Manitoba Curriculum Frameworks — Grade 4


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4-1.1.1

Express Ideas - Describe and reflect upon personal observations and experiences to make predictions and reach tentative conclusions.

4-1.1.2

Consider Others' Ideas - Explore connections between a variety of insights, ideas, and responses.

4-1.1.3

Experiment with Language and Form - Explore a variety of forms of expression for particular personal purposes.

4-1.1.4

Express Preferences - Collect and explain preferences for particular forms of oral, literary, and media texts.

4-1.1.5

Set Goals - Identify areas of personal accomplishment and set goals to enhance language learning and use.

4-1.2.1

Develop Understanding - Connect new information and experiences with prior knowledge to construct meaning in different contexts.

4-1.2.4

Extend Understanding - Reflect on ideas and experiences and ask questions to clarify and extend understanding.

4-2.1.1

Prior Knowledge - Make and record connections between personal experiences, prior knowledge, and a variety of texts.

4-2.1.2

Comprehension Strategies - Confirm or reject inferences, predictions, or conclusions based on textual information; check and confirm understanding by rereading.

4-2.1.3

Textual Cues - Use textual cues [such as headings and sub-headings, story elements, key ideas in exposition...] to construct and confirm meaning.

4-2.1.4

Cueing Systems - Use syntactic, semantic, and graphophonic cueing systems [including word order; context clues; structural analysis to identify roots, prefixes, suffixes, compound words, contractions, and singular and plural words] to construct and confirm meaning; use a junior dictionary to determine word meaning in context.

4-2.2.1

Experience Various Texts - Experience texts from a variety of forms and genres [such as personal narratives, plays, adventure stories, mysteries...] and cultural traditions; share responses.

4-2.2.2

Connect Self, Texts, and Culture - Identify similarities and differences between personal experiences and the experiences of people from various cultures portrayed in oral, literary, and media texts [including texts about Canada or by Canadian writers].

4-2.2.3

Appreciate the Artistry of Texts - Identify mood evoked by oral, literary, and media texts.

4-2.3.1

Forms and Genre - Distinguish similarities and differences among various forms and genres of oral, literary, and media texts [such as folk tales, poetry, bone and soapstone sculptures, news and weather reports...].

4-2.3.2

Techniques and Elements - Explain connections between events and the roles of main characters in oral, literary, and media texts, and identify how these texts may influence people's behaviours.

4-2.3.3

Vocabulary - Expand knowledge of words and word relationships [including homonyms, antonyms, and synonyms] using a variety of sources [such as print and electronic dictionaries, thesauri, people...].

4-2.3.4

Experiment with Language - Recognize how words and word combinations [such as word play, repetition, rhyme...] influence or convey meaning; identify ways in which exaggeration is used to convey humour.

4-2.3.5

Create Original Texts - Create original texts [such as murals, scripts for short plays, descriptive stories, charts, poems...] to communicate and demonstrate understanding of forms and techniques.

4-3.1.1

Use Personal Knowledge - Categorize personal knowledge of a topic to determine information needs.

4-3.1.2

Ask Questions - Ask general and specific questions on topics using predetermined categories.

4-3.1.3

Contribute to Group Inquiry - Identify relevant personal knowledge of a topic and possible categories of questions and purposes for group inquiry or research.

4-3.1.4

Create and Follow a Plan - Select and use a plan for gathering information.

4-3.2.1

Identify Personal and Peer Knowledge - Record, select, and share personal knowledge of a topic to focus inquiry or research.

4-3.2.2

Identify Sources - Answer inquiry or research questions using a variety of information sources [such as classroom materials, school libraries, video programs, Dene.Inuit hunts...].

4-3.2.3

Assess Sources - Assess the usefulness of information for inquiry or research using pre-established criteria.

4-3.2.4

Access Information - Use a variety of tools [including indices, maps, atlases, charts, glossaries, typographical features, card or electronic catalogues, and dictionaries] to access information and ideas; use visual and auditory cues to identify important information.

4-3.2.5

Make Sense of Information - Determine main and supporting ideas using prior knowledge, predictions, connections, inferences, and visual and auditory cues.

4-3.3.1

Organize Information - Organize information and ideas in logical sequences using a variety of strategies [such as clustering, webbing, charting from a model...].

4-4-0-1b.

Make and justify predictions based on observed patterns, collected data, or data provided from other sources. (GLO: A1, C2)

4-4-0-1c.

Identify practical problems to solve in the local environment. (GLO: C3)

4-4-0-2a.

Access information using a variety of sources. (GLO: C6)

4-4-0-2b.

Review information to determine its usefulness to inquiry or research needs. (GLO: C6, C8)

4-4-0-3c.

Create, in small groups, a plan to answer a given question. (GLO: C2)

4-4-0-3e.

Create a written plan to solve a problem or meet a need. (GLO: C3)

4-4-0-3f.

Develop criteria to evaluate an object, device, or system based on its function, aesthetics, and other considerations such as materials, and cost. (GLO: C3)

4-4-0-4a.

Carry out a plan, and describe the purpose of the steps followed. (GLO: C2)

4-4-0-4b.

Construct an object, device, or system to solve a problem or meet a need. (GLO: C3)

4-4-0-4c.

Test an object, device, or system with respect to pre-determined criteria. (GLO: C3, C5)

4-4-0-4d.

Identify and make improvements to an object, device, or system, and explain the rationale for the changes. (GLO: C3)

4-4-0-4e.

Identify problems as they arise, and work with others to find solutions. (GLO: C3, C7)

4-4-0-4f.

Assume roles, and share responsibilities as group members. (GLO: C7)

4-4-0-4g.

Communicate questions, ideas and intentions, and listen effectively to others during classroom-learning experiences. (GLO: C6)

4-4-0-4h.

Use tools and apparatus in a manner that ensures personal safety and the safety of others. (GLO: C1)

4-4-0-5a.

Select and use tools to observe, measure, and construct. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

4-4-0-5b.

Estimate and measure mass/weight, length, volume, area, and temperature using standard units. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

4-4-0-5c.

Record observations in a variety of ways. (GLO: C2, C6)

4-4-0-6a.

Construct bar graphs and pictographs using many to one correspondence, and interpret these as well as graphs from other sources. (GLO: C2, C6)

4-4-0-6b.

Identify and suggest explanations for patterns and discrepancies in data. (GLO: A1, A2, C2, C5)

4-4-0-6c.

Choose and identify relevant attributes for use in a classification system, and create a chart or diagram that shows the method of classifying. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

4-4-0-6d.

Sort and classify according to an established classification system. (GLO: C2, C3)

4-4-0-6e.

Evaluate, with guidance, the methods used to answer a question or solve a problem. (GLO: C2, C3)

4-4-0-7a.

Draw a conclusion based on evidence gathered through research and observation. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

4-4-0-7c.

Identify new problems that arise. (GLO: C3)

4-4-0-7d.

Construct meaning in different contexts by connecting new experiences and information to prior experiences and knowledge. (GLO: A2, C6)

4-4-0-7e.

Communicate results and conclusions in a variety of ways. (GLO: C6)

4-4-0-8b.

Recognize that scientists must support their explanations using evidence and scientific knowledge. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

4-4-0-8c.

Recognize that designing a solution to a simple problem may have considerations, such as cost, materials, time, and space. (GLO: B2, C3)

4-4-0-9a.

Respect alternative views of the world. (GLO: C5, C7)

4-4-0-9b.

Demonstrate confidence in their ability to do science. (GLO: C5)

4-4-0-9c.

Report and record what is observed, not what they think they ought to observe, nor what they believe the teacher expects. (GLO: C5)

4-4-1-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of habitats and communities. (GLO: C6, D2)

4-4-1-02.

Recognize that each plant and animal depends on a specific habitat to meet its needs. (GLO: D2)

4-4-1-03.

Identify the components of an animal habitat. (GLO: D2, E2)

4-4-1-04.

Identify physical and behavioural adaptations of animals and plants, and infer how these adaptations help them to survive in a specific habitat. (GLO: D1, D2)

4-4-1-05.

Investigate alternate explanations of plant or animal adaptations based on traditional knowledge from a variety of cultures. (GLO: A1, A4, C8)

4-4-1-06.

Investigate how technological developments often mirror physical adaptations. (GLO: A5, E1)

4-4-1-07.

Investigate and describe a variety of local and regional habitats and their associated populations of plants and animals. (GLO: D2, E2)

4-4-1-08.

Predict and test to determine an appropriate method for measuring a plant population within a given habitat. (GLO: A2, C2, C3, C5)

4-4-1-09.

Recognize that plant and animal populations interact within a community. (GLO: D2)

4-4-1-10.

Recognize that the food chain is a system in which some of the energy from the Sun is transferred eventually to animals. (GLO: D2, D4, E2)

4-4-1-11.

Construct food chains and food webs, and classify organisms according to their roles. (GLO: D2, E2)

4-4-1-13.

Predict, based on their investigations, how the removal of a plant or animal population may affect the rest of the community. (GLO: D2, E2, E3)

4-4-1-14.

Investigate natural and human-caused changes to habitats, and identify resulting effects on plant and animal populations. (GLO: B1, B5, D2, E3)

4-4-1-15.

Describe how their actions can help conserve plant and animal populations and their habitats. (GLO: B5)

4-4-1-17.

Recognize and appreciate how traditional knowledge contributes to our understanding of plant and animal populations and interactions. (GLO: A1, A2, A4, C8)

4-4-2-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of light. (GLO: A5, B1, C6, D4)

4-4-2-02.

Give examples of various forms of energy. (GLO: D4, E4)

4-4-2-03.

Recognize that energy is an integral part of daily life. (GLO: B1, D4, E4)

4-4-2-04.

Demonstrate that white light can be separated into colours. (GLO: C2, D4)

4-4-2-05.

Distinguish between objects that produce their own light and those that reflect light from another source. (GLO: A1, A2, D4)

4-4-2-06.

Identify a variety of natural and artificial light sources. (GLO: D4)

4-4-2-07.

Observe and describe properties of light. (GLO: C2, D4)

4-4-2-08.

Explore to determine effects different materials and objects have on a light beam. (GLO: C2, D3, D4)

4-4-2-09.

Recognize that most objects that produce light also give off heat, and identify objects that produce light but give off little or no heat. (GLO: D4)

4-4-2-10.

Classify materials as transparent, translucent, or opaque. (GLO: D3, E1)

4-4-2-11.

Evaluate the usefulness of a material for a particular task based on its ability to transmit, reflect, or absorb light. (GLO: A5, B1, D3)

4-4-2-12.

Predict the location, shape, and size of a shadow based on the position of a light source relative to an object. (GLO: C2, D4)

4-4-2-13.

Identify technological developments that extend our ability to see, and recognize their impact on science. (GLO: A5, B1)

4-4-2-14.

Use the design process to construct a device that transmits and reflects light. (GLO: B1, C3)

4-4-2-16.

Identify different uses of light at home, at school, and in the community, and explain how the brightness and colour of the light are appropriate for each use. (GLO: B1, B3, C1)

4-4-3-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of sound. (GLO: B1, C6, D4)

4-4-3-02.

Recognize that sound is a form of energy. (GLO: D4, E4)

4-4-3-03.

Recognize that energy makes things happen and can be found all around us. (GLO: D4, E4)

4-4-3-04.

Identify and classify various sounds using student-generated criteria. (GLO: C2, D4)

4-4-3-05.

Recognize that sounds are caused by vibrations. (GLO: D3, D4)

4-4-3-06.

Use the design process to create a musical instrument. (GLO: C3, C5, D4, E2)

4-4-3-07.

Demonstrate how the pitch and loudness of sounds can be modified. (GLO: C2, D3, D4, E3)

4-4-3-08.

Observe and describe properties of sound. (GLO: C2, D4)

4-4-3-09.

Describe how the human ear is designed to detect sound vibrations. (GLO: D1, D4)

4-4-3-10.

Recognize that there is a range of sounds that humans can and cannot hear. (GLO: D1)

4-4-3-11.

Describe practices that help ensure protection of the ears and hearing. (GLO: B3, C1)

4-4-3-12.

Describe harmful effects of high or sustained sound levels and identify potential sound hazards at home or in the community. (GLO: B1, B3, C1)

4-4-3-13.

Investigate to compare how vibrations travel differently through solids, liquids, and gases. (GLO: C2, D3, E1)

4-4-3-14.

Explore to determine the ability of materials to transmit or absorb sound. (GLO: C2, D3, E1)

4-4-3-15.

Describe how materials that absorb or reflect sound are used in different situations. (GLO: B1, C1, D3)

4-4-3-16.

Describe devices that extend our ability to produce, transmit, and detect sound. (GLO: B1)

4-4-3-17.

Investigate to identify inventions related to sound, and describe their impacts on society. (GLO: A4, B1, B2)

4-4-3-18.

Describe the role of sound in different jobs and hobbies. (GLO: B4)

4-4-4-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of rocks, minerals, and erosion. (GLO: C6, D5)

4-4-4-02.

Classify rocks and minerals according to student-generated criteria. (GLO: C2, D3, D5)

4-4-4-03.

Test to determine characteristics of rocks and properties of minerals, and classify accordingly. (GLO: A1, C2, D3, D5)

4-4-4-04.

Differentiate between minerals and rocks. (GLO: D5)

4-4-4-05.

Compare rocks and minerals from the local environment with each other and with those from other geological areas. (GLO: C2, D5, E1)

4-4-4-06.

Give examples of products derived from rocks and minerals. (GLO: B1)

4-4-4-07.

Describe how characteristics of rocks and properties of minerals determine their uses. (GLO: B1, D3, D5)

4-4-4-08.

Recognize that there are three types of rock, and describe how each is formed. (GLO: D5)

4-4-4-09.

Explain how fossils are formed. (GLO: D1, D5, E3)

4-4-4-10.

Describe how fossils help humans gain a better understanding of Earth's history, including identifying organisms that are now extinct. (GLO: A1, A2, D1, D5)

4-4-4-11.

Investigate and describe ways in which rock contributes to soil formation. (GLO: D5, E2, E3)

4-4-4-14.

Describe effects of wind, water, and ice on the landscape. (GLO: D5, E3)

4-4-GLO-1.

Students will explore concepts of identity, culture, and community in relation to individuals, societies, and nations.

4-4-GLO-2.

Students will explore the dynamic relationships of people with the land, places, and environments.

4-4-GLO-3.

Students will explore how people, events, and ideas of the past shape the present and influence the future.

4-4-GLO-4.

Students will explore the global interdependence of people, communities, societies, nations, and environments.

4-4-GLO-5.

Students will explore the processes and structures of power and authority, and their implications for individuals, relationships, communities, and nations.

4-4-GLO-6.

Students will explore the distribution of resources and wealth in relation to individuals, communities, and nations.

4-4-KC-001.

Describe Canadian and provincial or territorial symbols and monuments.

4-4-KC-002.

Identify democratic ideals in Canadian society.

4-4-KC-003.

Identify days important to Canadians and Manitobans.

4-4-KE-047.

Use examples to distinguish between public and private property.

4-4-KE-048.

Identify various ways in which governments help people meet their needs.

4-4-KG-039.

Identify ways in which the people of Manitoba are connected to other people in the world.

4-4-KG-040.

Recognize that personal decisions and actions can affect people elsewhere in the world.

4-4-KH-033.

Relate stories of people and events that shaped Manitoba.

4-4-KH-034.

Give examples of the impact of European settlement on Aboriginal communities in Manitoba.

4-4-KH-035.

Describe ways in which life in Manitoba has changed over time.

4-4-KH-036.

Give examples of stories and traditions of the northern territory studied.

4-4-KH-037.

Identify the main reasons for the creation of Nunavut and the new Northwest Territories.

4-4-KH-038.

Describe changes in ways of life in the last century in the northern territory studied.

4-4-KI-005.

Identify cultural communities in Manitoba.

4-4-KI-006.

Give examples of diverse artistic and cultural achievements of Manitobans.

4-4-KI-006A.

Give examples of Aboriginal artistic and cultural achievements and organizations in Manitoba.

4-4-KI-006F.

Give examples of francophone artistic and cultural achievements and organizations in Manitoba.

4-4-KI-007.

Identify Aboriginal communities, cultures, and languages in Manitoba.

4-4-KI-007A.

Identify connections between their community and other Aboriginal communities in Manitoba.

4-4-KI-008.

Identify francophone communities in Manitoba.

4-4-KI-008F.

Identify connections between their local community and other francophone communities in Manitoba.

4-4-KI-009.

Describe the influence of various factors on their identities.

4-4-KI-009A.

Understand the teachings of Elders about their culture and identity.

4-4-KI-009F.

Describe the influence of their cultural heritage on their francophone identity.

4-4-KI-010.

Give examples of the contributions of diverse ethnic and cultural communities to the history of Manitoba.

4-4-KI-011.

Give examples of Aboriginal contributions to the history of Manitoba.

4-4-KI-011A.

Recognize that their identities are connected to the history of their Aboriginal community.

4-4-KI-012.

Give examples of francophone contributions to the history of Manitoba.

4-4-KI-012F.

Recognize that their identities are connected to the history of their francophone community.

4-4-KL-015.

Describe the relative locations of Manitoba and Canada in the world using cardinal directions.

4-4-KL-016.

Locate the geographic regions on a map of Canada.

4-4-KL-017.

Describe characteristics of the geographic regions of Canada.

4-4-KL-018.

Locate the oceans, major landforms, lakes, and waterways on a map of Canada.

4-4-KL-019.

Locate the provinces, territories, and capital cities on a map of Canada.

4-4-KL-020.

Locate on a map and describe geographic features of Manitoba.

4-4-KL-020A.

Use traditional knowledge to describe and locate places in Manitoba.

4-4-KL-021.

Locate on a map and identify major natural resources in Manitoba.

4-4-KL-022.

Describe the main demographic features of Manitoba.

4-4-KL-023.

Identify issues related to environmental stewardship and sustainability in Manitoba.

4-4-KL-024.

Give examples of Aboriginal peoples' traditional relationships with the land.

4-4-KL-025.

Describe places of historic, cultural, or environmental significance in Manitoba.

4-4-KL-026.

Describe the influence of the natural environment on settlement in Manitoba.

4-4-KL-027.

Relate stories of interactions between the Selkirk settlers and Aboriginal peoples.

4-4-KL-028.

Locate on a map and describe physical features of the northern territory studied.

4-4-KL-029.

Identify natural resources in the northern territory studied.

4-4-KL-030.

Describe the demographic features of the northern territory studied.

4-4-KL-031.

Give examples of changes to place names in the northern territory studied.

4-4-KL-032.

Describe various purposes of inuksuit.

4-4-KP-041.

Explain the purposes of government.

4-4-KP-042.

Identify levels of government in Canada and give examples of their responsibilities.

4-4-KP-043.

Identify elected government leaders in their local communities, in Manitoba, and in Canada.

4-4-KP-044.

Recognize that there are elected Aboriginal representatives in Manitoba and in Canada.

4-4-KP-044A.

Identify elected representatives of their Aboriginal communities.

4-4-KP-045.

Give examples of formal and informal power and authority in their lives.

4-4-KP-046.

Identify positive ways of dealing with conflict or the misuse of power and authority.

4-4-S-100.

Collaborate with others to share ideas, decisions, and responsibilities in groups.

4-4-S-101.

Resolve conflicts peacefully and fairly.

4-4-S-102.

Interact fairly and respectfully with others.

4-4-S-103.

Make decisions that reflect care, concern, and responsibility for the environment.

4-4-S-202.

Use appropriate terms or expressions to describe periods of time.

4-4-S-204.

Create timelines and other visual organizers to sequence and represent historical figures, relationships, or chronological events.

4-4-S-205.

Construct maps that include a title, legend, compass rose, and grid.

4-4-S-206.

Interpret maps that include a title, legend, compass rose, and grid.

4-4-S-207.

Use cardinal and intermediate directions and simple grids to locate and describe places on maps and globes.

4-4-S-400.

Listen actively to others to understand their perspectives.

4-4-S-401.

Use language that is respectful of human diversity.

4-4-S-402.

Support their ideas and opinions with information or observations.

4-4.1.2

Choose Forms - Choose from a variety of favourite forms and experiment with modelled forms [such as narrative and descriptive stories, plays, graphs...] for various audiences and purposes.

4-4.1.3

Organize Ideas - Determine key ideas and organize appropriate supporting details in own oral, written, and visual texts.

4-4.2.3

Enhance Legibility - Write legibly, with increasing speed, using a handwriting style that is consistent in alignment, shape, slant, and spacing; experiment with the use of templates, formatting, and familiar software when composing and revising.

4-4.2.5

Enhance Presentation - Prepare organized compositions and reports using sound effects and visuals [such as graphs, charts, diagrams...] that engage the audience.

4-4.3.1

Grammar and Usage - Edit for complete sentences and appropriate use of statements, questions, and exclamations.

4-4.3.2

Spelling (see Strategies) - Know and apply spelling conventions using a variety of strategies [including phonics, structural analysis, syllabication, and visual memory] and resources [such as dictionaries, spell-check functions, classroom resources...] and spelling patterns when editing and proofreading.

4-4.3.3

Punctuation and Capitalization - Know and use conventions of basic capitalization and punctuation [including commas in series and quotation marks] when editing and proofreading.

4-4.4.2

Effective Oral Communication - Describe and explain information and ideas to a particular audience; select, use, and monitor appropriate volume, intonation, and non-verbal cues.

4-5.1.2

Relate Texts to Culture - Explore cultural representations in oral, literary, and media texts from various communities.

4-5.1.3

Appreciate Diversity - Connect the insights of individuals in oral, literary, and media texts to personal experiences; discuss connections in representations of cultures in oral, literary, and media texts; discuss personal participation and responsibility in communities.

4-GLO-A1.

Recognize both the power and limitations of science as a way of answering questions about the world and explaining natural phenomena

4-GLO-A2.

Recognize that scientific knowledge is based on evidence, models and explanations, and evolves as new evidence appears and new conceptualizations develop

4-GLO-A3.

Distinguish critically between science and technology in terms of their respective contexts, goals, methods, products, and values

4-GLO-A4.

Identify and appreciate contributions made by women and men from many societies and cultural backgrounds towards increasing our understanding of the world and in bringing about technological innovations

4-GLO-A5.

Recognize that science and technology interact with and advance one another

4-GLO-B1.

Describe scientific and technological developments, past and present, and appreciate their impact on individuals, societies and the environment, both locally and globally.

4-GLO-B2.

Recognize that scientific and technological endeavors have been and continue to be influenced by human needs and the societal context of the time

4-GLO-B3.

Identify the factors that affect health and explain the relationships among personal habits, lifestyle choices, and human health, both individual and social

4-GLO-B4.

Demonstrate a knowledge of, and personal consideration for, a range of possible science- and technology-related interests, hobbies, and careers

4-GLO-B5.

Identify and demonstrate actions that promote a sustainable environment, society and economy, both locally and globally

4-GLO-C1.

Recognize safety symbols and practices related to scientific and technological activities and to their daily lives, and apply this knowledge in appropriate situations

4-GLO-C2.

Demonstrate appropriate scientific inquiry skills when seeking answers to questions

4-GLO-C3.

Demonstrate appropriate problem-solving skills while seeking solutions to technological challenges

4-GLO-C4.

Demonstrate appropriate critical thinking and decision-making skills when choosing a course of action based on scientific and technological information

4-GLO-C5.

Demonstrate curiosity, scepticism, creativity, open-mindedness, accuracy, precision, honesty, and persistence, and appreciate their importance as scientific and technological habits of mind

4-GLO-C6.

Employ effective communication skills and utilize information technology to gather and share scientific and technological ideas and data

4-GLO-C7.

Work cooperatively and value the ideas and contributions of others while carrying out scientific and technological activities

4-GLO-C8.

Evaluate, from a scientific perspective, information and ideas encountered during investigations and in daily life

4-GLO-D1.

Understand essential life structures and processes pertaining to a wide variety of organisms, including humans

4-GLO-D2.

Understand various biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, as well as their interaction and interdependence within ecosystems and within the biosphere as a whole

4-GLO-D3.

Understand the properties and structures of matter as well as various common manifestations and applications of the actions and interactions of matter

4-GLO-D4.

Understand how stability, motion, forces, and energy transfers and transformations play a role in a wide range of natural and constructed contexts

4-GLO-D5.

Understand the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere, as well as the processes involved within and between them

4-GLO-D6.

Understand the composition of the universe, the interactions within it, and the impacts of humankind's continued attempts to understand and explore it

4-GLO-E1.

Describe and appreciate the similarity and diversity of forms, functions, and patterns within the natural and constructed world

4-GLO-E2.

Describe and appreciate how the natural and constructed world is made up of systems and how interactions take place within and among these systems

4-GLO-E3.

Recognize that characteristics of materials and systems can remain constant or change over time, and describe the conditions and processes involved

4-GLO-E4.

Recognize that energy, whether transmitted or transformed, is the driving force of both movement and change, and is inherent within materials and in the interactions among them

4.N.1.

Represent and describe whole numbers to 10 000, pictorially and symbolically. [C, CN, V]

4.N.1.1.

Read a four-digit numeral without using the word "and" (e.g., 5321 is five thousand three hundred twenty-one, NOT five thousand three hundred AND twenty-one).

4.N.1.2.

Write a numeral using proper spacing without commas (e.g., 4567 or 4 567, 10 000).

4.N.1.3.

Write a numeral 0 - 10 000 in words.

4.N.1.4.

Represent a numeral using a place value chart or diagrams.

4.N.1.5.

Describe the meaning of each digit in a numeral.

4.N.1.6.

Express a numeral in expanded notation (e.g., 321 = 300 + 20 + 1).

4.N.1.7.

Write the numeral represented in expanded notation.

4.N.1.8.

Explain the meaning of each digit in a 4-digit numeral with all digits the same (e.g., for the numeral 2222, the first digit represents two thousands, the second digit two hundreds, the third digit two tens, and the fourth digit two ones).

4.N.10.

Relate decimals to fractions (to hundredths). [CN, R, V]

4.N.10.1.

Read decimals as fractions (e.g., 0.5 is zero and five-tenths).

4.N.10.2.

Express orally and in written form a decimal in fractional form.

4.N.10.3.

Express orally and in written form a fraction with a denominator of 10 or 100 as a decimal.

4.N.10.4.

Express a pictorial or concrete representation as a fraction or decimal (e.g., 15 shaded squares on a hundred grid can be expressed as 0.15 or 15/100).

4.N.10.5.

Express orally and in written form the decimal equivalent for a fraction (e.g., 50/100 can be expressed as 0.50).

4.N.11.

Demonstrate an understanding of addition and subtraction of decimals (limited to hundredths) by: using compatible numbers; estimating sums and differences; using mental math strategies to solve problems. [C, ME, PS, R, V]

4.N.11.1.

Predict sums and differences of decimals using estimation strategies.

4.N.11.2.

Solve problems, including money problems, which involve addition and subtraction of decimals, limited to hundredths.

4.N.11.3.

Determine the approximate solution of a problem not requiring an exact answer.

4.N.11.4.

Estimate a sum or difference using compatible numbers.

4.N.11.5.

Count back change for a purchase.

4.N.2.

Compare and order numbers to 10 000. [C, CN]

4.N.2.1.

Order a set of numbers in ascending or descending order, and explain the order by making references to place value.

4.N.2.2.

Create and order three 4-digit numerals.

4.N.2.3.

Identify the missing numbers in an ordered sequence or between two benchmarks on a number line (vertical or horizontal).

4.N.2.4.

Identify incorrectly placed numbers in an ordered sequence or between two benchmarks on a number line (vertical or horizontal).

4.N.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of addition of numbers with answers to 10 000 and their corresponding subtractions (limited to 3- and 4-digit numerals), concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, by: using personal strategies; using the standard algorithms; estimating sums and differences; solving problems [C, CN, ME, PS, R]

4.N.3.1.

Model addition and subtraction using concrete materials and visual representations, and record the process symbolically.

4.N.3.2.

Determine the sum of two numbers using a personal strategy (e.g., for 1326 + 548, record 1300 + 500 + 74).

4.N.3.3.

Determine the difference of two numbers using a personal strategy (e.g., for 4127 - 238, record 238 + 2 + 60 + 700 + 3000 + 127 or 4127 - 27 -100 -100 - 11).

4.N.3.4.

Model and explain the relationship that exists between an algorithm, place value, and number properties.

4.N.3.5.

Determine the sum and difference using the standard algorithms of vertical addition and subtraction. (Numbers are arranged vertically with corresponding place value digits aligned.)

4.N.3.7.

Estimate sums and differences using different strategies (e.g., front-end estimation and compensation).

4.N.3.8.

Solve problems that involve addition and subtraction of more than 2 numbers.

4.N.3.9.

Refine personal strategies to increase efficiency when appropriate (e.g., 3000-2999 should not require the use of an algorithm).

4.N.4.

Explain the properties of 0 and 1 for multiplication and the property of 1 for division. [C, CN, R]

4.N.4.1.

Explain the property for determining the answer when multiplying numbers by one.

4.N.4.2.

Explain the property for determining the answer when multiplying numbers by zero.

4.N.5.

Describe and apply mental mathematics strategies, such as: skip-counting from a known fact; using halving/doubling; using doubling and adding one more group; using patterns in the 9s facts; using repeated doubling to develop an understanding of basic multiplication facts to 9 X 9 and related division facts. [C, CN, ME, PS, R]

4.N.5.1.

Provide examples for applying mental mathematics strategies:

4.N.5.1.a.

Skip-counting from a known fact (e.g., for 6 x 3, think 5 x 3 = 15, then 15 + 3 = 18)

4.N.5.1.c.

Using a known double and adding one more group (e.g., for 3 x 7, think 2 x 7 = 14, then 14 + 7 = 21)

4.N.5.1.d.

Repeated doubling (e.g., for 4 x 6, think 2 x 6 = 12 and 2 x 12 = 24)

4.N.5.1.e.

Use ten facts when multiplying by 9 (e.g., for 9 X 6, think 10 X 6 = 60, and 60 - 6 = 54; for 7 X 9, think 7 X 10 = 70, and 70 - 7 = 63)

4.N.5.1.g.

Relating division to multiplication (e.g., for 64 /8, think 8 X __ = 64)

4.N.6.

Demonstrate an understanding of multiplication (2- or 3-digit numerals by 1-digit numerals) to solve problems by: using personal strategies for multiplication with and without concrete materials; using arrays to represent multiplication; connecting concrete representations to symbolic representations; estimating products [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

4.N.6.1.

Model a multiplication problem using the distributive property [e.g., 8 X 365 = (8 X300) + (8 X 60) + (8 X5)].

4.N.6.2.

Use concrete materials, such as base-10 blocks or their pictorial representations, to represent multiplication, and record the process symbolically.

4.N.6.3.

Create and solve a multiplication problem that is limited to 2 or 3 digits by 1 digit.

4.N.6.4.

Estimate a product using a personal strategy (e.g., 2 X 243 is close to or a little more than 2 X200, or close to or a little less than 2 X 250).

4.N.6.5.

Model and solve a multiplication problem using an array, and record the process.

4.N.6.6.

Solve a multiplication problem and record the process.

4.N.7.

Demonstrate an understanding of division (1-digit divisor and up to 2-digit dividend) to solve problems by: using personal strategies for dividing with and without concrete materials; estimating quotients; relating division to multiplication [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

4.N.7.1.

Solve a division problem without a remainder using arrays or base-10 materials.

4.N.7.2.

Solve a division problem with a remainder using arrays or base-10 materials.

4.N.7.3.

Solve a division problem using a personal strategy, and record the process.

4.N.7.5.

Estimate a quotient using a personal strategy (e.g., 86 / 4 is close to 80 / 4 or close to 80 / 5).

4.N.8.

Demonstrate an understanding of fractions less than or equal to one by using concrete and pictorial representations to: name and record fractions for the parts of a whole or a set; compare and order fractions; model and explain that for different wholes, two identical fractions may not represent the same quantity; provide examples of where fractions are used [C, CN, PS, R, V]

4.N.8.1.

Represent a fraction using concrete materials.

4.N.8.10.

Identify which of the benchmarks 0, 1/2, or 1 is closest to a fraction.

4.N.8.11.

Name fractions between two benchmarks on a number line (horizontal or vertical).

4.N.8.12.

Order a set of fractions by placing them on a number line (horizontal or vertical) with benchmarks.

4.N.8.14.

Provide an example of a fraction that represents part of a set, and a fraction that represents part of a whole, from everyday contexts.

4.N.8.2.

Identify a fraction from its concrete representation.

4.N.8.3.

Name and record the shaded and non-shaded parts of a set.

4.N.8.4.

Name and record the shaded and non-shaded parts of a whole.

4.N.8.5.

Represent a fraction pictorially by shading parts of a set.

4.N.8.6.

Represent a fraction pictorially by shading parts of a whole.

4.N.8.7.

Explain how denominators can be used to compare two unit fractions.

4.N.8.8.

Order a set of fractions that have the same numerator, and explain the ordering.

4.N.8.9.

Order a set of fractions that have the same denominator, and explain the ordering.

4.N.9.

Describe and represent decimals (tenths and hundredths), concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, R, V]

4.N.9.1.

Write the decimal for a concrete or pictorial representation of part of a set, part of a region or part of a unit of measure.

4.N.9.2.

Represent a decimal using concrete materials or a pictorial representation.

4.N.9.3.

Explain the meaning of each digit in a decimal with all digits the same.

4.N.9.4.

Represent a decimal using money values (pennies and dimes).

4.N.9.5.

Record a money value using decimals.

4.N.9.6.

Provide examples of everyday contexts in which tenths and hundredths are used.

4.N.9.7.

Model, using manipulatives or pictures, that a tenth can be expressed as hundredths (e.g., 0.9 is equivalent to 0.90 or 9 dimes is equivalent to 90 pennies).

4.PR.1.

Identify and describe patterns found in tables and charts, including a multiplication chart. [C, CN, PS, V]

4.PR.1.1.

Identify and describe a variety of patterns in a multiplication chart.

4.PR.1.2.

Determine the missing elements in a table or chart.

4.PR.1.3.

Identify error(s) in a table or chart.

4.PR.1.4.

Describe the pattern found in a table or chart.

4.PR.3.

Represent and describe patterns and relationships using charts and tables to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

4.PR.3.1.

Extend patterns found in a table or chart to solve a problem.

4.PR.3.2.

Translate the information provided in a problem into a table or chart.

4.PR.3.3.

Identify and extend the patterns in a table or chart to solve a problem.

4.PR.4.

Identify and explain mathematical relationships using charts and diagrams to solve problems. [CN, PS, R, V]

4.PR.4.4.

Identify a sorting rule for a Venn diagram.

4.PR.4.5.

Describe the relationship shown in a Venn diagram when the circles intersect, when one circle is contained in the other, and when the circles are separate.

4.PR.4.6.

Determine where new elements belong in a Venn diagram.

4.PR.5.

Express a problem as an equation in which a symbol is used to represent an unknown number. [CN, PS, R]

4.PR.5.1.

Explain the purpose of the symbol, such as a triangle or circle, in an addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division equation with one unknown (e.g., 6 = 36 / __).

4.PR.5.2.

Express a pictorial or concrete representation of an equation in symbolic form.

4.PR.5.3.

Identify the unknown in a story problem, represent the problem with an equation, and solve the problem concretely, pictorially, or symbolically.

4.PR.5.4.

Create a problem in context for an equation with one unknown.

4.PR.6.

Solve one-step equations involving a symbol to represent an unknown number. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

4.PR.6.1.

Solve a one-step equation using manipulatives.

4.PR.6.2.

Solve a one-step equation using guess and test.

4.PR.6.4.

Solve an equation when the unknown is on the left or right side of the equation.

4.PR.6.5.

Represent and solve an addition or subtraction problem involving a "part-part-whole" or comparison context using a symbol to represent the unknown.

4.PR.6.6.

Represent and solve a multiplication or division problem involving equal grouping or partitioning (equal sharing), using symbols to represent the unknown.

4.SP.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of many-to-one correspondence. [C, R, T, V]

4.SP.1.1.

Compare graphs in which different intervals or correspondences are used, and explain why the interval or correspondence was used.

4.SP.1.2.

Compare graphs in which the same data has been displayed using one-to-one and many- to-one correspondences, and explain how they are the same and different.

4.SP.2.

Construct and interpret pictographs and bar graphs involving many-to-one correspondence to draw conclusions. [C, PS, R, V]

4.SP.2.1.

Identify an interval and correspondence for displaying a set of data in a graph, and justify the choice.

4.SP.2.4.

Answer a question using a graph in which data is displayed using many-to-one correspondence.

4.SS.1.

Read and record time using digital and analog clocks, including 24-hour clocks. [C, CN, V]

4.SS.1.1.

State the number of hours in a day.

4.SS.1.2.

Express the time orally and numerically from a 12-hour analog clock.

4.SS.1.3.

Express the time orally and numerically from a 24-hour analog clock.

4.SS.1.4.

Express the time orally and numerically from a 12-hour digital clock.

4.SS.1.5.

Describe time orally and numerically from a 24-hour digital clock.

4.SS.1.6.

Describe time orally as "minutes to"or "minutes after"the hour.

4.SS.2.

Read and record calendar dates in a variety of formats. [C, V]

4.SS.2.1.

Write dates in a variety of formats (e.g., yyyy/mm/dd, dd/mm/yyyy, March 21, 2006, dd/mm/yy).

4.SS.2.2.

Relate dates written in the format yyyy/mm/dd to dates on a calendar.

4.SS.2.3.

Identify possible interpretations of a given date (e.g., 06/03/04).

4.SS.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of area of regular and irregular 2-D shapes by: recognizing that area is measured in square units; selecting and justifying referents for the units cm^2 or m^2; estimating area by using referents for cm^2 or m^2; determining and recording area (cm^2 or m^2); constructing different rectangles for a given area (cm^2 or m^2) in order to demonstrate that many different rectangles may have the same area [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

4.SS.3.1.

Describe area as the measure of surface recorded in square units.

4.SS.3.10.

Demonstrate that many rectangles are possible for an area by drawing at least two different rectangles for the same area.

4.SS.3.2.

Identify and explain why the square is the most efficient unit for measuring area.

4.SS.3.7.

Determine the area of a regular 2-D shape and explain the strategy.

4.SS.3.8.

Determine the area of an irregular 2-D shape and explain the strategy.

4.SS.3.9.

Construct a rectangle for a given area.

4.SS.4.

Solve problems involving 2-D shapes and 3-D objects. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

4.SS.4.1.

Fill an outline with 2-D shapes (e.g., tangram pieces, pentominoes, or polygons).

4.SS.4.2.

Reproduce 2-D shapes from drawings, real objects (e.g., tables, houses, letters of the alphabet), or attributes on geo-boards.

4.SS.5.

Describe and construct rectangular and triangular prisms. [C, CN, R, V]

4.SS.5.1.

Identify and name common attributes of rectangular prisms from sets of rectangular prisms.

4.SS.5.2.

Identify and name common attributes of triangular prisms from sets of triangular prisms.

4.SS.5.3.

Sort a set of rectangular and triangular prisms using the shape of the base.

4.SS.5.5.

Construct rectangular prisms from their nets.

4.SS.5.6.

Construct triangular prisms from their nets.

4.SS.5.7.

Identify examples of rectangular and triangular prisms found in the environment.

4.SS.6.

Demonstrate an understanding of line symmetry by: identifying symmetrical 2-D shapes; creating symmetrical 2-D shapes; drawing one or more lines of symmetry in a 2-D shape [C, CN, V]

4.SS.6.1.

Identify the characteristics of symmetrical and non-symmetrical 2-D shapes.

4.SS.6.2.

Sort a set of 2-D shapes as symmetrical and non-symmetrical.

4.SS.6.4.

Identify lines of symmetry of a set of 2-D shapes, and explain why each shape is symmetrical.

4.SS.6.5.

Determine whether or not a 2-D shape is symmetrical by using a Mira or by folding and superimposing.

4.SS.6.7.

Provide examples of symmetrical shapes found in the environment, and identify the line(s) of symmetry.

4.SS.6.8.

Sort a set of 2-D shapes as those that have no lines of symmetry, one line of symmetry, or more than one line of symmetry.