Manitoba Curriculum Frameworks — Grade 2


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2-1.1.2

Consider Others' Ideas - Ask for others' ideas and observations to help discover and explore personal understanding.

2-1.1.3

Experiment with Language and Form - Use a variety of forms to organize and give meaning to familiar experiences, ideas, and information.

2-1.1.4

Express Preferences - Express preferences for a variety of oral, literary, and media texts.

2-1.1.5

Set Goals - Develop a sense of self as reader, writer, and illustrator.

2-1.2.1

Develop Understanding - Connect new information, ideas, and experiences with prior knowledge and experiences.

2-1.2.2

Explain Opinions - Explain new experiences and understanding.

2-1.2.4

Extend Understanding - Demonstrate curiosity about and question ideas and observations to make sense of experiences.

2-2-0-1b.

Make predictions based on observed patterns or on collected data. (GLO: A1, C2)

2-2-0-1c.

Identify practical problems to solve in the immediate environment. (GLO: C3)

2-2-0-2a.

Access information using a variety of sources. (GLO: C6)

2-2-0-2b.

Match information to research needs. (GLO: C6, C8)

2-2-0-3c.

Develop, as a class, limited criteria to evaluate an object or device based on its function and aesthetics. (GLO: C3, C7)

2-2-0-4a.

Follow simple directions, and describe the purpose of steps followed. (GLO: C2)

2-2-0-4b.

Construct an object or device to solve a problem or meet a need. (GLO: C3)

2-2-0-4c.

Test an object or device with respect to pre-determined criteria. (GLO: C3)

2-2-0-4g.

Verbalize questions, ideas, and intentions during classroom activities. (GLO: C6)

2-2-0-4h.

Follow given safety procedures and rules. (GLO: C1)

2-2-0-4i.

Recognize international symbols and the Canadian Safety Association signage, which provide information on the safety of substances. (GLO: C1)

2-2-0-5a.

Make, with guidance, observations that are relevant to a specific question. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

2-2-0-5b.

Use, with guidance, tools to observe, measure, and construct. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

2-2-0-5d.

Estimate and measure length using standard units. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

2-2-0-5e.

Record observations using written language, drawings, and, with guidance, charts. (GLO: C2, C6)

2-2-0-6b.

Discuss data and generate new questions from displayed data. (GLO: A1, A2, C2, C5)

2-2-0-7a.

Propose an answer to the initial question based on their observations. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

2-2-0-7b.

Propose a solution to the initial problem. (GLO: C3)

2-2-0-7c.

Identify new problems that arise. (GLO: C3)

2-2-0-7d.

Connect new experiences, ideas, and information with prior knowledge and experiences. (GLO: A2)

2-2-0-7e.

Describe, in a variety of ways, what was done and what was observed. (GLO: C6)

2-2-0-8a.

Recognize that learning can come from careful observations and investigations. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

2-2-0-8b.

Recognize that tools are developed in response to human needs. (GLO: A3, B2)

2-2-1-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of growth and changes in animals. (GLO: B3, C6, D1)

2-2-1-02.

Identify and describe constant and changing characteristics of humans as they grow and develop. (GLO: D1, E3)

2-2-1-03.

Recognize that all humans do not grow and develop at the same rate. (GLO: B3, D1, E1, E3)

2-2-1-04.

Recognize that food is a form of energy and that healthy eating is essential for growth and development. (GLO: B3, D1, D4, E4)

2-2-1-05.

Identify the four food groups of Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating and give examples of foods from each group. (GLO: B3, E1)

2-2-1-06.

Plan a menu for one day based on the four food groups outlined in Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating. (GLO: B3, C4, D1)

2-2-1-07.

Recognize that foods humans eat come from plants and animals, and classify foods accordingly. (GLO: B1, B3)

2-2-1-08.

Recognize that all animals can have offspring, and that offspring generally resemble their parents. (GLO: D1, E1)

2-2-1-09.

Compare the appearance of young and mature animals of the same type. (GLO: D1, E1, E3)

2-2-1-10.

Compare the length of time from birth to adulthood for humans and other animals. (GLO: D1, E1)

2-2-1-11.

Identify and describe constant and changing characteristics of an animal as it grows and develops. (GLO: D1, E3)

2-2-1-12.

Describe and classify a wide range of animals according to various characteristics and behaviours. (GLO: C2, D1, E1)

2-2-1-13.

Describe and compare ways in which different animals care for their offspring. (GLO: D1, E1)

2-2-1-14.

Describe changes in the appearance and activity of various animals as they go through a complete life cycle. (GLO: D1, E3)

2-2-1-15.

Compare the life cycles of animals that have similar life cycles and those that have different life cycles. (GLO: E1, E3)

2-2-1-16.

Observe and describe an animal's life processes. (GLO: E3)

2-2-1-17.

Identify and describe ways in which humans help other animals. (GLO: B1, B5)

2-2-2-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of solids, liquids, and gases. (GLO: C6, D3, D4)

2-2-2-02.

Identify substances, materials, and objects as solids or liquids. (GLO: D3)

2-2-2-03.

Investigate and compare properties of familiar solids. (GLO: C2, D3, E1)

2-2-2-04.

Investigate and compare properties of familiar liquids. (GLO: C2, D3)

2-2-2-05.

Identify similarities and differences among properties of familiar solids and liquids. (GLO: D3, E1)

2-2-2-06.

Distinguish between solids that dissolve in water and those that do not. (GLO: D3, E1)

2-2-2-07.

Explore interactions of familiar liquids with different surfaces, powdered solids, and other liquids, and describe how these interactions determine their uses. (GLO: A5, B1, C1, C2)

2-2-2-08.

Identify liquids used in the home, and describe how they are used. (GLO: B1)

2-2-2-09.

Compare different materials with respect to their capacity to absorb liquids, and describe how this capacity determines their uses. (GLO: B1, C2, D3)

2-2-2-11.

Explore to determine that there is a substance around us called air. (GLO: A2, C2, D3, D5)

2-2-2-12.

Recognize that air is composed of several gases. (GLO: D3)

2-2-2-13.

Identify properties of gases. (GLO: D3)

2-2-2-14.

Explore to determine how water can be made to change from one state to another and back again. (GLO: C2, D3, D4, E3)

2-2-2-15.

Recognize that the states of solids and liquids remain constant in some circumstances, but may change in other circumstances. (GLO: D3, E3)

2-2-2-16.

Describe ways humans dispose of solids and liquids to maintain a clean and healthy environment. (GLO: B5)

2-2-2-17.

Predict and test to determine whether a variety of materials float or sink in water. (GLO: C2, D3)

2-2-2-18.

Demonstrate ways to make sinking materials float and floating materials sink. (GLO: B1, C3)

2-2-2-19.

Use the design process to construct an object that is buoyant and able to support a given mass/weight. (GLO: C3)

2-2-3-07.

Recognize that the position and motion of an object can be changed by a push or a pull and the size of the change is related to the strength of the push or pull. (GLO: D4)

2-2-3-08.

Compare and describe the effects of friction on the motion of objects and humans when travelling across different surfaces. (GLO: C2, D4)

2-2-3-09.

Explore and describe the effects of changing the slope of an inclined plane on the downward motion of an object and the effort needed to push or pull an object upward. (GLO: C2, D4)

2-2-3-10.

Identify how humans use inclined planes to make motion easier. (GLO: B1, D4)

2-2-3-11.

Explore toys to determine how wheels and axles interact and move. (GLO: C2, D4)

2-2-3-12.

Recognize that the wheels of a vehicle rotate clockwise or counterclockwise depending on the direction of motion of the vehicle. (GLO: D4)

2-2-3-13.

Identify how humans use the wheel and axle to make movement easier. (GLO: B1, D4)

2-2-3-14.

Use the design process to construct a vehicle with wheels and axles that meets given criteria. (GLO: C3, D4)

2-2-4-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of air and water. (GLO: C6, D4, D5)

2-2-4-02.

Recognize that air can move. (GLO: D5)

2-2-4-03.

Observe and identify evidence of moving air in indoor and outdoor environments. (GLO: B1, C2, D5)

2-2-4-04.

Identify positive and negative effects of changes in air temperature and movement in indoor and outdoor environments. (GLO: B1, E3)

2-2-4-05.

Use the design process to construct and test a device that shows evidence of air movement. (GLO: C3)

2-2-4-06.

Observe and identify examples of water in the environment. (GLO: C2, D5)

2-2-4-07.

Describe evidence of water changing state, and recognize that these changes are part of the water cycle. (GLO: D4, D5, E2, E3)

2-2-4-08.

Investigate to determine factors that cause things to dry quickly or slowly. (GLO: C2, D5, E3)

2-2-4-09.

Identify sources of drinking water, and explain how this water is distributed in one's own and in other communities. (GLO: B1, D5, E2)

2-2-4-10.

Describe different uses of water by humans. (GLO: B1)

2-2-4-11.

Explain and appreciate the importance of clean air and water for humans, plants, and animals. (GLO: B5, D2)

2-2-4-12.

Identify substances that pollute air and water, and describe ways of reducing such pollution. (GLO: B3, B5, D3, D5)

2-2-4-13.

Recognize that clean water is an increasingly scarce resource in many parts of the world, and describe consequences of a shortage of clean water. (GLO: B1, B3, B5)

2-2-4-14.

Record personal use of water, and identify ways in which they can reduce water usage. (GLO: B5, C2, C5)

2-2-GLO-1.

Students will explore concepts of identity, culture, and community in relation to individuals, societies, and nations.

2-2-GLO-2.

Students will explore the dynamic relationships of people with the land, places, and environments.

2-2-GLO-3.

Students will explore how people, events, and ideas of the past shape the present and influence the future.

2-2-GLO-4.

Students will explore the global interdependence of people, communities, societies, nations, and environments.

2-2-GLO-5.

Students will explore the processes and structures of power and authority, and their implications for individuals, relationships, communities, and nations.

2-2-GLO-6.

Students will explore the distribution of resources and wealth in relation to individuals, communities, and nations.

2-2-KC-001.

Recognize that all members of communities have responsibilities and rights.

2-2-KE-038.

Give examples of needs common to all Canadians.

2-2-KE-039.

Give examples of media influences on their choices and decisions.

2-2-KG-031.

Identify Canada as one of many countries in the world.

2-2-KH-025.

Relate stories of significant events and people in their local community's past.

2-2-KH-025A.

Relate stories of significant events and people in their local Aboriginal community.

2-2-KH-026.

Identify ways in which life in Canadian communities has changed over time.

2-2-KH-027.

Recognize that First Nations and Inuit people are Canada's original peoples.

2-2-KH-028.

Recognize that many people came to Canada from other parts of the world to establish communities.

2-2-KI-004.

Identify the defining characteristics of communities.

2-2-KI-005.

Describe characteristics of their local communities.

2-2-KI-006.

Identify cultural groups in their local communities.

2-2-KI-007.

Give examples of factors that shape who they are.

2-2-KI-008.

Recognize that stories of their elders, groups, and communities help shape who they are.

2-2-KI-008A.

Recognize that their Elders, ancestors, and communities connect them to the past, present, and future.

2-2-KI-009.

Describe groups with which they identify.

2-2-KI-010.

Identify their heritage and culture.

2-2-KI-010A.

Identify their Aboriginal heritage and culture.

2-2-KI-011.

Recognize the diversity that characterizes Canada.

2-2-KI-012.

Identify common features of Canadian communities.

2-2-KI-013.

Recognize that Aboriginal, francophone, and other cultural communities are part of the Canadian community.

2-2-KL-021.

Give examples of ways in which the natural environment shapes daily life in communities studied.

2-2-KL-022.

Explain the importance of conserving or restoring natural resources.

2-2-KL-023.

Locate communities studied on a map of Canada.

2-2-KL-024.

Locate Canada on a world map or globe.

2-2-KP-035.

Identify possible sources of conflict in groups and communities.

2-2-S-101.

Resolve conflicts peacefully and fairly.

2-2-S-102.

Interact fairly and respectfully with others.

2-2-S-103.

Make decisions that reflect care, concern, and responsibility for the environment.

2-2-S-204.

Use simple timelines to organize information chronologically.

2-2-S-205.

Construct maps that include a title, legend, and symbols.

2-2-S-206.

Interpret maps that include a title, legend, and symbols.

2-2-S-207.

Use cardinal directions to describe location.

2-2-S-302.

Use information or observation to form opinions.

2-2-S-303.

Revise ideas and opinions based on new information.

2-2-S-400.

Listen actively to others.

2-2-S-401.

Use language that is respectful of others.

2-2-S-402.

Express reasons for their ideas and opinions.

2-2-S-404.

Relate events and stories in chronological order.

2-2.1.1

Prior Knowledge - Make connections between texts, prior knowledge, and personal experiences.

2-2.1.2

Comprehension Strategies - Explain anticipated meaning, recognize relationships, and draw conclusions; self-correct understanding using a variety of strategies [including rereading for story sense].

2-2.1.3

Textual Cues - Use textual cues [such as story patterns, titles...] to construct and confirm meaning.

2-2.1.4

Cueing Systems - Use syntactic, semantic, and graphophonic cues [including word order, punctuation, capitalization, intonation, and phrasing; sound-symbol relationships to identify initial, medial, and final sounds, letter clusters, blends, digraphs, vowels, and familiar and unfamiliar words] to construct and confirm meaning in context.

2-2.2.1

Experience Various Texts - Choose to engage in a variety of shared and independent listening, reading, and viewing experiences using texts from a variety of forms and genres [such as legends, video programs, fables, riddles...] and cultural traditions.

2-2.2.2

Connect Self, Texts, and Culture - Discuss the experiences and traditions of various communities and cultures portrayed in oral, literary, and media texts [including texts about Canada or by Canadian writers].

2-2.2.3

Appreciate the Artistry of Texts - Identify and express the feelings of people in oral, literary, and media texts.

2-2.3.1

Forms and Genre - Recognize that information and ideas can be expressed in a variety of forms and genres [such as poetry, articles, stories, songs, films...].

2-2.3.2

Techniques and Elements - Identify the main characters and discuss in own words the beginning, middle, and ending of oral, literary, and media texts.

2-2.3.3

Vocabulary - Use knowledge of commonalities in word families to increase vocabulary in a variety of contexts.

2-2.3.4

Experiment with Language - Demonstrate interest in the sounds of words and word combinations in pattern books, poems, songs, and oral and visual presentations.

2-2.3.5

Create Original Texts - Create original texts [such as oral or written stories, pictures, dramatizations...] to communicate and demonstrate understanding of forms and techniques.

2-3.1.1

Use Personal Knowledge - Record personal knowledge of a topic to identify information needs.

2-3.1.2

Ask Questions - Ask questions to understand a topic and identify information needs.

2-3.1.4

Create and Follow a Plan - Recall and follow directions for accessing and gathering information.

2-3.2.1

Identify Personal and Peer Knowledge - Participate in group talk to generate information on a topic and to identify sources of additional information.

2-3.2.2

Identify Sources - Access information using a variety of sources [such as elders, simple chapter books, concept books, multimedia, computers...].

2-3.2.3

Assess Sources - Match information to inquiry or research needs.

2-3.2.4

Access Information - Use the specific library organizational system to locate information and ideas; use visual and auditory cues to make meaning.

2-3.2.5

Make Sense of Information - Make connections between prior knowledge, ideas, information, and oral, visual, and written text features [such as table of contents, chapter headings, key words, captions...].

2-3.3.1

Organize Information - Categorize related information and ideas using a variety of strategies [such as linking significant details, sequencing events in a logical order...].

2-4.1.2

Choose Forms - Use a variety of forms [such as simple reports, illustrations, role-plays of characters and situations, string games...] for particular audiences and purposes.

2-4.1.3

Organize Ideas - Order ideas to create a beginning, middle, and end in own oral, written, and visual texts.

2-4.2.1

Appraise Own and Others' Work - Share own stories and creations with peers and respond to questions or comments; respond to own and others' work and presentations using pre-established criteria.

2-4.2.2

Revise Content - Revise illustrations and representations by adding or deleting words and details to make sense.

2-4.2.3

Enhance Legibility - Form letters and words of consistent size and shape; print legibly using correct letter formation and spacing; explore and use the keyboard to compose and revise text.

2-4.2.5

Enhance Presentation - Combine illustrations and written texts to express ideas, feelings, and information.

2-4.3.2

Spelling (see Strategies) - Spell familiar words using a variety of strategies [including phonics, structural analysis, and visual memory] and resources [such as personal dictionaries, classroom charts, help from others...].

2-4.3.3

Punctuation and Capitalization - Use periods and question marks as end punctuation.

2-4.4.1

Share Ideas and Information - Share information and ideas on a topic with a familiar audience; clarify information by responding to questions.

2-4.4.3

Attentive Listening and Viewing - Demonstrate attentive audience behaviours [such as asking relevant questions...].

2-5.1.1

Compare Responses - Tell, draw, and write about self, family, and community.

2-5.1.2

Relate Texts to Culture - Talk about similarities among stories from oral, literary, and media texts from various communities.

2-5.1.3

Appreciate Diversity - Connect situations portrayed in oral, literary, and media texts to personal experiences.

2-5.1.4

Celebrate Special Occasions - Participate in shared language experiences to celebrate individual and class achievements.

2-5.2.4

Evaluate Group Process - Acknowledge achievements of others; rehearse roles and responsibilities in group process by helping others and asking others for help.

2-GLO-A1.

Recognize both the power and limitations of science as a way of answering questions about the world and explaining natural phenomena

2-GLO-A2.

Recognize that scientific knowledge is based on evidence, models and explanations, and evolves as new evidence appears and new conceptualizations develop

2-GLO-A3.

Distinguish critically between science and technology in terms of their respective contexts, goals, methods, products, and values

2-GLO-A4.

Identify and appreciate contributions made by women and men from many societies and cultural backgrounds towards increasing our understanding of the world and in bringing about technological innovations

2-GLO-A5.

Recognize that science and technology interact with and advance one another

2-GLO-B1.

Describe scientific and technological developments, past and present, and appreciate their impact on individuals, societies and the environment, both locally and globally.

2-GLO-B2.

Recognize that scientific and technological endeavors have been and continue to be influenced by human needs and the societal context of the time

2-GLO-B3.

Identify the factors that affect health and explain the relationships among personal habits, lifestyle choices, and human health, both individual and social

2-GLO-B4.

Demonstrate a knowledge of, and personal consideration for, a range of possible science- and technology-related interests, hobbies, and careers

2-GLO-B5.

Identify and demonstrate actions that promote a sustainable environment, society and economy, both locally and globally

2-GLO-C1.

Recognize safety symbols and practices related to scientific and technological activities and to their daily lives, and apply this knowledge in appropriate situations

2-GLO-C2.

Demonstrate appropriate scientific inquiry skills when seeking answers to questions

2-GLO-C3.

Demonstrate appropriate problem-solving skills while seeking solutions to technological challenges

2-GLO-C4.

Demonstrate appropriate critical thinking and decision-making skills when choosing a course of action based on scientific and technological information

2-GLO-C5.

Demonstrate curiosity, scepticism, creativity, open-mindedness, accuracy, precision, honesty, and persistence, and appreciate their importance as scientific and technological habits of mind

2-GLO-C6.

Employ effective communication skills and utilize information technology to gather and share scientific and technological ideas and data

2-GLO-C8.

Evaluate, from a scientific perspective, information and ideas encountered during investigations and in daily life

2-GLO-D1.

Understand essential life structures and processes pertaining to a wide variety of organisms, including humans

2-GLO-D2.

Understand various biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, as well as their interaction and interdependence within ecosystems and within the biosphere as a whole

2-GLO-D3.

Understand the properties and structures of matter as well as various common manifestations and applications of the actions and interactions of matter

2-GLO-D4.

Understand how stability, motion, forces, and energy transfers and transformations play a role in a wide range of natural and constructed contexts

2-GLO-D5.

Understand the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere, as well as the processes involved within and between them

2-GLO-D6.

Understand the composition of the universe, the interactions within it, and the impacts of humankind's continued attempts to understand and explore it

2-GLO-E1.

Describe and appreciate the similarity and diversity of forms, functions, and patterns within the natural and constructed world

2-GLO-E2.

Describe and appreciate how the natural and constructed world is made up of systems and how interactions take place within and among these systems

2-GLO-E3.

Recognize that characteristics of materials and systems can remain constant or change over time, and describe the conditions and processes involved

2-GLO-E4.

Recognize that energy, whether transmitted or transformed, is the driving force of both movement and change, and is inherent within materials and in the interactions among them

2.N.1.

Say the number sequence from 0 to 100 by: 2s, 5s, and 10s, forward and backward, using starting points that are multiples of 2, 5, and 10 respectively; 10s using starting points from 1 to 9; 2s starting from 1 [C, CN, ME, R]

2.N.1.1.

Extend a skip-counting sequence by 2s, 5s, or 10s forward and backward.

2.N.1.2.

Skip-count by 10s, given any number from 1 to 9 as a starting point.

2.N.1.3.

Count by 2s starting from 1 or from any odd number.

2.N.1.4.

Identify and correct errors and omissions in a skip-counting sequence.

2.N.1.5.

Count a sum of money with pennies, nickels, or dimes (to 100).

2.N.1.6.

Count quantity using groups of 2s, 5s, or 10s and counting on.

2.N.10.

Apply mental mathematics strategies, including: using doubles; making 10; using one more, one less; using two more, two less; building on a known double; using addition for subtraction to develop recall of basic addition facts to 18 and related subtraction facts. [C, CN, ME, R, V]

2.N.10.1.

Explain the mental mathematics strategy that could be used to determine an addition or subtraction fact, such as:

2.N.10.1.a.

Using doubles (e.g., for 4 + 6, think 5 + 5)

2.N.10.1.b.

Using doubles plus one (e.g., for 4 + 5, think 4 + 4 + 1)

2.N.10.1.c.

Using doubles take away one (e.g., for 4 + 5, think 5 + 5 -1)

2.N.10.1.d.

Using doubles plus two (e.g., for 4 + 6, think 4 + 4 + 2)

2.N.10.1.e.

Using doubles take away two (e.g., for 4 + 6, think 6 + 6 - 2)

2.N.10.1.f.

Making 10 (e.g., for 7 + 5, think 7 + 3 + 2)

2.N.10.1.g.

Building on a known double (e.g., 6 + 6 = 12, so 6 + 7 = 12 + 1 = 13)

2.N.10.2.

Use and describe a personal strategy for determining a sum to 18 and the corresponding subtraction.

2.N.2.

Demonstrate if a number (up to 100) is even or odd. [C, CN, PS, R]

2.N.2.1.

Determine if a number is even or odd by using concrete materials or pictorial representations.

2.N.2.2.

Identify even and odd numbers in a sequence, such as in a hundred chart.

2.N.2.3.

Sort a set of numbers into even and odd.

2.N.3.

Describe order or relative position using ordinal numbers. [C, CN, R]

2.N.3.1.

Indicate the position of an object in a sequence by using ordinal numbers.

2.N.3.2.

Compare the relative position of an object in two different sequences.

2.N.4.

Represent and describe numbers to 100, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, V]

2.N.4.1.

Represent a number using concrete materials, such as ten frames and base-10 materials.

2.N.4.2.

Represent a number using coins (pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters).

2.N.4.4.

Represent a number pictorially.

2.N.4.6.

Read a number (0 to 100) in symbolic or word form.

2.N.4.7.

Record a number (0 to 20) in words.

2.N.5.

Compare and order numbers up to 100. [C, CN, R, V]

2.N.5.1.

Order a set of numbers in ascending or descending order, and verify the result using a hundred chart, number line, ten frames, or by making reference to place value.

2.N.5.2.

Identify errors in an ordered sequence.

2.N.7.

Illustrate, concretely and pictorially, the meaning of place value for numbers to 100. [C, CN, R, V]

2.N.7.1.

Explain and show with counters the meaning of each digit for a 2-digit numeral with both digits the same (e.g., for the numeral 22, the first digit represents two tens [twenty counters] and the second digit represents two ones [two counters]).

2.N.7.2.

Count the number of objects in a set using groups of 10s and 1s, and record the result as a 2-digit numeral under the headings of 10s and 1s.

2.N.7.3.

Describe a 2-digit numeral in at least two ways (e.g., 24 as two tens and four ones, twenty and four, two groups of ten and four left over, and twenty-four ones).

2.N.7.4.

Illustrate using 10 frames and diagrams that a numeral consists of a certain number of groups of 10 and a certain number of 1s.

2.N.7.5.

Illustrate using proportional base-10 materials that a numeral consists of a certain number of tens and a certain number of ones.

2.N.7.6.

Explain why the value of a digit depends on its placement within a numeral.

2.N.9.

Demonstrate an understanding of addition (limited to 1- and 2-digit numerals) with answers to 100 and the corresponding subtraction by: using personal strategies for adding and subtracting with and without the support of manipulatives; creating and solving problems that involve addition and subtraction; explaining that the order in which numbers are added does not affect the sum; explaining that the order in which numbers are subtracted may affect the difference [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

2.N.9.1.

Model addition and subtraction using concrete materials or visual representations, and record the process symbolically.

2.N.9.2.

Create an addition or a subtraction number sentence and a story problem for a solution.

2.PR.1.

Predict an element in a repeating pattern using a variety of strategies. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

2.PR.1.1.

Identify the core of a repeating pattern.

2.PR.1.2.

Describe and extend a pattern with two attributes.

2.PR.1.3.

Explain the rule used to create a repeating non-numerical pattern.

2.PR.1.4.

Predict an element in a repeating pattern using a variety of strategies.

2.PR.1.5.

Predict an element of a repeating pattern, and extend the pattern to verify the prediction.

2.PR.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of increasing patterns by: describing; reproducing; extending; creating patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds, and actions (numbers to 100). [C, CN, PS, R, V]

2.PR.2.1.

Identify and describe increasing patterns in a variety of contexts (e.g., hundred chart, number line, addition tables, calendar, a tiling pattern, or drawings).

2.PR.2.2.

Represent an increasing pattern concretely and pictorially.

2.PR.2.3.

Identify errors in an increasing pattern.

2.PR.2.4.

Explain the rule used to create an increasing pattern.

2.PR.2.5.

Create an increasing pattern and explain the pattern rule.

2.PR.2.6.

Represent an increasing pattern using another mode (e.g., colour to shape).

2.PR.2.7.

Solve a problem using increasing patterns.

2.PR.2.8.

Identify and describe increasing patterns in the environment (e.g., house/room numbers, flower petals, book pages, calendar, pine cones, leap years).

2.PR.2.9.

Determine missing elements in a concrete, pictorial, or symbolic increasing pattern, and explain the reasoning.

2.PR.3.

Demonstrate and explain the meaning of equality and inequality by using manipulatives and diagrams (0 to 100). [C, CN, R, V]

2.PR.3.2.

Construct and draw two unequal sets using the same object (same shape and mass), and explain the reasoning.

2.PR.3.3.

Demonstrate how to change two sets, equal in number, to create inequality.

2.PR.3.4.

Choose from three or more sets the one that does not have a quantity equal to the others, and explain why.

2.PR.4.

Record equalities and inequalities symbolically using the equal symbol or the not-equal symbol. [C, CN, R, V]

2.PR.4.1.

Determine whether two sides of a number sentence are equal (=) or not equal (). Write the appropriate symbol and justify the answer.

2.SP.1.

Gather and record data about self and others to answer questions. [C, CN, PS, V]

2.SP.1.2.

Organize data as it is collected using concrete objects, tallies, checkmarks, charts, or lists.

2.SP.2.

Construct and interpret concrete graphs and pictographs to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

2.SP.2.2.

Determine the common attributes of pictographs by comparing a set of pictographs.

2.SP.2.3.

Answer questions pertaining to a concrete graph or pictograph.

2.SP.2.5.

Create a pictograph to represent a set of data using one-to-one correspondence.

2.SP.2.6.

Solve a problem by constructing and interpreting a concrete graph or pictograph.

2.SS.1.

Relate the number of days to a week and the number of months to a year in a problem-solving context. [C, CN, PS, R]

2.SS.1.1.

Read a date on a calendar.

2.SS.1.2.

Name and order the days of the week.

2.SS.1.3.

Identify the day of the week and the month of the year for an identified calendar date.

2.SS.1.4.

State that there are seven days in a week and twelve months in a year.

2.SS.1.6.

Identify yesterday's/tomorrow's date.

2.SS.1.7.

Identify the month that comes before and the month that comes after a given month.

2.SS.1.8.

Name and order the months of the year.

2.SS.2.

Relate the size of a unit of measure to the number of units (limited to non-standard units) used to measure length and mass (weight). [C, CN, ME, R, V]

2.SS.2.1.

Explain why one of two non-standard units may be a better choice for measuring the length of an object.

2.SS.2.2.

Explain why one of two non-standard units may be a better choice for measuring the mass of an object.

2.SS.2.3.

Select a non-standard unit for measuring the length or mass of an object, and explain why it was chosen.

2.SS.2.4.

Estimate the number of non-standard units needed for a measurement task.

2.SS.2.5.

Explain why the number of units of a measurement will vary depending upon the unit of measure used.

2.SS.3.

Compare and order objects by length, height, distance around, and mass (weight) using non-standard units, and make statements of comparison. [C, CN, ME, R, V]

2.SS.3.1.

Estimate, measure, and record the length, height, distance around, or mass (weight) of an object using non-standard units.

2.SS.3.2.

Compare and order the measure of two or more objects in ascending or descending order, and explain the method of ordering.

2.SS.4.

Measure length to the nearest non-standard unit by: using multiple copies of a unit; using a single copy of a unit (iteration process) [C, ME, R, V]

2.SS.4.1.

Explain why overlapping or leaving gaps does not result in accurate measures.

2.SS.4.2.

Count the number of non-standard units required to measure the length of an object using a single copy or multiple copies of the same unit of measure.

2.SS.4.3.

Estimate and measure an object using multiple copies of a non-standard unit and using a single copy of the same unit many times, and explain the results.

2.SS.4.4.

Estimate and measure, using non-standard units, a length that is not a straight line.

2.SS.4.5.

Create different rulers, using non-standard units of measure, and use these rulers to measure length.

2.SS.5.

Demonstrate that changing the orientation of an object does not alter the measurements of its attributes. [C, R, V]

2.SS.5.1.

Measure an object, change the orientation, re-measure, and explain the results.

2.SS.6.

Sort 2-D shapes and 3-D objects using two attributes, and explain the sorting rule. [C, CN, R, V]

2.SS.6.1.

Determine the differences between two pre-sorted sets, and explain the sorting rule.

2.SS.6.2.

Identify and name two common attributes of items within a sorted group.

2.SS.6.3.

Sort a set of 2-D shapes (regular and irregular) according to two attributes, and explain the sorting rule.

2.SS.6.4.

Sort a set of 3-D objects according to two attributes, and explain the sorting rule.

2.SS.7.

Describe, compare, and construct 3-D objects, including: cubes; spheres; cones; cylinders; prisms; pyramids [C, CN, R, V]

2.SS.7.1.

Sort a set of 3-D objects, and explain the sorting rule.

2.SS.7.2.

Identify common attributes of cubes, spheres, cones, cylinders, prisms, or pyramids from sets of the same 3-D objects.

2.SS.7.3.

Identify and describe 3-D objects with different dimensions.

2.SS.7.4.

Identify and describe 3-D objects with different orientations.

2.SS.7.6.

Identify examples of cubes, spheres, cones, cylinders, prisms, or pyramids found in the environment.

2.SS.8.

Describe, compare, and construct 2-D shapes, including: triangles; squares; rectangles; circles [C, CN, R, V]

2.SS.8.1.

Sort a set of 2-D shapes, and explain the sorting rule.

2.SS.8.2.

Identify common attributes of triangles, squares, rectangles, or circles from sets of the same type of 2-D shapes.

2.SS.8.3.

Identify 2-D shapes with different dimensions.

2.SS.8.4.

Identify 2-D shapes with different orientations.

2.SS.8.5.

Create a model to represent a 2-D shape.

2.SS.8.6.

Create a pictorial representation of a 2-D shape.

2.SS.9.

Identify 2-D shapes as parts of 3-D objects in the environment. [C, CN, R, V]

2.SS.9.1.

Compare and match a 2-D shape, such as a triangle, square, rectangle, or circle, to the faces of 3-D objects in the environment.

2.SS.9.2.

Name the 2-D faces of a 3-D object.