British Columbia Prescribed Learning Outcomes — Grade 11


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AST11.BI.1.

The breadth and diversity of Asia's physical and human resources have contributed to the development of distinct and disparate political, cultural, and economic regions in the late 20th century.

AST11.BI.2.

Colonialism, imperialism, and resource disparity have been the primary reasons for conflict and movement of peoples in Asia.

AST11.BI.3.

Ethnic, regional, and national identities, shaped in part by geography and migration, exert significant political and cultural influence in Asia.

AST11.BI.4.

Rapid industrialization, urbanization, and economic growth in Asia in the late 20th century have created complex environmental challenges.

AST11.C.1.

Physical geography, including resource distribution and physiographic features

AST11.C.2.

Human geography, including demography, migration, urbanization, and environmental issues

AST11.C.3.

Industrialization, globalization, economic systems, and distribution of wealth and resources

AST11.C.5.

Development, structure, and function of political and social institutions

AST11.C.6.

Social and political movements, including human rights initiatives

AST11.C.7.

Local, regional, and global conflict

AST11.C.8.

Local, regional, and national identities

BFP11.BI.1.

The identities, worldviews, and language of BC First Peoples are renewed, sustained, and transformed through their connection to the land.

BFP11.BI.2.

The impact of contact and colonialism continues to affect the political, social, and economic lives of BC First Peoples.

BFP11.BI.3.

Cultural expressions convey the richness, diversity, and resiliency of BC First Peoples.

BFP11.BI.4.

Through self-governance, leadership, and self-determination, BC First Peoples challenge and resist Canada's ongoing colonialism.

BFP11.C.1.

Traditional territories of the BC First Nations and the relationships with the land

BFP11.C.2.

Role of oral tradition for BC First Peoples

BFP11.C.3.

Impact of historical exchanges of ideas, practices, and materials among local BC First Peoples and with non-indigenous peoples

BFP11.C.4.

Provincial and federal governmental policies and practices that have affected, and continue to affect, BC First Peoples responses to colonialism

BFP11.C.5.

The resistance of BC First Peoples to colonialism

BFP11.C.6.

Role and significance of media in challenging and supporting the continuity of culture, language, and self-determination of BC First Peoples

BFP11.C.7.

Commonalities and differences between traditional and contemporary BC First Peoples governance systems

BFP11.C.8.

Contemporary challenges facing BC First Peoples, including legacies of colonialism

BFP11.CC.

Curricular Competencies

BFP11.CC.1.

Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; listen to the oral traditions of Elders and other local knowledge holders; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions

BFP11.CC.10.

Recognize and understand that some knowledge is considered sacred and only shared with permission and/or in certain situations, with certain people (ethical judgment)

BFP11.CC.11.

Make reasoned ethical claims about actions in the past and present after considering the context and values of the times (ethical judgment)

BFP11.CC.2.

Use holistic, experiential, reflective, and relational experiences to better understand connectedness and the reciprocal relationship of First Peoples and the sense of place

BFP11.CC.3.

Recognize the consequences of our actions (cause and consequence)

BFP11.CC.4.

Assess and compare the significance of the interconnections between people, events, and developments at a particular time and place, and determine what they reveal about issues in the past and present (significance)

BFP11.CC.5.

Ask questions and corroborate inferences of Elders and other local knowledge keepers through oral traditions, indigenous knowledge, memory, history, and story (evidence)

BFP11.CC.6.

Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups in different time periods and places (continuity and change)

BFP11.CC.7.

Determine and assess the long- and-short term causes and consequences, and the intended and unintended consequences, of an event, decision, or development (cause and consequence)

BFP11.CC.8.

Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, and events, and distinguish between worldviews of today and the past (perspective)

BFP11.CC.9.

Recognize implicit and explicit ethical claims in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)

CHE11.BI.1.1.

Atoms and molecules are the fundamental building blocks of matter.

CHE11.BI.1.2.

Chemical bonds are the result of electrostatic forces.

CHE11.BI.1.3.

Periodicity can be explained by atomic structure.

CHE11.BI.2.1.

The mole is a convenient way to express quantities of particles

CHE11.BI.3.1.

The rearrangement of atoms in chemical reactions is predictable.

CHE11.BI.3.2.

Matter and energy are conserved in chemical reactions.

CHE11.BI.3.3.

Chemical reactions and their applications have significant implications for human health, society, and the environment

CHE11.BI.4.1.

Solubility within a solution is determined by the nature of the solute and the solvent.

CHE11.BI.4.2.

Solution chemistry and its applications have significant implications for human health, society, and the environment

CHE11.BI.5.1.

Carbon's ability to form four bonds, with itself and other elements, results in a wide variety of organic compounds.

CHE11.BI.5.2.

Organic chemistry and its applications have significant implications for human health, society, and the environment.

CHE11.C.

Content - Students are expected to know the following:

CHE11.C.1.1.

Classification of matter

CHE11.C.1.3.

The subatomic structures of atoms, ions, and isotopes

CHE11.C.1.4.

Quantum mechanical model

CHE11.C.1.7.1.

Chemical and physical properties of the elements

CHE11.C.1.7.3.

The similarities and trends in the properties of elements

CHE11.C.2.1.

The significance and use of the mole

CHE11.C.2.3.

Stoichiometric calculations (using significant figures) involving:

CHE11.C.2.3.1.

Atomic mass, molecular mass, molar mass

CHE11.C.2.3.2.

Molar quantities of gases at STP, SATP

CHE11.C.2.3.3.

Molecular and empirical formulae to identify a substance

CHE11.C.3.1.

Physical and chemical change

CHE11.C.3.2.

The rearrangement of the atoms as bonds are broken and new bonds are formed

CHE11.C.3.3.2.

Predicting products and reactants

CHE11.C.3.4.

Stoichiometric calculations (using significant figures) involving:

CHE11.C.3.4.5.

Excess and limiting reactants

CHE11.C.3.5.

Practical applications, including local chemical processes

CHE11.C.4.1.

Solubility of molecular and ionic compounds

CHE11.C.4.3.

Polarity of water and other solvents

CHE11.C.4.4.

Properties of solutions

CHE11.C.4.5.

Solubility tables and predicting precipitates

CHE11.C.4.6.

Stoichiometric calculations (using significant figures) involving:

CHE11.C.4.8.

Environmental impacts of non-metal oxide solutions

CHE11.C.5.1.

Features and common applications of organic chemistry

CHE11.C.5.2.

Bonds/forces in organic compounds

CHE11.C.5.3.

Names, structures, and geometry of simple organic compounds

CHE11.C.5.4.

Common functional groups

CHE11.CC.

Curricular Competencies - Students are expected to be able to do the following:

CHE11.CC.1.1.

Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal, local, or global interest

CHE11.CC.2.2.

Assess risks and address ethical, cultural, and/or environmental issues associated with their proposed methods

CHE11.CC.2.3.

Use appropriate SI units and appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to systematically and accurately collect and record data

CHE11.CC.2.4.

Apply the concepts of accuracy and precision to experimental procedures and data:

CHE11.CC.3.3.

Seek and analyze patterns, trends, and connections in data, including describing relationships between variables, performing calculations, and identifying inconsistencies

CHE11.CC.3.4.

Construct, analyze, and interpret graphs, models, and/or diagrams

CHE11.CC.3.5.

Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence

CHE11.CC.4.10.

Assess risks in the context of personal safety and social responsibility

CHE11.CC.4.3.

Evaluate the validity and limitations of a model or analogy in relation to the phenomenon modelled

CHE11.CC.4.5.

Consider the changes in knowledge over time as tools and technologies have developed

CHE11.CC.4.6.

Connect scientific explorations to careers in science

CHE11.CC.4.8.

Consider social, ethical, and environmental implications of the findings from their own and others' investigations

CHE11.CC.5.1.

Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches

CHE11.CC.5.2.

Co-operatively design projects with local and/or global connections and applications

CHE11.CC.5.3.

Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry

CHE11.CC.5.4.

Implement multiple strategies to solve problems in real-life, applied, and conceptual situations

CHE11.CC.5.5.

Consider the role of scientists in innovation

CHE11.CC.6.1.

Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon

CHE11.CC.6.2.

Communicate scientific ideas, information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations

CHE11.CC.6.3.

Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place

CPC11.BI.1.

Understanding the diversity and complexity of cultural expressions in one culture enhances our understanding of other cultures.

CPC11.BI.2.

Interactions between belief systems, social organization, and language influence artistic expressions of culture.

CPC11.BI.3.

Geographic and environmental factors influenced the development of agriculture, trade, and increasingly complex cultures.

CPC11.BI.4.

Value systems and belief systems shape the structures of power and authority within a culture.

CPC11.C.1.

Definitions of culture and how these have changed over time

CPC11.C.2.

Elements of culture and cultural expressions

CPC11.C.3.

Conflict and conflict resolution within and between cultures

CPC11.C.4.

Systems of power, authority, and governance

CPC11.C.5.

Role of value systems and belief systems in the development of cultures

CPC11.C.6.

Interactions and exchanges between cultures

CPC11.C.7.

Interactions between cultures and the natural environment

CPC11.CC.

Curricular Competencies

CPC11.CC.2.

Assess and compare the significance of cultural expressions at particular times and places (historical significance)

CPC11.CC.4.

Analyze continuities and changes in diverse cultures at different times and places (continuity and change)

CPC11.CC.5.

Assess the development and impact of the thought, artistic expressions, power and authority, and technological adaptations of diverse cultures (cause and consequence)

CPC11.CC.6.

Explain different perspectives on past and present cultures (perspective)

ENS11.BI.1.1.

Local environments contain diverse ecosystems with many roles and relationships.

ENS11.BI.2.1.

Interconnected systems sustain healthy ecosystems.

ENS11.BI.2.2.

Ecosystem stability is an important result of sustainability

ENS11.BI.3.1.

Human practices affect the sustainability of ecosystems.

ENS11.BI.4.1.

Humans can play a role in conservation and restoration of ecosystems.

ENS11.C.

Content - Students are expected to know the following:

ENS11.C.1.1.

Abiotic and edaphic factors

ENS11.C.1.2.1.

Species and their ecological roles

ENS11.C.1.2.2.

Relationships and interactions in ecosystems

ENS11.C.2.3.

Population dynamics and landscape structure

ENS11.C.2.4.

Change and stability in ecosystems

ENS11.C.3.1.

Benefits of healthy ecosystems

ENS11.C.3.2.

Humans as agents of change:

ENS11.C.3.2.1.

First Peoples and other traditional ecological knowledge

ENS11.C.3.2.2.

Unsustainable and sustainable ecosystem practices

ENS11.C.4.1.

Environmental stressors challenge ecosystem integrity, health, and sustainability

ENS11.C.4.2.

Ecological restoration principles and practices

ENS11.C.4.3.

First Peoples concept of interconnectedness as related to conservation and restoration

ENS11.C.4.4.

Engagement in ongoing and potential stewardship projects

ENS11.CC.

Curricular Competencies - Students are expected to be able to do the following:

ENS11.CC.2.2.

Assess risks and address ethical, cultural, and/or environmental issues associated with their proposed methods

ENS11.CC.2.3.

Use appropriate SI units and appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to systematically and accurately collect and record data

ENS11.CC.2.4.

Apply the concepts of accuracy and precision to experimental procedures and data:

ENS11.CC.3.4.

Construct, analyze, and interpret graphs, models, and/or diagrams

ENS11.CC.3.6.

Analyze cause-and-effect relationships

ENS11.CC.4.5.

Consider the changes in knowledge over time as tools and technologies have developed

ENS11.CC.4.6.

Connect scientific explorations to careers in science

ENS11.CC.4.8.

Consider social, ethical, and environmental implications of the findings from their own and others' investigations

ENS11.CC.5.1.

Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches

ENS11.CC.5.3.

Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry

ENS11.CC.5.4.

Implement multiple strategies to solve problems in real-life, applied, and conceptual situations

ENS11.CC.5.5.

Consider the role of scientists in innovation

ESC11.BI.1.1.

Earth materials are changed as they cycle through the geosphere and are used as resources, with economic and environmental implications.

ESC11.BI.2.1.

Plate tectonic theory explains the consequences of tectonic plate interactions.

ESC11.BI.3.1.

The transfer of energy through the atmosphere creates weather and is affected by climate change.

ESC11.BI.4.1.

The distribution of water has a major influence on weather and climate.

ESC11.BI.5.1.

Astronomy seeks to explain the origin and interactions of Earth and its solar system.

ESC11.C.

Content - Students are expected to know the following:

ESC11.C.1.1.

Earth materials can be identified and classified based on their properties:

ESC11.C.1.2.

The rock cycle explains how rocks are formed, destroyed, and transformed:

ESC11.C.1.3.

Economic and environmental implications of geologic resources within BC and globally:

ESC11.C.2.1.

Plate tectonic theory unifies evidence from:

ESC11.C.2.1.2.

Distribution of mountain ranges, volcanoes, and earthquake epicentres

ESC11.C.2.1.3.

Sea-floor spreading and hot spots

ESC11.C.2.2.

Convection of heat within Earth's interior drives plate motion and creates unique features at different plate boundaries

ESC11.C.2.3.

Plate tectonic settings within BC and local geological terrains:

ESC11.C.3.1.

The hydrologic cycle is driven by the transfer of energy within the atmosphere and hydrosphere

ESC11.C.3.2.

The atmosphere is divided into layers that have unique properties

ESC11.C.3.3.

The composition of the atmosphere has changed over time:

ESC11.C.3.4.

The interaction of water, air, and energy creates weather

ESC11.C.3.5.

Solar radiation interacts with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere and has impacts on the energy budget

ESC11.C.4.1.

The hydrologic cycle is driven by the transfer of energy within the atmosphere and hydrosphere

ESC11.C.4.3.

Water is a unique resource and is found in many forms on Earth:

ESC11.C.4.4.

Use of remote sensing and direct observation to determine the properties of the ocean and ocean floor

ESC11.C.4.5.

Ocean currents are dependent on salinity, temperature, and density

ESC11.C.4.6.

Oceans and lakes influence local and global climates

ESC11.C.4.7.

Water sources are affected by climate change

ESC11.C.4.8.

First Peoples knowledge of climate change and interconnectedness as related to environmental systems

ESC11.C.5.1.

The nebular hypothesis explains the origin of the formation of solar systems:

ESC11.C.5.1.1.

Formation of planets and moons

ESC11.C.5.2.

Earth is a unique planet within its solar system

ESC11.C.5.3.

Stars are the centre of a solar system and can be classified based on their characteristics

ESC11.C.5.4.

Impacts of the Earth-moon-sun system

ESC11.C.5.5.

Application of space technologies to study changes to Earth and its systems

ESC11.CC.

Curricular Competencies - Students are expected to be able to do the following:

ESC11.CC.1.1.

Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal, local, or global interest

ESC11.CC.1.2.

Make observations aimed at identifying their own questions, including increasingly abstract ones, about the natural world

ESC11.CC.2.1.

Collaboratively and individually plan, select, and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and lab experiments, to collect reliable data (qualitative and quantitative)

ESC11.CC.2.2.

Assess risks and address ethical, cultural, and/or environmental issues associated with their proposed methods

ESC11.CC.2.3.

Use appropriate SI units and appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to systematically and accurately collect and record data

ESC11.CC.2.4.

Apply the concepts of accuracy and precision to experimental procedures and data:

ESC11.CC.3.1.

Experience and interpret the local environment

ESC11.CC.3.2.

Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information

ESC11.CC.3.3.

Seek and analyze patterns, trends, and connections in data, including describing relationships between variables, performing calculations, and identifying inconsistencies

ESC11.CC.3.4.

Construct, analyze, and interpret graphs, models, and/or diagrams

ESC11.CC.3.6.

Analyze cause-and-effect relationships

ESC11.CC.4.10.

Assess risks in the context of personal safety and social responsibility

ESC11.CC.4.3.

Evaluate the validity and limitations of a model or analogy in relation to the phenomenon modelled

ESC11.CC.4.5.

Consider the changes in knowledge over time as tools and technologies have developed

ESC11.CC.4.6.

Connect scientific explorations to careers in science

ESC11.CC.4.8.

Consider social, ethical, and environmental implications of the findings from their own and others' investigations

ESC11.CC.5.1.

Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches

ESC11.CC.5.3.

Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry

ESC11.CC.5.4.

Implement multiple strategies to solve problems in real-life, applied, and conceptual situations

ESC11.CC.5.5.

Consider the role of scientists in innovation

ESC11.CC.6.1.

Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon

ESC11.CC.6.2.

Communicate scientific ideas, information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations

ESC11.CC.6.3.

Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place

HGG11.BI.1.

Analyzing data from a variety of sources allows us to better understand our globally connected world.

HGG11.BI.2.

Demographic patterns and population distribution are influenced by physical features and natural resources.

HGG11.BI.3.

Human activities alter landscapes in a variety of ways.

HGG11.BI.4.

A geographic region can encompass a variety of physical features and/or human interactions.

HGG11.C.1.

Demographic patterns of growth, decline, and movement

HGG11.C.2.

Relationships between cultural traits, the use of physical space, and impacts on the environment, including First Peoples cultures

HGG11.C.3.

Global agricultural practices

HGG11.C.4.

Industrialization, trade, and natural resource demands

HGG11.C.5.

Increased urbanization and influences on societies and environments

HGG11.C.6.

Relationships between natural resources and patterns of population settlement and economic development

HGG11.C.7.

Political organization of geographic regions

HGG11.CC.

Curricular Competencies

HGG11.CC.1.

Use geographic inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze data and ideas; and communicate findings and decisions

HGG11.CC.2.

Assess the significance of places by identifying the physical and/or human features that characterize them (sense of place)

HGG11.CC.3.

Assess the interpretations of geographic evidence after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence and interpretation)

HGG11.CC.4.

Draw conclusions about the variation and distribution of geographic phenomena over time and space (patterns and trends)

HGG11.CC.5.

Evaluate how particular geographic actions or events influence human practices or outcomes (geographical value judgments)

HGG11.CC.6.

Evaluate the features or aspects of geographic phenomena or locations to explain what makes them worthy of attention or recognition (geographical importance)

HGG11.CC.7.

Identify and assess how human and environmental factors and events influence each other (interactions and associations)

HGG11.CC.8.

Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past or present, and determine whether we have a responsibility to respond (geographical value judgments)

LSC11.BI.1.1.

All living things have common characteristics.

LSC11.BI.2.1.

Living things evolve over time.

LSC11.BI.3.1.

Organisms are grouped on the basis of identifiable similarities.

LSC11.C.

Content - Students are expected to know the following:

LSC11.C.1.1.

Cells are the basic unit of life:

LSC11.C.1.1.1.

Comparing cell structures

LSC11.C.1.1.2.

Prokaryotic and eukaryotic

LSC11.C.1.1.3.

Unicellular and multicellular

LSC11.C.1.1.5.

Sexual and asexual reproduction

LSC11.C.1.1.6.

Cellular respiration and photosynthesis

LSC11.C.1.2.1.

Basic structure and function of a virus

LSC11.C.1.2.2.

Lytic and lysogenic cycles

LSC11.C.1.2.3.

Effects of viruses on organisms

LSC11.C.2.1.1.

Role of DNA in evolution as a hereditary material

LSC11.C.2.1.2.

Five agents of evolutionary change

LSC11.C.2.2.

Development of the theory of evolution

LSC11.C.2.6.

Artificial selection and genetic modifications

LSC11.C.3.1.

Taxonomy principles for classifying organisms:

LSC11.C.3.1.2.

Phylogenetic tree and cladogram

LSC11.C.3.1.4.

First Peoples understandings of animal body plans

LSC11.C.3.1.5.

First Peoples uses of local plants

LSC11.C.3.3.

Unifying characteristics of the evolutionary continuum across the kingdoms:

LSC11.CC.

Curricular Competencies - Students are expected to be able to do the following:

LSC11.CC.1.1.

Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal, local, or global interest

LSC11.CC.1.2.

Make observations aimed at identifying their own questions, including increasingly abstract ones, about the natural world

LSC11.CC.1.3.

Formulate multiple hypotheses and predict multiple outcomes

LSC11.CC.2.1.

Collaboratively and individually plan, select, and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and lab experiments, to collect reliable data (qualitative and quantitative)

LSC11.CC.2.2.

Assess risks and address ethical, cultural, and/or environmental issues associated with their proposed methods

LSC11.CC.2.3.

Use appropriate SI units and appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to systematically and accurately collect and record data

LSC11.CC.2.4.

Apply the concepts of accuracy and precision to experimental procedures and data:

LSC11.CC.3.1.

Experience and interpret the local environment

LSC11.CC.3.2.

Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information

LSC11.CC.3.3.

Seek and analyze patterns, trends, and connections in data, including describing relationships between variables, performing calculations, and identifying inconsistencies

LSC11.CC.3.4.

Construct, analyze, and interpret graphs, models, and/or diagrams

LSC11.CC.3.6.

Analyze cause-and-effect relationships

LSC11.CC.4.10.

Assess risks in the context of personal safety and social responsibility

LSC11.CC.4.3.

Evaluate the validity and limitations of a model or analogy in relation to the phenomenon modelled

LSC11.CC.4.5.

Consider the changes in knowledge over time as tools and technologies have developed

LSC11.CC.4.6.

Connect scientific explorations to careers in science

LSC11.CC.4.8.

Consider social, ethical, and environmental implications of the findings from their own and others' investigations

LSC11.CC.5.1.

Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches

LSC11.CC.5.3.

Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry

LSC11.CC.5.4.

Implement multiple strategies to solve problems in real-life, applied, and conceptual situations

LSC11.CC.5.5.

Consider the role of scientists in innovation

LSC11.CC.6.1.

Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon

LSC11.CC.6.2.

Communicate scientific ideas, information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations

LSC11.CC.6.3.

Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place

PHY11.BI.1.1.

Kinematics allows us to predict, describe, and analyze an object's motion.

PHY11.BI.2.1.

Forces influence the motion of an object.

PHY11.BI.3.1.

Momentum is conserved in a closed system.

PHY11.BI.4.1.

Energy is found in different forms, is conserved, and has the ability to do work.

PHY11.BI.5.1.

The application of conservation laws explains the flow of electricity within a circuit.

PHY11.BI.6.1.

Light can be modelled as a wave or a particle.

PHY11.BI.7.1.

Quantum mechanics can be used to describe the behaviour of very small particles.

PHY11.BI.8.1.

Special relativity helps explain the relationship between space and time.

PHY11.BI.9.1.

Nuclear reactions involve changes in the atomic nucleus.

PHY11.C.

Content - Students are expected to know the following:

PHY11.C.1.1.

Vector and scalar quantities

PHY11.C.1.5.

The relationship between variables

PHY11.C.2.1.

The fundamental nature of forces

PHY11.C.2.7.

Newton's laws of motion

PHY11.C.2.8.

The relationship between variables

PHY11.C.2.9.

First Peoples knowledge

PHY11.C.3.3.

Law of conservation of momentum

PHY11.C.3.4.

The relationship between variables

PHY11.C.4.1.

Potential and kinetic energy

PHY11.C.4.3.

Law of conservation of energy

PHY11.C.4.6.

The relationship between variables

PHY11.C.5.4.

The relationship between variables

PHY11.C.6.11.

Applications of geometric optics

PHY11.C.6.12.

The relationship between variables

PHY11.C.7.1.

Evidence that led to the development of quantum theory

PHY11.C.7.2.

The wave-particle duality of light

PHY11.C.7.4.

Heisenberg's uncertainty principle

PHY11.C.7.5.

De Broglie and the wave nature of light

PHY11.C.7.6.

Applications of quantum theory

PHY11.C.8.1.

Development of the special relativity theory:

PHY11.C.8.1.1.

Michelson-Morley experiment

PHY11.C.8.1.2.

Postulates of special relativity

PHY11.C.8.2.

Relative motion and effects:

PHY11.C.8.3.

Equivalence of energy and mass

PHY11.C.8.4.

The relationship between variables

PHY11.C.9.3.

Applications of nuclear processes

PHY11.CC.

Curricular Competencies - Students are expected to be able to do the following:

PHY11.CC.1.1.

Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal, local, or global interest

PHY11.CC.1.2.

Make observations aimed at identifying their own questions, including increasingly abstract ones, about the natural world

PHY11.CC.1.3.

Formulate multiple hypotheses and predict multiple outcomes

PHY11.CC.2.1.

Collaboratively and individually plan, select, and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and lab experiments, to collect reliable data (qualitative and quantitative)

PHY11.CC.2.2.

Assess risks and address ethical, cultural, and/or environmental issues associated with their proposed methods

PHY11.CC.2.3.

Use appropriate SI units and appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to systematically and accurately collect and record data

PHY11.CC.2.4.

Apply the concepts of accuracy and precision to experimental procedures and data:

PHY11.CC.3.1.

Experience and interpret the local environment

PHY11.CC.3.2.

Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information

PHY11.CC.3.3.

Seek and analyze patterns, trends, and connections in data, including describing relationships between variables, performing calculations, and identifying inconsistencies

PHY11.CC.3.4.

Construct, analyze, and interpret graphs, models, and/or diagrams

PHY11.CC.3.5.

Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence

PHY11.CC.3.6.

Analyze cause-and-effect relationships

PHY11.CC.4.1.

Evaluate their methods and experimental conditions, including identifying sources of error or uncertainty, confounding variables, and possible alternative explanations and conclusions

PHY11.CC.4.10.

Assess risks in the context of personal safety and social responsibility

PHY11.CC.4.2.

Describe specific ways to improve their investigation methods and the quality of the data

PHY11.CC.4.3.

Evaluate the validity and limitations of a model or analogy in relation to the phenomenon modelled

PHY11.CC.4.4.

Demonstrate an awareness of assumptions, question information given, and identify bias in their own work and in primary and secondary sources

PHY11.CC.4.5.

Consider the changes in knowledge over time as tools and technologies have developed

PHY11.CC.4.6.

Connect scientific explorations to careers in science

PHY11.CC.4.7.

Exercise a healthy, informed skepticism and use scientific knowledge and findings to form their own investigations to evaluate claims in primary and secondary sources

PHY11.CC.4.8.

Consider social, ethical, and environmental implications of the findings from their own and others' investigations

PHY11.CC.4.9.

Critically analyze the validity of information in primary and secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems

PHY11.CC.5.1.

Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches

PHY11.CC.5.2.

Co-operatively design projects with local and/or global connections and applications

PHY11.CC.5.3.

Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry

PHY11.CC.5.4.

Implement multiple strategies to solve problems in real-life, applied, and conceptual situations

PHY11.CC.5.5.

Consider the role of scientists in innovation

PHY11.CC.6.1.

Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon

PHY11.CC.6.2.

Communicate scientific ideas, information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations

PHY11.CC.6.3.

Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place

PHY11.CC.7.1.

Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches

PHY11.CC.7.2.

Co-operatively design projects with local and/or global connections and applications

PHY11.CC.7.3.

Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry

PHY11.CC.7.4.

Implement multiple strategies to solve problems in real-life, applied, and conceptual situations

PHY11.CC.7.5.

Consider the role of scientists in innovation

PHY11.CC.8.1.

Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon

PHY11.CC.8.2.

Communicate scientific ideas, information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations

PHY11.CC.8.3.

Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place

PLS11.BI.1.

Understanding how political decisions are made is critical to being an informed and engaged citizen.

PLS11.BI.2.

Political institutions and ideology shape both the exercise of power and the nature of political outcomes.

PLS11.BI.3.

Decision making in a democratic system of government is shaped by the unequal distribution of political and social power.

PLS11.BI.4.

International political agreements require compromises between countries with a wide range of values and priorities.

PLS11.C.1.

Structure and function of Canadian and First Peoples political institutions

PLS11.C.2.

Major ideologies and political systems

PLS11.C.3.

Election processes and electoral systems

PLS11.C.4.

Role of mass media in democratic societies

PLS11.C.5.

Power relationships between citizens, government, and other bodies in the creation of public policy

PLS11.C.6.

Scope and characteristics of the international system

PLS11.C.7.

Issues in local, regional, or national politics in Canada

PLS11.C.8.

Issues in global politics, such as security, conflict management, development, and sustainability

PLS11.CC.

Curricular Competencies

PLS11.CC.2.

Evaluate how factors, forces, events, or people influence developments, outcomes, or decisions (significance, relevance, and pertinence)

PLS11.CC.4.

Analyze the methods used by the media, governments, and other important groups to influence public perception of an issue or event (political perspectives)

PLS11.CC.5.

Explain how different ideologies and worldviews shape perspectives on the same political issue and information (political perspectives)

PLS11.CC.6.

Analyze interrelationships between objectives and intended or unintended results (interrelationships, objectives, and results)

PLS11.CC.7.

Assess the factors that cause political stability or instability (stability and change)

SCC11.C.

Content - Students are expected to know the following:

SCC11.C.1.1.2.

Allergies and sensitivities

SCC11.C.1.1.3.

Medications and supplements

SCC11.C.1.1.4.

Non-Western health practices, including First Peoples health and healing practices

SCC11.C.1.2.

Safe use and storage of household chemicals

SCC11.C.1.3.1.

Home automation and safety alarms

SCC11.C.1.4.

Science literacy and informed decision making: pseudo-science versus science

SCC11.C.2.1.

Waste recycling and disposal:

SCC11.C.2.1.3.

Transfer stations and landfills

SCC11.C.2.1.4.

Impacts of personal choices

SCC11.C.2.2.

Chemicals commonly found in the workplace or in industrial products:

SCC11.C.2.2.1.

Chemical safety, including disposal methods

SCC11.C.2.2.2.

Current WHMIS and other standards

SCC11.C.2.2.4.

Classes of hazardous chemicals

SCC11.C.2.3.

Combustive and explosive materials:

SCC11.C.2.4.1.

Methodologies and technologies

SCC11.C.2.4.2.

Forensic techniques and protocols

SCC11.C.2.4.3.

Impact of advances in technology

SCC11.C.3.1.

Extreme weather events:

SCC11.C.3.1.2.

Weather and climate change

SCC11.C.3.2.1.

Natural and human-influenced events

SCC11.C.3.3.

Agriculture practices and processes:

SCC11.C.3.3.1.

Chemicals used in agriculture

SCC11.C.3.3.3.

Impacts of personal choices

SCC11.C.3.4.

Energy generation and needs:

SCC11.C.3.5.

Sustainability of resources:

SCC11.C.3.5.1.

Impacts of personal choices

SCC11.C.3.5.2.

First Peoples worldview and sustainability

SCC11.CC.

Curricular Competencies - Students are expected to be able to do the following:

SCC11.CC.1.1.

Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal, local, or global interest

SCC11.CC.1.2.

Make observations aimed at identifying their own questions, including increasingly abstract ones, about the natural world

SCC11.CC.1.3.

Formulate multiple hypotheses and predict multiple outcomes

SCC11.CC.2.1.

Collaboratively and individually plan, select, and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and lab experiments, to collect reliable data (qualitative and quantitative)

SCC11.CC.2.2.

Assess risks and address ethical, cultural, and/or environmental issues associated with their proposed methods

SCC11.CC.2.3.

Use appropriate SI units and appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to systematically and accurately collect and record data

SCC11.CC.2.4.

Apply the concepts of accuracy and precision to experimental procedures and data:

SCC11.CC.3.1.

Experience and interpret the local environment

SCC11.CC.3.2.

Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information

SCC11.CC.3.3.

Seek and analyze patterns, trends, and connections in data, including describing relationships between variables, performing calculations, and identifying inconsistencies

SCC11.CC.3.4.

Construct, analyze, and interpret graphs, models, and/or diagrams

SCC11.CC.3.5.

Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence

SCC11.CC.3.6.

Analyze cause-and-effect relationships

SCC11.CC.4.10.

Assess risks in the context of personal safety and social responsibility

SCC11.CC.4.3.

Evaluate the validity and limitations of a model or analogy in relation to the phenomenon modelled

SCC11.CC.4.4.

Demonstrate an awareness of assumptions, question information given, and identify bias in their own work and in primary and secondary sources

SCC11.CC.4.5.

Consider the changes in knowledge over time as tools and technologies have developed

SCC11.CC.4.6.

Connect scientific explorations to careers in science

SCC11.CC.4.7.

Exercise a healthy, informed skepticism, and use scientific knowledge and findings to form their own investigations to evaluate claims in primary and secondary sources

SCC11.CC.4.8.

Consider social, ethical, and environmental implications of the findings from their own and others' investigations

SCC11.CC.4.9.

Critically analyze the validity of information in primary and secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems

SCC11.CC.5.1.

Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches

SCC11.CC.5.2.

Co-operatively design projects with local and/or global connections and applications

SCC11.CC.5.3.

Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry

SCC11.CC.5.4.

Implement multiple strategies to solve problems in real-life, applied, and conceptual situations

SCC11.CC.5.5.

Consider the role of scientists in innovation

SCC11.CC.6.1.

Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon

SCC11.CC.6.2.

Communicate scientific ideas, information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations

SCC11.CC.6.3.

Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place

TWH11.BI.1.

Nationalist movements can unite people in common causes or lead to intense conflict between different groups.

TWH11.BI.2.

The rapid development and proliferation of communication and transportation technologies in the 20th century led to profound changes in personal and national identities.

TWH11.BI.3.

The breakdown of long-standing imperialist structures created new economic and political systems.

TWH11.C.1.

The rise and rule of authoritarian regimes

TWH11.C.2.

Civil wars, independence movements, and revolutions

TWH11.C.3.

Human rights movements, including those of indigenous peoples

TWH11.C.4.

Religious, ethnic, and/or cultural conflicts, including genocide

TWH11.C.5.

Global conflicts, including World War I, World War II, and the Cold War

TWH11.C.6.

Migrations, movements, and territorial boundaries

TWH11.C.7.

Interdependence and international co-operation

TWH11.C.8.

Social and cultural developments

TWH11.C.9.

Mass consumption and production of communication and transportation technologies

TWH11.CC.

Curricular Competencies

TWH11.CC.2.

Assess the significance of people, locations, events, and developments, and compare varying perspectives on their historical significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)

TWH11.CC.5.

Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, and developments (cause and consequence)

TWH11.CC.6.

Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, and events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)