Alberta Programs of Study — Grade 5


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5-1.1.1.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Use appropriate prior knowledge and experiences to make sense of new ideas and information.

5-1.1.2.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Read, write, represent and talk to explore personal understandings of new ideas and information.

5-1.1.3.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Use own experiences as a basis for exploring and expressing opinions and understanding.

5-1.1.4.

Experiment with language and forms: Select from provided forms of oral, print and other media texts those that best organize ideas and information and develop understanding of topics.

5-1.1.5.

Express preferences: Select and explain preferences for particular forms of oral, print and other media texts.

5-1.1.6.

Set goals: Reflect on areas of personal accomplishment, and set personal goals to improve language learning and use.

5-1.2.1.

Consider others' ideas: Seek others' viewpoints to build on personal responses and understanding.

5-1.2.2.

Combine ideas: Use talk, notes, personal writing and representing to explore relationships among own ideas and experiences, those of others and those encountered in oral, print and other media texts.

5-1.2.3.

Extend understanding: Search for further ideas and information from others and from oral, print and other media texts to extend understanding.

5-10.1.

Recognize and describe one or more examples of wetland ecosystems found in the local area; e.g., pond, slough, marsh, bog, fen.

5-10.10.

Identify individual and group actions that can be taken to preserve and enhance wetland habitats.

5-10.2.

Understand that a wetland ecosystem involves interactions between living and nonliving things, both in and around the water.

5-10.3.

Identify some plants and animals found at a wetland site, both in and around the water; and describe the life cycles of these plants and animals.

5-10.4.

Identify and describe adaptations that make certain plants and animals suited for life in a wetland.

5-10.5.

Understand and appreciate that all animals and plants, not just the large ones, have an important role in a wetland community.

5-10.6.

Identify the roles of different organisms in the food web of a pond: producers - green plants that make their own food, using sunlight; consumers - animals that eat living plants and/or animals; decomposers - organisms, such as molds, fungi, insects and worms, that reuse and recycle materials that were formerly living.

5-10.7.

Draw diagrams of food chains and food webs, and interpret such diagrams.

5-10.8.

Recognize that some aquatic animals use oxygen from air and others from water, and identify examples and adaptations of each.

5-10.9.

Identify human actions that can threaten the abundance or survival of living things in wetland ecosystems; e.g., adding pollutants, changing the flow of water, trapping or hunting pond wildlife.

5-2.1.1.

Use prior knowledge: Describe ways that personal experiences and prior knowledge contribute to understanding new ideas and information.

5-2.1.10.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Integrate knowledge of phonics, sight vocabulary and structural analysis with knowledge of language and context clues to read unfamiliar words in context.

5-2.1.2.

Use prior knowledge: Use knowledge of organizational structures, such as tables of contents, indices, topic sentences and headings, to locate information and to construct and confirm meaning.

5-2.1.3.

Use comprehension strategies: Preview sections of print texts, and apply reading rate and strategies appropriate for the purpose, content and format of the texts.

5-2.1.4.

Use comprehension strategies: Comprehend new ideas and information by responding personally, taking notes and discussing ideas with others.

5-2.1.5.

Use comprehension strategies: Use the meanings of familiar words to predict the meanings of unfamiliar words in context.

5-2.1.6.

Use comprehension strategies: Monitor understanding by comparing personal knowledge and experiences with information on the same topic from a variety of sources.

5-2.1.8.

Use textual cues: Identify and use the structural elements of texts, such as letters, brochures, glossaries and encyclopedias, to access and comprehend ideas and information.

5-2.1.9.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Identify and know the meaning of high frequency prefixes and suffixes by sight to read unfamiliar, multisyllable words in context.

5-2.10.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will record observations and measurements accurately, using a chart format where appropriate. Computer resources may be used for record keeping and for display and interpretation of data.

5-2.12.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will evaluate how well the procedures worked and identify possible improvements.

5-2.2.

Focus: Students will identify one or more possible answers to questions by stating a prediction or a hypothesis.

5-2.2.1.

Experience various text: Experience oral, print and other media texts from a variety of cultural traditions and genres, such as historical fiction, myths, biographies, poetry, news reports and guest speakers.

5-2.2.10.

Construct meaning from texts: Retell or represent stories from the points of view of different characters.

5-2.2.12.

Appreciate the artistry of texts: Alter sentences and word choices to enhance meaning and to create mood and special effects.

5-2.2.2.

Experience various text: Express points of view about oral, print and other media texts.

5-2.2.3.

Experience various text: Make connections between fictional texts and historical events.

5-2.2.4.

Experience various text: Describe and discuss new places, times, characters and events encountered in oral, print and other media texts.

5-2.2.5.

Experience various text: Write or represent the meaning of texts in different forms.

5-2.2.6.

Construct meaning from texts: Compare characters and situations portrayed in oral, print and other media texts to those encountered in the classroom and community.

5-2.2.7.

Construct meaning from texts: Describe characters' qualities based on what they say and do and how they are described in oral, print and other media texts.

5-2.2.8.

Construct meaning from texts: Describe and discuss the influence of setting on the characters and events.

5-2.2.9.

Construct meaning from texts: Support own interpretations of oral, print and other media texts, using evidence from personal experiences and the texts.

5-2.3.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify one or more ways of finding answers to given questions.

5-2.3.1.

Understand forms and genres: Identify and discuss similarities and differences among a variety of forms of oral, print and other media texts.

5-2.3.3.

Understand techniques and elements: Identify the main problem or conflict in oral, print and other media texts, and explain how it is resolved.

5-2.3.4.

Understand techniques and elements: Identify and discuss the main character's point of view and motivation.

5-2.3.5.

Understand techniques and elements: Identify examples of apt word choice and imagery that create particular effects.

5-2.3.6.

Understand techniques and elements: Identify sections or elements in print or other media texts, such as shots in films or sections in magazines.

5-2.3.7.

Experiment with language: Experiment with words and sentence patterns to create word pictures; identify how imagery and figurative language, such as simile and exaggeration, convey meaning.

5-2.4.

Explore and Investigate: Students will plan, with guidance, and carry out procedures that comprise a fair test.

5-2.4.1.

Generate ideas: Use texts from listening, reading and viewing experiences as models for producing own oral, print and other media texts.

5-2.4.2.

Elaborate on the expression of ideas: Experiment with modeled forms of oral, print and other media texts to suit particular audiences and purposes.

5-2.4.3.

Structure texts: Use structures encountered in texts to organize and present ideas in own oral, print and other media texts.

5-2.4.4.

Structure texts: Use own experience as a starting point and source of information for fictional oral, print and other media texts.

5-2.6.

Explore and Investigate: Students will select appropriate materials and identify how they will be used.

5-2.7.

Explore and Investigate: Students will work individually or cooperatively in planning and carrying out procedures.

5-2.8.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify sources of information and ideas and access information and ideas from those sources. Sources may include library, classroom, community and computer-based resources.

5-2.9.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will communicate with group members to share and evaluate ideas, and assess progress.

5-3.1.

Focus: Students will identify problems to be solved and the purpose(s) of the problem-solving activity: What problem(s) are we trying to solve? What conditions must be met? What controls are required? How will we know that we have done what we set out to do?

5-3.1.1.

Focus attention: Summarize important ideas in oral, print and other media texts and express opinions about them.

5-3.1.3.

Determine information needs: Identify categories of information related to particular topics, and ask questions related to each category.

5-3.10.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will identify new applications for the design or problem solution.

5-3.2.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify one or more possible approaches to solving the problem and plan, with guidance, a set of steps to follow.

5-3.2.1.

Use a variety of sources: Locate information to answer research questions using a variety of sources, such as newspapers, encyclopedias, CDROMs, a series by the same writer, scripts, diaries, autobiographies, interviews and oral traditions.

5-3.2.2.

Access information: Use a variety of tools, such as chapter headings, glossaries and encyclopedia guide words, to access information.

5-3.3.3.

Organize information: Add, delete or combine ideas to communicate more effectively.

5-3.3.6.

Record information: Record ideas and information in relevant categories, according to research plan.

5-3.3.7.

Evaluate information: Connect gathered information to prior knowledge to reach new conclusions.

5-3.4.

Explore and Investigate: Students will attempt a variety of strategies and modify procedures, as needed (troubleshoot problems).

5-3.4.1.

Share ideas and information: Communicate ideas and information in a variety of oral, print and other media texts, such as illustrated reports, charts, graphic displays and travelogues.

5-3.4.3.

Review research process: Assess personal research skills using pre-established criteria.

5-3.8.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will evaluate the procedures used to solve the problem and identify possible improvements.

5-3.9.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will evaluate a design or product, based on a given set of questions or criteria. The criteria/questions may be provided by the teacher or developed by the students.

5-4.1.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying curiosity.

5-4.1.2.

Appraise own and others' work: Use developed criteria to provide feedback to others and to revise own work.

5-4.1.3.

Revise and edit: Revise to add and organize details that support and clarify intended meaning.

5-4.1.4.

Revise and edit: Edit for appropriate use of statements, questions and exclamations.

5-4.1.5.

Enhance legibility: Write legibly, using a style that is consistent in alignment, shape and slant.

5-4.1.6.

Enhance legibility: Apply word processing skills and use publishing programs to organize information.

5-4.1.7.

Expand knowledge of language: Extend word choice through knowledge of synonyms, antonyms and homonyms and the use of a thesaurus.

5-4.1.8.

Expand knowledge of language: Distinguish different meanings for the same word, depending on the context in which it is used.

5-4.10.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying a sense of personal and shared responsibility for actions taken.

5-4.11.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying respect for living things and environments, and commitment for their care.

5-4.2.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying confidence in personal ability to learn and develop problem-solving skills.

5-4.2.1.

Attend to grammar and usage: Use words and phrases to modify and clarify ideas in own writing.

5-4.2.10.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Recognize various uses of apostrophes, and use them appropriately in own writing.

5-4.2.2.

Attend to grammar and usage: Use connecting words to link ideas in sentences and paragraphs.

5-4.2.4.

Attend to grammar and usage: Identify past, present and future verb tenses, and use in sentences.

5-4.2.5.

Attend to spelling: Use phonic knowledge and skills, visual memory, the meaning and function of words in context, and spelling generalizations to spell with accuracy in own writing.

5-4.2.6.

Attend to spelling: Study and use the correct spelling of commonly misspelled words in own writing.

5-4.2.7.

Attend to spelling: Know and consistently apply spelling conventions when editing and proofreading own writing.

5-4.2.9.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Use quotation marks and separate paragraphs to indicate passages of dialogue in own writing.

5-4.3.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying inventiveness and open-mindedness.

5-4.3.1.

Present information: Organize ideas and information in presentations to maintain a clear focus and engage the audience.

5-4.3.2.

Enhance presentation: Use effective openings and closings that attract and sustain reader or audience interest.

5-4.3.3.

Use effective oral and visual communication: Adjust volume, tone of voice and gestures to engage the audience; arrange presentation space to focus audience attention.

5-4.3.4.

Demonstrate attentive listening and viewing: Identify and interpret the purpose of verbal and nonverbal messages and the perspectives of the presenter.

5-4.3.5.

Demonstrate attentive listening and viewing: Show respect for the presenter's opinions by listening politely and providing thoughtful feedback.

5-4.4.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying perseverance in the search for understandings and for solutions to problems.

5-4.5.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying flexibility in considering new ideas.

5-4.6.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying critical-mindedness in examining evidence and determining what the evidence means.

5-4.7.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying a willingness to use evidence as the basis for their conclusions and actions.

5-4.7.8.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Use capital letters, appropriately, in titles, headings and subheadings in own writing.

5-4.8.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying a willingness to work with others in shared activities and in sharing of experiences.

5-4.9.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying appreciation of the benefits gained from shared effort and cooperation.

5-5.1.

Recognize and appreciate the potential dangers involved in using sources of electrical currents: understand that household electrical currents are potentially dangerous and not a suitable source for experimentation; understand that small batteries are a relatively safe source of electricity, for experimentation and study, but that care should be taken to avoid short circuits; understand that short circuits may cause wires to heat up, as well as waste the limited amount of energy in batteries.

5-5.1.1.

Appreciate diversity: Discuss personal understanding of the lives of people or characters in various communities, cultural traditions, places and times portrayed in oral, print and other media texts.

5-5.1.2.

Appreciate diversity: Compare own and others' responses to ideas and experiences related to oral, print and other media texts.

5-5.1.3.

Relate texts to culture: Identify and discuss how qualities, such as courage, ambition and loyalty, are portrayed in oral, print and other media texts from diverse cultures and communities.

5-5.1.4.

Celebrate accomplishments and events: Select and use language appropriate in tone and form to recognize and honour people and events.

5-5.1.5.

Use language to show respect: Determine and use language appropriate to the context of specific situations.

5-5.10.

Draw and interpret, with guidance, circuit diagrams that include symbols for switches, power sources, resistors, lights and motors.

5-5.2.

Describe and demonstrate example activities that show that electricity and magnetism are related: demonstrate that electricity can be used to create magnetism; demonstrate that a moving magnet can be used to generate electricity.

5-5.2.2.

Cooperate with others: Discuss and decide whether to work individually or collaboratively to achieve specific goals.

5-5.2.4.

Work in groups: Contribute ideas to help solve problems, and listen and respond constructively.

5-5.2.5.

Work in groups: When doing a group project on wetlands, students realize that they do not have enough information to support their point that frogs are disappearing. They discuss ways to find more information.

5-5.3.

Demonstrate and interpret evidence of magnetic fields around magnets and around current-carrying wires, by use of iron filings or by use of one or more compasses.

5-5.4.

Demonstrate that a continuous loop of conducting material is needed for an uninterrupted flow of current in a circuit.

5-5.5.

Distinguish electrical conductors - materials that allow electricity to flow through them - from insulators - materials that do not allow electricity to flow through them.

5-5.6.

Recognize and demonstrate that some materials, including resistors, are partial conductors of electricity.

5-5.7.

Predict the effect of placing an electrical resistance in a simple circuit; e.g., in a circuit with a light bulb or electric motor.

5-5.8.

Recognize that the amount of electricity we use in our homes is measured in kilowatt hours.

5-5.9.

Interpret and explain: the reading on a household electrical meter; efficiency labels on electrical appliances.

5-6.1.

Identify example applications of electrical devices in the school and home environment, and classify the kinds of uses. Categories of electrical use may include such things as: heating, lighting, communicating, moving, computing.

5-6.2.

Design and construct circuits that operate lights and other electrical devices.

5-6.3.

Recognize the importance of switches and other control mechanisms to the design and operation of electrical devices, and identify purposes of switches in particular applications.

5-6.4.

Construct and use a variety of switches.

5-6.5.

Design and construct vehicles or other devices that use a battery-powered electric motor to produce motion; e.g., model cars, hoists, fans.

5-6.7.

Demonstrate different ways of lighting two lights from a single power source, and compare the results. Students should recognize that wiring two bulbs in series makes both bulbs glow less brightly than if the bulbs are wired in parallel. Students may demonstrate this knowledge operationally and do not need to use the terms series and parallel.

5-6.8.

Demonstrate different ways of using two batteries to light a bulb, and compare the results. Students should recognize that wiring the batteries in series causes the bulb to glow brighter than it would if parallel wiring were used.

5-6.9.

Given a design task and appropriate materials, invent and construct an electrical device that meets the task requirements.

5-7.1.

Recognize and identify examples of the following kinds of mixtures: two or more solids; e.g., sand and sugar, a solid and a liquid; e.g., sugar and water, two or more liquids; e.g., milk and tea.

5-7.5.

Recognize that the surface of water has distinctive properties, and describe the interaction of water with other liquids and solids.

5-7.7.

Distinguish reversible from irreversible changes of materials, and give examples of each.

5-7.8.

Recognize and describe evidence of a chemical reaction. Explain how the products of a reaction differ from the original substances.

5-7.9.

Use an indicator to identify a solution as being acidic or basic.

5-9.1.

Predict where, within a given indoor or outdoor environment, one is likely to find the warmest and coolest temperatures.

5-9.10.

Recognize that weather systems are generated because different surfaces on the face of Earth retain and release heat at different rates.

5-9.11.

Understand that climate refers to long term weather trends in a particular region and that climate varies throughout the world.

5-9.12.

Recognize that human actions can affect climate, and identify human actions that have been linked to the greenhouse effect.

5-9.13.

Appreciate how important it is to be able to forecast weather and to have suitable clothing or shelter to endure various types of weather.

5-9.14.

Test fabrics and clothing designs to choose those with characteristics that most effectively meet the challenges of particular weather conditions; e.g., water resistance, wind resistance, protection from cold.

5-9.2.

Describe patterns of air movement, in indoor and outdoor environments, that result when one area is warm and another area is cool.

5-9.3.

Describe and demonstrate methods for measuring wind speed and for finding wind direction.

5-9.4.

Describe evidence that air contains moisture and that dew and other forms of precipitation come from moisture in the air.

5-9.5.

Describe and measure different forms of precipitation, in particular, rain, hail, sleet, snow.

5-9.6.

Measure at least four different kinds of weather phenomena. Either student constructed or standard instruments may be used.

5-9.7.

Record weather over a period of time.

5-9.8.

Identify some common types of clouds, and relate them to weather patterns.

5-9.9.

Describe the effects of the Sun's energy on daily and seasonal changes in temperature - 24-hour and yearly cycles of change.

5.[CN]

Connections: Students are expected to connect mathematical ideas to other concepts in mathematics, to everyday experiences and to other disciplines

5.[ME]

Mental Mathematics and Estimation: Students are expected to demonstrate fluency with mental mathematics and estimation

5.[PS]

Problem Solving: Students are expected to develop and apply new mathematical knowledge through problem solving

5.[R]

Reasoning: Students are expected to develop mathematical reasoning

5.[V]

Visualization: Students are expected to develop visualization skills to assist in processing information, making connections and solving problems.

5.1.1.

Represent and describe whole numbers to 1 000 000. [C, CN, V, T] [ICT: C6-2.2]

5.1.1.1.

Appreciate the variety and abundance of natural resources in Canada (ER, LPP)

5.1.1.2.

Appreciate the diversity of geographic phenomena in Canada (LPP)

5.1.1.3.

Appreciate the environmental significance of national parks and protected areas in Canada (ER, LPP)

5.1.1.4.

Appreciate how the land sustains communities and the diverse ways that people have of living with the land (GC, LPP)

5.1.1.5.

Appreciate the influence of the natural environment on the growth and development of Canada (LPP)

5.1.1.6.

Demonstrate care and concern for the environment through their choices and actions (GC, LPP)

5.1.1.7.

Appreciate the geographic vastness of Canada (LPP)

5.1.10.

Compare and order decimals (to thousandths) by using: benchmarks; place value; equivalent decimals. [C, CN, R, V]

5.1.11.

Demonstrate an understanding of addition and subtraction of decimals (limited to thousandths). [C, CN, PS, R, V]

5.1.2.

Use estimation strategies in problem-solving contexts. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

5.1.2.1.

What are the major geographical regions, landforms and bodies of water in Canada? (LPP)

5.1.2.2.

How do landforms, bodies of water and natural resources affect the quality of life in Canada? (LPP)

5.1.2.3.

How have natural disasters and severe weather been part of Canada's physical geography? (LPP, TCC)

5.1.2.4.

What are the differences and similarities among the geographical regions of Canada? (LPP)

5.1.2.5.

How is the geographical region they live in different from other regions of Canada? (LPP)

5.1.2.6.

What are the factors that determine climate in the diverse geographical regions of Canada (e.g., latitude, water, mountains)? (LPP)

5.1.2.7.

How are Canada's national parks and protected areas important to the sustainability of Canada's natural environment? (ER, LPP)

5.1.3.

Apply mental mathematics strategies and number properties in order to understand and recall basic multiplication facts (multiplication tables) to 81 and related division facts. [C, CN, ME, R, V]

5.1.3.1.

In what ways do natural resources and the physical geography of a region determine the establishment of communities? (ER, LPP)

5.1.3.2.

How are natural resources used, exchanged and conserved in Canada? (ER, LPP)

5.1.3.3.

Whose responsibility should it be to ensure the preservation of Canada's national parks and protected areas? (C, ER, LPP)

5.1.4.

Apply mental mathematics strategies for multiplication. [C, CN, ME, R, V]

5.1.5.

Demonstrate, with and without concrete materials, an understanding of multiplication (2-digit by 2-digit) to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, V]

5.1.6.

Demonstrate, with and without concrete materials, an understanding of division (3-digit by 1-digit), and interpret remainders to solve problems. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

5.1.7.

Demonstrate an understanding of fractions by using concrete, pictorial and symbolic representations to: create sets of equivalent fractions; compare fractions with like and unlike denominators. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

5.1.8.

Describe and represent decimals (tenths, hundredths, thousandths), concretely, pictorially and symbolically. [C, CN, R, V]

5.1.9.

Relate decimals to fractions and fractions to decimals (to thousandths). [CN, R, V]

5.2.1.

Determine the pattern rule to make predictions about subsequent elements. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

5.2.1.1.

Recognize how an understanding of Canadian history and the stories of its peoples contributes to their sense of identity (I, TCC)

5.2.1.2.

Acknowledge oral traditions, narratives and stories as valid sources of knowledge about the land and diverse Aboriginal cultures and history (CC, I, TCC)

5.2.1.3.

Acknowledge the roots of Francophone identity and presence in Canada (CC, I, TCC)

5.2.1.4.

Acknowledge British influence and presence in Canada (CC, I, TCC)

5.2.1.5.

Acknowledge the contributions made by diverse cultural groups to the evolution of Canada (CC, I, TCC)

5.2.1.6.

Recognize how changes in society can affect identity (CC, I)

5.2.2.

Express a given problem as an equation in which a letter variable is used to represent an unknown number (limited to whole numbers). [C, CN, PS, R]

5.2.2.1.

What do the stories of First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples tell us about their beliefs regarding the relationship between people and the land? (I, CC, TCC, LPP)

5.2.2.2.

How are the Aboriginal cultures and ways of life unique in each of the western, northern, central and eastern regions of Canada? (I, CC, TCC)

5.2.2.3.

How were the natural environment and geography of each region of Canada determining factors of the diversity among Aboriginal groups (e.g., languages, symbolism)? (LPP, TCC)

5.2.2.4.

What was the significance of the potlatch to the identity of the Aboriginal peoples of the Northwest Coast? (I, CC, LPP)

5.2.2.5.

In what ways do anthropology and archaeology contribute to our understanding of First Nations, Metis and Inuit peoples? (CC, LPP, TCC)

5.2.3.

Solve problems involving single-variable, one-step equations with whole number coefficients and whole number solutions. [C, CN, PS, R]

5.2.3.1.

How do stories and legends of the coureurs des bois and voyageurs inform us about Francophone history, culture and presence throughout Canada? (I, CC, TCC)

5.2.3.2.

What do stories about the habitants tell us about Francophone history, culture and presence in Canada? (I, CC, TCC)

5.2.4.

Students will examine, critically, ways of life of the fur traders by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

5.2.4.1.

How are the stories of the Metis people, their culture and heritage rooted in the fur trade? (CC, I, TCC)

5.2.4.2.

How do stories about ways of life in fur trade forts reflect the British influence in Canada? (CC, TCC, PADM)

5.2.4.3.

What were the main languages spoken by fur traders and their families in the fur trade forts? (I, CC, TCC, ER)

5.2.5.

Students will examine, critically, ways of life of the United Empire Loyalists by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

5.2.5.1.

What do stories of the United Empire Loyalists tell us about British culture and presence in Canada? (CC, I, TCC)

5.2.5.2.

How did the diversity of United Empire Loyalists contribute to Canadian diversity? (I, CC, TCC, LPP)

5.2.6.

Students will examine, critically, the ways of life of immigrants from the British Isles during the Great Migration by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

5.2.6.1.

What do stories of Irish and Scottish immigrants tell us about their heritage and presence in Canada? (CC, I, TCC)

5.2.6.2.

What do stories of British peoples tell us about the British history, culture and presence in Canada? (CC, I, TCC)

5.2.7.

Students will examine, critically, how the North West Mounted Police shaped ways of life in Canada by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

5.2.7.1.

What do stories of the North West Mounted Police tell us about the settlement and development of western and northern Canada? (LPP, PADM)

5.2.7.2.

How have stories of the North West Mounted Police shaped identity in western and northern Canada? (I, TCC, PADM)

5.2.8.

Students will examine, critically, ways of life of non-European immigrants by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

5.2.8.1.

How do stories of Chinese immigrants (i.e., railway workers) contribute to an understanding of the development of Canada? (CC, I, TCC)

5.2.8.2.

What do stories of the Underground Railroad tell us about the history and presence of Black communities in Canada? (CC, I, TCC, LPP)

5.2.8.3.

How do stories of immigrants from India contribute to an understanding of diversity in Canada? (CC, I)

5.2.9.

Students will examine, critically, how European immigrants shaped ways of life in western Canada by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

5.2.9.1.

What do stories of immigrants from Ukraine, Poland, Russia and Germany tell us about their history and presence in western Canada? (CC, I, GC, LPP, TCC)

5.2.9.2.

How were European immigrants affected by pressures to conform in western Canada? (C, CC, I, GC, LPP, TCC)

5.3.1.

Identify 90 angles. [ME, V]

5.3.1.1.

Recognize how economic and political changes impact ways of life of citizens (C, ER, I, PADM)

5.3.1.2.

Recognize the effects of Confederation on citizenship and identity from multiple perspectives (C, I, PADM, TCC)

5.3.1.3.

Recognize the historical significance of French and English as Canada's official languages (C, I, PADM)

5.3.2.

Design and construct different rectangles, given either perimeter or area, or both (whole numbers), and make generalizations. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

5.3.2.1.

How did John A. Macdonald and George-etienne Cartier contribute as partners of Confederation? (TCC, PADM)

5.3.2.2.

How did the circumstances surrounding Confederation eventually lead to French and English becoming Canada's two official languages? (I, C, PADM)

5.3.2.3.

How did the building of Canada's national railway affect the development of Canada? (CC, ER, PADM)

5.3.2.4.

Why were Aboriginal peoples excluded from the negotiations surrounding Confederation? (TCC, PADM)

5.3.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of measuring length (mm) by: selecting and justifying referents for the unit mm; modelling and describing the relationship between mm and cm units, and between mm and m units. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

5.3.3.1.

Who were the Famous Five? (LPP, TCC)

5.3.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of volume by: selecting and justifying referents for cm^3 or m^3 units; estimating volume, using referents for cm^3 or m^3; measuring and recording volume (cm^3 or m^3); constructing right rectangular prisms for a given volume. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

5.3.4.1.

How did the First World War contribute to the industrialization and urbanization of Canada? (ER, LPP)

5.3.4.2.

In what ways did the Great Depression of the 1930s affect ways of life in urban and rural communities? (ER, LPP, TCC)

5.3.4.3.

How did the economic boom immediately following the Second World War affect ways of life in Canada? (CC, ER, TCC)

5.3.5.

Demonstrate an understanding of capacity by: describing the relationship between mL and L; selecting and justifying referents for mL or L units; estimating capacity, using referents for mL or L; measuring and recording capacity (mL or L). [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

5.3.5.1.

How was the Statute of Westminster a recognition of Canada as a country? (C, I, TCC)

5.3.5.2.

How did Lester B. Pearson's initiative within the United Nations contribute to Canada's identity as a peacekeeping country? (GC, I, PADM)

5.3.5.3.

How did the adoption of the Canadian flag affect collective identity within Canada? (I, LPP)

5.3.5.4.

How was the patriation of the Constitution in 1982 a step toward nationhood? (GC, I, PADM)

5.3.5.5.

How is the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms a symbol of Canada's emerging identity? (I, PADM)

5.3.5.6.

What factors led to the creation of Nunavut? (I, CC, LPP, PADM)

5.3.6.

Describe and provide examples of edges and faces of 3-D objects, and sides of 2-D shapes that are: parallel; intersecting; perpendicular; vertical; horizontal. [C, CN, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-2.2, P5-2.3]

5.3.7.

Identify and sort quadrilaterals, including: rectangles; squares; trapezoids; parallelograms; rhombuses according to their attributes. [C, R, V]

5.3.8.

Identify and describe a single transformation, including a translation, rotation and reflection of 2-D shapes. [C, T, V] [ICT: C6-2.1]

5.3.9.

Perform, concretely, a single transformation (translation, rotation or reflection) of a 2-D shape, and draw the image. [C, CN, T, V] [ICT: C6-2.1]

5.4.3.

Describe the likelihood of a single outcome occurring, using words such as: impossible; possible; certain. [C, CN, PS, R]

5.4.4.

Compare the likelihood of two possible outcomes occurring, using words such as: less likely; equally likely; more likely. [C, CN, PS, R]

5.S.1.1.

Analyze significant local and current affairs from a variety of sources, distinguishing between fact and opinion.

5.S.1.2.

Evaluate ideas, information and positions from multiple perspectives.

5.S.1.3.

Re-evaluate personal opinions to broaden understanding of a topic or an issue.

5.S.1.5.

Seek responses to inquiries from various authorities through electronic media.

5.S.1.6.

Recognize that information serves different purposes and that data from electronic sources may need to be verified to determine accuracy or relevance for the purpose used.

5.S.2.1.

Use photographs and interviews to make meaning of historical information.

5.S.2.2.

Use historical and community resources to understand and organize the sequence of national historical events.

5.S.2.3.

Explain the historical context of key events of a given time period.

5.S.2.4.

Organize information, using such tools as a database, spreadsheet or electronic webbing.

5.S.3.1.

Use latitude and longitude to determine the absolute location of places in Canada on maps and globes.

5.S.3.2.

Construct maps, diagrams and charts to display geographic information.

5.S.3.3.

Use historical maps to make meaning of historical events and issues.

5.S.3.4.

Use cardinal and intermediate directions and simple grids to locate places on maps and globes.

5.S.3.5.

Use the scale on maps and globes to determine the distance between places.

5.S.3.6.

List, map and discuss major waterways that have been significant in the establishment of communities in Canada (e.g., St. Lawrence River, Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Seaway, Red River).

5.S.4.1.

Determine when a decision needs to be made in dealing with problems and issues.

5.S.4.2.

Collaborate with others to apply strategies for decision making and problem solving.

5.S.4.3.

Select and use technology to assist in problem solving.

5.S.4.4.

Use data gathered from a variety of electronic sources to address identified problems.

5.S.4.5.

Solve problems requiring the sorting, organizing, classifying and extending of data, using such tools as calculators, spreadsheets, databases or hypertext technology.

5.S.4.6.

Use graphic organizers, such as mind mapping/webbing, flow charting and outlining, to present connections between ideas and information in a problem-solving environment.

5.S.4.7.

Generate alternative solutions to problems by using technology to facilitate the process.

5.S.5.2.

Demonstrate the ability to deal constructively with diversity and disagreement.

5.S.5.4.

Record group brainstorming, planning and sharing of ideas by using technology.

5.S.5.5.

Retrieve data from available storage devices, such as a shared folder, to which a group has contributed.

5.S.6.1.

Demonstrate commitment to the well-being of the school or community by volunteering to help where needed.

5.S.7.10.

Use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information.

5.S.7.2.

Use graphs, tables, charts and Venn diagrams to interpret information.

5.S.7.5.

Design and follow a plan, including a schedule, to be used during an inquiry process, and make revisions to the plan, as necessary.

5.S.7.6.

Access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locators (URLs).

5.S.7.7.

Navigate within a document, compact disc or other software program that contains links.

5.S.7.8.

Organize information gathered from the Internet, or an electronic source, by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories.

5.S.7.9.

Organize information, using such tools as a database, spreadsheet or electronic webbing.

5.S.8.2.

Respond appropriately to comments and questions, using language respectful of human diversity.

5.S.8.3.

Listen to others to understand their perspectives.

5.S.8.4.

Create visual images for particular audiences and purposes.

5.S.8.5.

Identify and distinguish points of view expressed in electronic sources on a particular topic.

5.S.8.6.

Extend the scope of a project beyond classroom collaboration by using communication technologies, such as the telephone and e-mail.

5.S.9.1.

Examine how various people might interpret a media message differently.

5.S.9.2.

Examine diverse perspectives regarding an issue presented in the media.