Alberta Programs of Study — Grade 6


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6-1.1.1.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Use prior experiences with oral, print and other media texts to choose new texts that meet learning needs and interests.

6-1.1.2.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Read, write, represent and talk to explore and explain connections between prior knowledge and new information in oral, print and other media texts.

6-1.1.3.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Engage in exploratory communication to share personal responses and develop own interpretations.

6-1.1.4.

Experiment with language and forms: Experiment with a variety of forms of oral, print and other media texts to discover those best suited for exploring, organizing and sharing ideas, information and experiences.

6-1.1.5.

Express preferences: Assess a variety of oral, print and other media texts, and discuss preferences for particular forms.

6-1.1.6.

Set goals: Assess personal language use, and revise personal goals to enhance language learning and use.

6-1.2.1.

Consider others' ideas: Select from others' ideas and observations to expand personal understanding.

6-1.2.2.

Combine ideas: Use talk, notes, personal writing and representing, together with texts and the ideas of others, to clarify and shape understanding.

6-10.1.

Identify reasons why trees and forests are valued. Students meeting this expectation should be aware that forests serve as habitat for a variety of living things and are important to human needs for recreation, for raw materials and for a life-supporting environment.

6-10.10.

Identify an issue regarding forest use, identify different perspectives on that issue, and identify actions that might be taken.

6-10.2.

Describe kinds of plants and animals found living on, under and among trees; and identify how trees affect and are affected by those living things.

6-10.3.

Describe the role of trees in nutrient cycles and in the production of oxygen.

6-10.4.

Identify general characteristics that distinguish trees from other plants, and characteristics that distinguish deciduous from coniferous trees.

6-10.5.

Identify characteristics of at least four trees found in the local environment. Students should be familiar with at least two deciduous trees and two coniferous trees. Examples should include native species, such as spruce, birch, poplar, and pine and cultivated species, such as elm and crab apple.

6-10.6.

Describe and classify leaf shapes, leaf arrangements, branching patterns and the overall form of a tree.

6-10.7.

Interpret the growth pattern of a young tree, distinguishing this year's growth from that of the previous year and from the year before that. Students meeting this expectation should recognize differences in colouration and texture of new growth and old growth, and locate scars that separate old and new growth.

6-10.8.

Identify human uses of forests, and compare modern and historical patterns of use.

6-10.9.

Identify human actions that enhance or threaten the existence of forests.

6-2.1.

Focus: Students will ask questions that lead to exploration and investigation.

6-2.1.1.

Use prior knowledge: Combine personal experiences and the knowledge and skills gained through previous experiences with oral, print and other media texts to understand new ideas and information.

6-2.1.10.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Use the meanings of prefixes and suffixes to predict the meanings of unfamiliar words in context.

6-2.1.11.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Integrate and apply knowledge of phonics, sight vocabulary, language and context clues, and structural analysis to read unfamiliar words in texts of increasing length and complexity.

6-2.1.12.

Use references: Choose the most appropriate reference to confirm the spellings or locate the meanings of unfamiliar words in oral, print and other media texts.

6-2.1.2.

Use prior knowledge: Students talk about examples of human frailties, such as vanity, greed and jealousy, and after reading several Greek myths, write about how the myths portray these frailties.

6-2.1.3.

Use prior knowledge: Apply knowledge of organizational structures of oral, print and other media texts to assist with constructing and confirming meaning.

6-2.1.4.

Use comprehension strategies: Identify, and explain in own words, the interrelationship of the main ideas and supporting details.

6-2.1.5.

Use comprehension strategies: Preview the content and structure of subject area texts, and use this information to set a purpose, rate and strategy for reading.

6-2.1.6.

Use comprehension strategies: Use definitions provided in context to identify the.

6-2.1.7.

Use comprehension strategies: Monitor understanding by evaluating new ideas and information in relation to known ideas and information.

6-2.1.8.

Use textual cues: Use text features, such as charts, graphs and dictionaries, to enhance understanding of ideas and information.

6-2.1.9.

Use textual cues: Identify and use the structural elements of texts, such as magazines, newspapers, newscasts and news features, to access and comprehend ideas and information.

6-2.10.

Explore and Investigate: Students will modify the procedures as needed.

6-2.11.

Explore and Investigate: Students will work individually or cooperatively in planning and carrying out procedures.

6-2.13.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will communicate effectively with group members in sharing and evaluating ideas, and assessing progress.

6-2.14.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will record observations and measurements accurately, using a chart format where appropriate. Computer resources may be used for record keeping and for display and interpretation of data.

6-2.15.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will evaluate procedures used and identify possible improvements.

6-2.16.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will state an inference, based on results. The inference will identify a cause and effect relationship that is supported by observations.

6-2.17.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will identify possible applications of what was learned.

6-2.18.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will identify new questions that arise from what was learned.

6-2.2.

Focus: Students will identify one or more possible answers to questions by stating a prediction or a hypothesis.

6-2.2.1.

Experience various text: Experience oral, print and other media texts from a variety of cultural traditions and genres, such as autobiographies, travelogues, comics, short films, myths, legends and dramatic performances.

6-2.2.10.

Appreciate the artistry of texts: Explain how metaphor, personification and synecdoche are used to create mood and mental images.

6-2.2.11.

Appreciate the artistry of texts: Experiment with sentence patterns, imagery and exaggeration to create mood and mental images.

6-2.2.12.

Appreciate the artistry of texts: Discuss how detail is used to enhance character, setting, action and mood in oral, print and other media texts.

6-2.2.2.

Experience various text: Explain own point of view about oral, print and other media texts.

6-2.2.3.

Experience various text: Make connections between own life and characters and ideas in oral, print and other media texts.

6-2.2.4.

Experience various text: Discuss common topics or themes in a variety of oral, print and other media texts.

6-2.2.5.

Construct meaning from texts: Observe and discuss aspects of human nature revealed in oral, print and other media texts, and relate them to those encountered in the community.

6-2.2.6.

Construct meaning from texts: Summarize oral, print or other media texts, indicating the connections among events, characters and settings.

6-2.2.7.

Construct meaning from texts: Identify or infer reasons for a character's actions or feelings.

6-2.2.9.

Construct meaning from texts: Comment on the credibility of characters and events in oral, print and other media texts, using evidence from personal experiences and the text.

6-2.3.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify one or more ways of finding answers to given questions.

6-2.3.1.

Understand forms and genres: Identify key characteristics of a variety of forms or genres of oral, print and other media texts.

6-2.3.2.

Understand forms and genres: Discuss the differences between print and other media versions of the same text.

6-2.3.3.

Understand techniques and elements: Discuss the connections among plot, setting and characters in oral, print and other media texts.

6-2.3.4.

Understand techniques and elements: Identify first and third person narration, and discuss preferences with reference to familiar texts.

6-2.3.5.

Understand techniques and elements: Explore techniques, such as visual imagery, sound, flashback and voice inflection, in oral, print and other media texts.

6-2.3.6.

Understand techniques and elements: Identify strategies that presenters use in media texts to influence audiences.

6-2.3.7.

Experiment with language: Alter words, forms and sentence patterns to create new versions of texts for a variety of purposes; explain how imagery and figurative language, such as personification and alliteration, clarify and enhance meaning.

6-2.4.

Explore and Investigate: Students will plan and carry out procedures that comprise a fair test.

6-2.4.1.

Generate ideas: Choose life themes encountered in reading, listening and viewing activities and in own experiences for creating oral, print and other media texts.

6-2.4.3.

Structure texts: Determine purpose and audience needs to choose forms, and organize ideas and details in oral, print and other media texts.

6-2.4.4.

Structure texts: Express the same ideas in different forms and genres; compare and explain the effectiveness of each for audience and purpose.

6-2.5.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify variables:

6-2.6.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify the variable to be manipulated.

6-2.7.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify variables to be held constant.

6-2.8.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify the variable that will be observed (responding variable).

6-2.9.

Explore and Investigate: Students will select appropriate materials and identify how they will be used.

6-3.1.

Focus: Students will identify problems to be solved and the purpose(s) of problem-solving activities: What problem(s) are we trying to solve? What resources can we use? How will we know that we have done what we set out to do? What possible impacts do we need to consider?

6-3.1.2.

Focus attention: Use note-taking or representing to assist with understanding ideas and information, and focusing topics for investigation.

6-3.1.3.

Determine information needs: Decide on and select the information needed to support a point of view.

6-3.10.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will identify positive and negative impacts that may arise and potential risks that need to be monitored: What good effects and what bad effects could this solution have? What would we need to look for to be sure that it is working as intended?

6-3.11.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will identify new applications for the design or problem solution.

6-3.2.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify one or more possible approaches and plan a set of steps for solving the problem.

6-3.2.1.

Use a variety of sources: Locate information to answer research questions using a variety of sources, such as printed texts, bulletin boards, biographies, art, music, community resource people, CDROMs and the Internet.

6-3.2.2.

Access information: Use a variety of tools, such as bibliographies, thesauri, electronic searches and technology, to access information.

6-3.3.

Explore and Investigate: Students will select appropriate materials and identify how they will be used.

6-3.3.1.

Organize information: Organize ideas and information using a variety of strategies and techniques, such as comparing and contrasting, and classifying and sorting according to subtopics and sequence.

6-3.3.2.

Organize information: Organize and develop ideas and information into oral, print or other media texts with introductions that interest audiences and state the topic, sections that develop the topic and conclusions.

6-3.3.4.

Record information: Use outlines, thought webs and summaries to show the relationships among ideas and information and to clarify meaning.

6-3.3.5.

Record information: Quote information from oral, print and other media sources.

6-3.4.

Explore and Investigate: Students will attempt a variety of strategies and modify procedures, as needed (troubleshoot problems).

6-3.4.1.

Share ideas and information: Communicate ideas and information in a variety of oral, print and other media texts, such as multiparagraph reports, question and answer formats and graphs.

6-3.4.2.

Share ideas and information: Select appropriate visuals, print and/or other media to inform and engage the audience.

6-3.4.3.

Review research process: Establish goals for enhancing research skills.

6-3.5.

Explore and Investigate: Students will work individually or cooperatively in planning and carrying out procedures.

6-3.6.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify sources of information and ideas and demonstrate skill in accessing them. Sources may include library, classroom, community and computer-based resources.

6-3.8.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will evaluate procedures used and identify possible improvements.

6-3.9.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will evaluate a design or product, based on a given set of questions or criteria. The criteria/questions may be provided by the teacher or developed by the students. .

6-4.1.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying curiosity.

6-4.1.1.

Appraise own and others' work: Work collaboratively to revise and enhance oral, print and other media texts.

6-4.1.2.

Appraise own and others' work: Ask for and evaluate the usefulness of feedback and assistance from peers.

6-4.1.3.

Revise and edit: Revise to provide focus, expand relevant ideas and eliminate unnecessary information.

6-4.1.4.

Revise and edit: Edit for appropriate verb tense and for correct pronoun references.

6-4.1.5.

Enhance legibility: Write legibly and at a pace appropriate to context and purpose.

6-4.1.6.

Enhance legibility: Experiment with a variety of software design elements, such as spacing, graphics, titles and headings, and font sizes and styles, to enhance the presentation of texts.

6-4.1.7.

Expand knowledge of language: Show the relationships among key words associated with topics of study, using a variety of strategies such as thought webs, outlines and lists.

6-4.1.8.

Expand knowledge of language: Choose words that capture a particular aspect of meaning and that are appropriate for context, audience and purpose.

6-4.1.9.

Enhance artistry: Experiment with several options, such as sentence structures, figurative language and multimedia effects, to choose the most appropriate way of communicating ideas or information.

6-4.10.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying a sense of personal and shared responsibility for actions taken.

6-4.11.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying respect for living things and environments, and commitment for their care.

6-4.2.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying confidence in personal ability to learn and develop problem-solving skills.

6-4.2.1.

Attend to grammar and usage: Identify the use of coordinate and subordinate conjunctions to express ideas.

6-4.2.10.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Identify ellipses that show words are omitted or sentences are incomplete when reading, and use them to assist comprehension.

6-4.2.2.

Attend to grammar and usage: Use complex sentence structures and a variety of sentence types in own writing.

6-4.2.3.

Attend to grammar and usage: Identify comparative and superlative forms of adjectives, and use in own writing.

6-4.2.4.

Attend to grammar and usage: Identify past, present and future verb tenses, and use throughout a piece of writing.

6-4.2.6.

Attend to spelling: Explain the importance of correct spellings for effective communication.

6-4.2.7.

Attend to spelling: Edit for and correct commonly misspelled words in own writing, using spelling generalizations and the meaning and function of words in context.

6-4.2.8.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Use colons before lists, to separate hours and minutes, and after formal salutations in own writing.

6-4.2.9.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Identify parentheses and colons when reading, and use them to assist comprehension.

6-4.3.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying inventiveness and open-mindedness.

6-4.3.1.

Present information: Use various styles and forms of presentations, depending on content, audience and purpose.

6-4.3.2.

Enhance presentation: Emphasize key ideas and information to enhance audience understanding and enjoyment.

6-4.3.3.

Use effective oral and visual communication: Demonstrate control of voice, pacing, gestures and facial expressions; arrange props and presentation space to enhance communication.

6-4.3.4.

Demonstrate attentive listening and viewing: Identify the tone, mood and emotion conveyed in oral and visual presentations.

6-4.3.5.

Demonstrate attentive listening and viewing: Respond to the emotional aspects of presentations by providing nonverbal encouragement and appreciative comments.

6-4.4.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying perseverance in the search for understandings and for solutions to problems.

6-4.5.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying flexibility in considering new ideas.

6-4.6.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying critical-mindedness in examining evidence and determining what the evidence means.

6-4.7.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying a willingness to use evidence as the basis for their conclusions and actions.

6-4.8.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying a willingness to work with others in shared activities and in sharing of experiences.

6-4.9.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying appreciation of the benefits gained from shared effort and cooperation.

6-5.1.

Provide evidence that air takes up space and exerts pressure, and identify examples of these properties in everyday applications.

6-5.1.1.

Appreciate diversity: Compare personal challenges and situations encountered in daily life with those experienced by people or characters in other times, places and cultures as portrayed in oral, print and other media texts.

6-5.1.2.

Appreciate diversity: Share and discuss ideas and experiences that contribute to different responses to oral, print and other media texts.

6-5.1.3.

Relate texts to culture: identify ways in which oral, print and other media texts from diverse cultures and communities explore similar ideas.

6-5.1.4.

Celebrate accomplishments and events: Use appropriate language to participate in public events, occasions or traditions.

6-5.1.5.

Use language to show respect: Demonstrate respect by choosing appropriate language and tone in oral, print and other media texts.

6-5.2.

Provide evidence that air is a fluid and is capable of being compressed, and identify examples of these properties in everyday applications.

6-5.2.1.

Cooperate with others: Assume a variety of roles, and share responsibilities as a group member.

6-5.2.2.

Cooperate with others: Identify and participate in situations and projects in which group work enhances learning and results.

6-5.2.3.

Work in groups: Contribute to group knowledge of topics to identify and focus information needs, sources and purposes for research or investigations.

6-5.2.4.

Work in groups: Address specific problems in a group by specifying goals, devising alternative solutions and choosing the best alternative.

6-5.2.5.

Evaluate group process: Assess own contributions to group process, and set personal goals for working effectively with others.

6-5.3.

Describe and demonstrate instances in which air movement across a surface results in lift - Bernoulli's principle.

6-5.4.

Recognize that in order for devices or living things to fly, they must have sufficient lift to overcome the downward force of gravity.

6-5.5.

Identify adaptations that enable birds and insects to fly.

6-5.6.

Describe the means of propulsion for flying animals and for aircraft.

6-5.7.

Recognize that streamlining reduces drag, and predict the effects of specific design changes on the drag of a model aircraft or aircraft components.

6-5.8.

Recognize that air is composed of different gases, and identify evidence for different gases. Example evidence might include: effects on flames, the 'using up' of a particular gas by burning or rusting, animal needs for air exchange.

6-6.1.

Conduct tests of a model parachute design, and identify design changes to improve the effectiveness of the design.

6-6.2.

Describe the design of a hot-air balloon and the principles by which its rising and falling are controlled.

6-6.3.

Conduct tests of glider designs; and modify a design so that a glider will go further, stay up longer or fly in a desired way; e.g., fly in a loop, turn to the right.

6-6.4.

Recognize the importance of stability and control to aircraft flight; and design, construct and test control surfaces.

6-6.5.

Apply appropriate vocabulary in referring to control surfaces and major components of an aircraft. This vocabulary should include: wing, fuselage, vertical and horizontal stabilizers, elevators, ailerons, rudder.

6-6.6.

Construct and test propellers and other devices for propelling a model aircraft.

6-6.7.

Describe differences in design between aircraft and spacecraft, and identify reasons for the design differences. Note: Model aircraft or rockets may be constructed and used as part of this topic. It is recommended that these models be simple devices of the student's construction, not prefabricated models. Propulsion of rockets by chemical fuels is neither required nor recommended, due to safety considerations.

6-7.1.

Recognize that the Sun and stars emit the light by which they are seen and that most other bodies in space, including Earth's Moon, planets and their moons, comets, and asteroids, are seen by reflected light.

6-7.10.

Recognize that not only Earth, but other planets, have moons; and identify examples of similarities and differences in the characteristics of those moons.

6-7.11.

Identify technologies and procedures by which knowledge, about planets and other objects in the night sky, has been gathered.

6-7.12.

Understand that Earth, the Sun and the Moon are part of a solar system that occupies only a tiny part of the known universe.

6-7.2.

Describe the location and movement of individual stars and groups of stars (constellations) as they move through the night sky.

6-7.3.

Recognize that the apparent movement of objects in the night sky is regular and predictable, and explain how this apparent movement is related to Earth's rotation.

6-7.5.

Construct and use a device for plotting the apparent movement of the Sun over the course of a day; e.g., construct and use a sundial or shadow stick.

6-7.6.

Describe seasonal changes in the length of the day and night and in the angle of the Sun above the horizon.

6-7.7.

Recognize that the Moon's phases are regular and predictable, and describe the cycle of its phases.

6-7.8.

Illustrate the phases of the Moon in drawings and by using improvised models. An improvised model might involve such things as a table lamp and a sponge ball.

6-7.9.

Recognize that the other eight known planets, which revolve around the Sun, have characteristics and surface conditions that are different from Earth; and identify examples of those differences.

6-9.1.

Recognize evidence of recent human activity, and recognize evidence of animal activity in a natural outdoor setting.

6-9.2.

Observe a set of footprints, and infer the direction and speed of travel.

6-9.3.

Recognize that evidence found at the scene of an activity may have unique characteristics that allow an investigator to make inferences about the participants and the nature of the activity, and give examples of how specific evidence may be used.

6-9.4.

Investigate evidence and link it to a possible source; e.g., by: classifying footprints, tire prints and soil samples from a variety of locations, analyzing the ink from different pens, using paper chromatography; analyzing handwriting samples to identify the handwriting of a specific person; comparing samples of fabric; classifying fingerprints collected from a variety of surfaces.

6.[C]

Communication: Students are expected to communicate in order to learn and express their understanding

6.[CN]

Connections: Students are expected to connect mathematical ideas to other concepts in mathematics, to everyday experiences and to other disciplines

6.[ME]

Mental Mathematics and Estimation: Students are expected to demonstrate fluency with mental mathematics and estimation

6.[PS]

Problem Solving: Students are expected to develop and apply new mathematical knowledge through problem solving

6.[R]

Reasoning: Students are expected to develop mathematical reasoning

6.[V]

Visualization: Students are expected to develop visualization skills to assist in processing information, making connections and solving problems.

6.1.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of place value, including numbers that are: greater than one million; less than one thousandth. [C, CN, R, T]

6.1.1.1.

Recognize and respect the democratic rights of all citizens in Canada (C, I)

6.1.1.2.

Value the role of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms in protecting individual and collective rights and freedoms (I, PADM)

6.1.1.3.

Recognize the influence of historical events and legislation on democratic decision making in Canada (TCC, PADM)

6.1.1.4.

Value citizens' participation in a democratic society (C)

6.1.1.5.

Value the contributions of elected representatives in the democratic process (PADM)

6.1.2.

Solve problems involving whole numbers and decimal numbers. [ME, PS, T] [ICT: C6-2.4]

6.1.2.1.

What is democracy (i.e., justice, equity, freedoms, representation)? (C, PADM)

6.1.2.2.

What are the similarities and differences between direct and representative democracy? (PADM)

6.1.2.3.

What are the rights and responsibilities of citizens living in a representative democracy? (C, PADM)

6.1.2.4.

How does Canada's justice system help protect your democratic and constitutional rights? (C, PADM)

6.1.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of factors and multiples by: determining multiples and factors of numbers less than 100; identifying prime and composite numbers; solving problems using multiples and factors. [CN, PS, R, V]

6.1.3.1.

How does the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms protect the individual rights and freedoms of all Canadians? (I, PADM)

6.1.3.2.

How does the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms protect collective rights in Canada (i.e., Aboriginal rights, the linguistic rights of official language minorities)? (I, PADM)

6.1.3.3.

How did the Treaty of La Grande Paix de Montral address collective identity and collective rights? (I, PADM, TCC)

6.1.3.4.

How do the Treaty of La Grande Paix de Montral and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms compare in the way that each addresses individual and collective identity and collective rights? (PADM, TCC, I)

6.1.3.5.

Why is the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms entrenched in the Canadian Constitution? (C, I, PADM)

6.1.4.

Relate improper fractions to mixed numbers and mixed numbers to improper fractions. [CN, ME, R, V]

6.1.5.

Demonstrate an understanding of ratio, concretely, pictorially and symbolically. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.1.5.1.

How is the provincial government structured? (PADM)

6.1.5.2.

What is the role and status of the Lieutenant Governor within the provincial government? (GC, PADM)

6.1.5.3.

What are the responsibilities of the provincial government (i.e., laws, taxes, services)? (PADM)

6.1.5.4.

How are representatives chosen at the provincial level of government (i.e., electoral process)? (PADM)

6.1.5.5.

What are the differences between the responsibilities of a Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) and a cabinet minister? (PADM)

6.1.6.

Demonstrate an understanding of percent (limited to whole numbers), concretely, pictorially and symbolically. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.1.6.1.

How can individuals, groups and associations within a community participate in the decision-making process regarding current events or issues (i.e., lobbying, petitioning, organizing and attending local meetings and rallies, contacting elected representatives)? (C, PADM)

6.1.6.3.

In what ways do elected officials demonstrate their accountability to the electorate (e.g., respond to constituents, participate in local events, represent and express in government meetings the concerns of constituents)? (C, PADM)

6.1.7.

Demonstrate an understanding of integers, concretely, pictorially and symbolically. [C, CN, R, V]

6.1.8.

Demonstrate an understanding of multiplication and division of decimals (1-digit whole number multipliers and 1-digit natural number divisors). [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

6.1.9.

Explain and apply the order of operations, excluding exponents, with and without technology (limited to whole numbers). [C, CN, ME, PS, T] [ICT: C6-2.4, C6-2.7]

6.2.1.

Represent and describe patterns and relationships, using graphs and tables. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V] [ICT: C6-2.3]

6.2.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of the relationships within tables of values to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, R] [ICT: C6-2.3]

6.2.3.

Represent generalizations arising from number relationships, using equations with letter variables. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.2.3.1.

How was the government of ancient Athens structured? (PADM)

6.2.3.2.

How did the structure of the government in ancient Athens provide opportunities for citizens to participate in decision making? (C, PADM)

6.2.3.3.

How did identity, status and class structure impact citizenship in ancient Athens? (C, I)

6.2.3.4.

How did the social structure of ancient Athens impact its political structure? (CC, PADM)

6.2.3.5.

To what extent were democratic ideals of equity and fairness part of the structure of government and society in ancient Athens? (I, PADM)

6.2.4.

Express a given problem as an equation in which a letter variable is used to represent an unknown number. [C, CN, PS, R]

6.2.4.1.

How was the Iroquois Confederacy structured? (PADM)

6.2.4.2.

What was the role and status of women within the Iroquois Confederacy? (I, PADM)

6.2.4.3.

What are the advantages and disadvantages of consensus as a decision-making model for government? (PADM)

6.2.4.4.

How did the Six Nations use the consensus-building process? (PADM)

6.2.4.5.

How did the Wampum Belt address collective identity? (I, PADM)

6.2.4.6.

How did the social structure of the Iroquois Confederacy impact its political structure? (CC, PADM)

6.2.4.7.

To what extent did the decision-making process within the Iroquois Confederacy reflect democratic ideals of equity and fairness? (PADM)

6.2.5.

Demonstrate and explain the meaning of preservation of equality, concretely and pictorially. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.3.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of angles by: identifying examples of angles in the environment; classifying angles according to their measure; estimating the measure of angles, using 45, 90 and 180 as reference angles; determining angle measures in degrees; drawing and labelling angles when the measure is specified. [C, CN, ME, V]

6.3.2.

Demonstrate that the sum of interior angles is: 180 in a triangle; 360 in a quadrilateral. [C, R]

6.3.3.

Develop and apply a formula for determining the: perimeter of polygons; area of rectangles; volume of right rectangular prisms. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.3.4.

Construct and compare triangles, including: scalene; isosceles; equilateral; right; obtuse; acute in different orientations. [C, PS, R, V]

6.3.5.

Describe and compare the sides and angles of regular and irregular polygons. [C, PS, R, V]

6.3.8.

Identify and plot points in the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane, using whole number ordered pairs. [C, CN, V]

6.3.9.

Perform and describe single transformations of a 2-D shape in the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane (limited to whole number vertices). [C, CN, PS, T, V] [ICT: C6-2.1]

6.4.1.

Create, label and interpret line graphs to draw conclusions. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.4.2.

Select, justify and use appropriate methods of collecting data, including: questionnaires; experiments; databases; electronic media. [C, CN, PS, R, T] [ICT: C4-2.2, C6-2.2, C7-2.1, P2-2.1, P2-2.2]

6.4.3.

Graph collected data, and analyze the graph to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, R, T] [ICT: C6-2.5, C7-2.1, P2-2.1, P2-2.2]

6.4.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of probability by: identifying all possible outcomes of a probability experiment; differentiating between experimental and theoretical probability; determining the theoretical probability of outcomes in a probability experiment; determining the experimental probability of outcomes in a probability experiment; comparing experimental results with the theoretical probability for an experiment. [C, ME, PS, T] [ICT: C6-2.1, C6-2.4]

6.S.1.1.

Assess significant local and current affairs from a variety of sources, with a focus on examining bias and distinguishing fact from opinion

6.S.1.2.

Critically evaluate ideas, information and positions

6.S.1.3.

Re-evaluate personal opinions to broaden understanding of a topic or an issue

6.S.1.4.

Generate original ideas and strategies in individual and group activities

6.S.1.5.

Seek responses to inquiries from various authorities through electronic media

6.S.2.1.

Use primary sources to interpret historical events and issues

6.S.2.2.

Use historical and community resources to understand and organize the sequence of historical events

6.S.2.3.

Explain the historical contexts of key events of a given time period

6.S.2.4.

Use examples of events to describe cause and effect and change over time

6.S.2.5.

Organize information, using such tools as a database, spreadsheet or electronic webbing

6.S.3.1.

Construct and interpret various types of maps (i.e., historical, physical, political maps) to broaden understanding of topics being studied

6.S.3.2.

Use geographic tools, including software, that assist in preparing graphs and maps

6.S.3.3.

Use cardinal and intermediate directions to locate places on maps and globes

6.S.3.5.

Identify geographic problems and issues and pose geographic questions

6.S.4.2.

Consider multiple perspectives when dealing with issues, decision making and problem solving

6.S.4.4.

Select and use technology to assist in problem solving

6.S.4.5.

Use data gathered from a variety of electronic sources to address identified problems

6.S.4.6.

Solve problems requiring the sorting, organizing, classifying and extending of data, using such tools as calculators, spreadsheets, databases or hypertext technology

6.S.4.7.

Use graphic organizers, such as mind mapping/webbing, flow charting and outlining, to present connections among ideas and information in a problem-solving environment

6.S.4.9.

Generate alternative solutions to problems by using technology to facilitate the process

6.S.5.1.

Demonstrate the skills of compromise to reach group consensus

6.S.5.2.

Work collaboratively with others to achieve a common goal

6.S.5.3.

Record group brainstorming, planning and sharing of ideas by using technology

6.S.6.1.

Demonstrate commitment to the well-being of their community by drawing attention to situations of injustice where action is needed

6.S.7.1.

Determine reliability of information filtering for point of view and bias

6.S.7.10.

Use a variety of technologies to organize and synthesize researched information

6.S.7.11.

Reflect on and describe the processes involved in completing a project

6.S.7.3.

Use graphs, tables, charts and Venn diagrams to interpret information

6.S.7.4.

Draw and support conclusions based on information gathered to answer a research question

6.S.7.7.

Design and follow a plan, including a schedule, to be used during an inquiry process, and make revisions to the plan, as necessary

6.S.7.8.

Access and retrieve appropriate information from the Internet by using a specific search path or from given uniform resource locators (URLs)

6.S.7.9.

Organize information, using such tools as a database, spreadsheet or electronic webbing

6.S.8.1.

Express opinions and present perspectives and information in a variety of forms such as oral or written presentations, speeches or debates

6.S.8.2.

Express reasons for their ideas and opinions, in oral or written form

6.S.8.4.

Respond appropriately to comments and questions, using language respectful of human diversity

6.S.8.5.

Listen to others to understand their perspectives

6.S.8.6.

Organize information gathered from the Internet, or an electronic source, by selecting and recording the data in logical files or categories

6.S.8.7.

Communicate effectively through appropriate forms, such as speeches, reports and multimedia presentations, applying information technologies that serve particular audiences and purposes

6.S.9.1.

Detect bias present in the media

6.S.9.2.

Examine and assess diverse perspectives regarding an issue presented in the media

6.S.9.3.

Analyze significant current affairs

6.S.9.4.

Identify and distinguish points of view expressed in electronic sources on a particular topic

6.S.9.5.

Use selected presentation tools to demonstrate connections among various pieces of information

6.S.9.6.

Recognize that information serves different purposes and that data from electronic sources may need to be verified to determine accuracy or relevance for the purpose used