Alberta Programs of Study — Grade 3


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3-1.1.1.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Connect prior knowledge and personal experiences with new ideas and information in oral, print and other media texts.

3-1.1.2.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Explain understanding of new concepts in own words.

3-1.1.3.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Explore ideas and feelings by asking questions, talking to others and referring to oral, print and other media texts.

3-1.1.4.

Experiment with language and forms: Choose appropriate forms of oral, print and other media texts for communicating and sharing ideas with others.

3-1.1.5.

Express preferences: Choose and share a variety of oral, print and other media texts in areas of particular interest.

3-1.1.6.

Set goals: Discuss areas of personal accomplishment as readers, writers and illustrators.

3-1.2.1.

Consider others' ideas: Ask for others' ideas and observations to explore and clarify personal understanding.

3-1.2.3.

Extend understanding: Ask questions to clarify information and ensure understanding.

3-11.1.

Classify a variety of animals, based on observable characteristics; e.g., limbs, teeth, body covering, overall shape, backbone.

3-11.10.

Demonstrate knowledge of the needs of animals studied, and demonstrate skills for their care.

3-11.2.

Observe and describe the growth and development of at least one living animal, as the animal develops from early to more advanced stages. The animal(s) should be from one or more of the following groups: mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, insects. Suggested examples include: gerbils, guppies, mealworms, tadpoles, worms, butterflies/moths. Additional examples from other animal groups might also be included: brine shrimp, isopods, spiders.

3-11.3.

Predict the next stages in the growth and development of at least one animal from each of the following groups: mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, insects; and identify similarities and differences in their developmental sequences.

3-11.4.

Identify the food needs of at least one animal from each of the following groups: mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, insects; and describe changes in how each animal obtains food through different stages of its life.

3-11.5.

Demonstrate awareness that parental care is characteristic of some animals and not of others, and identify examples of different forms of parental care.

3-11.6.

Demonstrate awareness that animals require different habitats in order to meet their basic needs of food, water, shelter and space.

3-11.7.

Recognize adaptations of a young animal to its environment, and identify changes in its relationship to its environment as it goes through life; e.g., tadpoles are adapted for life in an aquatic environment; adult frogs show adaptations to both terrestrial and aquatic environments.

3-11.8.

Identify examples of environmental conditions that may threaten animal survival, and identify examples of extinct animals.

3-11.9.

Recognize that habitat preservation can help maintain animal populations, and identify ways that student actions can assist habitat preservation.

3-2.1.1.

Use prior knowledge: Share ideas developed through interests, experiences and discussion that are related to new ideas and information.

3-2.1.10.

Use textual cues: Attend to and use knowledge of capitalization, commas in a series, question marks, exclamation marks and quotation marks to read accurately, fluently and with comprehension during oral and silent reading.

3-2.1.11.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Apply phonic rules and generalizations competently and confidently to read unfamiliar words in context.

3-2.1.12.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Apply word analysis strategies, to segment words into parts or syllables, when reading unfamiliar words in context.

3-2.1.13.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Associate sounds with an increasing number of vowel combinations, consonant blends and digraphs, and letter clusters to read unfamiliar words in context.

3-2.1.15.

Use references: Use pictionaries, junior dictionaries and spell-check functions to confirm the spellings or locate the meanings of unfamiliar words in oral, print and other media texts.

3-2.1.2.

Use prior knowledge: Identify the different ways in which oral, print and other media texts, such as stories, textbooks, letters, pictionaries and junior dictionaries, are organized and use them to construct and confirm meaning.

3-2.1.3.

Use comprehension strategies: Use grammatical knowledge to predict words and construct sentences when reading narrative and expository materials.

3-2.1.4.

Use comprehension strategies: Apply a variety of strategies, such as setting a purpose, confirming predictions, making inferences and drawing conclusions.

3-2.1.5.

Use comprehension strategies: Identify the main idea or topic and supporting details in simple narrative and expository passages.

3-2.1.7.

Use comprehension strategies: Read silently with increasing confidence and accuracy.

3-2.1.8.

Use comprehension strategies: Monitor and confirm meaning by rereading when necessary, and by applying knowledge of pragmatic, semantic, syntactic and graphophonic cueing systems.

3-2.1.9.

Use textual cues: Use headings, paragraphs, punctuation and quotation marks to assist with constructing and confirming meaning.

3-2.2.

Focus: Students will identify one or more possible answers to questions by stating predictions or hypotheses.

3-2.2.1.

Experience various texts: Choose a variety of oral, print and other media texts for shared and independent listening, reading and viewing experiences, using texts from a variety of cultural traditions and genres, such as nonfiction, chapter books, illustrated storybooks, drum dances, fables, CDROM programs and plays.

3-2.2.10.

Appreciate the artistry of texts: Express feelings related to words, visuals and sound in oral, print and other media texts.

3-2.2.11.

Appreciate the artistry of texts: Identify how authors use comparisons, and explain how they create mental images.

3-2.2.2.

Experience various texts: Tell or write about favourite parts of oral, print and other media texts.

3-2.2.3.

Experience various texts: Identify types of literature, such as humour, poetry, adventure and fairy tales, and describe favourites.

3-2.2.4.

Experience various texts: Connect own experiences with the experiences of individuals portrayed in oral, print and other media texts, using textual references.

3-2.2.5.

Construct meaning from texts: Connect portrayals of characters or situations in oral, print and other media texts to personal and classroom experiences.

3-2.2.6.

Construct meaning from texts: Summarize the main idea of individual oral, print and other media texts.

3-2.2.7.

Construct meaning from texts: Discuss, represent or write about ideas in oral, print and other media texts, and relate them to own ideas and experiences and to other texts.

3-2.2.8.

Construct meaning from texts: Make inferences about a character's actions or feelings.

3-2.2.9.

Construct meaning from texts: Express preferences for one character over another.

3-2.3.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify, with guidance, procedures to be followed in finding answers to given questions.

3-2.3.1.

Understand forms and genres: Identify distinguishing features of a variety of oral, print and other media texts.

3-2.3.2.

Understand forms and genres: Discuss ways that visual images convey meaning in print and other media texts.

3-2.3.3.

Understand techniques and elements: Include events, setting and characters when summarizing or retelling oral, print or other media texts.

3-2.3.4.

Understand techniques and elements: Describe the main characters in terms of who they are, their actions in the story and their relations with other characters.

3-2.3.5.

Understand techniques and elements: Identify ways that messages are enhanced in oral, print and other media texts by the use of specific techniques.

3-2.3.6.

Experiment with language: Recognize examples of repeated humour, sound and poetic effects that contribute to audience enjoyment.

3-2.4.

Explore and Investigate: Students will carry out procedures developed by themselves or identified by others.

3-2.4.4.

Elaborate on the expression of ideas: Add sufficient detail to oral, print and other media texts to tell about setting and character, and to sustain plot.

3-2.5.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify materials and how they are used.

3-2.6.

Explore and Investigate: Students will work independently or with others to carry out the identified procedures.

3-2.7.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify, with guidance, sources of information and ideas and, with guidance, access information and ideas from those sources. Sources may include library, classroom, community and computer-based resources.

3-2.8.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will record observations and measurements, using captioned pictures and charts, with guidance in the construction of charts. Computer resources may be used for record keeping and for display and interpretation of data.

3-2.9.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will state an inference, based on observations.

3-3.1.

Focus: Students will identify the purpose of the object to be constructed: What is to be developed? What is it for?

3-3.1.2.

Determine information needs: Ask topic-appropriate questions to identify information needs.

3-3.2.

Explore and Investigate: Students will attempt a variety of strategies to complete tasks.

3-3.2.1.

Use a variety of sources: Find information to answer research questions using a variety of sources, such as children's magazines, CDROMs, plays, folk tales, songs, stories and the environment.

3-3.2.2.

Access information: Use text features, such as titles, pictures, headings, labels, diagrams and dictionary guide words, to access information.

3-3.2.3.

Access information: Locate answers to questions and extract appropriate and significant information from oral, print and other media texts.

3-3.2.4.

Access information: Use card or electronic catalogues to locate information.

3-3.3.2.

Organize information: Draft Ideas and information into short paragraphs, with topic and supporting sentences.

3-3.4.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify materials and how they are used.

3-3.4.1.

Share ideas and information: Organize and share ideas and information on topics to engage familiar audiences.

3-3.4.2.

Share ideas and information: Use titles, headings and visuals to add interest and highlight important points of presentation.

3-3.4.3.

Review research process: Assess the research process, using pre-established criteria.

3-3.5.

Explore and Investigate: Students will engage in all parts of the task and support the efforts of others.

3-3.7.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will communicate results of construction activities, using written and oral language and pictures.

3-3.8.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will evaluate the product and identify possible improvements.

3-3.9.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will identify new applications for the design or method of construction.

3-4.1.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying curiosity.

3-4.1.10.

Expand knowledge of language: Choose words, language patterns, illustrations or sounds to add detail and create desired effects in oral, print and other media texts.

3-4.1.3.

Revise and edit: Edit for complete and incomplete sentences.

3-4.1.4.

Enhance legibility: Print legibly, and begin to learn proper alignment, shape and slant of cursive writing.

3-4.1.5.

Enhance legibility: Space words and sentences consistently on a line and page.

3-4.1.6.

Enhance legibility: Use keyboarding skills to compose, revise and print text.

3-4.1.7.

Enhance legibility: Understand and use vocabulary associated with keyboarding and word processing.

3-4.1.8.

Expand knowledge of language: Explain relationships among words and concepts associated with topics of study.

3-4.1.9.

Expand knowledge of language: Experiment with words and word meanings to produce a variety of effects.

3-4.2.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying confidence in personal ability to explore materials and learn by direct study.

3-4.2.1.

Attend to grammar and usage: Identify a variety of sentence types, and use in own writing.

3-4.2.10.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Use apostrophes to form common contractions and show possession in own writing.

3-4.2.11.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Identify commas, end punctuation, apostrophes and quotation marks when reading, and use them to assist comprehension.

3-4.2.2.

Attend to grammar and usage: Identify correct subject-verb agreement, and use in own writing.

3-4.2.3.

Attend to grammar and usage: Use adjectives and adverbs to add interest and detail to own writing.

3-4.2.5.

Attend to spelling: Use phonic knowledge and skills and visual memory, systematically, to spell phonically regular, three-syllable words in own writing.

3-4.2.6.

Attend to spelling: Identify generalizations that assist with the spelling of unfamiliar words, including irregular plurals in own writing.

3-4.2.7.

Attend to spelling: Identify frequently misspelled words, and develop strategies for learning to spell them correctly in own writing.

3-4.2.8.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Use capital letters appropriately in titles of books and stories.

3-4.2.9.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Use exclamation marks, appropriately, as end punctuation in own writing.

3-4.3.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying inventiveness and willingness to consider new ideas.

3-4.3.1.

Present information: Present ideas and information on a topic, using a pre-established plan.

3-4.3.2.

Enhance presentation: Use print and nonprint aids to illustrate ideas and information in oral, print and other media texts.

3-4.3.3.

Use effective oral and visual communication: Speak or present oral readings with fluency, rhythm, pace, and with appropriate intonation to emphasize key ideas.

3-4.3.4.

Demonstrate attentive listening and viewing: Rephrase, restate and explain the meaning of oral and visual presentations.

3-4.3.5.

Demonstrate attentive listening and viewing: Identify and set purposes for listening and viewing.

3-4.4.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying perseverance in the search for understandings and for solutions to problems.

3-4.5.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying a willingness to base their conclusions and actions on the evidence of their own experiences.

3-4.6.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying a willingness to work with others in shared activities and in sharing of experiences.

3-4.7.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying appreciation of the benefits gained from shared effort and cooperation.

3-4.8.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying a sense of responsibility for personal and group actions.

3-4.9.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying respect for living things and environments, and commitment for their care.

3-5.1.

Compare samples of various kinds of rock, and identify similarities and differences.

3-5.1.1.

Appreciate diversity: Describe similarities between experiences and traditions encountered in daily life and those portrayed in oral, print and other media texts.

3-5.1.2.

Appreciate diversity: Retell, paraphrase or explain ideas in oral, print and other media texts.

3-5.1.4.

Celebrate accomplishments and events: Use appropriate language to acknowledge and celebrate individual and class accomplishments.

3-5.1.5.

Use language to show respect: Demonstrate respect for the ideas, abilities and language use of others.

3-5.2.

Given a description of the properties of a particular rock or mineral, identify a sample rock or mineral that matches those properties. Properties that students should be able to describe and interpret include: colour, lustre or 'shininess'; e.g., shiny, dull, glassy, metallic, earthy, texture; e.g., rough, smooth, uneven, hardness, based on scratch tests with available materials, presence of carbonates. Note that the presence of carbonates can be tested with vinegar or another mild acid, crystal shape for minerals, or overall pattern of rocks.

3-5.3.

Describe and classify a group of rocks and minerals, based upon the above properties.

3-5.4.

Recognize that rocks are composed of a variety of materials; and given a coarse-grained rock and magnifier, describe some of the component materials.

3-5.5.

Recognize and describe the various components within a sample of soil; e.g., clay, sand, pebbles, decaying plants; and describe differences between two different soil samples.

3-5.6.

Describe ways in which rocks break down to become soil, and demonstrate one or more of these ways; e.g., by shaking a group of small, soft rocks in a jar of water; by striking rocks together. Note: Safety goggles should be used.

3-5.7.

Describe some common uses of rocks and minerals; and identify examples of those uses within the school, home or local community.

3-7.2.

Select appropriate materials for use in construction tasks, and explain the choice of materials. Students should demonstrate familiarity with a variety of materials, such as papers, woods, plastics, clay and metals.

3-7.6.

Understand that simple designs are often as effective as more complex ones, as well as being easier and cheaper to build, and illustrate this understanding with a practical example.

3-8.1.

Recognize that functional structures must be sufficiently strong and stable and that unstable or weak structures are often unsafe to use.

3-8.2.

Compare and evaluate the strength and stability of different models or objects constructed.

3-8.4.

Apply procedures to test the strength of construction materials, in particular, different stocks of papers, plastics or wood.

3-8.5.

Apply procedures to test different designs.

3-8.7.

Identify and apply methods for making a structure stronger and more stable; e.g., by adding or joining parts to form triangles.

3-9.1.

Identify examples of vibration.

3-9.10.

Recognize that certain sounds have characteristics that cause them to be interpreted as pleasant or unpleasant, and identify these characteristics.

3-9.11.

Describe changes in hearing that result from continued exposure to loud noise and from the natural process of aging.

3-9.12.

Construct and evaluate different kinds of soundproofing and sound-amplifying devices.

3-9.13.

Explain the role that sound plays in communication.

3-9.2.

Recognize that sound is the result of vibration; and demonstrate that the larger the vibration, the louder the sound.

3-9.3.

Recognize that there are ways of measuring the loudness of sounds and that loud sounds pose a danger to the ear.

3-9.4.

Recognize that pitch is the result of differences in the rate of vibration, and predict how a change in the rate of vibration will affect a sound.

3-9.5.

Demonstrate a variety of ways of producing sounds; e.g., by striking an empty glass, by blowing air into a bottle, by constructing and using a device that involves vibrating strings.

3-9.6.

Use sound-producing devices that the student has constructed to demonstrate methods for controlling the loudness, pitch and quality of sound produced.

3-9.7.

Identify examples that show that sound can travel through a variety of materials, including solids, liquids and air, and that sound travels in all directions.

3-9.8.

Describe how the human ear senses vibrations.

3-9.9.

Compare the range of hearing in humans to that in other animals; e.g., dogs and bats.

3.[CN]

Connections: Students are expected to connect mathematical ideas to other concepts in mathematics, to everyday experiences and to other disciplines

3.[ME]

Mental Mathematics and Estimation: Students are expected to demonstrate fluency with mental mathematics and estimation

3.[PS]

Problem Solving: Students are expected to develop and apply new mathematical knowledge through problem solving

3.[R]

Reasoning: Students are expected to develop mathematical reasoning

3.[V]

Visualization: Students are expected to develop visualization skills to assist in processing information, making connections and solving problems.

3.1.1.

Students will appreciate similarities and differences among people and communities:

3.1.1.1.

Demonstrate an awareness of and interest in the beliefs, traditions and customs of groups and communities other than their own (CC)

3.1.10.

Apply mental mathematics strategies and number properties in order to understand and recall basic addition facts and related subtraction facts to 18. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

3.1.11.

Demonstrate an understanding of multiplication to 5 5 by: representing and explaining multiplication using equal grouping and arrays; creating and solving problems in context that involve multiplication; modelling multiplication using concrete and visual representations, and recording the process symbolically; relating multiplication to repeated addition; relating multiplication to division. [C, CN, PS, R]

3.1.12.

Demonstrate an understanding of division (limited to division related to multiplication facts up to 5 5) by: representing and explaining division using equal sharing and equal grouping; creating and solving problems in context that involve equal sharing and equal grouping; modelling equal sharing and equal grouping using concrete and visual representations, and recording the process symbolically; relating division to repeated subtraction; relating division to multiplication. [C, CN, PS, R]

3.1.13.

Demonstrate an understanding of fractions by: explaining that a fraction represents a part of a whole; describing situations in which fractions are used; comparing fractions of the same whole that have like denominators. [C, CN, ME, R, V]

3.1.2.

Represent and describe numbers to 1000, concretely, pictorially and symbolically. [C, CN, V]

3.1.2.1.

What determines quality of life? (CC)

3.1.2.10.

How is cultural diversity expressed within each community? (CC, I)

3.1.2.2.

How does daily life reflect quality of life in the communities (e.g., employment, transportation, roles of family members)? (CC, ER, GC)

3.1.2.3.

How does access to public services affect the communities? (e.g., schools, hospitals, libraries, transportation systems)? (ER, GC, PADM)

3.1.2.4.

What are the traditions, celebrations, stories and practices in the communities that connect the people to the past and to each other (e.g., language spoken, traditions, customs)? (CC, GC, TCC)

3.1.2.5.

How is identity reflected in traditions, celebrations, stories and customs in the communities? (CC, I, TCC)

3.1.2.6.

How are the various leaders chosen in the communities (e.g., within families, within schools, within communities, within government)? (GC, PADM)

3.1.2.7.

How are decisions made in the communities? Who is responsible for making the decisions? (CC, PADM)

3.1.2.8.

How do the individuals and groups in the communities maintain peace? (GC, PADM)

3.1.2.9.

How do the individuals and groups in the communities cooperate and share with other group members? (C, CC)

3.1.3.

Compare and order numbers to 1000. [C, CN, R, V]

3.1.3.1.

Where, on a globe and/or map, are the communities in relation to Canada? (LPP)

3.1.3.2.

In what ways do the people in the communities depend on, adapt to and change the environment in which they live and work? (ER, LPP)

3.1.3.3.

In what ways do the communities show concern for their natural environment? (GC, LPP)

3.1.3.4.

How does the physical geography influence the human activities in the communities (e.g., availability of water, climate)? (CC, LPP)

3.1.4.

Estimate quantities less than 1000, using referents. [ME, PS, R, V]

3.1.4.1.

What are the main goods and services produced by the communities studied (i.e., agricultural activities, manufacturing activities)? (ER, GC)

3.1.4.2.

What goods and services do the communities import from and export to other parts of the world? (ER, GC)

3.1.4.3.

What are the main forms of technologies, transportation and communication in the communities? (ER, GC)

3.1.5.

Illustrate, concretely and pictorially, the meaning of place value for numerals to 1000. [C, CN, R, V]

3.1.6.

Describe and apply mental mathematics strategies for adding two 2-digit numerals. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

3.1.7.

Describe and apply mental mathematics strategies for subtracting two 2-digit numerals. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

3.1.8.

Apply estimation strategies to predict sums and differences of two 2-digit numerals in a problem-solving context. [C, ME, PS, R]

3.1.9.

Demonstrate an understanding of addition and subtraction of numbers with answers to 1000 (limited to 1-, 2- and 3-digit numerals), concretely, pictorially and symbolically, by: using personal strategies for adding and subtracting with and without the support of manipulatives; creating and solving problems in context that involve addition and subtraction of numbers. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

3.2.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of increasing patterns by: describing; extending; comparing; creating numerical (numbers to 1000) and non-numerical patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds and actions. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

3.2.1.1.

Recognize how their actions might affect people elsewhere in the world and how the actions of others might affect them (C, GC)

3.2.1.2.

Respect the equality of all human beings (C, GC, I)

3.2.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of decreasing patterns by: describing; extending; comparing; creating numerical (numbers to 1000) and non-numerical patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds and actions. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

3.2.2.1.

How are the rights, responsibilities and roles of citizens in communities around the world the same or different than those of Canadian citizens? (C, GC)

3.2.2.2.

What are some environmental concerns that Canada and communities around the world share? (ER, GC)

3.2.2.3.

In what ways can individuals and groups contribute to positive change in the world? (C, GC, PADM)

3.2.2.4.

How do international organizations support communities in need throughout the world (e.g., UNICEF, Red Cross, Development and Peace)? (C, GC)

3.2.2.5.

What are examples of international organizations formed by individuals (e.g., Free the Children, Mdecins sans frontires (Doctors Without Borders))? (C, GC)

3.2.2.6.

What are examples of international organizations formed by nations (e.g., UN)? (C, GC, PADM)

3.2.3.

Sort objects or numbers, using one or more than one attribute. [C, CN, R, V]

3.2.4.

Solve one-step addition and subtraction equations involving a symbol to represent an unknown number. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

3.3.1.

Relate the passage of time to common activities, using nonstandard and standard units (minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, years). [CN, ME, R]

3.3.2.

Relate the number of seconds to a minute, the number of minutes to an hour and the number of days to a month in a problem-solving context. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

3.3.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of measuring length (cm, m) by: selecting and justifying referents for the units cm and m; modelling and describing the relationship between the units cm and m; estimating length, using referents; measuring and recording length, width and height. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

3.3.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of measuring mass (g, kg) by: selecting and justifying referents for the units g and kg; modelling and describing the relationship between the units g and kg; estimating mass, using referents; measuring and recording mass. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

3.3.5.

Demonstrate an understanding of perimeter of regular and irregular shapes by: estimating perimeter, using referents for cm or m; measuring and recording perimeter (cm, m); constructing different shapes for a given perimeter (cm, m) to demonstrate that many shapes are possible for a perimeter. [C, ME, PS, R, V]

3.3.6.

Describe 3-D objects according to the shape of the faces and the number of edges and vertices. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

3.3.7.

Sort regular and irregular polygons, including: triangles; quadrilaterals; pentagons; hexagons; octagons according to the number of sides. [C, CN, R, V]

3.4.1.

Collect first-hand data and organize it using: tally marks; line plots; charts; lists to answer questions. [C, CN, PS, V] [ICT: C4-1.3]

3.4.2.

Construct, label and interpret bar graphs to solve problems. [C, PS, R, V] [ICT: C4-1.3, C7-1.3, C7-1.4]

3.S.1.1.

Evaluate ideas and information from different points of view

3.S.1.2.

Choose and justify a course of action

3.S.1.4.

Compare and contrast information from similar types of electronic sources, such as information collected on the Internet

3.S.2.1.

Correctly apply terms related to time, including past, present, future

3.S.2.2.

Arrange events, facts and/or ideas in sequence

3.S.3.1.

Create and use a simple map to locate communities studied in the world

3.S.3.2.

Use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places on maps and globes

3.S.3.3.

Apply the concept of relative location to determine locations of people and places

3.S.3.4.

Apply the terms hemisphere, poles, equator

3.S.4.1.

Apply new ideas and strategies to contribute to decision making and problem solving

3.S.4.3.

Collaborate with others to devise strategies for dealing with problems and issues

3.S.4.4.

Use technology to organize and display data in a problem-solving context

3.S.5.3.

Consider the needs and points of view of others

3.S.5.4.

Work and play in harmony with others to create a safe and caring environment

3.S.6.1.

Participate in projects that improve or meet the particular needs of their school or community

3.S.7.1.

Make connections between cause-and-effect relationships from information gathered from varied sources

3.S.7.2.

Evaluate whether information supports an issue or a research question

3.S.7.3.

Develop questions that reflect a personal information need

3.S.7.5.

Access and retrieve appropriate information from electronic sources for a specific inquiry

3.S.7.6.

Navigate within a document, compact disc or other software program that contains links

3.S.7.7.

Organize information from more than one source

3.S.7.8.

Process information from more than one source to retell what has been discovered

3.S.7.9.

Draw conclusions from organized information

3.S.8.2.

Listen to others in order to understand their points of view

3.S.8.3.

Interact with others in a socially appropriate manner

3.S.8.5.

Use technology to support and present conclusions

3.S.9.1.

Compare information on the same issue or topic from print media, television, photographs and the Internet