Manitoba Curriculum Frameworks — Grade 3


Click on any standard to search for aligned resources. This data may be subject to copyright. You may download a CSV of the Manitoba Curriculum Frameworks if your intention constitutes fair use.


Plan, assess, and analyze learning aligned to these standards using Kiddom.

Learn more: How Kiddom Empowers Teachers.

3-1.1.1

Express Ideas - Describe personal observations, experiences, predictions, and feelings.

3-1.1.2

Consider Others' Ideas - Consider others' ideas and observations to discover and explore personal understanding.

3-1.1.3

Experiment with Language and Form - Experiment with language to express feelings, and talk about memorable experiences and events.

3-1.1.4

Express Preferences - Collect and share favourite oral, literary, and media texts.

3-1.1.5

Set Goals - Discuss areas of personal accomplishment and use pre-established criteria to set goals in language learning and use.

3-1.2.1

Develop Understanding - Examine how new experiences, ideas, and information connect to prior knowledge and experiences; record connections.

3-1.2.4

Extend Understanding - Ask questions to clarify information and develop new understanding.

3-2.1.1

Prior Knowledge - Make connections between texts, prior knowledge, and personal experiences.

3-2.1.2

Comprehension Strategies - Set a purpose for listening, reading, and viewing; make and confirm predictions, inferences, and conclusions; reread to check meaning.

3-2.1.3

Textual Cues - Use textual cues [such as titles, covers, headings, illustrations, paragraphs as units of meaning...] to construct and confirm meaning.

3-2.1.4

Cueing Systems - Use syntactic, semantic, and graphophonic cues [including word order and punctuation - period, question mark, exclamation mark, apostrophe, and quotation marks; high-frequency sight words; structural analysis to identify prefixes, suffixes, compound words, contractions, and singular and plural words] to construct and confirm meaning in context.

3-2.2.1

Experience Various Texts - Choose a variety of literary and media texts for shared and independent listening, reading, and viewing experiences using texts from a variety of forms and genres [such as non-fiction, chapter books, novels, short stories...] and cultural traditions.

3-2.2.2

Connect Self, Texts, and Culture - Discuss similarities between experiences and traditions encountered in daily life and those portrayed in oral, literary, and media texts [including texts about Canada or by Canadian writers].

3-2.2.3

Appreciate the Artistry of Texts - Identify words that form mental images and create mood in oral, literary, and media texts.

3-2.3.1

Forms and Genre - Recognize the distinguishing features of a variety of forms and genres [such as stories, poetry, plays, drum dances, news reports...].

3-2.3.2

Techniques and Elements - Identify the sequence of events in oral, literary, and media texts, the time and place in which they occur, and the roles of main characters.

3-2.3.3

Vocabulary - Apply knowledge of word patterns [including root words, prefixes, and suffixes] in a variety of contexts to extend knowledge of words.

3-2.3.4

Experiment with Language - Identify examples of repeated sound and poetic effects that contribute to enjoyment; respond to humour in oral, literary, and media texts.

3-2.3.5

Create Original Texts - Create original texts [such as personal narratives, reports, visual art, dramatizations, puppet plays, tableaux...] to communicate and demonstrate understanding of forms and techniques.

3-3-0-1b.

Make predictions based on observed patterns, collected data, or data provided from other sources. (GLO: A1, C2

3-3-0-1c.

Identify practical problems to solve in the local environment. (GLO: C3)

3-3-0-2a.

Access information using a variety of sources. (GLO: C6)

3-3-0-2b.

Review information to determine its usefulness to research needs. (GLO: C6, C8)

3-3-0-3c.

Create, with the class, a plan to answer a given question. (GLO: C2, C7)

3-3-0-3e.

Create, in small groups, a written plan to solve a problem or meet a need. (GLO: C3, C7)

3-3-0-4a.

Carry out a plan, and describe the steps followed. (GLO: C2)

3-3-0-4b.

Construct an object or device to solve a problem or meet a need. (GLO: C3)

3-3-0-4c.

Test an object or device with respect to pre-determined criteria. (GLO: C3, C5)

3-3-0-4d.

Identify and make improvements to an object or device, and explain the rationale for the changes. (GLO: C3)

3-3-0-4e.

Respond respectfully to the ideas and actions of others, and recognize their ideas and contributions. (GLO: C5, C7)

3-3-0-4f.

Assume roles and share responsibilities as group members. (GLO: C7)

3-3-0-4g.

Verbalize questions, ideas, and intentions during classroom-learning experiences. (GLO: C6)

3-3-0-4h.

Follow given safety procedures and rules, and explain why they are needed. (GLO: C1)

3-3-0-5a.

Make observations that are relevant to a specific question. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

3-3-0-5b.

Use tools to observe, measure, and construct. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

3-3-0-5c.

Estimate and measure mass/weight, length, volume, and temperature using standard units. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

3-3-0-5d.

Estimate and measure the passage of time using standard units. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

3-3-0-5e.

Record observations in a variety of ways. (GLO: C2, C6)

3-3-0-6a.

Display data using more than one way to represent the same data. (GLO: C2, C6)

3-3-0-6b.

Discuss data and generate new questions from displayed data. (GLO: A1, A2, C2, C5)

3-3-0-6c.

Place materials and objects in a sequence or in groups using two or more attributes, and describe the system used. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

3-3-0-7a.

Draw a simple conclusion based on their observations. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

3-3-0-7c.

Identify new problems that arise. (GLO: C3)

3-3-0-7d.

Examine how new experiences, ideas, and information connect to prior knowledge and experiences, and record these connections. (GLO: A2, C6)

3-3-0-7e.

Communicate results and conclusions in a variety of ways. (GLO: C6)

3-3-0-8b.

Recognize that scientists develop explanations from observations and what they already know about the world, and that good explanations are based on evidence. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

3-3-0-8c.

Recognize that designing a solution to a simple problem may have considerations, such as cost, materials, time, and space. (GLO: B2, C3)

3-3-0-9a.

Listen to and consider differing opinions. (GLO: C5, C7)

3-3-0-9b.

Express enjoyment when sharing and discussing science-related experiences from daily life. (GLO: C5)

3-3-1-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of growth and changes in plants. (GLO: C6, D1)

3-3-1-02.

Observe, compare, and contrast the structure and appearance of several types of plants. (GLO: C2, D1, E1)

3-3-1-03.

Show respect for plants as living things. (GLO: B5)

3-3-1-04.

Conduct experiments to determine conditions needed for healthy plant growth. (GLO: A1, C2, C5, D1)

3-3-1-05.

Recognize that a plant uses the Sun's energy to make its own food. (GLO: D1, D2, D4, E4)

3-3-1-06.

Use the design process to construct an environment that enhances plant growth. (GLO: A5, C3, C5, D1)

3-3-1-07.

Identify the basic parts of plants and describe their functions. (GLO: D1, E2)

3-3-1-08.

Explain how different adaptations of plants help them survive in particular environments. (GLO: D1, D2, E1)

3-3-1-10.

Care for a flowering plant throughout its life cycle, tracking its growth, and its changes over time. (GLO: B5, C5, D1, E3)

3-3-1-11.

Identify characteristics that remain constant and those that change throughout the life cycle of a flowering plant. (GLO: D1, E3)

3-3-1-12.

Identify needs common to plants and animals, and contrast how they meet those needs. (GLO: D1, E1)

3-3-1-13.

Describe ways that plants and animals depend on each other. (GLO: D2, E2)

3-3-1-14.

Describe ways plants are important to the environment. (GLO: B5, D2)

3-3-1-15.

Identify and describe hobbies and jobs involving plants. (GLO: B4)

3-3-1-16.

Identify how humans from various cultures use plant parts for food and medicine. (GLO: A4, B1, C5, E1)

3-3-1-17.

Investigate to determine how humans from various cultures make useful products from plant materials. (GLO: A3, A4, B1)

3-3-1-18.

Explain how humans replenish the plants they use and the consequences if plants are not replenished. (GLO: B1, B5, E3)

3-3-2-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of materials and structures. (GLO: D4)

3-3-2-02.

Conduct experiments to compare the strength of common materials. (GLO: A1, A2, C2, D3)

3-3-2-03.

Explore to determine ways to strengthen a material used for building. (GLO: B1, C2, D3)

3-3-2-04.

Explore to determine an appropriate method for joining two materials for a specific use. (GLO: C2, D3)

3-3-2-05.

Recognize that balance affects the stability of a structure. (GLO: D3)

3-3-2-06.

Explore to determine ways to improve the strength and stability of a frame structure. (GLO: C2, D4, E2)

3-3-2-07.

Identify shapes that are part of natural and human-built structures from various cultures and describe how these shapes help to provide strength and stability. (GLO: A4, D4, E2)

3-3-2-08.

Identify characteristics of materials that need to be considered when choosing materials for building structures. (GLO: C6, D3)

3-3-2-09.

Use the design process to build a structure that meets given criteria related to strength, stability, and function. (GLO: A3, C3)

3-3-2-10.

Describe the effects of various forces on different structures. (GLO: D4, E2)

3-3-2-11.

Evaluate simple structures to determine if they are safe and appropriate to the user. (GLO: C1, C3, C4, D4)

3-3-2-12.

Investigate to identify hobbies and jobs related to construction, engineering, and architecture. (GLO: B4)

3-3-2-13.

Identify various materials used in the construction of buildings in their community and in communities around the world. (GLO: A4, B1, D3, E1)

3-3-3-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of forces. (GLO: C6, D4)

3-3-3-02.

Recognize that force is a push or pull and that attraction and repulsion are types of pushes and pulls. (GLO: D4)

3-3-3-03.

Describe evidence showing that objects and living things on or near Earth are pulled toward it by a force called gravity. (GLO: A2, D4)

3-3-3-04.

Predict and test to identify materials that are attracted by magnets and those that can be magnetized. (GLO: C2, C5, D3)

3-3-3-05.

Investigate to determine how to magnetize a given object. (GLO: C2, D4)

3-3-3-06.

Investigate to determine the location of poles on a magnet, and the shape of the magnetic field around a magnet. (GLO: A1, C2, D4)

3-3-3-07.

Demonstrate that opposite poles attract and like poles repel. (GLO: C2, D4)

3-3-3-08.

Explain why Earth can be compared to a giant magnet. (GLO: D4, E1, E2)

3-3-3-09.

Demonstrate and explain how a compass operates by magnetism. (GLO: B1, D4)

3-3-3-10.

Describe potentially harmful effects of magnets on magnetized materials. (GLO: B1, C1, D4)

3-3-3-11.

Describe and demonstrate ways to use everyday materials to produce electrostatic charges. (GLO: D4)

3-3-3-12.

Investigate to determine how electrostatically charged materials interact with each other and with uncharged materials. (GLO: A2, C2, D4)

3-3-3-13.

Identify ways in which problems associated with static electricity can be avoided or eliminated. (GLO: B1, C1, D4)

3-3-3-14.

Investigate to determine the change in magnetic and electrostatic forces at different distances. (GLO: C2, D4)

3-3-3-15.

Predict and test to determine the effect of placing materials between a magnet and an attracted object and between charged objects. (GLO: C2, C5, D4)

3-3-3-16.

Recognize that gravitational, magnetic, and electrostatic forces can move certain objects without touching them directly. (GLO: D4)

3-3-3-17.

Distinguish between motion that is caused without contact and that which is caused by contact. (GLO: D4)

3-3-3-18.

Identify devices that use gravitational, magnetic, or electrostatic forces. (GLO: B1, D4)

3-3-3-19.

Use the design process to construct a game, toy, or useful device that uses gravitational, magnetic, or electrostatic forces. (GLO: C3, C5)

3-3-4-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of soils in the environment. (GLO: C6, D5)

3-3-4-02.

Identify and describe various components within a sample of soil from the local environment. (GLO: D5)

3-3-4-03.

Explore to determine ways to separate soil components. (GLO: C2, D5)

3-3-4-04.

Describe and compare components of soil samples collected at different locations and depths. (GLO: D5, E1)

3-3-4-05.

Compare the water-holding capacity of different soils. (GLO: D3, D5, E1)

3-3-4-06.

Describe the effect of water on different soils. (GLO: D3, D5)

3-3-4-07.

Conduct experiments to determine how different soils affect the growth of plants. (GLO: A1, A2, C2, D2)

3-3-4-08.

Explain the importance of understanding the characteristics of different soils. (GLO: A5, B1, B5, E2)

3-3-4-09.

Identify animals found in soil and explain their importance to soil quality. (GLO: B5, D2)

3-3-4-10.

Describe ways to return organic matter to the soil. (GLO: B1, B5, D2, D5)

3-3-4-11.

Use the design process to construct a simple composter that returns organic matter to the soil. (GLO: B1, B5, C3, D2)

3-3-4-12.

Investigate how humans from various cultures use earth materials to make objects. (GLO: A4, B1, B4)

3-3-GLO-1.

Students will explore concepts of identity, culture, and community in relation to individuals, societies, and nations.

3-3-GLO-2.

Students will explore the dynamic relationships of people with the land, places, and environments.

3-3-GLO-3.

Students will explore how people, events, and ideas of the past shape the present and influence the future.

3-3-GLO-4.

Students will explore the global interdependence of people, communities, societies, nations, and environments.

3-3-GLO-5.

Students will explore the processes and structures of power and authority, and their implications for individuals, relationships, communities, and nations.

3-3-GLO-6.

Students will explore the distribution of resources and wealth in relation to individuals, communities, and nations.

3-3-KC-001.

Recognize citizenship as membership in the Canadian community.

3-3-KC-002.

Give examples of responsibilities and rights of Canadian citizens.

3-3-KC-005.

Recognize that people around the world have basic human rights.

3-3-KC-006.

Explain the importance of fairness and sharing in groups and communities.

3-3-KE-035.

Give examples of work, goods, and technologies in communities studied.

3-3-KE-036.

Give examples of how the natural environment influences work, goods, technologies, and trade in communities studied.

3-3-KE-037.

Describe diverse ways in which communities meet their members' needs.

3-3-KE-038.

Identify media influences on their perceptions of people and places elsewhere in the world.

3-3-KG-027.

Give examples of concerns common to communities around the world.

3-3-KG-028.

Identify organizations that support communities in all countries of the world.

3-3-KG-029.

Identify ways in which community services can help people acquire their basic human rights.

3-3-KG-030.

Describe similarities and connections between communities around the world.

3-3-KG-031.

Give examples of personal decisions and actions that may positively affect people locally or globally.

3-3-KH-021.

Recognize the continuity of cultures, traditions, and practices over time.

3-3-KH-022.

Recognize that communities change over time.

3-3-KH-023.

Describe characteristics of daily life in an ancient society.

3-3-KH-024.

Give examples of customs, stories, and traditions of an ancient society.

3-3-KH-025.

Describe ways in which members of an ancient society expressed themselves.

3-3-KH-026.

Give examples of the enduring contributions of an ancient society.

3-3-KI-007.

Identify factors that may influence their identities.

3-3-KI-007A.

Describe personally significant aspects of their Aboriginal community.

3-3-KI-007F.

Describe personally significant aspects of their francophone community.

3-3-KI-008.

Describe countries as types of communities defined by borders.

3-3-KI-009.

Define the elements that constitute a culture.

3-3-KI-010.

Describe characteristics of daily life in communities studied.

3-3-KI-011.

Give examples of cultural expression in communities studied.

3-3-KI-012.

Recognize the diversity of cultures and communities in the world.

3-3-KI-013.

Compare daily life in their own communities to life in communities studied.

3-3-KL-014.

Locate on a map or globe the equator and the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

3-3-KL-015.

Locate on a map or globe the continents and oceans.

3-3-KL-016.

Identify maps, aerial photographs, and satellite images as representations of the surface of the Earth.

3-3-KL-017.

Describe the influence of natural phenomena on ways of life in communities studied.

3-3-KL-018.

Give examples of the use of natural resources in communities studied.

3-3-KL-019.

Recognize that people have diverse ways of living on or with the land.

3-3-KL-020.

Locate communities or countries studied on a world map or globe.

3-3-KP-032.

Give examples of formal and informal leadership and decision making in groups and communities.

3-3-KP-033.

Identify ways of resolving conflict in groups and communities.

3-3-KP-034.

Identify ways to deal with bullying.

3-3-S-101.

Resolve conflicts peacefully and fairly.

3-3-S-102.

Interact fairly and respectfully with others.

3-3-S-103.

Make decisions that reflect care, concern, and responsibility for the environment.

3-3-S-104.

Consider the rights and opinions of others during interactions.

3-3-S-200.

Select information from oral, visual, material, print, or electronic sources.

3-3-S-201.

Organize and record information in a variety of formats and reference sources appropriately.

3-3-S-202.

Use appropriate terms or expressions to describe periods of time.

3-3-S-203.

Select and use appropriate tools and technologies to accomplish tasks.

3-3-S-204.

Use timelines to organize information chronologically.

3-3-S-205.

Construct maps that include a title, legend, and compass rose.

3-3-S-206.

Interpret maps that include a title, legend, and compass rose.

3-3-S-207.

Use cardinal directions to describe the relative locations of places on maps and globes.

3-3-S-301.

Consider advantages and disadvantages of solutions to a problem.

3-3-S-303.

Revise ideas and opinions based on new information.

3-3-S-304.

Distinguish fact from opinion.

3-3-S-400.

Listen actively to others to understand their perspectives.

3-3-S-401.

Use language that is respectful of human diversity.

3-3-S-402.

Support their ideas and opinions with information or observations.

3-3.1.1

Use Personal Knowledge - Use self-questioning to determine personal knowledge of a topic and identify information needs.

3-3.1.2

Ask Questions - Ask topic-appropriate questions to identify information needs.

3-3.1.3

Contribute to Group Inquiry - Contribute knowledge of a topic in group discussion to help determine information needs.

3-3.1.4

Create and Follow a Plan - Recall and follow a sequential plan for accessing and gathering information.

3-3.2.1

Identify Personal and Peer Knowledge - Record and share personal knowledge of a topic.

3-3.2.2

Identify Sources - Answer inquiry and research questions using a variety of information sources [such as children's magazines, plays, folktales, personal song, storytelling, the land...].

3-3.2.3

Assess Sources - Review information to determine its usefulness to inquiry or research needs using pre-established criteria.

3-3.2.4

Access Information - Use knowledge of visual and auditory cues and organizational devices [including titles, pictures, headings, labels, diagrams, library files, dictionary guide words, and table of contents] to locate and gather information and ideas.

3-3.2.5

Make Sense of Information - Determine main ideas in information using prior knowledge, predictions, connections, and inferences.

3-3.3.4

Develop New Understanding - Determine information needs during the inquiry or research process; assess inquiry or research experiences and skills.

3-4.1.1

Generate Ideas - Generate and contribute ideas on particular topics for oral, written, and visual texts using a variety of strategies [such as brainstorming, creating thought webs, listing, drawing...].

3-4.1.2

Choose Forms - Use a variety of forms [such as puppet plays, drum dances, readers' theatre, murals, narrative stories...] for particular audiences and purposes.

3-4.2.3

Enhance Legibility - Print and write legibly, developing a personal style; format text and space words consistently on a line and page or on an electronic screen.

3-4.2.4

Enhance Artistry - Select from a range of word choices and use simple and compound sentence patterns to communicate ideas and information.

3-4.2.5

Enhance Presentation - Prepare neat and organized compositions, reports, and charts that engage the audience.

3-4.3.1

Grammar and Usage - Edit for complete sentences.

3-4.3.2

Spelling (see Strategies) - Know and apply conventional spelling patterns using a variety of strategies [including phonics, structural analysis, and visual memory] and resources [such as junior dictionaries, electronic spell-check functions...] when editing and proofreading.

3-4.3.3

Punctuation and Capitalization - Know and use some punctuation conventions [including periods, exclamation marks, and question marks] when editing and proofreading.

3-4.4.2

Effective Oral Communication - Select, monitor, and use appropriate volume, expression, and non-verbal cues in presentations; use physical stance and gestures to enhance communication.

3-4.4.3

Attentive Listening and Viewing - Demonstrate appropriate audience behaviours [such as showing enjoyment and appreciation...].

3-5.1.1

Compare Responses - Record ideas and experiences and share them with others.

3-5.1.2

Relate Texts to Culture - Discuss ideas within stories from oral, literary, and media texts from various communities.

3-5.1.3

Appreciate Diversity - Connect portrayals of individuals or situations in oral, literary, and media texts to personal experiences; talk about personal participation and responsibility in communities.

3-GLO-A1.

Recognize both the power and limitations of science as a way of answering questions about the world and explaining natural phenomena

3-GLO-A2.

Recognize that scientific knowledge is based on evidence, models and explanations, and evolves as new evidence appears and new conceptualizations develop

3-GLO-A3.

Distinguish critically between science and technology in terms of their respective contexts, goals, methods, products, and values

3-GLO-A4.

Identify and appreciate contributions made by women and men from many societies and cultural backgrounds towards increasing our understanding of the world and in bringing about technological innovations

3-GLO-A5.

Recognize that science and technology interact with and advance one another

3-GLO-B1.

Describe scientific and technological developments, past and present, and appreciate their impact on individuals, societies and the environment, both locally and globally.

3-GLO-B2.

Recognize that scientific and technological endeavors have been and continue to be influenced by human needs and the societal context of the time

3-GLO-B3.

Identify the factors that affect health and explain the relationships among personal habits, lifestyle choices, and human health, both individual and social

3-GLO-B4.

Demonstrate a knowledge of, and personal consideration for, a range of possible science- and technology-related interests, hobbies, and careers

3-GLO-B5.

Identify and demonstrate actions that promote a sustainable environment, society and economy, both locally and globally

3-GLO-C1.

Recognize safety symbols and practices related to scientific and technological activities and to their daily lives, and apply this knowledge in appropriate situations

3-GLO-C2.

Demonstrate appropriate scientific inquiry skills when seeking answers to questions

3-GLO-C3.

Demonstrate appropriate problem-solving skills while seeking solutions to technological challenges

3-GLO-C4.

Demonstrate appropriate critical thinking and decision-making skills when choosing a course of action based on scientific and technological information

3-GLO-C5.

Demonstrate curiosity, scepticism, creativity, open-mindedness, accuracy, precision, honesty, and persistence, and appreciate their importance as scientific and technological habits of mind

3-GLO-C6.

Employ effective communication skills and utilize information technology to gather and share scientific and technological ideas and data

3-GLO-C7.

Work cooperatively and value the ideas and contributions of others while carrying out scientific and technological activities

3-GLO-C8.

Evaluate, from a scientific perspective, information and ideas encountered during investigations and in daily life

3-GLO-D1.

Understand essential life structures and processes pertaining to a wide variety of organisms, including humans

3-GLO-D2.

Understand various biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, as well as their interaction and interdependence within ecosystems and within the biosphere as a whole

3-GLO-D3.

Understand the properties and structures of matter as well as various common manifestations and applications of the actions and interactions of matter

3-GLO-D4.

Understand how stability, motion, forces, and energy transfers and transformations play a role in a wide range of natural and constructed contexts

3-GLO-D5.

Understand the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere, as well as the processes involved within and between them

3-GLO-D6.

Understand the composition of the universe, the interactions within it, and the impacts of humankind's continued attempts to understand and explore it

3-GLO-E1.

Describe and appreciate the similarity and diversity of forms, functions, and patterns within the natural and constructed world

3-GLO-E2.

Describe and appreciate how the natural and constructed world is made up of systems and how interactions take place within and among these systems

3-GLO-E3.

Recognize that characteristics of materials and systems can remain constant or change over time, and describe the conditions and processes involved

3-GLO-E4.

Recognize that energy, whether transmitted or transformed, is the driving force of both movement and change, and is inherent within materials and in the interactions among them

3.N.1.

Say the number sequence between any two given numbers forward and backward: from 0 to 1000 by (10s or 100s, using any starting point; 5s, using starting points that are multiples of 5; 25s, using starting points that are multiples of 25); from 0 to 100 by (3s, using starting points that are multiples of 3; 4s, using starting points that are multiples of 4) [C, CN, ME]

3.N.1.1.

Extend a skip-counting sequence by 10s or 100s, forward and backward, using a given starting point.

3.N.1.2.

Extend a skip-counting sequence by 5s, forward and backward, starting at a given multiple of 5.

3.N.1.3.

Extend a skip-counting sequence by 25s, forward and backward, starting at a given multiple of 25.

3.N.1.4.

Extend a given skip-counting sequence by 3s, forward, starting at a given multiple of 3.

3.N.1.5.

Extend a given skip-counting sequence by 4s, starting at a given multiple of 4.

3.N.1.6.

Identify and correct errors and omissions in a skip-counting sequence.

3.N.1.7.

Determine the value of a set of coins (nickels, dimes, quarters, loonies) by using skip-counting.

3.N.1.8.

Identify and explain the skip-counting pattern for a number sequence.

3.N.10.

Apply mental math strategies to determine addition facts and related subtraction facts to 18 (9 + 9). [C, CN, ME, R, V]

3.N.10.1.

Describe a mental mathematics strategy that could be used to determine a given basic fact, such as:

3.N.10.1.a.

Doubles (e.g., for 6 + 8, think 7 + 7)

3.N.10.1.b.

Doubles plus one (e.g., for 6 + 7, think 6 + 6 + 1)

3.N.10.1.c.

Doubles take away one (e.g., for 6 + 7, think 7 + 7 - 1)

3.N.10.1.d.

Doubles plus two (e.g., for 6 + 8, think 6 + 6 + 2)

3.N.10.1.e.

Doubles take away two (e.g., for 6 + 8, think 8 + 8 - 2)

3.N.10.1.f.

Making 10 (e.g., for 6 + 8, think 6 + 4 + 4 or 8 + 2 + 4)

3.N.10.1.g.

Commutative property (e.g., for 3 + 9, think 9 + 3)

3.N.10.1.h.

Addition to subtraction (e.g., for 13 - 7, think 7 + __ = 13)

3.N.10.2.

Provide a rule for determining answers for adding and subtracting zero.

3.N.11.

Demonstrate an understanding of multiplication to 5 X 5 by: representing and explaining multiplication using equal grouping and arrays; creating and solving problems in context that involve multiplication; modelling multiplication using concrete and visual representations, and recording the process symbolically; relating multiplication to repeated addition; relating multiplication to division [C, CN, PS, R]

3.N.11.1.

Identify events from experience that can be described as multiplication.

3.N.11.10.

Relate multiplication to division by using arrays and by writing related number sentences.

3.N.11.11.

Solve a problem in context involving multiplication.

3.N.11.2.

Represent a story problem (orally, shared reading, written) using manipulatives or diagrams, and record in a number sentence.

3.N.11.3.

Skip-count by 2s, 3s, 4s, and 5s to determine the answer to a multiplication problem represented as equal groups.

3.N.11.4.

Represent a multiplication expression as repeated addition.

3.N.11.5.

Represent a repeated addition as multiplication.

3.N.11.7.

Represent, concretely or pictorially, equal groups for a number sentence.

3.N.11.8.

Represent a multiplication expression using an array.

3.N.11.9.

Create an array to model the commutative property of multiplication.

3.N.12.

Demonstrate an understanding of division by: representing and explaining division using equal sharing and equal grouping; creating and solving problems in context that involve equal sharing and equal grouping; modelling equal sharing and equal grouping using concrete and visual representations, and recording the process symbolically; relating division to repeated subtraction; relating division to multiplication (limited to division related to multiplication facts up to 5 X 5). [C, CN, PS, R]

3.N.12.1.

Identify events from experience that can be described as equal sharing.

3.N.12.10.

Solve a problem involving division.

3.N.12.2.

Identify events from experience that can be described as equal grouping.

3.N.12.3.

Illustrate, with counters or a diagram, a story problem involving equal sharing, presented orally or through shared reading, and solve the problem.

3.N.12.4.

Illustrate, with counters or a diagram, a story problem involving equal grouping, presented orally or through shared reading, and solve the problem.

3.N.12.5.

Listen to a story problem, represent the numbers using manipulatives or a sketch, and record the problem with a number sentence.

3.N.12.7.

Represent a division expression as repeated subtraction.

3.N.12.8.

Represent a repeated subtraction as a division expression.

3.N.12.9.

Relate division to multiplication by using arrays and by writing related number sentences.

3.N.13.

Demonstrate an understanding of fractions by: explaining that a fraction represents a portion of a whole divided into equal parts; describing situations in which fractions are used; comparing fractions of the same whole with like denominators [C, CN, ME, R, V]

3.N.13.1.

Identify common characteristics of a set of fractions.

3.N.13.2.

Describe everyday situations where fractions are used.

3.N.13.3.

Cut or fold a whole into equal parts, or draw a whole in equal parts; demonstrate that the parts are equal and name the parts.

3.N.13.5.

Represent a fraction concretely or pictorially.

3.N.13.6.

Name and record the fraction represented by the shaded and non-shaded parts of a region.

3.N.13.7.

Compare fractions with the same denominator using models.

3.N.13.8.

Identify the numerator and denominator for a fraction.

3.N.13.9.

Model and explain the meaning of numerator and denominator.

3.N.2.

Represent and describe numbers to 1000, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, V]

3.N.2.1.

Read a 3-digit numeral without using the word and (e.g., 321 is three hundred twenty- one, NOT three hundred AND twenty-one).

3.N.2.2.

Read a number word (0 to 1000).

3.N.2.4.

Represent a number using manipulatives, such as base-10 materials.

3.N.2.5.

Represent a number pictorially.

3.N.2.6.

Write number words for multiples of ten to 90.

3.N.2.7.

Write number words for multiples of a hundred to 900.

3.N.3.

Compare and order numbers to 1000. [CN, R, V]

3.N.3.1.

Place a set of numbers in ascending or descending order, and verify the result by using a hundred chart (e.g., a one hundred chart, a two hundred chart, a three hundred chart, a number line, or by making references to place value).

3.N.3.2.

Create as many different 3-digit numerals as possible, given three different digits. Place the numbers in ascending or descending order.

3.N.3.3.

Identify errors in an ordered sequence.

3.N.4.

Estimate quantities less than 1000 using referents. [ME, PS, R, V]

3.N.4.1.

Estimate the number of groups of ten in a quantity using 10 as a referent (known quantity).

3.N.4.2.

Estimate the number of groups of a hundred in a quantity using 100 as a referent.

3.N.4.3.

Estimate a quantity by comparing it to a referent.

3.N.4.4.

Select an estimate for a quantity by choosing among three possible choices.

3.N.4.5.

Select and justify a referent for determining an estimate for a quantity.

3.N.5.

Illustrate, concretely and pictorially, the meaning of place value for numerals to 1000. [C, CN, R, V]

3.N.5.1.

Record in more than one way the number represented by proportional and non- proportional concrete materials.

3.N.5.2.

Represent a number in different ways using proportional and non-proportional concrete materials, and explain how they are equivalent (e.g., 351 can be represented as three 100s, five 10s and one 1, or as two 100s, fifteen 10s, and one 1, or as three 100s, four 10s, and eleven 1s).

3.N.5.3.

Explain, and show with counters, the meaning of each digit for a 3-digit numeral with all digits the same (e.g., for the numeral 222, the first digit represents two hundreds [two hundred counters] the second digit represents two tens [twenty counters], and the third digit represents two ones [two counters]).

3.N.6.

Describe and apply mental mathematics strategies for adding two 2-digit numerals, such as: adding from left to right; taking one addend to the nearest multiple of ten and then compensating; using doubles [C, ME, PS, R, V]

3.N.6.1.

Add two 2-digit numerals using a mental mathematics strategy, and explain or model the strategy.

3.N.6.2.

Explain how to use the ___adding from left to right strategy (e.g., to determine the sum of 23 + 46, think 20 + 40 and 3 + 6).

3.N.6.3.

Explain how to use the taking one added to the nearest multiple of ten strategy (e.g., to determine the sum of 28 + 47, think 30 + 47 -2 or 50 + 28 - 3).

3.N.6.4.

Explain how to use the addition using doubles strategy (e.g., to determine the sum of 24 + 26, think 25 + 25; to determine the sum of 25 + 26, think 25 + 25 + 1 or doubles plus 1).

3.N.6.5.

Apply a mental mathematics strategy for adding two 2-digit numerals.

3.N.7.

Describe and apply mental mathematics strategies for subtracting two 2-digit numerals, such as: taking the subtrahend to the nearest multiple of ten and then compensating; thinking of addition; using doubles [C, ME, PS, R, V]

3.N.7.1.

Subtract two 2-digit numerals using a mental mathematics strategy, and explain or model the strategy.

3.N.7.2.

Explain how to use the "taking the subtrahend to the nearest multiple of ten" and then compensating strategy (e.g., to determine the difference of 48 -19, think 48 - 20 + 1).

3.N.7.3.

Explain how to use the "thinking of addition" strategy (e.g., to determine the difference of 62 + 45, think 45 + 5, then 50 + 12, and then 5 + 12).

3.N.7.4.

Explain how to use the "using doubles" strategy (e.g., to determine the difference of 24 - 12, think 12 + 12).

3.N.7.5.

Apply a mental mathematics strategy for subtracting two 2-digit numerals.

3.N.8.

Apply estimation strategies to predict sums and differences of two 2-digit numerals in a problem-solving context. [C, ME, PS, R]

3.N.8.1.

Estimate the solution for a story problem involving the sum of two 2-digit numerals (e.g., to estimate the sum of 43 + 56, use 40 + 50; the sum is close to 90).

3.N.8.2.

Estimate the solution for a story problem involving the difference of two 2-digit numerals (e.g., to estimate the difference of 56-23, use 50 - 20; the difference is close to 30).

3.N.9.

Demonstrate an understanding of addition and subtraction of numbers with answers to 1000 (limited to 1-, 2-, and 3-digit numerals) by: using personal strategies for adding and subtracting with and without the support of manipulatives; creating and solving problems in contexts that involve addition and subtraction of numbers concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, ME, PS, R]

3.N.9.1.

Model the addition of two or more numbers using concrete or visual representations, and record the process symbolically.

3.N.9.2.

Model the subtraction of two numbers using concrete or visual representations, and record the process symbolically.

3.N.9.3.

Create an addition or subtraction story problem for a solution.

3.N.9.4.

Determine the sum of two numbers using a personal strategy (e.g., for 326 + 48, record 300 + 60 + 14).

3.N.9.5.

Determine the difference of two numbers using a personal strategy (e.g., for 127 - 38, record 38 + 2 + 80 + 7 or 127 - 20 - 10 -8).

3.N.9.6.

Solve a problem involving the sum or difference of two numbers.

3.PR.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of increasing patterns by: describing; extending; comparing; creating patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, and numbers (to 1000). [C, CN, PS, R, V]

3.PR.1.1.

Describe an increasing pattern by stating a pattern rule that includes the starting point and a description of how the pattern continues.

3.PR.1.10.

Identify and apply a pattern rule to determine missing elements for a pattern.

3.PR.1.11.

Describe the strategy used to determine missing elements in an increasing pattern.

3.PR.1.2.

Identify the pattern rule of an increasing pattern, and extend the pattern for the next three terms.

3.PR.1.3.

Identify and explain errors in an increasing pattern.

3.PR.1.5.

Compare numeric patterns of counting by 2s, 3s, 4s, 5s, 10s, 25s, and 100s.

3.PR.1.6.

Create a concrete, pictorial, or symbolic representation of an increasing pattern for a pattern rule.

3.PR.1.7.

Create a concrete, pictorial, or symbolic increasing pattern, and describe the pattern rule.

3.PR.1.8.

Solve a problem using increasing patterns.

3.PR.1.9.

Identify and describe increasing patterns in the environment.

3.PR.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of decreasing patterns by: describing; extending; comparing; creating patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, and numbers (starting from 1000 or less). [C, CN, PS, R, V]

3.PR.2.1.

Describe a decreasing pattern by stating a pattern rule that includes the starting point and a description of how the pattern continues.

3.PR.2.10.

Identify and apply a pattern rule to determine missing elements for a pattern.

3.PR.2.11.

Describe the strategy used to determine missing elements in a decreasing pattern.

3.PR.2.2.

Identify the pattern rule of a decreasing pattern, and extend the pattern for the next three terms.

3.PR.2.3.

Identify and explain errors in a decreasing pattern.

3.PR.2.6.

Create a concrete, pictorial, or symbolic decreasing pattern for a pattern rule.

3.PR.2.7.

Create a concrete, pictorial, or symbolic decreasing pattern, and describe the pattern rule.

3.PR.2.8.

Solve a problem using decreasing patterns.

3.PR.2.9.

Identify and describe decreasing patterns in the environment.

3.PR.3.

Solve one-step addition and subtraction equations involving symbols representing an unknown number. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

3.PR.3.1.

Explain the purpose of the symbol, such as a triangle or a circle, in an addition or a subtraction equation with one unknown.

3.PR.3.2.

Create an addition or subtraction equation with one unknown to represent a combination or separation action.

3.PR.3.3.

Provide an alternative symbol for the unknown in an addition or subtraction equation.

3.PR.3.4.

Solve an addition or subtraction equation that represents combining or separating actions with one unknown, using manipulatives.

3.PR.3.5.

Solve an addition or subtraction equation with one unknown using a variety of strategies including guess and test.

3.PR.3.6.

Explain why the unknown in an addition or subtraction equation has only one value.

3.SP.1.

Collect first-hand data and organize it using: tally marks; line plots; charts; lists to answer questions. [C, CN, V]

3.SP.1.1.

Record the number of objects in a set using tally marks.

3.SP.1.2.

Determine the attributes of line plots.

3.SP.1.3.

Organize a set of data using tally marks, line plots, charts, or lists.

3.SP.1.4.

Collect and organize data using tally marks, line plots, charts, or lists.

3.SP.1.5.

Answer questions arising from a line plot, chart, or list.

3.SP.1.6.

Answer questions using collected data.

3.SP.2.

Construct, label, and interpret bar graphs to solve problems. [PS, R, V]

3.SP.2.1.

Determine the attributes of bar graphs.

3.SP.2.3.

Draw conclusions from a bar graph to solve problems.

3.SP.2.4.

Solve problems by constructing and interpreting a bar graph.

3.SS.2.

Relate the number of seconds to a minute, the number of minutes to an hour, and the number of days to a month in a problem-solving context. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

3.SS.2.1.

Determine the number of days in any month using a calendar.

3.SS.2.2.

Solve a problem involving the number of minutes in an hour or the number of days in a given month.

3.SS.2.3.

Create a calendar that includes days of the week, dates, and events.

3.SS.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of measuring length (cm, m) by: selecting and justifying referents for the units cm and m; modelling and describing the relationship between the units cm and m; estimating length using referents; measuring and recording length, width, and height [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

3.SS.3.4.

Show that 100 centimetres is equivalent to 1 metre by using concrete materials.

3.SS.3.5.

Estimate the length of an object using personal referents.

3.SS.3.6.

Determine and record the length or width of a 2-D shape.

3.SS.3.7.

Determine and record the length, width, or height of a 3-D object.

3.SS.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of measuring mass (g, kg) by: selecting and justifying referents for the units g and kg; modelling and describing the relationship between the units g and kg; estimating mass using referents; measuring and recording mass [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

3.SS.4.4.

Explain the relationship between 1000 grams and 1 kilogram using a model.

3.SS.4.5.

Estimate the mass of an object using personal referents.

3.SS.4.6.

Determine and record the mass of a 3-D object.

3.SS.4.7.

Measure, using a scale, and record the mass of everyday objects using the units g and kg.

3.SS.4.8.

Provide examples of 3-D objects that have a mass of approximately 1g, 100g, and 1kg.

3.SS.4.9.

Determine the mass of two similar objects with different masses, and explain the results.

3.SS.5.

Demonstrate an understanding of perimeter of regular and irregular shapes by: estimating perimeter using referents for centimetre or metre; measuring and recording perimeter (cm, m); constructing different shapes for a given perimeter (cm, m) to demonstrate that many shapes are possible for a perimeter [C, ME, PS, R, V]

3.SS.5.1.

Measure and record the perimeter of a regular shape, and explain the strategy used.

3.SS.5.3.

Construct a shape for a given perimeter (cm, m).

3.SS.5.4.

Construct or draw more than one shape for the same perimeter.

3.SS.5.5.

Estimate the perimeter of a shape (cm, m) using personal referents.

3.SS.6.

Describe 3-D objects according to the shape of the faces, and the number of edges and vertices. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

3.SS.6.1.

Identify the faces, edges, and vertices of a 3-D object, including cubes, spheres, cones, cylinders, pyramids, and prisms.

3.SS.6.2.

Identify the shape of the faces of a 3-D object.

3.SS.6.3.

Determine the number of faces, edges, and vertices of a 3-D object.

3.SS.6.4.

Construct a skeleton of a 3-D object, and describe how the skeleton relates to the 3-D object.

3.SS.6.5.

Sort a set of 3-D objects according to the number of faces, edges, or vertices.

3.SS.7.

Sort regular and irregular polygons, including: triangles; quadrilaterals; pentagons; hexagons; octagons according to the number of sides. [C, CN, R, V]

3.SS.7.1.

Classify a set of regular and irregular polygons according to the number of sides.

3.SS.7.2.

Identify regular and irregular polygons having different dimensions.

3.SS.7.3.

Identify regular and irregular polygons having different orientations.