Manitoba Curriculum Frameworks — Grade 1


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1-1-0-1b.

Make predictions based on classroom experiences. (GLO: A1, C2)

1-1-0-1c.

Recognize a practical problem in a given context. (GLO: C3)

1-1-0-2a.

Access information using a variety of sources. (GLO: C6)

1-1-0-2b.

Recognize when information answers the questions asked. (GLO: C6, C8)

1-1-0-3c.

Develop, as a class, limited criteria to evaluate an object or device based on its function. (GLO: C3, C7)

1-1-0-4a.

Follow simple directions while undertaking explorations. (GLO: C2)

1-1-0-4b.

Construct an object or device to solve a problem or meet a need. (GLO: C3)

1-1-0-4c.

Test, with guidance, an object or device with respect to pre-determined criteria. (GLO: C3, C5)

1-1-0-4d.

Identify and make improvements to an object or device with respect to pre-determined criteria. (GLO: C3)

1-1-0-4g.

Verbalize questions and ideas during classroom learning experiences. (GLO: C6)

1-1-0-4h.

Follow given safety procedures and rules. (GLO: C1)

1-1-0-4i.

Recognize safety symbols in their surroundings. (GLO: C1)

1-1-0-5a.

Observe using a combination of the senses. (GLO: C2)

1-1-0-5b.

Use, with guidance, appropriate materials and tools to measure and construct. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

1-1-0-5d.

Select an appropriate non-standard unit, and estimate and measure length. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

1-1-0-5e.

Record observations using drawings and tally charts. (GLO: C2, C6)

1-1-0-6b.

Compare data using quantitative terms, and ask questions about the data gathered. (GLO: A1, A2, C2, C5)

1-1-0-7a.

Propose an answer to the initial question based on their observations. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

1-1-0-7b.

Propose a solution to the initial problem. (GLO: C3)

1-1-0-7c.

Identify new problems that arise. (GLO: C3)

1-1-0-7d.

Connect new experiences and information with prior knowledge. (GLO: A2)

1-1-0-7e.

Describe, in a variety of ways, what was done and what was observed. (GLO: C6)

1-1-0-8a.

Recognize that learning can come from careful observations and investigations. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

1-1-0-8b.

Recognize that tools are developed in response to human needs. (GLO: A3)

1-1-0-9a.

Willingly consider other people's views. (GLO: C5, C7)

1-1-0-9b.

Willingly observe, question, and explore. (GLO: C5)

1-1-0-9c.

Express enjoyment of science-related classroom activities. (GLO: C5)

1-1-0-9d.

Take the time to measure with care. (GLO: C5)

1-1-1-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of characteristics and needs of living things. (GLO: C6, D1)

1-1-1-02.

Identify major parts of the human body and describe their functions. (GLO: D1, E2)

1-1-1-03.

Identify and describe common characteristics of humans and other animals they have observed. (GLO: D1, E1)

1-1-1-04.

Identify and appreciate variations that make each human unique. (GLO: C5, E1)

1-1-1-05.

Recognize that plants, as living things, come in different forms. (GLO: D1, E1)

1-1-1-06.

Observe and identify similarities in life processes between themselves and other living things. (GLO: D1, E1)

1-1-1-07.

Recognize that plants, animals, and humans, as living things, have particular needs. (GLO: D1)

1-1-1-08.

Describe what is needed to care for a pet, a farm animal, or an indoor plant. (GLO: B4, B5)

1-1-1-09.

Compare ways in which humans and other animals meet their needs. (GLO: C2, D1, E1)

1-1-1-10.

Describe how humans and other living things depend on their environment to meet their needs. (GLO: D2, E2)

1-1-1-11.

Design a representation of an environment that meets the needs of a Manitoba animal. (GLO: C3, D1)

1-1-1-12.

Identify hobbies and jobs that require knowledge of the needs of living things. (GLO: B4, B5)

1-1-1-13.

Develop, implement, and evaluate personal and group action plans that contribute to a healthy environment for themselves and for other living things. (GLO: B3, B5, C4, C7)

1-1-1-14.

Show respect for living things in their immediate environment. (GLO: B5)

1-1-1-15.

Recognize that some information they receive about living things is not scientific in nature. (GLO: A1, C5, C8)

1-1-2-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of the senses. (GLO: C6, D1, D3)

1-1-2-02.

Identify the five senses and describe the main body parts with which they are associated. (GLO: D1)

1-1-2-03.

Use their senses to sort and classify objects. (GLO: C2, D1, E1)

1-1-2-04.

Identify and describe parts of the eye that help to protect it. (GLO: D1)

1-1-2-05.

Recognize that their fingertips are especially sensitive to touch. (GLO: D1)

1-1-2-06.

Identify the external part of the ear, and explore to determine its function. (GLO: D1)

1-1-2-07.

Use smell to identify familiar substances, following safe procedures. (GLO: C1, C2, D3)

1-1-2-08.

Identify parts of the nose and describe their functions. (GLO: D1)

1-1-2-09.

Identify parts of the body that are involved directly and indirectly in tasting. (GLO: D1)

1-1-2-10.

Identify objects and procedures that protect the body and preserve each of the senses in explorations and in daily life. (GLO: B3, C1)

1-1-2-11.

Explore to determine ways that the appearance, texture, sound, smell, and taste of objects can be altered. (GLO: D3, E3)

1-1-2-12.

Describe ways in which the senses can both protect and mislead. (GLO: B3, C1, D1)

1-1-2-13.

Recognize and appreciate that humans have different capabilities for sensing the environment and can use aids to assist them. (GLO: B1, C5, E1)

1-1-2-14.

Recognize and appreciate that humans may have different interpretations of similar sensory observations. (GLO: C5, E1)

1-1-2-15.

Give examples of how the senses are important in various activities, hobbies, and jobs. (GLO: B4)

1-1-3-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of objects and materials. (GLO: C6, D3)

1-1-3-02.

Explore and describe characteristics of materials using their sensory observations. (GLO: C2, D3)

1-1-3-03.

Distinguish between an object and the materials used to construct it. (GLO: D3, E2)

1-1-3-04.

Identify materials that make up familiar objects. (GLO: D3, E2)

1-1-3-05.

Explore to identify characteristics of common materials. (GLO: D3)

1-1-3-09.

Describe ways that materials can be joined. (GLO: C3, D3)

1-1-3-10.

Use the design process to construct a useful object by selecting, combining, joining, and shaping materials. (GLO: C3, D3)

1-1-3-11.

Demonstrate ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle materials during classroom learning experiences. (GLO: B5, D3)

1-1-4-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to changes over time. (GLO: C6, D4, D6)

1-1-4-02.

Recognize that the Sun is a source of light and heat. (GLO: D4, E4)

1-1-4-03.

Recognize that a day is divided into day time and night time based on the presence or absence of sunlight. (GLO: D6)

1-1-4-04.

Sequence and record events and activities that occur over the course of a day, a week, or a year. (GLO: C2)

1-1-4-07.

Record, describe, and compare changes in temperature at different times of the day. (GLO: C2, D4, E3)

1-1-4-09.

Compare characteristics of the four seasons. (GLO: E1, E3)

1-1-4-10.

Describe how humans prepare for seasonal changes. (GLO: B1, C1)

1-1-4-11.

Identify people who help us prepare for and deal with seasonal changes. (GLO: B4)

1-1-4-13.

Sort clothing to suit each season, and justify their decisions. (GLO: B1, B3, C3, C4)

1-1-4-14.

Describe safety precautions related to daily weather, the changing of the seasons, and weather extremes. (GLO: B3, C1)

1-1-4-16.

Identify physical and behavioural changes that occur seasonally among Manitoba plants and animals, and discuss possible reasons for these changes. (GLO: D1, E3)

1-1-4-17.

Use the design process to construct a device or structure that helps a Manitoba animal adjust to seasonal changes. (GLO: B5, C3)

1-1-GLO-1.

Students will explore concepts of identity, culture, and community in relation to individuals, societies, and nations.

1-1-GLO-2.

Students will explore the dynamic relationships of people with the land, places, and environments.

1-1-GLO-3.

Students will explore how people, events, and ideas of the past shape the present and influence the future.

1-1-GLO-4.

Students will explore the global interdependence of people, communities, societies, nations, and environments.

1-1-GLO-5.

Students will explore the processes and structures of power and authority, and their implications for individuals, relationships, communities, and nations.

1-1-GLO-6.

Students will explore the distribution of resources and wealth in relation to individuals, communities, and nations.

1-1-KC-005.

Describe their responsibilities and rights in the school and community.

1-1-KE-027.

Give examples to distinguish needs from wants.

1-1-KE-028.

Give examples of how media may influence their needs, wants, and choices.

1-1-KE-029.

Describe ways in which work may be shared in families, schools, and communities.

1-1-KG-020.

Recognize that people all over the world have similar concerns, needs, and relationships.

1-1-KH-017.

Give examples of traditions and celebrations that connect them to the past.

1-1-KH-018.

Identify family connections to previous generations.

1-1-KH-019.

Describe how the repeating patterns of the seasons influence their lives.

1-1-KI-007.

Give examples of groups with which they identify.

1-1-KI-008.

Identify characteristics of communities.

1-1-KI-009.

Describe ways in which their family expresses its culture and identity.

1-1-KI-010.

Give examples of diverse ways in which people live and express themselves.

1-1-KI-011.

Identify similarities between diverse communities.

1-1-KL-012.

Recognize that people depend on the environment for survival.

1-1-KL-013.

Identify their address or describe the relative location of their home in their community, town, or city.

1-1-KL-014.

Recognize globes and maps as representations of the surface of the Earth.

1-1-KL-015.

Distinguish land and water masses on globes and maps.

1-1-KL-016A.

Identify local Aboriginal landmarks and significant places.

1-1-KP-022.

Give examples of decision making in their daily lives.

1-1-KP-023.

Describe how other people may influence their lives and how they may influence the lives of others.

1-1-KP-024.

Explain purposes of rules and laws in the school and community.

1-1-KP-025.

Give examples of causes of interpersonal conflict and solutions to interpersonal conflict in the school and community.

1-1-KP-026.

Identify ways to deal with bullying.

1-1-S-100.

Cooperate and collaborate with others.

1-1-S-101.

Consider others' needs when working and playing together.

1-1-S-102.

Interact fairly and respectfully with others.

1-1-S-103.

Make decisions that reflect care, concern, and responsibility for the environment.

1-1-S-201.

Categorize information using selected criteria.

1-1-S-204.

Use simple timelines to organize information chronologically.

1-1-S-205.

Construct simple maps to represent familiar places and locations.

1-1-S-206.

Interpret simple maps as representations of familiar places and locations.

1-1-S-207.

Use relative terms to describe familiar locations.

1-1-S-300.

Use comparison in investigations.

1-1-S-301.

Identify consequences of their decisions and actions.

1-1-S-302.

Use information or observation to form opinions.

1-1-S-303.

Revise ideas and opinions based on new information.

1-1-S-400.

Listen actively to others.

1-1-S-401.

Use language that is respectful of others.

1-1-S-402.

Express reasons for their ideas and opinions.

1-1-S-404.

Relate events and stories in chronological order.

1-1.1.1

Express Ideas - Talk about personal experiences and familiar events.

1-1.1.2

Consider Others' Ideas - Listen to and acknowledge experiences and feelings shared by others.

1-1.1.3

Experiment with Language and Form - Use a variety of forms to express and explore familiar events, ideas, and information.

1-1.1.4

Express Preferences - Explain why an oral, literary, or media text is a personal favourite.

1-1.1.5

Set Goals - Choose to read and write with and for others.

1-1.2.1

Develop Understanding - Connect new experiences and information with prior knowledge.

1-1.2.2

Explain Opinions - Describe new experiences and ideas.

1-1.2.4

Extend Understanding - Ask questions to make sense of experiences.

1-2.1.1

Prior Knowledge - Make connections between texts, prior knowledge, and personal experiences.

1-2.1.2

Comprehension Strategies - Ask questions to anticipate meaning and use a variety of strategies [including rereading and reading on] to confirm understanding.

1-2.1.3

Textual Cues - Use textual cues [such as pictures, patterns, rhymes...] to construct and confirm meaning.

1-2.1.4

Cueing Systems - Use syntactic, semantic, and graphophonic cues [including differentiating between letters and words, basic sight words, sound-letter relationships to identify initial and final consonants, and letter clusters] to construct and confirm meaning; use pictionaries to determine word meaning in context.

1-2.2.1

Experience Various Texts - Participate in shared listening, reading, and viewing experiences using texts from a variety of forms and genres [such as poems, books with recurring language patterns, cartoons...] and cultural traditions.

1-2.2.2

Connect Self, Texts, and Culture - Share personal experiences and family traditions related to oral, literary, and media texts; identify choices that people make in texts [including texts about Canada or by Canadian writers].

1-2.2.3

Appreciate the Artistry of Texts - Share feelings and moods evoked by oral, literary, and media texts.

1-2.3.1

Forms and Genre - Recognize different forms and genres of oral, literary, and media texts [such as poetry, plays, storytelling by elders, video programs, cartoons...].

1-2.3.2

Techniques and Elements - Relate and represent the beginning, middle, and end of oral, literary, and media texts.

1-2.3.3

Vocabulary - Experiment with parts of words, word combinations, and word patterns [such as compound words, refrains, choruses...] for a variety of purposes.

1-2.3.4

Experiment with Language - Appreciate repetition, rhyme, and rhythm in shared language experiences [such as action songs, word play...].

1-2.3.5

Create Original Texts - Create original texts [such as paintings and drawings, dramatizations, oral or written stories...] to communicate and demonstrate understanding of forms and techniques.

1-3.1.1

Use Personal Knowledge - Discuss personal knowledge of a topic to discover information needs.

1-3.1.2

Ask Questions - Ask questions to satisfy personal curiosity on a topic and discuss information needs.

1-3.1.3

Contribute to Group Inquiry - Ask and answer questions to help satisfy group curiosity and information needs on a specific topic.

1-3.1.4

Create and Follow a Plan - Listen actively and recall and follow directions for gathering information.

1-3.2.1

Identify Personal and Peer Knowledge - Identify and share personal knowledge related to experiences.

1-3.2.2

Identify Sources - Answer questions using oral, visual, and print information sources [such as picture and concept books, people, multimedia, excursions, camps...].

1-3.2.4

Access Information - Understand that library materials have a specific organizational system, and use titles to locate information and ideas; use visual and auditory cues to make meaning.

1-3.2.5

Make Sense of Information - Make and check predictions using prior knowledge and oral, visual, and written text features [such as illustrations, titles, opening shot sin video programs, electronic texts...] to understand information.

1-3.3.1

Organize Information - Identify and categorize information according to similarities, differences, and sequences.

1-3.3.4

Develop New Understanding - Recall, talk about, and record information-gathering experiences.

1-4.1.1

Generate Ideas - Contribute ideas from personal experiences for oral, written, and visual texts.

1-4.1.2

Choose Forms - Share ideas and experiences through talking, storytelling, pictures, singing, illustrations, and print.

1-4.1.3

Organize Ideas - Organize print and pictures to express ideas and tell stories.

1-4.2.3

Enhance Legibility - Strive for consistency in letter size and shape; print letters legibly from left to right horizontally, using lines on a page as a guide; explore and use the keyboard to produce text.

1-4.2.5

Enhance Presentation - Add captions and details to own stories and drawings.

1-4.3.1

Grammar and Usage - Check for completeness of work and add details and enhancements.

1-4.3.2

Spelling (see Strategies) - Use sound-symbol relationships and visual memory to spell familiar words.

1-4.3.3

Punctuation and Capitalization - Capitalize the first letters of names, the beginnings of statements, and the pronoun 'I'; use periods.

1-4.4.1

Share Ideas and Information - Share information and ideas in a brief presentation to a familiar audience; use illustrations and other materials to aid the presentation.

1-4.4.3

Attentive Listening and Viewing - Demonstrate active listening and viewing skills and strategies [such as giving non-verbal encouragement, asking questions...].

1-5.1.1

Compare Responses - Tell, draw, and write about self and family.

1-5.1.2

Relate Texts to Culture - Listen to stories from oral, literary, and media texts from various communities.

1-5.1.3

Appreciate Diversity - Relate aspects of stories and characters to personal feelings and experiences.

1-5.1.4

Celebrate Special Occasions - Share ideas and experiences through conversation, puppet plays, dramatic scenes, and songs.

1-5.2.2

Work in Groups - Take turns sharing information and ideas.

1-5.2.3

Use Language to Show Respect - Recognize that individuals adjust language use according to the situation.

1-GLO-A1.

Recognize both the power and limitations of science as a way of answering questions about the world and explaining natural phenomena

1-GLO-A2.

Recognize that scientific knowledge is based on evidence, models and explanations, and evolves as new evidence appears and new conceptualizations develop

1-GLO-A3.

Distinguish critically between science and technology in terms of their respective contexts, goals, methods, products, and values

1-GLO-A4.

Identify and appreciate contributions made by women and men from many societies and cultural backgrounds towards increasing our understanding of the world and in bringing about technological innovations

1-GLO-A5.

Recognize that science and technology interact with and advance one another

1-GLO-B1.

Describe scientific and technological developments, past and present, and appreciate their impact on individuals, societies and the environment, both locally and globally.

1-GLO-B2.

Recognize that scientific and technological endeavors have been and continue to be influenced by human needs and the societal context of the time

1-GLO-B3.

Identify the factors that affect health and explain the relationships among personal habits, lifestyle choices, and human health, both individual and social

1-GLO-B4.

Demonstrate a knowledge of, and personal consideration for, a range of possible science- and technology-related interests, hobbies, and careers

1-GLO-B5.

Identify and demonstrate actions that promote a sustainable environment, society and economy, both locally and globally

1-GLO-C1.

Recognize safety symbols and practices related to scientific and technological activities and to their daily lives, and apply this knowledge in appropriate situations

1-GLO-C2.

Demonstrate appropriate scientific inquiry skills when seeking answers to questions

1-GLO-C3.

Demonstrate appropriate problem-solving skills while seeking solutions to technological challenges

1-GLO-C4.

Demonstrate appropriate critical thinking and decision-making skills when choosing a course of action based on scientific and technological information

1-GLO-C5.

Demonstrate curiosity, scepticism, creativity, open-mindedness, accuracy, precision, honesty, and persistence, and appreciate their importance as scientific and technological habits of mind

1-GLO-C6.

Employ effective communication skills and utilize information technology to gather and share scientific and technological ideas and data

1-GLO-C8.

Evaluate, from a scientific perspective, information and ideas encountered during investigations and in daily life

1-GLO-D1.

Understand essential life structures and processes pertaining to a wide variety of organisms, including humans

1-GLO-D2.

Understand various biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, as well as their interaction and interdependence within ecosystems and within the biosphere as a whole

1-GLO-D3.

Understand the properties and structures of matter as well as various common manifestations and applications of the actions and interactions of matter

1-GLO-D4.

Understand how stability, motion, forces, and energy transfers and transformations play a role in a wide range of natural and constructed contexts

1-GLO-D5.

Understand the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere, as well as the processes involved within and between them

1-GLO-D6.

Understand the composition of the universe, the interactions within it, and the impacts of humankind's continued attempts to understand and explore it

1-GLO-E1.

Describe and appreciate the similarity and diversity of forms, functions, and patterns within the natural and constructed world

1-GLO-E2.

Describe and appreciate how the natural and constructed world is made up of systems and how interactions take place within and among these systems

1-GLO-E3.

Recognize that characteristics of materials and systems can remain constant or change over time, and describe the conditions and processes involved

1-GLO-E4.

Recognize that energy, whether transmitted or transformed, is the driving force of both movement and change, and is inherent within materials and in the interactions among them

1.N.1.

Say the number sequence by: 1s forward and backward between any two given numbers (0 to 100); 2s to 30, forward starting at 0; 5s and 10s to 100, forward starting at 0 [C, CN, ME, V]

1.N.1.1.

Recite forward by 1s the number sequence between two given numbers (0 to 100).

1.N.1.2.

Recite backward by 1s the number sequence between two given numbers.

1.N.1.3.

Record a numeral (0 to 100) symbolically when it is presented orally.

1.N.1.4.

Read a numeral (0 to 100) when it is presented symbolically.

1.N.1.5.

Skip-count by 2s to 30 starting at 0.

1.N.1.6.

Skip-count by 5s to 100 starting at 0.

1.N.1.7.

Skip-count by 10s to 100 starting at 0.

1.N.1.8.

Identify and correct errors and omissions in a number sequence.

1.N.10.

Describe and use mental mathematics strategies including: counting on, counting back; using one more, one less; making 10; starting from known doubles; using addition to subtract to determine the basic addition and related subtraction facts to 18. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

1.N.10.1.

Use and describe a mental mathematics strategy for determining a sum.

1.N.10.2.

Use and describe a mental mathematics strategy for determining a difference.

1.N.10.3.

Use and describe the related addition facts for a subtraction fact (fact family) (e.g., 6 - 4 = 2 has two related addition facts: 4 + 2 = 6, 2 + 4 = 6).

1.N.10.4.

Use and describe related subtraction facts for an addition fact (fact family) (e.g., 2 + 3 = 5 has two related subtraction facts: 5-3 = 2, 5-2 = 3).

1.N.2.

Subitize and name familiar arrangements of 1 to 10 dots (or objects). [C, CN, ME, V]

1.N.2.1.

Look briefly at a familiar dice arrangement of 1 to 6 dots, and identify the number represented without counting.

1.N.2.2.

Look briefly at a familiar ten-frame arrangement of 1 to 10 dots (or objects), and identify the number represented without counting.

1.N.2.3.

Look briefly at a finger arrangement, and identify how many fingers there are without counting.

1.N.2.4.

Identify the number represented by an arrangement of dots (or objects) on a ten frame, and describe the number's relationship to 5 and to 10.

1.N.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of counting by: using the counting-on strategy; using parts or equal groups to count sets [C, CN, ME, R, V]

1.N.3.1.

Determine the total number of objects in a set, starting from a known quantity and counting on by 1s.

1.N.3.2.

Count number of objects in a set using groups of 2s, 5s, or 10s.

1.N.3.3.

Count the total number of objects in a set, starting from a known quantity and counting on by using groups of 2s, 5s, or 10s.

1.N.4.

Represent and describe numbers to 20, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, V]

1.N.4.1.

Represent a number up to 20 using a variety of manipulatives, including ten frames and base-10 materials.

1.N.4.2.

Read number words to 20.

1.N.4.3.

Partition any quantity up to 20 into two parts, and identify the number of objects in each part.

1.N.4.4.

Represent a number to 20 in two parts, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically.

1.N.4.5.

Determine compatible number pairs for 5, 10, and 20.

1.N.4.6.

Model a number using two different objects (e.g., 10 desks represents the same number as 10 pencils).

1.N.4.7.

Place numerals on a horizontal or vertical number line with benchmarks 0, 5, 10, and 20.

1.N.5.

Compare and order sets containing up to 20 elements to solve problems using: referents; one-to-one correspondence [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

1.N.5.1.

Build a set equal to another set that contains up to 20 elements.

1.N.5.2.

Build a set that has more, fewer, or as many elements as another set.

1.N.5.3.

Build several sets of different objects that have the same number of elements in the set.

1.N.5.4.

Compare two sets using one-to-one correspondence, and describe them using comparative words such as > more, < fewer, =as many.

1.N.5.5.

Compare a set to a referent using comparative language.

1.N.5.6.

Solve a story problem (pictures and words) that involves the comparison of two quantities.

1.N.7.

Demonstrate, concretely and pictorially, how a number, up to 30, can be represented by a variety of equal groups with and without singles. [C, R, V]

1.N.7.1.

Represent a number in a variety of equal groups with and without singles (e.g., 17 can be represented by 8 groups of 2 and one single, 5 groups of 3 and two singles, 4 groups of 4 and one single, 3 groups of 5 and two singles, and 1 group of 10 with seven singles).

1.N.7.2.

Recognize that for a number of counters, no matter how they are grouped, the total number of counters does not change.

1.N.7.3.

Group a set of counters into equal groups with and without singles in more than one way, and explain which grouping makes counting easier.

1.N.8.

Identify the number, up to 20, that is one more, two more, one less, and two less than a given number. [C, CN, ME, R, V]

1.N.8.1.

Name the number that is one more, two more, one less, or two less than a given number, up to 20.

1.N.8.2.

Represent a number on a ten frame that is one more, two more, one less, or two less than a given number.

1.N.9.

Demonstrate an understanding of addition of numbers with answers to 20 and their corresponding subtraction facts, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, by: using familiar and mathematical language to describe additive and subtractive actions from their experience; creating and solving problems in context that involve addition and subtraction; modelling addition and subtraction using a variety of concrete and visual representations, and recording the process symbolically [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

1.N.9.1.

Act out a story problem presented orally or through shared reading.

1.N.9.2.

Indicate if the scenario in a story problem represents additive or subtractive action.

1.N.9.4.

Create a story problem for addition that connects to student experience, and simulate the action with counters.

1.N.9.5.

Create a story problem for subtraction that connects to student experience, and simulate the action with counters.

1.N.9.6.

Create a story problem for a number sentence.

1.N.9.7.

Represent a story problem pictorially or symbolically to show the additive or subtractive action, and solve the problem.

1.PR.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of repeating patterns (two to four elements) by: describing; reproducing; extending; creating patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds, and actions. [C, PS, R, V]

1.PR.1.1.

Describe a repeating pattern containing two to four elements in its core.

1.PR.1.2.

Identify errors in a repeating pattern.

1.PR.1.3.

Identify the missing element(s) in a repeating pattern.

1.PR.1.4.

Create and describe a repeating pattern using a variety of manipulatives, musical instruments, and actions.

1.PR.1.5.

Reproduce and extend a repeating pattern using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds, and actions.

1.PR.1.6.

Identify and describe, using everyday language, a repeating pattern in the environment (e.g., classroom, outdoors).

1.PR.1.7.

Identify repeating events (e.g., days of the week, birthdays, seasons).

1.PR.2.

Translate repeating patterns from one representation to another. [C, R, V]

1.PR.2.1.

Represent a repeating pattern using another mode (e.g., actions to sound, colour to shape, ABC ABC to blue yellow green blue yellow green).

1.PR.2.2.

Describe a repeating pattern using a letter code (e.g., ABC ABC...).

1.PR.3.

Describe equality as a balance and inequality as an imbalance, concretely and pictorially (0 to 20). [C, CN, R, V]

1.PR.3.1.

Construct two equal sets using the same objects (same shape and mass), and demonstrate their equality of number using a balance scale.

1.PR.3.2.

Construct two unequal sets using the same objects (same shape and mass), and demonstrate their inequality of number using a balance scale.

1.PR.3.3.

Determine if two concrete sets are equal or unequal, and explain the process used.

1.PR.4.

Record equalities using the equal symbol (0 to 20). [C, CN, PS, V]

1.PR.4.1.

Represent an equality using manipulatives or pictures.

1.PR.4.4.

Record different representations of the same quantity (0 to 20) as equalities.

1.SS.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of measurement as a process of comparing by identifying attributes that can be compared; ordering objects; making statements of comparison; filling, covering, or matching [C, CN, PS, R, V]

1.SS.1.1.

Identify common attributes, such as length (height), mass (weight), volume (capacity), and area, which could be used to compare a set of two objects.

1.SS.1.2.

Compare two objects and identify the attributes used to compare.

1.SS.1.3.

Determine which of two or more objects is longest/shortest by matching, and explain the reasoning.

1.SS.1.4.

Determine which of two or more objects is heaviest/lightest by comparing, and explain the reasoning.

1.SS.1.5.

Determine which of two or more objects holds the most/least by filling, and explain the reasoning.

1.SS.1.6.

Determine which of two or more objects has the greatest/least area by covering, and explain the reasoning.

1.SS.2.

Sort 3-D objects and 2-D shapes using one attribute, and explain the sorting rule. [C, CN, R, V]

1.SS.2.1.

Sort a set of familiar 3-D objects or 2-D shapes using a given sorting rule.

1.SS.2.2.

Sort a set of familiar 3-D objects using a single attribute determined by the student, and explain the sorting rule.

1.SS.2.3.

Sort a set of 2-D shapes using a single attribute determined by the student, and explain the sorting rule.

1.SS.2.4.

Determine the difference between two pre-sorted sets of familiar 3-D objects or 2-D shapes, and explain a possible sorting rule used to sort them.

1.SS.3.

Replicate composite 2-D shapes and 3-D objects. [CN, PS, V]

1.SS.3.1.

Select 2-D shapes from a given set of 2-D shapes to reproduce a composite 2-D shape.

1.SS.3.2.

Select 3-D objects from a given set of 3-D objects to reproduce a composite 3-D object.

1.SS.3.3.

Predict and select the 2-D shapes used to produce a composite 2-D shape, and verify by deconstructing the composite shape.

1.SS.3.4.

Predict and select the 3-D objects used to produce a composite 3-D object, and verify by deconstructing the composite object.

1.SS.4.

Compare 2-D shapes to parts of 3-D objects in the environment. [C, CN, V]

1.SS.4.1.

Identify 3-D objects in the environment that have parts similar to a 2-D shape.