyze laws, policies, and processes to determine how governmental systems affect individuals and groups in society.

9-12.GV.1.GS.B

Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of citizens and institutions to address and solve problems.

9-12.GV.1.PC.A

Using a government lens, describe how peoples perspectives shaped the sources/artifacts they created.

9-12.GV.1.PC.B

Examine the origins and impact of social structures and stratification on societies, and relationships between peoples and governments.

9-12.GV.2.CC.A

Trace the evolution of government in the English colonies to explain American colonists expectations for self-rule.

9-12.GV.2.CC.B

Analyze the Declaration of Independence to determine the influence of classical and Enlightenment thought on revolutionary ideals.

9-12.GV.2.CC.C

Evaluate the extent to which decisions made in the Constitutional Convention were influenced by previous. models of government and experiences under British rule.

9-12.GV.2.CC.D

Compare and contrast the structure and function of democratic governments and authoritarian governments, noting their impact on people, groups and societies.

9-12.GV.2.EC.A

Analyze the impact of economics and economic theories on the formation of United States governmental ideals, principles and structures.

9-12.GV.2.G.A

Analyze how geography of North America influenced the governmental systems which developed there.

9-12.GV.2.GS.A

Analyze how the codification of law impacted early civilizations and shaped enduring concepts government, law, and social order.

9-12.GV.2.GS.B

Apply the concepts of natural law, social contract, due process of law, and popular sovereignty to explain the purposes and legacy of the Declaration of Independence.

9-12.GV.2.GS.C

Describe the strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation to explain its failure as a national government.

9-12.GV.2.PC.A

Analyze the varying perspectives of individuals and groups to explain emerging divisions and political philosophies as the United States was founded.

9-12.GV.3.CC.A

Explain how the central debates of the Constitutional Convention were resolved.

9-12.GV.3.CC.B

Explain how concerns over a strong central government were addressed to provide for ratification of the Constitution.

9-12.GV.3.CC.C

Trace the significant changes in roles, powers and size of the three branches of government.

9-12.GV.3.CC.D

Analyze the changing relationship between state and federal governmental powers.

9-12.GV.3.EC.A

Compare trade, monetary policy, and taxation under the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution.

9-12.GV.3.EC.B

Analyze the changing roles of government in the economy throughout United States history.

9-12.GV.3.GS.A

Apply the concepts of due process of law, popular sovereignty, rule of law, representation, and federalism to explain the purpose and legacy of the Constitution.

9-12.GV.3.GS.B

Analyze the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution to determine their success in implementing the ideals of the Declaration of Independence.

9-12.GV.3.GS.C

Analyze the unique roles and responsibilities of the three branches of government to determine how they function and interact.

9-12.GV.3.GS.D

Describe and give examples of how the constitutional principle of checks and balances limits the powers of government and leaders.

9-12.GV.3.GS.E

Explain how the Bill of Rights and subsequent amendments limit the power of government, protect individual liberty, and provide for equality under the law.

9-12.GV.3.GS.F

Compare the structure and functions of local, state and federal governments.

9-12.GV.3.PC.A

Analyze the varying perspectives of individuals and groups regarding the development of the American governmental system to explain emerging divisions and political philosophies.

9-12.GV.3.PC.B

Evaluate the intended and unintended impact of government decision-making on individuals, groups, and society.

9-12.GV.4.CC.A

Trace the changing power relationships between branches of the United States government over time.

9-12.GV.4.CC.B

Analyze changing ideals regarding an active judiciary, an active legislature and an active executive branch in United States government over time.

9-12.GV.4.CC.C

Explain the powers and responsibilities of citizens and institutions to address and solve problems.

9-12.GV.4.EC.A

Analyze the role that people, businesses, and government play in taxation and spending required to maintain the public good.

9-12.GV.4.G.A

Analyze state and federal electoral results to determine the influence of social, regional and demographic characteristics.

9-12.GV.4.GS.A

Evaluate the role and influence of contemporary political parties on government.

9-12.GV.4.GS.B

Explain a citizens legal obligations, as well as opportunities for, engaging with and using local, state, and federal governments to shape decision-making.

9-12.GV.4.GS.C

Compare the various. processes pertaining to the selection of political leaders at the federal, state, and local level.

9-12.GV.4.PC.A

Explain how political parties and interest groups reflect diverse perspectives and are influenced by individuals.

9-12.GV.4.PC.B

Evaluate factors that shape public opinion on elections and policy issues.

9-12.GV.4.PC.C

Predict the consequences that occur when institutions fail to meet the needs of individuals and groups, and when individuals fail to carry out their personal responsibilities.

9-12.LS1.A.1

Construct a model of how the structure of DNA determines the structure of proteins which carry out the essential functions of life through System of specialized cells. [Clarification Statement: Genes are the regions in DNA that code for proteins. Basic transcription and translation explain the roles of DNA and RNA in coding the instructions for making polypeptides.]

9-12.LS1.A.2

Develop and use a model to illustrate the hierarchical organization of interacting System that provide specific functions within multicellular Organisms. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on functions at the organism system level such as nutrient uptake, water delivery, and organism movement in response to stimuli.]

9-12.LS1.A.3

Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis. [Clarification Statement: Examples of investigations could include heart rate response to exercise, stomata response to moisture and temperature, and root development in response to water levels.]

9-12.LS1.B.1

Develop and use models to communicate the role of mitosis, cellular division, and differentiation in producing and maintaining complex Organisms. [Clarification Statement: Major events of the cell cycle include cell growth, DNA replication, preparation for division, separation of chromosomes, and separation of cell contents.]

9-12.LS1.C.1

Use a model to demonstrate how photosynthesis transforms light energy into stored chemical energy. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on illustrating inputs and outputs of matter and the transfer and transformation of energy in photosynthesis by plants and other photosynthesizing Organisms. Examples of models could include diagrams, chemical equations, and conceptual models.]

9-12.LS1.C.2

Use a model to demonstrate that cellular respiration is a chemical process whereby the bonds of molecules are broken and the bonds in new compounds are formed resulting in a net transfer of energy. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the conceptual understanding of the inputs and outputs of the process of cellular respiration.]

9-12.LS1.C.3

Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence that organic macromolecules are primarily composed of six elements, where carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms may combine with nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus to form large carbon-based molecules. [Clarification Statement: Large carbon-based molecules included are proteins, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and lipids.]

9-12.LS2.A.1

Explain how various biotic and abiotic factors affect the carrying capacity and biodiversity of an ecosystem using mathematical and/or computational representations. [Clarification Statement: Examples of biotic factors could include relationships among individuals (e.g., feeding relationships, symbioses, competition) and disease. Examples of abiotic factors could include climate and weather conditions, natural disasters, and availability of resources. Genetic diversity includes within a population and species within an ecosystem. Examples of mathematical comparisons could include graph, charts, histograms, and population changes gathered from simulations or historical data sets.]

9-12.LS2.B.1

Construct and revise an explanation based on evidence that the processes of photosynthesis, chemosynthesis, and aerobic and anaerobic respiration are responsible for the cycling of matter and flow of energy through Ecosystems and that environmental conditions restrict which reactions can occur. [Clarification Statement: Examples of environmental conditions can include the availability of sunlight or oxygen.]

9-12.LS2.B.2

Communicate the pattern of the cycling of matter and the flow of energy among trophic levels in an ecosystem. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on using a model of stored energy in biomass to describe the transfer of energy from one tropic level to another. Emphasis is on atoms and molecules as they move through an ecosystem.]

9-12.LS2.B.3

Use a model that illustrates the roles of photosynthesis, cellular respiration, decomposition, and combustion to explain the cycling of carbon in its various forms among the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere. [Clarification Statement: The primary forms of carbon include carbon dioxide, hydrocarbons, waste, and biomass. Examples of models could include simulations and mathematical and conceptual models.]

9-12.LS2.C.1

Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning that the interactions in Ecosystems maintain relatively consistent populations of species while conditions remain stable, but changing conditions may result in new ecosystem dynamics. [Clarification Statement: Examples of changes in ecosystem conditions could include modest biological or physical changes, such as moderate hunting or a seasonal flood; and extreme changes, such as volcanic eruption or sea level rise.]

9-12.LS2.C.2

Design, evaluate, and/or refine solutions that positively impact the environment and biodiversity. [Clarification Statement: Examples of solutions may include captive breeding programs, habitat restoration, pollution mitigation, energy conservation, agriculture and mining programs, and ecotourism.]

9-12.LS3.A.1

Develop and use models to clarify relationships about how DNA in the form of chromosomes is passed from parents to offspring through the processes of meiosis and fertilization in sexual reproduction.

9-12.LS3.B.1

Compare and contrast asexual and sexual reproduction with regard to genetic information and variation in offspring

9-12.LS3.B.2

Develop and use a model to describe why structural changes to genes (mutations) located on chromosomes may affect proteins and may result in harmful, beneficial, or neutral effects to the structure and function of the organism. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on conceptual understanding that changes in genetic material may result in making different proteins.]

9-12.LS3.B.3

Make and defend a claim that inheritable genetic variations may result from: (1) new genetic combinations through meiosis, (2) mutations occurring during replication, and/or (3) mutations caused by environmental factors. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on using data to support arguments for the way variation occurs.]

9-12.LS3.B.4

Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the use of mathematics (Punnett Squares) to describe the probability of traits as it relates to genetic and environmental factors in the expression of traits.]

9-12.LS4.A.1

Communicate scientific information that common ancestry and biological evolution are supported by multiple lines of empirical evidence. (Clarification statement: Emphasis is on a conceptual understanding of the role each line of evidence has relating to common ancestry and biological evolution. Examples of evidence could include similarities in DNA sequences, anatomical structures, and order of appearance of structures in embryological development. Communicate could mean written report, oral discussion, etc.)

9-12.LS4.A.2

Analyze displays of pictorial data to compare patterns of similarities in the embryological development across multiple species to identify relationships not evident in the fully formed anatomy. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on inferring general patterns of relatedness among embryos of different Organisms by comparing the macroscopic appearance of diagrams or pictures.]

9-12.LS4.B.1

Construct an explanation based on evidence that the process of evolution primarily results from four factors: (1) the potential for a species to increase in number, (2) the heritable genetic variation of individuals in a species due to mutation and sexual reproduction, (3) competition for limited resources, and (4) the proliferation of those Organisms that are better able to survive and reproduce in the environment. (Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on using evidence to explain the influence each of the four factors has on number of Organisms, behaviors, morphology, or physiology in terms of ability to compete for limited resources and subsequent survival of individuals and adaptation of species. Examples of evidence could include mathematical models such as simple distribution graph and proportional reasoning.)

9-12.LS4.B.2

Apply concepts of statistics and probability to support explanations that Organisms with an advantageous heritable trait tend to increase in proportion to Organisms lacking this trait. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on analyzing shifts in numerical distribution of traits and using these shifts as evidence to support explanations.]

9-12.LS4.C.1

Construct an explanation based on evidence for how natural selection leads to adaptation of populations. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on using data to provide evidence for how specific biotic and abiotic differences in Ecosystems (such as ranges of seasonal temperature, long-term climate change, acidity, light, geographic barriers, or evolution of other Organisms) contribute to a change in gene frequency over time, leading to adaptation of populations.]

9-12.LS4.C.2

Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in: (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other species. [Clarification statement: Emphasis is on determining cause and effect relationships for how changes to the environment such as deforestation, fishing, and application of fertilizers, droughts, flood, and the rate of change of the environment affect distribution or disappearance of traits in species.]

9-12.LS4.C.3

Create or revise a model to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on designing solutions for a proposed problem related to threatened or endangered species, or to genetic variation of Organisms for multiple species.]

9-12.PS1.A.1

Use the organization of the periodic table to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms. [Clarification Statement: Examples of properties that could be predicted from patterns could include reactivity of metals, types of bonds formed, numbers of bonds formed, and reactions with oxygen.]

9-12.PS1.A.2

Construct and revise an explanation for the products of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties. [Clarification Statement: Examples of chemical reactions could include the reaction of sodium and chlorine, or of oxygen and hydrogen.]

9-12.PS1.A.3

Plan and conduct an investigation to gather evidence to compare physical and chemical properties of substances such as melting point, boiling point, vapor pressure, surface tension, and chemical reactivity to infer the relative strength of attractive forces between particles. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on understanding the relative strength of forces between particles. Examples of particles could include ions, atoms, molecules, and networked materials (such as graphite).

9-12.PS1.A.4

Apply the concepts of bonding and crystalline/molecular structure to explain the macroscopic properties of various categories of structural materials, i.e. metals, ionic (ceramics), and polymers. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the attractive and repulsive forces that determine the functioning of the material. Examples could include why electrically conductive materials are often made of metal, flexible but durable materials are made up of long chained molecules, and pharmaceuticals are designed to interact with specific receptors.]

9-12.PS1.A.5

Develop a model to illustrate that the release or absorption of energy from a chemical reaction system depends upon the changes in total bond energy. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the idea that a chemical reaction is a system that affects the energy change. Examples of models could include molecular-level drawings and diagrams of reactions, graph showing the relative energies of reactants and products, and representations showing energy is conserved.]

9-12.PS1.B.1

Apply scientific principles and evidence to provide an explanation about the effects of changing the temperature or concentration of the reacting particles on the rate at which a reaction occurs. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on student reasoning that focuses on the number and energy of collisions between molecules.]

9-12.PS1.B.2

Refine the design of a chemical system by specifying a change in conditions that would alter the amount of products at equilibrium. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the application of Le Chateliers Principle and on refining designs of chemical reaction System, including descriptions of the connection between changes made at the macroscopic level and what happens at the molecular level. Examples of designs could include different ways to increase product formation including adding reactants or removing products.]

9-12.PS1.B.3

Use symbolic representations and mathematical calculations to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on conservation of matter and mass through balanced chemical equations, use of the mole concept and proportional relationships.]

9-12.PS1.C.1

Use symbolic representations to illustrate the changes in the composition of the nucleus of the atom and the energy released during the processes of fission, fusion, and radioactive decay. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on simple qualitative models, such as pictures or diagrams, and on the scale of energy released in nuclear processes relative to other kinds of transformations.]

9-12.PS2.A.1

Analyze data to support and verify the concepts expressed by Newton's 2nd law of motion, as it describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration. [Clarification Statement: Examples of data could include tables or graph of position or velocity as a function of time for objects subject to a net unbalanced force, such as a falling object, an object rolling down a ramp, or a moving object being pulled by a constant force.]

9-12.PS2.A.2

Use mathematical representations to support and verify the concepts that the total momentum of a system of objects is conserved when there is no net force on the system. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the quantitative conservation of momentum in interactions and the qualitative meaning of this principle.]

9-12.PS2.A.3

Apply scientific principles of motion and momentum to design, evaluate, and refine a device that minimizes the force on a macroscopic object during a collision. [Clarification Statement: Examples of evaluation and refinement could include determining the success of the device at protecting an object from damage and modifying the design to improve it. Examples of a device could include a football helmet or a parachute.]

9-12.PS2.B.1

Use mathematical representations of Newtons Law of Gravitation to describe and predict the gravitational forces between objects. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on both quantitative and conceptual descriptions of gravitational fields.]

9-12.PS2.B.2

Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that an electric current can produce a magnetic field and that a changing magnetic field can produce an electric current.

9-12.PS3.A.1

Create a computational model to calculate the change in the energy of one component in a system when the changes in energy are known. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on explaining the meaning of mathematical expressions used in the model.]

9-12.PS3.A.2

Develop and use models to illustrate that energy at the macroscopic scale can be accounted for as a combination of energy associated with the motions of particles (objects) and energy associated with the relative position of particles (objects). [Clarification Statement: Examples of phenomena at the macroscopic scale could include the conversion of kinetic energy to thermal energy, the energy stored due to position of an object above the earth, and the energy stored between two electrically-charged plates. Examples of models could include diagrams, drawings, descriptions, and computer simulations.]

9-12.PS3.A.3

Design, build, and refine a device that works within given constraints to convert one form of energy into another form of energy. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of devices. Examples of devices could include Rube Goldberg devices, wind turbines, solar cells, solar ovens, and generators. Examples of constraints could include use of renewable energy forms and efficiency.]

9-12.PS3.B.1

Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that the transfer of thermal energy when two components of different temperature are combined within a closed system results in a more uniform energy distribution among the components in the system (second law of thermodynamics). [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on analyzing data from student investigations and using mathematical thinking to describe the energy changes both quantitatively and conceptually. Examples of investigations could include mixing liquids at different initial temperatures or adding objects at different temperatures to water.]

9-12.PS3.C.1

Develop and use a model of two objects interacting through electric or magnetic fields to illustrate the forces between objects and the changes in energy of the objects due to the interaction. . [Clarification Statement: Examples of models could include drawings, diagrams, and texts, such as drawings of what happens when two charges of opposite polarity are near each other.]

9-12.PS4.A.1

Use mathematical representations to support a claim regarding relationships among the frequency, wavelength, and speed of waves traveling in various media. [Clarification Statement: Examples of data could include electromagnetic radiation traveling in a vacuum and glass, sound waves traveling through air and water, and seismic waves traveling through the Earth.]

9-12.PS4.A.2

Evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning behind the idea that electromagnetic radiation can be described either by a wave model or a particle model, and that for some situations one model is more useful than the other. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on how the experimental evidence supports the claim and how a theory is generally modified in light of new evidence. Examples of a phenomenon could include resonance, interference, diffraction, and photoelectric effect.]

9-12.PS4.B.1

Communicate technical information about how electromagnetic radiation interacts with matter. [Clarification Statement: Examples could include solar cells capturing light and converting it to electricity; medical imaging; and communications technology.]

9-12.PS4.B.2

Evaluate the validity and reliability of claims in published materials of the effects that different frequencies of electromagnetic radiation have when absorbed by matter. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the idea that photons associated with different frequencies of light have different energies, and the damage to living tissue from electromagnetic radiation depends on the energy of the radiation. Examples of published materials could include trade books, magazines, web resources, videos, and other passages that may reflect bias.]

9-12.WH.1.CC.A

Create and use tools to analyze a chronological sequence of related events in world history.

9-12.WH.1.CC.B

Explain connections between historical context and peoples perspectives at the time in world history.

9-12.WH.1.CC.C

Develop a research plan, identify appropriate resources for investigating social studies topics, and create and present a research product which applies an aspect of world history post c. 1450 to a contemporary issue.

9-12.WH.1.CC.D

Using an inquiry lens, develop compelling questions about world history post c. 1450, to determine helpful resources and consider multiple points of views represented in the resources.

9-12.WH.1.CC.E

Analyze the causes and consequences of a specific problem in world history post c. 1450 as well as the challenges and opportunities faced by those trying to address the problem.

9-12.WH.1.EC.A

Using a world history lens, analyze the opportunity costs and benefits of economic decisions on society as a whole as well as on individuals post c. 1450.

9-12.WH.1.G.A

Create and use maps and other graphic representations in order to explain relationships and reveal patterns or trends in world history c.1450-2010.

9-12.WH.1.G.B

Analyze how the physical and human characteristics of world regions post c. 1450 are connected to changing identity and culture.

9-12.WH.1.G.C

Locate major cities of the world and key world nations; the worlds continents, and oceans; and major topographical features of the world

9-12.WH.1.GS.A

Analyze laws, policies and processes to determine how governmental systems affect individuals and groups in society in World history prior to c.1450.

9-12.WH.1.GS.B

Predict the consequences which can occur when individuals fail to carry out their personal responsibilities.

9-12.WH.1.GS.C

Predict the consequences which can occur when institutions fail to meet the needs of individuals and groups.

9-12.WH.1.PC.A

Using a world history lens, describe how peoples perspectives shaped the sources/artifacts they created.

9-12.WH.1.PC.B

Using a world history lens, examine the origins and impact of social structures and stratification on societies and relationships between peoples.

9-12.WH.2.CC.A

Explain the causes and effects of the expansion of societies in Western Africa, Byzantine Empire, Gupta India, Chinese Dynasties, and Muslim Empires.

9-12.WH.2.CC.B

Compare the dominant characteristics, contributions of, and interactions among major civilizations of Asia, Europe, Africa, the Americas and Middle East in ancient and medieval times.

9-12.WH.2.CC.C

Explain how the Crusades, Scientific Revolution, Black Death, and the resulting exchanges that followed, impacted Europe and led to the Renaissance.

9-12.WH.2.EC.A

Analyze the flow of goods and ideas along ocean and overland trade routes to explain their contributions to economic success or failures of societies in Europe, Africa, Middle East, India, the Americasand China.

9-12.WH.2.G.A

Analyze physical geography to explain how regions are connected or isolated from each other.

9-12.WH.2.G.B

Compare and contrast geographic regions by examining the cultural characteristics of European, African, and Asian and

9-12.WH.2.GS.A

Compare and contrast governmental systems, including monarchy, oligarchy, dynasty, and theocracy.

9-12.WH.2.GS.B

Explain the influence of the classical revival on governmental systems including their source of power, how leaders are selected, and how decisions are made.

9-12.WH.2.PC.A

Explain how scientific and technological advancements impacted the interconnectedness within and among regions.

9-12.WH.2.PC.B

Analyze the intellectual, architectural, and artistic achievements of the Renaissance resulting from the rebirth of Classical ideas

9-12.WH.2.PC.C

Analyze the historic development of Islam as well as the expansion of Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism in order to explain their transformations and roles in conflict and cooperation.

9-12.WH.3.CC.A

Analyze the historical context of the Protestant Reformation and Scientific Revolution to explain new institutions and ways of thinking, and explain their social, political and economic impact.

9-12.WH.3.CC.B

Analyze the causes and consequences of European overseas expansion to determine its effect on people and cultures in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.

9-12.WH.3.CC.C

Explain the challenges and benefits of large land empires including those found in Russia, China, and the Middle East.

9-12.WH.3.EC.A

Compare the extent, interaction and impact of African, European, American and Asian trade networks.

9-12.WH.3.EC.B

Compare the origins, development and effects of coercive labor systems in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas.

9-12.WH.3.EC.C

Describe how new sources of wealth, resulting from increasing global interactions, impacted cultures and civilizations.

9-12.WH.3.G.A

Analyze physical geography to explain the availability and movement of resources.

9-12.WH.3.G.B

Describe major changes in patterns of migration and human settlement in Africa, Asia and the Americas resulting from European expansion.

9-12.WH.3.GS.A

Describe how governments and institutions of the Eastern and Western Hemispheres changed to deal with the challenges and opportunities of an interconnected world.

9-12.WH.3.GS.B

Analyze the style and function of a leader to determine his/her impact on a governmental system.

9-12.WH.3.PC.A

Analyze the exchange of people, goods and ideas to determine their impact on global interdependence and conflict.

9-12.WH.3.PC.B

Determine the extent and impact of cultural exchange, interaction, and disruption that resulted from the Columbian Exchange and European expansion in the Eastern and Western Hemispheres.

9-12.WH.3.PC.C

Assess changing ideas of class, ethnicity, race, gender, and age to affect a persons roles in society and social institutions.

9-12.WH.3.PC.D

Trace the development and impact of religious. reform on exploration, interactions and conflicts among various. groups and nations.

9-12.WH.4.CC.A

Evaluate the forms of republics over time to determine their implication for pre-revolutionary ideas and expectations during the Age of Revolution.

9-12.WH.4.CC.B

Compare and contrast caU.S.es and significant outcomes of political revolutions during this era.

9-12.WH.4.CC.C

Analyze political revolutions and reform movements in order to determine their enduring effects worldwide on the political expectations for self-government and individual liberty.

9-12.WH.4.CC.D

Analyze responses and reactions to revolutions in order to predict future conflicts.

9-12.WH.4.CC.E

Evaluate the impact of nationalism on existing and emerging peoples and nations post c. 1450.

9-12.WH.4.EC.A

Analyze the origins and characteristics of laissez faire, market, mixed, and command economic systems to determine their effects on personal, social, and political decisions

9-12.WH.4.EC.B

Examine the connections among natural resources, entrepreneurship, innovation, labor, and capital to determine their effects on an industrial economy in Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas.

9-12.WH.4.G.A

Explain how and why places changed as a result of revolutions and why various. people perceive the same place in varied ways.

9-12.WH.4.G.B

Extrapolate the push-pull factors created by revolutions to determine their impacts on population distribution, settlements, and migrations.

9-12.WH.4.G.C

Explain the significance of new technologies in expanding peoples capacity to modify the physical environment and their intended and unintended consequences.

9-12.WH.4.GS.A

Analyze the key ideas of Enlightenment thinkers to explain the development of ideas such as natural law, natural rights, social contract, due process, and separation of powers.

9-12.WH.4.GS.B

Compare and contrast limited and absolute governments and the extent of their impact on individuals and society.

9-12.WH.4.GS.C

Compare and contrast government systems resulting from political revolutions.

9-12.WH.4.PC.A

Analyze the intellectual, artistic, and literary achievements of the Enlightenment and ensuing revolutions in order to determine how they challenged the status. quo.

9-12.WH.4.PC.B

Analyze new technologies and new forms of energy to determine their effects on the lives of individuals, groups, and societal organization.

9-12.WH.4.PC.C

Analyze social and educational reform movements to determine their impact on the challenges brought about by revolutions.

9-12.WH.4.PC.D

Analyze political, social, cultural, artistic and economic revolutions to determine how they impacted concepts of class, race, tribe, slavery, and caste affiliation

9-12.WH.5.CC.A

Analyze world-wide imperialism in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries to determine its causes and consequences.

9-12.WH.5.CC.B

Trace the origins, and relationships among the world wars, revolutions, and global conflicts of twentieth century to determine their impacts on the world today.

9-12.WH.5.CC.C

Analyze the varying process of colonization and decolonization to compare their impact on and legacies in the world today.

9-12.WH.5.EC.A

Analyze economic systems such as market, mixed, and command to determine their impact on economic growth, labor markets, rights of citizens, the environment, and resource allocation in and among regions.

9-12.WH.5.EC.B

Evaluate the response of individuals, groups, and governments to economic, environmental, health, and medical challenges to understand how systems change and evolve over time.

9-12.WH.5.G.A

Analyze physical geography to explain the availability and movement of resources.

9-12.WH.5.G.B

Explain how technology has reduced barriers and expanded peoples capacity to make use of, or modify, the physical environment.

9-12.WH.5.G.C

Evaluate the relationship between technological and scientific advancements and increasing global interaction.

9-12.WH.5.G.D

Analyze major demographic patterns to determine their effect on the human and physical systems.

9-12.WH.5.GS.A

Compare and contrast evolving governmental systems, including monarchy, theocracy, totalitarianism and representative government to determine their impact on society.

9-12.WH.5.GS.B

Analyze treaties, agreements, and international organizations to determine their impact on world challenges along with national and international order.

9-12.WH.5.PC.A

Analyze causes and patterns of human rights violations and genocide and suggest resolutions for current and future conflicts.

9-12.WH.5.PC.B

Analyze the process of globalization to determine its effects on global conflict and cooperation.

9-12.WH.5.PC.C

Analyze the technological, intellectual, artistic, and literary achievements of the modern era to determine how society reflects and challenges the status quo.

9-12.WH.5.PC.D

Analyze the causes and effects of thechanging roles of class, ethnicity, race, gender and age on world cultures post c. 1450.

9-12.WH.5.PC.E

Distinguish the powers and responsibilities of citizens and institutions to address and solve world problems c. post 1450.

A1.APR.A.1

Add, subtract and multiply polynomials, and understand that polynomials follow the same general rules of arithmetic and are closed under these operations.

A1.APR.A.2

Divide polynomials by monomials.

A1.BF.A.1

Analyze the effect of translations and scale changes on functions.

A1.CED.A.1

Create equations and inequalities in one variable and use them to model and/or solve problems.

A1.CED.A.2

Create and graph linear, quadratic and exponential equations in two variables.

A1.CED.A.3

Represent constraints by equations or inequalities and by systems of equations or inequalities, and interpret the data points as a solution or non-solution in a modeling context.

A1.CED.A.4

Solve literal equations and formulas for a specified variable that highlights a quantity of interest.

A1.DS.A.1

Analyze and interpret graphical displays of data.

A1.DS.A.2

Use statistics appropriate to the shape of the data distribution to compare center and spread of two or more different data sets.

A1.DS.A.3

Interpret differences in shape, center and spreads in the context of the data sets, accounting for possible effects of outliers.

A1.DS.A.4a

Summarize data in two-way frequency tables. a Interpret relative frequencies in the context of the data.

A1.DS.A.4b

Summarize data in two-way frequency tables. b Recognize possible associations and trends in the data.

A1.DS.A.5a

Construct a scatter plot of bivariate quantitative data describing how the variables are related; determine and use a function that models the relationship. a Construct a linear function to model bivariate data represented on a scatter plot that minimizes residuals.

A1.DS.A.5b

Construct a scatter plot of bivariate quantitative data describing how the variables are related; determine and use a function that models the relationship. b Construct an exponential function to model bivariate data represented on a scatter plot that minimizes residuals.

A1.DS.A.6

Interpret the slope (rate of change) and the y-intercept (constant term) of a linear model in the context of the data.

A1.DS.A.7

Determine and interpret the correlation coefficient for a linear association.

A1.DS.A.8

Distinguish between correlation and causation.

A1.IF.A.1a

Understand that a function from one set (domain) to another set (range) assigns to each element of the domain exactly one element of the range. a Represent a function using function notation.

A1.IF.A.1b

Understand that a function from one set (domain) to another set (range) assigns to each element of the domain exactly one element of the range. b Understand that the graph of a function labeled ? is the set of all ordered pairs (?, y) that satisfy the equation ?=f(?).

A1.IF.A.2

Use function notation to evaluate functions for inputs in their domains, and interpret statements that use function notation in terms of a context.

A1.IF.B.3

Using tables, graphs and verbal descriptions, interpret key characteristics of a function that models the relationship between two quantities.

A1.IF.B.4

Relate the domain and range of a function to its graph and, where applicable, to the quantitative relationship it describes.

A1.IF.B.5

Determine the average rate of change of a function over a specified interval and interpret the meaning.

A1.IF.B.6

Interpret the parameters of a linear or exponential function in terms of the context.

A1.IF.C.7

Graph functions expressed symbolically and identify and interpret key features of the graph.

A1.IF.C.8

Translate between different but equivalent forms of a function to reveal and explain properties of the function and interpret these in terms of a context.

A1.IF.C.9

Compare the properties of two functions given different representations.

A1.LQE.A.1a

Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear or exponential functions. a Determine that linear functions change by equal differences over equal intervals.

A1.LQE.A.1b

Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear or exponential functions. b Recognize exponential situations in which a quantity grows or decays by a constant percent rate per unit interval.

A1.LQE.A.2

Describe, using graphs and tables, that a quantity increasing exponentially eventually exceeds a quantity increasing linearly or quadratically.

A1.LQE.A.3

Construct linear, quadratic and exponential equations given graphs, verbal descriptions or tables.

A1.LQE.B.4

Write arithmetic and geometric sequences in recursive and explicit forms, and use them to model situations and translate between the two forms.

A1.LQE.B.5

Recognize that sequences are functions, sometimes defined recursively, whose domain is a subset of the set of integers.

A1.LQE.B.6

Find the terms of sequences given an explicit or recursive formula.

A1.NQ.A.1

Explain how the meaning of rational exponents extends from the properties of integer exponents.

A1.NQ.A.2

Rewrite expressions involving radicals and rational exponents using the properties of exponents. Limit to rational exponents with a numerator of 1.

A1.NQ.B.3a

Use units of measure as a way to understand and solve problems involving quantities. a Identify, label and use appropriate units of measure within a problem.

A1.NQ.B.3b

Use units of measure as a way to understand and solve problems involving quantities. b Convert units and rates.

A1.NQ.B.3c

Use units of measure as a way to understand and solve problems involving quantities. c Use units within problems.

A1.NQ.B.3d

Use units of measure as a way to understand and solve problems involving quantities. d Choose and interpret the scale and the origin in graphs and data displays.

A1.NQ.B.4

Define and use appropriate quantities for representing a given context or problem.

A1.NQ.B.5

Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities.

A1.REI.A.1

Explain how each step taken when solving an equation or inequality in one variable creates an equivalent equation or inequality that has the same solution(s) as the original.

A1.REI.A.2a

Solve problems involving quadratic equations. a Use the method of completing the square to create an equivalent quadratic equation.

A1.REI.A.2b

Solve problems involving quadratic equations. b Derive the quadratic formula.

A1.REI.A.2c

Solve problems involving quadratic equations. c Analyze different methods of solving quadratic equations.

A1.REI.B.3

Solve a system of linear equations algebraically and/or graphically.

A1.REI.B.4

Solve a system consisting of a linear equation and a quadratic equation algebraically and/or graphically.

A1.REI.B.5

Justify that the technique of linear combination produces an equivalent system of equations.

A1.REI.C.6

Explain that the graph of an equation in two variables is the set of all its solutions plotted in the Cartesian coordinate plane.

A1.REI.C.7

Graph the solution to a linear inequality in two variables.

A1.REI.C.8

Solve problems involving a system of linear inequalities.

A1.SSE.A.1

Interpret the contextual meaning of individual terms or factors from a given problem that utilizes formulas or expressions.

A1.SSE.A.2

Analyze the structure of polynomials to create equivalent expressions or equations.

A1.SSE.A.3a

Choose and produce equivalent forms of a quadratic expression or equations to reveal and explain properties. a Find the zeros of a quadratic function by rewriting it in factored form.

A1.SSE.A.3b

Choose and produce equivalent forms of a quadratic expression or equations to reveal and explain properties. b Find the maximum or minimum value of a quadratic function by completing the square.

A2.APR.A.1

Extend the knowledge of factoring to include factors with complex coefficients.

A2.APR.A.2

Understand the Remainder Theorem and use it to solve problems.

A2.APR.A.3

Find the least common multiple of two or more polynomials.

A2.APR.A.4

Add, subtract, multiply and divide rational expressions.

A2.APR.A.5

Identify zeros of polynomials when suitable factorizations are available, and use the zeros to sketch the function defined by the polynomial.

A2.BF.A.1

Create new functions by applying the four arithmetic operations and composition of functions (modifying the domain and range as necessary).

A2.BF.A.2

Derive inverses of functions, and compose the inverse with the original function to show that the functions are inverses.

A2.BF.A.3

Describe the effects of transformations algebraically and graphically, creating vertical and horizontal translations, vertical and horizontal reflections and dilations (expansions/compressions) for linear, quadratic, cubic, square and cube root, absolute value, exponential and logarithmic functions.

A2.DS.A.1

Analyze how random sampling could be used to make inferences about population parameters.

A2.DS.A.2

Determine whether a specified model is consistent with a given data set.

A2.DS.A.3

Describe and explain the purposes, relationship to randomization and differences among sample surveys, experiments and observational studies.

A2.DS.A.4

Use data from a sample to estimate characteristics of the population and recognize the meaning of the margin of error in these estimates.

A2.DS.A.5

Describe and explain how the relative sizes of a sample and the population affect the margin of error of predictions.

A2.DS.A.6

Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts.

A2.DS.A.7

Evaluate reports based on data.

A2.DS.B.8

Know and use the characteristics of normally distributed data sets; predict what percentage of the data will be above or below a given value that is a multiple of standard deviations above or below the mean.

A2.DS.B.9

Fit a data set to a distribution using its mean and standard deviation to determine whether the data is approximately normally distributed.

A2.FM.A.1

Create functions and use them to solve applications of quadratic and exponential function model problems.

A2.IF.A.1

Identify and interpret key characteristics of functions represented graphically, with tables and with algebraic symbolism to solve problems.

A2.IF.A.2

Translate between equivalent forms of functions.

A2.NQ.A.1

Extend the system of powers and roots to include rational exponents.

A2.NQ.A.2

Create and recognize equivalent expressions involving radical and exponential forms of expressions.

A2.NQ.A.3

Add, subtract, multiply and divide radical expressions.

A2.NQ.A.4

Solve equations involving rational exponents and/or radicals and identify situations where extraneous solutions may result.

A2.NQ.B.5

Represent complex numbers.

A2.NQ.B.6

Add, subtract, multiply and divide complex numbers.

A2.NQ.B.7

Know and apply the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra.

A2.REI.A.1

Create and solve equations and inequalities, including those that involve absolute value.

A2.REI.A.2

Solve rational equations where numerators and denominators are polynomials and where extraneous solutions may result.

A2.REI.B.3

Create and solve systems of equations that may include non-linear equations and inequalities.

A2.SSE.A.1

Develop the definition of logarithms based on properties of exponents.

A2.SSE.A.2

Use the inverse relationship between exponents and logarithms to solve exponential and logarithmic equations.

A2.SSE.A.3

Use properties of logarithms to solve equations or find equivalent expressions.

A2.SSE.A.4

Understand why logarithmic scales are used, and use them to solve problems.

G.C.A.1

Prove that all circles are similar using similarity transformations.

G.C.A.2

Identify and describe relationships among inscribed angles, radii and chords of circles.

G.C.A.3

Construct the inscribed and circumscribed circles of a triangle, and prove properties of angles for a quadrilateral inscribed in a circle.

G.C.B.4

Derive the formula for the length of an arc of a circle.

G.C.B.5

Derive the formula for the area of a sector of a circle.

G.CO.A.1

Define angle, circle, perpendicular line, parallel line, line segment and ray based on the undefined notions of point, line, distance along a line and distance around a circular arc.

G.CO.A.2

Represent transformations in the plane, and describe them as functions that take points in the plane as inputs and give other points as outputs.

G.CO.A.3

Describe the rotational symmetry and lines of symmetry of two-dimensional figures.

G.CO.A.4

Develop definitions of rotations, reflections and translations in terms of angles, circles, perpendicular lines, parallel lines and line segments.

G.CO.A.5

Demonstrate the ability to rotate, reflect or translate a figure, and determine a possible sequence of transformations between two congruent figures.

G.CO.B.6

Develop the definition of congruence in terms of rigid motions.

G.CO.B.7

Develop the criteria for triangle congruence from the definition of congruence in terms of rigid motions.

G.CO.C.10

Prove theorems about polygons.

G.CO.C.8

Prove theorems about lines and angles.

G.CO.C.9

Prove theorems about triangles.

G.CO.D.11

Construct geometric figures using various tools and methods.

G.CP.A.1

Describe events as subsets of a sample space using characteristics of the outcomes, or as unions, intersections or complements of other events.

G.CP.A.2

Understand the definition of independent events and use it to solve problems.

G.CP.A.3

Calculate conditional probabilities of events.

G.CP.A.4

Construct and interpret two-way frequency tables of data when two categories are associated with each object being classified. Use the two-way table as a sample space to decide if events are independent and to approximate conditional probabilities.

G.CP.A.5

Recognize and explain the concepts of conditional probability and independence in a context.

G.CP.A.6

Apply and interpret the Addition Rule for calculating probabilities.

G.CP.A.7

Apply and Interpret the general Multiplication Rule in a uniform probability model.

G.CP.A.8

Use permutations and combinations to solve problems.

G.GMD.A.1

Give an informal argument for the formulas for the circumference of a circle, area of a circle, volume of a cylinder, pyramid and cone.

G.GMD.A.2

Use volume formulas for cylinders, pyramids, cones, spheres and composite figures to solve problems.

G.GMD.B.3

Identify the shapes of two-dimensional cross-sections of three-dimensional objects.

G.GMD.B.4

Identify three-dimensional objects generated by transformations of two-dimensional objects.

G.GPE.A.1

Derive the equation of a circle.

G.GPE.A.2

Derive the equation of a parabola given a focus and directory.

G.GPE.B.3

Use coordinates to prove geometric theorems algebraically.

G.GPE.B.4

Prove the slope criteria for parallel and perpendicular lines and use them to solve problems.

G.GPE.B.5

Find the point on a directed line segment between two given points that partitions the segment in a given ratio.

G.GPE.B.6

Use coordinates to compute perimeters of polygons and areas of triangles and rectangles.

G.MG.A.1

Use geometric shapes, their measures and their properties to describe objects.

G.MG.A.2

Apply concepts of density based on area and volume in modeling situations.

G.MG.A.3

Apply geometric methods to solve design mathematical modeling problems.

G.SRT.A.1

Construct and analyze scale changes of geometric figures.

G.SRT.A.2

Use the definition of similarity to decide if figures are similar and to solve problems involving similar figures.

G.SRT.A.3

Use the properties of similarity transformations to establish the AA criterion for two triangles to be similar.

G.SRT.B.4

Use congruence and similarity criteria for triangles to solve problems and to prove relationships in geometric figures.

G.SRT.C.5

Understand that side ratios in right triangles define the trigonometric ratios for acute angles.

G.SRT.C.6

Explain and use the relationship between the sine and cosine of complementary angles.

G.SRT.C.7

Use trigonometric ratios and the Pythagorean Theorem to solve right triangles.

G.SRT.C.8

Derive the formula A = 1/2 ab sin(C) for the area of a triangle.

Health-9.FS.1.A.

Investigate disorders, their treatments, and prevention techniques to maintain a healthy sensory system (e.g., hearing loss, glaucoma, near and far-sightedness, halitosis, numbness, tingling)

Health-9.FS.1.B.

Investigate disorders, their treatment, and prevention techniques to maintain a healthy muscular system (e.g., muscular dystrophy, muscle cramps, tendonitis, muscle strains)

Health-9.FS.1.C.

Investigate disorders, their treatment, and prevention techniques to maintain a healthy skeletal system (e.g., osteoporosis, arthritis, sprain, scoliosis)

Health-9.FS.1.E.

Investigate disorders, their treatments, and prevention techniques to maintain a healthy cardio-respiratory system (e.g., high blood pressure, anemia, hemophilia, sickle cell, asthma, allergies, bronchitis, pneumonia)

Health-9.FS.1.G.

Investigate disorders, their treatment, and prevention techniques to maintain a healthy nervous system (e.g., mental disorders, spinal cord injuries, cerebral palsy, meningitis, chemical imbalances, hives, shingles, multiple sclerosis, Parkinsons, epilepsy)

Health-9.FS.1.I.

Investigate disorders, their treatment, and prevention techniques to maintain a healthy urinary/excretory system (e.g., kidney stones, urinary tract infections, nephritis)

Health-9.FS.1.J.

Investigate disorders, their treatments, and prevention techniques to maintain a healthy endocrine system (e.g., thyroid cancer, type II diabetes, chemical imbalances)

Health-9.FS.1.K.

Recognize normal vs. abnormal conditions of the reproductive system

Health-9.FS.1.L.

Investigate disorders, their treatments, and prevention techniques to maintain a healthy lymphatic/immune system (e.g., common cold, influenza, tonsillitis, strep throat)

Health-9.FS.2.A.

Cite evidence that supports the rights both individuals and the communities have when making social health decisions

Health-9.FS.2.B.

Develop a list of attributes needed to live effectively with others

Health-9.FS.2.C.

Compare and contrast constructive versus destructive defense mechanisms as a means for handling ones emotions

Health-9.HM.1.A.

Show the steps used in the problem solving model to examine system functions and disease formation encountered in daily living situations (e.g., lead poisoning, second-hand smoke)

Health-9.HM.1.B.

Discuss the concept of preventive care and its importance in maintaining and improving health

Health-9.HM.1.D.

Analyze factors (e.g., time, cost, accessibility) and benefits (physical and psychological) related to regular participation in physical activity

Health-9.HM.2.A.

Assess key nutrients and their specific functions and influences on body processes (e.g., disease prevention)

Health-9.HM.2.B.

Prove how a well-balanced diet that is low in fat, high in fiber, vitamins and minerals can reduce the risk of certain disease

Health-9.HM.2.C.

Apply concepts using food labels to meet the dietary needs of individuals for a healthy lifestyle (e.g., diabetes, lactose intolerance, food allergies)

Health-9.HM.2.D.

Discuss the cause and effect relationships that influence a safe food supply (e.g., regulatory agencies, food handling and production, food storage techniques, pesticides, additives, bioterrorism)

Health-9.HM.2.E.

Design a nutritional plan and fitness program based on the relationship between food intake and activity level with regard to weight management and healthy living (e.g., caloric intake, calorie expenditure, weight gain, weight maintenance, and safe weight loss)

Health-9.HM.3.A.

Evaluate the role the media can play in influencing young adults self concept by idealizing body image and elite performance levels of famous people

Health-9.HM.3.B.

Analyze the reliability of health care information, services and products that could affect consumer decision-making (e.g., finding specialists such as CDC, county health departments, extension centers; insurance carriers, clinics, hospitals, OB/GYN, and emergency rooms)

Health-9.HM.3.C.

Develop a list of individual and/or governmental agencies and explain their responsibility for providing assistance to people for their health needs (e.g., Al-anon for drug abuse or dermatologist for acne)

Health-9.HM.4.A.

Apply practices that preserve and enhance the safety and health of others (e.g., conflict resolution, peer mediation, seeking adult or professional consultation, stress management, goal setting, decision-making, assertive behavior, resisting peer pressure, asset development)

Health-9.HM.4.D.

Create a plan using life management skills to address personal and social concerns that are a part of daily living (e.g., learning to manage time and stress, setting goals, dealing with conflicts, working collaboratively)

Health-9.HM.4.E.

Develop a list of intervention skills that can be used to prevent violence and describe when and how to use these skills

Health-9.RA.1.A.

Describe the effects of positive lifestyles behaviors on the occurrence of disease (e.g., sunscreen, physical activity, diet, sleep, stress management)

Health-9.RA.1.B.

Describe the primary and secondary defenses for prevention of disease and discuss how they help to maintain or improve them

Health-9.RA.1.C.

Formulate and support an interpretation regarding the reoccurrence of resistant strains of pathogens (e.g., strep, herpes, mononucleosis, gonorrhea, Chlamydia, HIV, Staff Infection)

Health-9.RA.1.D.

Comparesigns and symptoms of commonsexually transmitted infections

Health-9.RA.1.F.

Analyze and evaluatehow teen pregnancy and parenting can impact personal, family and societal perspectives (e.g., dropout, low self-esteem, abandonment, and economics)

Health-9.RA.2.A.

Describe and analyze methods that can be effective in preventing societal problems affecting teens (e.g., rape, assault, homicide, and other personal safety risks, gangs)

Health-9.RA.2.B.

Identify, from a given list, those situations that are life threatening and perform basic life saving maneuvers (e.g., CPR, abdominal thrust, bleeding control, shock, burns, asthma, bee stings, snake bites, poisoning)

Health-9.RA.2.C.

Recognize activity-related conditions (e.g., bleeding, shock, asthma, low blood sugar, diabetes, dehydration) and perform appropriate first aid procedures and practices for each

Health-9.RA.2.D.

List the common water-related emergencies and describe prevention and treatment techniques

Health-9.RA.3.A.

Assess the short and long-term effects that performance enhancing aids have on the body processes (e.g., liver damage, heart failure, brain aneurysm, anger, road rage, acne, violence, memory loss, hepatitis, HIV) and on individuals and society (e.g., body image, obsession with winning, violent behavior, black market/illegal purchases)

Health-9.RA.3.B.

Explain why individuals need to follow label guidelines for all substances (e.g., compatibility of ingested substances)

Health-9.RA.3.C.

Evaluate the short and long term effects of alcohol, tobacco, and other substances on the body (e.g., changes in mood, thought processes, mental ability, coordination, reaction time) and draw conclusions on the impact of these substances on personal, social, and economic threats to society

Health-9.RA.4.A.

Define global warming and its effects on the health of individuals worldwide

Health-9.RA.4.B.

Compare ways that individuals, communities, state and federal government can cooperate to promote environmental health (e.g., recycling, adopt-a-highway programs, river clean-up, land preservation, community beautification, advocacy)

Music-HS.AP.1.A.a

General Music Classes: Identify and analyze forms and composition techniques: theme and variation, DC/Fine, DS al coda/Fine, AB/binary, ABA/ternary, song form, sonata, rondo, fugue, opera, ballet, musical theatre, symphonic, Jazz, sonata

Music-HS.AP.1.A.b

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Identify forms used in selected ensemble repertoire

Music-HS.AP.1.B.a

General Music Classes and Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Determine the musical means (source) and size of group of an aural example

Music-HS.AP.1.B.b

Describe the musical expression (mood) of an aural example

Music-HS.AP.1.B.c

Determine the order and organization of an aural example

Music-HS.AP.1.B.d

Determine the possible origin of an aural example (e.g., location and time)

Music-HS.AP.1.B.e

Characterize the use of music by its intended function (purpose) and its intended audience

Music-HS.AP.2.A.a

General Music Classes and Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Develop criteria to distinguish between quality and non-quality performance through listening and self-assessment with regard to the following musical elements: tone quality, expression/phrasing, rhytmic accuracy, pitch accuracy, part acquisition, blend/balance, posture.\/stage presence, diction/articulation, style

Music-HS.AP.2.B.a

General Music Classes: Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between quality and non-quality performance through listenin

Music-HS.AP.2.B.b

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Demonstrate the ability to distinguish between quality and non-quality performance through listening, performing, and self-assessment

Music-HS.AP.2.B.c

Use musical terminology to describe their personal response to musical example

Music-HS.EP.1.A.a

General Music Classes: Interpret and explain duration and meter in 2/4, . 4/4 and 6/8 meter signature using bar lines using: whole note/rest, quarter note/rest, half note/rest, eighth-note pairs, dotted half note, sixteenth notes, dotted quarter followed by eighth, dotted quarter note/rest, 3 eighth notes beamed together in 6/8, syncopation

Music-HS.EP.1.A.b

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Interpret and explain standard rhythmic notation in simple and compound meters using all rhythm and note values above, and add *syncopation, *alla breve

Music-HS.EP.1.B.a

General Music Classes: Identify standard pitch notation in the treble clef, including one ledger line above and below the staff (*middle C), and identify notes in the bass clef

Music-HS.EP.1.B.b

Identify accidentals sharps, flats, natural signs

Music-HS.EP.1.B.c

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: mploy standard pitch notation in the clef appropriate to students instrument or voice in an appropriate range and keys

Music-HS.EP.1.C.a

General Music Classes: Identify standard symbols for dynamics, tempo and articulation: p for piano, for forte, mp for mezzo piano, mf for mezzo forte, pp for pianissimo, ff for fortissimo, cresc or < for crescendo, decres or> for decrescendo, dim for diminuendo, *accelerando, *allegro, *ritardando, *moderato, *andante, *largo, *a tempo, accent, fermata, ties, slurs, staccato, legato

Music-HS.EP.1.C.b

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Apply standard listed for General Music classes, adding marcato and full complement of dynamic range including sfz

Music-HS.EP.1.D.a

General Music Classes: Use standard notation for rhythm, pitch, and expressive elements to record musical ideas of 2 to 4 measures (See Elements of Music)

Music-HS.EP.1.D.b

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Use standard notation for rhythm, pitch, and expressive elements to record musical ideas of 2 to 4 measures for instrument or voice

Music-HS.EP.1.D.c

Interpret selected literature that includes nonstandard notation symbols (See Elements of Music)

Music-HS.EP.1.E.a

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Proficient: Sight read standard musical notation at level 3 difficulty [Level 3--Moderately easy; contains moderate technical demands, expanded ranges, and varied interpretive requirements]

Music-HS.EP.1.E.b

Advanced Sight read standard musical notation at level 4 difficulty [Level 4moderately difficult; requires well-developed technical skills, attention to phrasing interpretation, and ability to perform various meters and rhythms in a variety of keys]

Music-HS.HC.1.A.a

General Music Classes: Identify music from various styles and historical periods by comparing and contrasting selected elements of music

Music-HS.HC.1.A.b

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Identify genre or style from various historical periods through listening to selected ensemble repertoire

Music-HS.HC.1.B.a

General Music Classes: Conclude possible origin and/or historical period of an aural example by applying artistic perceptions to selected musical examples

Music-HS.HC.1.B.b

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Proficient and Advanced Conclude possible origin and/or historical period of an aural example by applying artistic perceptions to selected musical examples

Music-HS.HC.1.B.c

Describe the historical significance of selected musical literature

Music-HS.HC.1.C.a

General Music Classes: Describe the effects of society, culture and technology on music

Music-HS.HC.1.C.b

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Proficient and Advanced, Categorize the function of music being performed in relation to its function in society or history

Music-HS.HC.1.D.a

General Music Classes: Discuss musical figures and their role as composers/performers/ innovators

Music-HS.HC.1.D.b

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Compare and contrast music and music-related vocations and avocations

Music-HS.HC.1.D.c

Cite well-known composers and/or performers of various styles and periods specific to ensemble repertoire

Music-HS.HC.1.D.d

Cite well-known performers specific to students instrument and/or voice

Music-HS.IC.1.A.a

General Music Classes: Explain how elements, artistic processes (such as imagination or skills), and organizational principles (such as unity and variety or repetition and contrast) are used in similar and distinctive ways in the various arts and cite examples

Music-HS.IC.1.A.b

Compare characteristics of two or more arts within a particular historical period or style and cite examples from various cultures

Music-HS.IC.1.A.c

Explain how the roles of creators, performers, and others involved in the arts resemble and differ from one another in the various arts disciplines

Music-HS.IC.1.A.d

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Compare the uses of characteristic elements, artistic processes, and organizational principles among the arts in different historical periods and different cultures

Music-HS.IC.1.A.e

Explain how the roles of creators, performers, and others involved in the production and presentation of the arts are similar to and different from one another in the various arts

Music-HS.IC.1.A.f

Compare characteristics of two or more arts within a particular historical period or style and cite examples from various cultures

Music-HS.IC.1.B.a

General Music Classes: Explain ways in which the principles and subject matter of various disciplines outside the arts are interrelated with those of music

Music-HS.IC.1.B.b

Compare and contrast the processes of analysis, inquiry, and creativity used in the arts to their use in other subject areas such as mathematics, literature, and the physical or social sciences

Music-HS.IC.1.B.c

Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: List several skills learned in ensembles and relate them to those skills needed in areas such as the work force, church or community group, and other school groups

Music-HS.PP.1.A.a

General Music/Instrumental Classes: Demonstrate singing skills and match pitch in an appropriate range

Music-HS.PP.1.A.b

Vocal Performance Classes: Proficient Demonstrate proper fundamental singing technique when performing music of moderate *technical demands, expanded range, and varied interpretations

Music-HS.PP.1.A.c

Advanced Demonstrate proper singing technique in the following: intonation, tone quality, breathing, diction, rhythm, note accuracy, posture, memorization

Music-HS.PP.1.B.a

General Music/Choir and Instrumental Classes: Proficient Apply vocal techniques required for expressive performance of varied literature

Music-HS.PP.1.B.b

Advanced Vocal Performance Classes: Apply vocal techniques required for expressive performance of varied literature

Music-HS.PP.1.C.a

Vocal Performance Classes: Proficient Apply stylistic elements needed to perform the music of various genres and cultures

Music-HS.PP.1.C.b

Advanced : Apply stylistic elements needed to perform the music of various genres and cultures

Music-HS.PP.1.D.a

Vocal Performance Classes: Proficient Perform one on a part in various arrangements for two or more voice parts *a cappella and with *accompaniment

Music-HS.PP.1.D.b

Advanced Perform one on a part in various four or more voice part arrangements a cappella and with accompaniment

Music-HS.PP.1.E.a

Vocal Performance Classes: Proficient Apply techniques for expressive performance of vocal literature of level 1-3 in a choral ensemble (refer to glossary for grade-level definitions)

Music-HS.PP.1.E.b

Advanced Apply techniques for expressive performance of vocal literature of Level 4 or higher in a chamber or choral ensemble (refer to glossary for Level of Difficulty)

Music-HS.PP.2.A.a

General Music/Vocal Music Classes: Demonstrate basic instrumental skills and knowledge on selected instruments (e.g., keyboard instrument, bells, auxiliary percussion, drum, guitar)

Music-HS.PP.2.A.b

Instrumental Performance Classes: Proficient :Apply instrumental technique (e.g., fingerings, bowings, stickings, playing position, tone quality, articulation) for grade 2-3 literature

Music-HS.PP.2.A.c

Demonstrate instrument maintenance and care

Music-HS.PP.2.A.d

Apply the ability to adjust the pitch to a given standard during performance (play in tune)

Music-HS.PP.2.A.e

Advanced: Apply instrumental technique (i.e., fingerings, bowings, stickings, playing position, tone quality, articulation) for grade 4 or higher literature

Music-HS.PP.2.B.a

Instrumental Performance Classes: Proficient: Read and perform music notation at a 3 grade-level (refer to glossary for Level of Difficulty)

Music-HS.PP.2.B.b

Advanced: Read and perform music notation at a 4 grade-level or higher (refer to glossary for Level of Difficulty)

Music-HS.PP.2.C.a

Instrumental Performance Classes: Perform a varied repertoire of music representing diverse cultures, genres and styles

Music-HS.PP.2.C.b

Apply stylistic elements needed to perform the music of various cultures, genres and styles

Music-HS.PP.2.D.a

Instrumental Performance Classes: Proficient: Play by ear simple melodies (4-6 pitches) on a melodic instrument or simple accompaniments on a harmonic instrument

Music-HS.PP.2.D.b

Advanced: Play by ear melodies or phrases of increasing complexity, on a melodic instrument or simple accompaniments on a harmonic instrument

Music-HS.PP.2.E.a

Instrumental Performance Classes: Proficient: Perform with other instrumentalists to achieve a characteristic ensemble sound including dynamics, timbre, balance, blend, and intonation

Music-HS.PP.2.E.b

Advanced: Perform with other instrumentalists to achieve a refined ensemble sound including dynamics, timbre, balance, blend, and intonation in advanced literature to include *solos, chamber ensembles, and large groups

Music-HS.PP.3.A.a

General Music/Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Improvise simple rhythmic and/or melodic variations in a consistent style and meter

Music-HS.PP.3.A.b

Vocal (Show Choir) and Instrumental (*Jazz) Performance Classes: Improvise harmonized parts: Improvise original melodies over given *chord progressions, each in a consistent style, meter, and *tonality

Music-HS.PP.4.A.a

General Music/Vocal and Instrumental Performance Classes: Proficient: Create or arrange songs or instrumental pieces using a variety of sound sources within specified guidelines

Music-HS.PP.4.A.b

Advanced: Compose music (phrases) in a distinct style, demonstrating creativity in using the *elements of music for expressive effect

Music-HS.PP.4.A.c

Arrange simple pieces for voices or instruments other than those for which the pieces were originally written (*transposition)

PE-HS.MP.1.E.a

Identify and analyze the critical elements of selected advanced skills (e.g., strength training, games)

PE-HS.MP.2.A.a

Analyze skill techniques of self and others, detect skill errors, and make corrections to show improvement (e.g., peer assessment)

PE-HS.MP.2.B.a

Summarize the history, rules, terminology, scoring and etiquette in a variety of individual, dual and team sports

PE-HS.MP.2.B.b

Identify and apply rules of play, skill techniques and basic game strategies in a variety of individual, dual and team sports

PE-HS.MP.2.B.c

Consistently demonstrate skill competency in a variety of individual, dual and team sports

PE-HS.MP.2.C.a

Summarize and apply rules, etiquette, skill techniques, and basic strategies in a variety of outdoor pursuits and recreational activities

PE-HS.MP.2.C.b

Consistently demonstrate skill competency in a variety of outdoor pursuits and recreational activities

PE-HS.MP.2.D.a

Summarize the history, rules, terminology and etiquette in aquatics or gymnastics

PE-HS.MP.2.D.b

Identify and apply rules, skill techniques and basic strategies in aquatics or gymnastics

PE-HS.MP.2.D.c

Consistently demonstrate skill competency in aquatics or gymnastics

PE-HS.MP.2.E.a

Investigate and cite career opportunities available as related to physical education (e.g., panel, research paper)

PE-HS.MP.3.C.a

Demonstrate rhythmic activities that use a variety of equipment to develop various components of fitness (e.g., dumbbells, exercise bands, steps, balls, scarves)

PE-HS.MP.3.D.a

Demonstrate basic skills and social etiquette in a variety of dance forms utilizing different cultural backgrounds (e.g., line dance, social, folk, aerobic, square, jazz, contemporary)

PE-HS.MP.3.E.a

Compare the recreational and social aspects of a variety of dances and their impact on cultural development

PE-HS.PA.1.A.a

Use the concepts of health-related and skill-related fitness to connect the benefits each offers to the development of total lifetime fitness

PE-HS.PA.1.A.b

Analyze present fitness levels to create a long-term personal fitness plan which meets current and future needs necessary for the maintenance of health and fitness

PE-HS.PA.1.B.a

Analyze and compare health, skill, and fitness benefits derived from a variety of sports and lifetime activities (e.g., pedometers, pulse wands, heart rate wands, tri-fit machines)

PE-HS.PA.1.B.b

Describe the relationship between nutrition, exercise and body composition (MyPyramid.gov)

PE-HS.PA.1.B.c

Investigate the negative effects of performance enhancing drugs and alcohol on health and physical performance

PE-HS.PA.1.B.d

Categorize short and long-term effects of stress on the individual

PE-HS.PA.1.B.e

Analyze the benefits of an effective stress management plan

PE-HS.PA.1.C.a

Design a personal fitness plan utilizing the FITT (frequency, intensity, time, type) principle and the principles of overload, progression, and specificity that contributes to an active healthy lifestyle (American College of Sport Medicine guidelines)

PE-HS.PA.1.C.b

Differentiate between how oxygen is utilized aerobically and anaerobically

PE-HS.PA.1.D.a

Identify the major muscle groups that are engaged during specific exercises and activities (e.g., bicep bicep curl)

PE-HS.PA.2.A.a

Show personal etiquette, respect, and safety skills during physical activities

PE-HS.PA.2.A.b

Identify strategies for including persons of diverse backgrounds and abilities in physical activities

PE-HS.PA.3.A.a

Identify the relationship between warm-up, cool-down, proper skill techniques, the use of protective equipment, and proper conditioning to exercise-related injuries

PE-HS.PA.3.A.b

Investigate and predict potential exercise-related injuries and medical conditions that could occur during a variety of physical activities

PE-HS.PA.3.B.a

Differentiate between life threatening and non-life threatening injuries and select the appropriate level of treatment (e.g., basic first aid, CPR, calling 911)

Theater-HS.AP.1.A.a

Proficient: Define the terminology and process of evaluation and apply this process to performances using appropriate theatre vocabulary

Theater-HS.AP.1.A.b

Advanced: Apply evaluation concepts to performances and compare and contrast literary and dramatic criticism of theatre, film, television or electronic media

Theater-HS.AP.1.B.a

Articulate, justify and apply personal criteria for critiquing dramatic texts and performances

Theater-HS.EP.1.A.a

Proficient: Identify spine, fourth wall, foil, subtext, aside, unities, and denouement

Theater-HS.EP.1.A.b

Advanced: Identify duex ex machina, pace, and styles (e.g., realism, naturalism, abstractism, epic, expressionism, comedy of manner, opera, theatre of cruelty and absurd, invisible theatre, performance art, musical theatre, vaudeville, madrigal)

Theater-HS.EP.1.B.a

Proficient: Identify centering, counter-cross, upstaging, emotional memory, motivation, obstacle, objective, tactic, action, pitch, rate, phrasing, volume, tempo, quality, and prepared audition

Theater-HS.EP.1.B.b

Advanced: Identify Method acting, master gesture, actors tendency, and master teachers approaches (e.g., Stanislavski, Hagen, Spolin, Strasberg, Alexander, Grotowski, Brecht, Suzuki, Adler, Artaud, Brook)

Theater-HS.EP.1.C.a

Proficient: Identify and apply stagecraft skills, Identify and apply technical knowledge and skills necessary to safely create and/or operate functional scenery, properties, lighting, sound, costumes, make-up and publicity

Theater-HS.EP.1.C.b

Advanced: Identify and apply the technical responsibilities of the head of crews for production, Identify specialized areas of study in technical theatre

Theater-HS.EP.1.D.a

Proficient: Define the directors responsibility to the authors intent, script, actors, designers, technicians and the audience, Identify the directors role in creating a production, Identify the skills necessary to block a scripted scene

Theater-HS.EP.1.D.b

Advanced: Identify the skills needed in directing a dramatic text including interpreting the text, giving clear instructions, specifying expectations, coaching the actors, developing a unified production concept, coordinating the technical elements, telling the story, and evaluating the rehearsal process and performance

Theater-HS.HC.1.A.a

Proficient: Research the cultural and historical background of a specific play

Theater-HS.HC.1.A.b

Advanced: Research, evaluate and synthesize cultural and historical information to support artistic choices

Theater-HS.HC.1.B.a

Proficient: Describe the roles of theatre, film, television and electronic media in American society

Theater-HS.HC.1.B.b

Advanced: Analyze and apply knowledge of social, political and dramatic aspects of theatre, film and television

Theater-HS.HC.2.A.a

Proficient: Identify, compare and contrast the lives, works and influences of representative theatre artists from various cultures and historical time periods (e.g., Shakespeare, Moliere, Ibsen, Julie Taymor, Peter Brook, Sondheim)

Theater-HS.HC.2.A.b

Advanced: Analyze and evaluate historical and cultural influences on theatre

Theater-HS.HC.2.A.c

Analyze and evaluate historical and cultural influences on theatre

Theater-HS.HC.2.B.a

Proficient: Select career and vocational opportunities in theatre and describe the training, skills, self-discipline and artistic discipline needed to pursue them

Theater-HS.HC.2.B.b

Advanced: Evaluate career and vocational opportunities in theatre, film, television, and electronic media justifying choices, and analyze the training, skills, self-discipline and artistic discipline needed to pursue them

Theater-HS.IC.1.A.a

Compare and contrast communication methods in theatre with that of art, music and dance, and integrate more than one art form in informal and formal performances

Theater-HS.IC.1.B.a

Proficient: Use hardware and software in lighting, Use hardware and software in sound, Use hardware and software in scenic elements, Use hardware and software in makeup and costuming, Use hardware and software in script writing, Use hardware and software in properties, Use hardware and software in business & house management

Theater-HS.IC.1.B.b

Advanced: Plan & incorporate the usage of hardware and software in lighting, Plan & incorporate the usage of hardware and software in sound, Plan & incorporate the usage of hardware and software in scenic elements, Plan & incorporate the usage of hardware and software in makeup and costuming, Plan & incorporate the usage of hardware and software in script writing, Plan & incorporate the usage of hardware and software in properties, Plan & incorporate the usage of hardware and software in business & house management

Theater-HS.IC.2.A.a

Proficient: Analyze budgetary needs of the technical aspect of a theatrical production, Predict the fiscal responsibilities of a production (e.g., royalties, costume and set expenses), Analyze a play and design a set using scale for a non-realized production, Use lighting equipment and accessories to demonstrate an understanding of the lighting spectrum, Use sound equipment to demonstrate an understanding of human hearing

Theater-HS.IC.2.A.b

Advanced: Portray theatre as a reflection of life in particular times, places and cultures, Trace historical and cultural developments in theatrical styles and genres, Apply budgetary needs of the technical aspect of a theatrical production, Plan fiscal responsibilities of a production, Analyze a play and design a set using scale for a realized production, Design lighting to demonstrate an understanding of the lighting spectrum

Theater-HS.PP.1.A.a

Proficient: Write an original scene utilizing character development and plot elements

Theater-HS.PP.1.A.b

Advanced:Write a script incorporating character, dialogue, stage directions, plot, rising action and resolution

Theater-HS.PP.1.B.a

Proficient: Use basic terms of theatre (see glossary), Utilize warm-up techniques for preparation of body, voice and mind, Improvise using emotional and sensory recall, Apply stage movement and pantomime technique to express thoughts, feelings and actions of a character

Theater-HS.PP.1.B.b

Advanced: Use advanced terms of theatre, Create and lead warm-up techniques for preparation of body, voice and mind, Create a character using emotional, intellectual, social characteristics and sensory recall, Using script analysis, identify and create a believable emotional build for a character, Use subtext in portrayal of characters in classical/contemporary scenes

Theater-HS.PP.1.C.a

Proficient: Apply stagecraft skills safely, Safely apply technical knowledge and skills to create and/or operate functional scenery, properties, lighting, sound, costumes, makeup, and publicity

Theater-HS.PP.1.C.b

Advanced: Organize and perform the technical responsibilities of the head of crews for production Display proficiency in at least one area of technical theatre of study (e.g., lighting, sound, dramaturg)

Theater-HS.PP.1.D.a

Proficient: Evaluate the directors role in creating a production, Block a scripted scene

Theater-HS.PP.1.D.b

Advanced: Direct a dramatic text including interpreting the text and playwrights intent, giving clear instructions, specifying expectations, coaching the actors, developing a unified production concept, coordinating the technical elements, telling the story, and evaluating the rehearsal process and performance

Theater-HS.PP.1.E.a

Model appropriate audience behavior at various performances

Theater-HS.PP.1.F.a

Proficient: Rehearse, polish and present a performance for a class or invited audience

Theater-HS.PP.1.F.b

Advanced: Stage a performance of a script

Visual Arts-HS.AP.1.A.b

Define aesthetics as the branch of philosophy that deals with the nature and value of art

Visual Arts-HS.AP.2.A.d

Interpret the meaning of the work (subject, theme, symbolism, message communicated)

Visual Arts-HS.EP.1.E.a

Identify and use color theory including color intensity and split-complementary color scheme

Visual Arts-HS.HC.1.B.b

Explain an artists place in historical context

Visual Arts-HS.PP.1.A.f

Use blending tools such as stumps and tortillons to modify values

Visual Arts-HS.PP.1.B.d

Blend one color/value smoothly into another

Visual Arts-HS.PP.1.B.e

Demonstrate proper use and cleaning of brushes and palettes

Visual Arts-HS.PP.2.A.c

Demonstrate production of a symmetrical form (e.g., cylinder, bowl, or cup)

Visual Arts-HS1.AP.1.A.a

Discuss personal beliefs about the nature of art

Visual Arts-HS1.AP.1.A.c

Discuss and develop answers to questions about art, such as: What is art?, Why do responses vary?, Who decides what makes an artwork special, valuable or good?

Visual Arts-HS1.AP.2.A.a

With one artwork: describe artwork; analyze the use of elements and principles in the work

Visual Arts-HS1.AP.2.A.b

Interpret the meaning of the work (subject, theme, symbolism, message communicated)

Visual Arts-HS1.AP.2.A.c

Judge the work from various perspectives: Showing a real or idealized image of life (Imitationalism); Expressing feelings (Emotionalism/ Expressionism); Emphasis on elements and principles (Formalism); Serving a purpose in the society or culture (Functionalism)

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.1.A.a

Identify and use weighted contour, parallel, and perpendicular lines

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.1.B.a

Differentiate between and use geometric and organic (freeform) shapes

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.1.C.a

Identify and use high and low relief

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.1.C.b

Identify and use illusion of form: sphere, cube, cone, and cylinder

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.1.D.a

Identify and use real, invented and simulated textures

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.1.E.a

Identify and use color theory including color value, and color schemes (analogous, monochromatic, and complementary)

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.1.F.a

Identify and use a range of values to create the illusion of simple forms (including highlights and cast shadows)

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.1.G.a

Identify and use positive and negative space in two-dimensional work

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.1.G.b

Identify and use perspective techniques to create the illusion of space (one-point linear perspective, overlapping, and change of size, detail, placement, value contrast)

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.2.A.a

Differentiate among and use symmetrical (formal), asymmetrical (informal), and radial balance

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.2.B.a

Identify and create emphasis (focal point) through contrast and convergence

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.2.C.a

Identify and use variation within a single element to create contrast (e.g., different values), asymmetrical (informal), and radial balance

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.2.D.a

Identify and use elements to create regular rhythm

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.2.E.a

Explain how elements and principles create unity in artworks

Visual Arts-HS1.EP.2.F.a

Identify and use realistic facial proportions

Visual Arts-HS1.HC.1.A.a

Identify artworks from the following: Ancient Greece/Rome, Renaissance, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Pop-art, Op art

Visual Arts-HS1.HC.1.B.a

Compare and contrast two artworks on: time

Visual Arts-HS1.HC.1.B.b

Compare and contrast two artworks on: place

Visual Arts-HS1.HC.1.B.c

Compare and contrast two artworks on: artist

Visual Arts-HS1.HC.1.B.d

Compare and contrast two artworks on: subject matter

Visual Arts-HS1.HC.1.B.e

Compare and contrast two artworks on: theme

Visual Arts-HS1.HC.1.B.f

Compare and contrast two artworks on: characteristics

Visual Arts-HS1.HC.1.B.g

Compare and contrast two artworks on: materials/technology

Visual Arts-HS1.HC.1.B.h

Compare and contrast two artworks on: ideas and beliefs of culture

Visual Arts-HS1.HC.1.B.i

Compare and contrast two artworks on: function of art in culture/society

Visual Arts-HS1.IC.1.A.a

Connect meanings of elements in art with terms in music, theatre, or dance

Visual Arts-HS1.IC.2.A.a

Explain how historical events and social ideas are reflected in artworks from selected cultures or historical time periods.

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.A.a

Create smooth, continuous value through even pressure

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.A.b

Create a range of 4 smoothly graduated values through varied pressure

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.A.c

Define edge through variations in pressure or angle

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.A.d

Use media in various ways to create simulated and invented textures

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.A.e

Use a ruler to create parallel, perpendicular, and converging lines

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.A.f

Demonstrate proficiency using a single drawing media

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.B.a

Mix tempera/acrylic paints to create different hues

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.B.b

Mix tempera/acrylic paints to create a range of 4 values and levels of intensity

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.B.c

Apply paint to create a solid area of color with no visible brushstrokes, change in value or intensity

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.B.f

Use brushes of various sizes/types

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.C.a

Create or modify an image using general software

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.C.b

General software refers to a program like Microsoft Word, which has paint tools

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.D.a

Demonstrate a relief block printmaking process

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.1.D.b

Create an artwork using a fiber arts process (e.g., weaving, paper-making, book arts, quilting, appliqu, basketry, knotting, batik).

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.2.A.a

Create a sculpture by layering and adhering material or objects (e.g., natural or manufactured clays, paper, board, plastercraft, papier mache, assemblage)

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.2.A.b

Create ceramics using a hand-building process (e.g., pinch, coil, slab); joining techniques, and a uniform thickness

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.3.A.a

Create original artworks using the following as subject matter: portrait, still life, landscape, non-objective, architecture.

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.3.B.a

Create a functional artwork based upon a cultural example

Visual Arts-HS1.PP.3.C.a

Create original artwork that communicates ideas through themes (e.g., identity, power, time, nature, illusion)

Visual Arts-HS2.AP.1.A.a

Discuss how perceptions in art reflect community and/or culture beliefs and values

Visual Arts-HS2.AP.1.A.b

Compare how responses to works of art differ based on whether the viewer is a member of the culture in which the art was created

Visual Arts-HS2.AP.2.A.a

Compare and contrast two artworks: describe artwork

Visual Arts-HS2.AP.2.A.b

analyze the use of elements and principles in the work

Visual Arts-HS2.AP.2.A.c

Interpret the meaning of the work (subject, theme, symbolism, message communicated) Judge the work from various perspectives

Visual Arts-HS2.AP.2.A.d

Showing a real or idealized image of life (Imitationalism), Expressing feelings (Emotionalism/ Expressionism), Emphasis on elements and principles (Formalism), Serving a purpose in the society or culture (Functionalism)

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.1.A.a

Identify and use hatching, crosshatching, stippling, and calligraphic lines

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.1.B.a

Identify and use complex shapes

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.1.C.a

Identify and use form in-the-round

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.1.C.b

Identify and demonstrate the illusion of complex form in a two-dimensional artwork

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.1.D.a

Identify and create simulated textures from observation

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.1.F.a

Identify and use a range of values to create the illusion of complex forms

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.1.G.a

Identify and use positive and negative space in three-dimensional work

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.1.G.b

Identify and use perspective techniques to create the illusion of space (two-point linear perspective, overlapping, and change of size, detail, placement, value, contrast, color)

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.2.A.a

Use elements to create compositional balance

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.2.B.a

Identify and use emphasis (focal point) through isolation and location

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.2.C.a

Identify and vary elements in the same work to create contrast (e.g., different values and different textures)

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.2.D.a

Identify and use elements to create progressive rhythm

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.2.E.a

Identify and create unity through elements and principles

Visual Arts-HS2.EP.2.F.a

Identify and use realistic figure proportions

Visual Arts-HS2.HC.1.A.a

Identify artworks from the following: Cubism, American Regionalism, Abstract Exresionalism, Native-American, Lation, Asia

Visual Arts-HS2.HC.1.B.a

Compare and contrast two artworks on: time

Visual Arts-HS2.HC.1.B.b

Compare and contrast two artworks on: place

Visual Arts-HS2.HC.1.B.c

Compare and contrast two artworks on: artist

Visual Arts-HS2.HC.1.B.d

Compare and contrast two artworks on: subject matter

Visual Arts-HS2.HC.1.B.e

Compare and contrast two artworks on: theme

Visual Arts-HS2.HC.1.B.f

Compare and contrast two artworks on: characteristics

Visual Arts-HS2.HC.1.B.g

Compare and contrast two artworks on: materials/technology

Visual Arts-HS2.HC.1.B.h

Compare and contrast two artworks on: ideas and beliefs of culture

Visual Arts-HS2.HC.1.B.i

Compare and contrast two artworks on: function of art in culture/society

Visual Arts-HS2.IC.1.A.a

Connect the characteristics of art and music created in the same culture or time period (e.g., Harlem Renaissance and jazz, Native-American art and music, Asian art and music, Latino art and music)

Visual Arts-HS2.IC.2.A.a

Explain how historical events and social ideas are reflected in artworks from selected cultures or historical time periods.

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.A.a

Create a range of 7 smoothly graduated values through varied pressure

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.A.b

Blend values/colors to create new values/colors

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.A.c

Combine a change in value/color with texture

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.A.d

Create a range of 4 graduated values using hatching, crosshatching, and stippling techniques

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.A.e

Use an eraser as a tool to change a value

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.A.g

Demonstrate proficiency using 3 drawing media (e.g., pencil, charcoal, conte, pastel, oil pastel, marker, pen and ink, colored pencils, scratchboard)

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.B.a

Mix tempera/acrylic paints to match observed hues

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.B.b

Demonstrate the following watercolor techniques: continuous wash, graduated wash

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.B.c

Apply watercolor to create simulated and invented textures

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.B.d

Select and use appropriate size and brush type (e.g., natural, synthetic, flat, round, bright, small-large sizes)

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.C.a

Create or modify an image using art software

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.C.b

Art software refers to a program such as Adobe Photoshop

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.D.a

Demonstrate one printmaking process (e.g., monoprint, collagraph, stamp, reduction relief block, lithograph, etching, serigraph

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.1.D.c

Create an artwork combining different fiber arts materials (e.g., paper, yarn, string, wire, metal, reed, raffia, fabric, beads, shells, found material)

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.2.A.a

Create a sculpture using carving techniques. Possible media choices could include, but are not limited to: clay, wax, soap, plaster, Styrofoam, commercially-produced carving blocks)

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.2.A.b

Create ceramics combining hand-building processes (e.g., pinch, coil, and/or slab), joining techniques and uniform thickness throughout product

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.2.A.c

Demonstrate consistent glaze application

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.3.A.a

Communicate ideas through the creation of a: portrait, still life, landscape, non-objective, architecture

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.3.B.a

Create an original functional artwork that expresses a culture

Visual Arts-HS2.PP.3.C.a

Create an original artwork that communicates ideas through the following themes (e.g., cultural identity, social commentary, ceremony/ritual, myth/legend, reflection/transparency)

Visual Arts-HS3.AP.1.A.a

Discuss how people from different groups might respond to artworks that express themes (e.g., national identity, spirituality, vision, progress, and human condition)

Visual Arts-HS3.AP.2.A.a

Compare and contrast student artwork with professional artworks or masterpieces: describe artwork

Visual Arts-HS3.AP.2.A.b

Analyze the use of elements and principles in the work

Visual Arts-HS3.AP.2.A.c

Interpret the meaning of the work (subject, theme, symbolism, message communicated) Judge the work from various perspectives

Visual Arts-HS3.AP.2.A.d

Showing a real or idealized image of life (Imitationalism), Expressing feelings (Emotionalism/ Expressionism), Emphasis on elements and principles (Formalism), Serving a purpose in the society or culture (Functionalism)

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.1.A.a

Identify and use gesture lines and implied lines

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.1.B.a

Identify and use implied shapes

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.1.C.a

Identify and create complex form in-the-round

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.1.C.b

Identify and demonstrate the illusion of transparent and reflective forms in two-dimensional artwork

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.1.D.a

Contrast textures within the same artwork

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.1.E.a

Identify and use arbitrary color and symbolic color

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.1.F.a

Identify and use a range of values to create the illusion of form through observation of transparent and reflective objects

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.1.G.a

Design negative and positive space from all viewpoints in three-dimensional work

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.1.G.b

From observation, identify and use appropriate perspective techniques to create the illusion of space

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.2.A.a

Use balance to support the communication of an idea

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.2.B.a

Use emphasis to support the communication of an idea

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.2.C.a

Use contrast to support the communication of an idea

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.2.D.a

Use rhythm to support the communication of an idea

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.2.E.a

Use unity to support the communication of an idea

Visual Arts-HS3.EP.2.F.a

Identify and use foreshortened figure proportions

Visual Arts-HS3.HC.1.A.a

Identify artworks from the following: German Expressionism, Surrealism, Photorealism, Post-Modern

Visual Arts-HS3.HC.1.B.a

Compare and contrast two artworks on: time

Visual Arts-HS3.HC.1.B.b

Compare and contrast two artworks on: place

Visual Arts-HS3.HC.1.B.c

Compare and contrast two artworks on: artist

Visual Arts-HS3.HC.1.B.d

Compare and contrast two artworks on: subject matter

Visual Arts-HS3.HC.1.B.e

Compare and contrast two artworks on: theme

Visual Arts-HS3.HC.1.B.f

Compare and contrast two artworks on: characteristics

Visual Arts-HS3.HC.1.B.g

Compare and contrast two artworks on: materials/technology

Visual Arts-HS3.HC.1.B.h

Compare and contrast two artworks on: ideas and beliefs of culture

Visual Arts-HS3.HC.1.B.i

Compare and contrast two artworks on: function of art in culture/society

Visual Arts-HS3.IC.1.A.a

Use theatre techniques to present information in art (e.g., voice, stage presence, props, video, script-writing, set)

Visual Arts-HS3.IC.2.A.a

Explain how historical events and social ideas are reflected in artworks from selected cultures or historical time periods.

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.A.a

Create a range of 10 smoothly graduated values through varied pressure

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.A.b

Create a range of 7 graduated values using hatching, crosshatching, and stippling techniques

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.A.c

Use hatching, crosshatching, and stippling to create texture

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.A.d

Use an eraser as a tool to create a range of values

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.A.e

Demonstrate proficiency using 4 drawing media (e.g., pencil, charcoal, conte, pastel, oil pastel, marker, pen and ink, colored pencils)

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.B.a

Select and use paint expressively (hard edge, soft edge, painterly brush strokes)

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.B.b

Demonstrate the following watercolor techniques: masking, wet on wet, dry brush, glaze, transparent layering, scratch, resist, lifting

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.B.c

Mix watercolors to match observed hues

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.C.a

Create expressive/symbolic art using art software

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.C.b

Art software refers to a program such as Adobe Photoshop

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.D.a

Demonstrate one printmaking process that require registering (e.g., reduction block, multiple block, serigraphy, etching)

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.1.D.b

Create a titled, numbered, signed edition

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.2.A.a

Create a mixed media sculpture using a variety of processes and techniques

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.2.A.b

Create a functional ceramic piece on the potters wheel

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.2.A.d

Demonstrate use of an alternative decorative finish (e.g., sgraffito, slip painting, incising, or Mishima)

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.3.A.a

Combine subject matter in original artworks to communicate ideas (e.g., figure and/or architecture in a landscape)

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.3.B.a

Create an original functional artwork that communicates a personal idea

Visual Arts-HS3.PP.3.C.a

Create original artwork that communicates ideas through themes (e.g., national identity, spirituality, vision, progress, human condition, narrative)

Visual Arts-HS4.AP.1.A.a

Discuss the evolution of personal beliefs about the nature of art

Visual Arts-HS4.AP.1.A.b

Discuss how personal and cultural beliefs influence the interpretation of the meaning, message, or value of a work of art

Visual Arts-HS4.AP.2.A.a

Use the following process with a body of work (portfolio)

Visual Arts-HS4.AP.2.A.c

Analyze the use of elements and principles in the work

Visual Arts-HS4.AP.2.A.e

Showing a real or idealized image of life (Imitationalism), Expressing feelings (Emotionalism/ Expressionism), Emphasis on elements and principles (Formalism), Serving a purpose in the society or culture (Functionalism)

Visual Arts-HS4.EP.1.A.a

Use line expressively to communicate ideas

Visual Arts-HS4.EP.1.B.a

Use shapes expressively to communicate ideas

Visual Arts-HS4.EP.1.C.a

Use forms expressively to communicate ideas

Visual Arts-HS4.EP.1.D.a

Use textures expressively to communicate ideas

Visual Arts-HS4.EP.1.E.a

Use color expressively to communicate ideas

Visual Arts-HS4.EP.1.F.a

Use value expressively to communicate ideas

Visual Arts-HS4.EP.1.G.a

Use space expressively to communicate ideas

Visual Arts-HS4.EP.2.E.a

Use unity to support the personal expression of an idea

Visual Arts-HS4.EP.2.F.a

Use facial and/or figure proportions expressively

Visual Arts-HS4.HC.1.A.a

Select and research periods/movements of art that align with portfolio development

Visual Arts-HS4.HC.1.B.a

Describe the evolution of an artists body of work over time

Visual Arts-HS4.IC.1.A.a

Select and present music that expresses personal artwork

Visual Arts-HS4.IC.2.A.a

Explain how contemporary events and social ideas are reflected in student artworks

Visual Arts-HS4.PP.1.A.a

Select and apply drawing media and techniques that demonstrate: sensitivity and subtlety in use of media, engagement with experimentation and/or risk taking,

Visual Arts-HS4.PP.1.B.a

Select and apply painting media and techniques that demonstrate: sensitivity and subtlety in use of media, engagement with experimentation and/or risk taking, informed decision-making

Visual Arts-HS4.PP.1.C.a

Select and apply digital/computer media that demonstrate sensitivity and subtlety in use of media, engagement with experimentation and/or risk taking, informed decision-making, *Art software refers to a program such as Adobe Photoshop

Visual Arts-HS4.PP.1.D.a

Select and apply printmaking media and techniques that demonstrate: sensitivity and subtlety in use of media, engagement with experimentation and/or risk taking, informed decision-making

Visual Arts-HS4.PP.1.D.b

Select and apply fiber media and techniques that demonstrate: sensitivity and subtlety in use of media, engagement with experimentation and/or risk taking, informed decision-making

Visual Arts-HS4.PP.2.A.a

Select and apply sculpture media and techniques that demonstrate: sensitivity and subtlety in use of media, engagement with experimentation and/or risk taking, informed decision-making

Visual Arts-HS4.PP.2.A.b

Select and apply ceramics media (e.g., clay body, decorative finish) and techniques that demonstrate: sensitivity and subtlety in use of media, engagement with experimentation and/or risk taking, informed decision-making

Visual Arts-HS4.PP.3.A.a

Select subject matter to communicate personal ideas through a series of original, related works

Visual Arts-HS4.PP.3.B.a

Create a series of original, related, functional artworks that communicates a personal idea

Visual Arts-HS4.PP.3.C.a

Develop a theme through a series of original artworks that communicates personal ideas Addresses complex visual and/or conceptual ideas, Shows imaginative, inventive approach, experimentation, risk taking, sensitivity and/or subtlety