Manitoba Curriculum Frameworks — Grade 5


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5-1.1.1

Express Ideas - Use personal experiences as a basis for exploring, predicting, and expressing opinions and understanding.

5-1.1.2

Consider Others' Ideas - Seek others' viewpoints to build on personal responses and understanding.

5-1.1.3

Experiment with Language and Form - Recognize and use favourite forms of self-expression.

5-1.1.4

Express Preferences - Review personal collection of favourite oral, literary, and media texts and share responses to preferred forms.

5-1.1.5

Set Goals - Set personal goals to enhance language learning and use.

5-1.2.1

Develop Understanding - Use prior knowledge and experiences selectively to make sense of new information in a variety of contexts.

5-1.2.4

Extend Understanding - Appraise ideas for clarity and ask extending questions.

5-2.1.1

Prior Knowledge - Describe and build upon connections between previous experiences, prior knowledge, and a variety of texts.

5-2.1.2

Comprehension Strategies - Use a variety of comprehension strategies [including setting a purpose, asking questions, inferring, and confirming or rejecting predictions and conclusions]; confirm understanding and self-correct when necessary.

5-2.1.3

Textual Cues - Use textual cues [such as key ideas, sequence of major events, table of contents, glossaries...] to construct and confirm meaning.

5-2.1.4

Cueing Systems - Use syntactic, semantic, and graphophonic cueing systems [including word order, context clues; structural analysis to identify roots, prefixes, and suffixes] to construct and confirm meaning; use a dictionary to determine word meaning in context.

5-2.2.1

Experience Various Texts - Experience texts from a variety of forms and genres [such as historical fiction, myths, biographies...] and cultural traditions; explain preferences for particular types of oral, literary, and media texts.

5-2.2.2

Connect Self, Texts, and Culture - Compare the challenges and situations encountered in daily life with those experienced by people in other times, places, and cultures as portrayed in oral, literary, and media texts [including texts about Canada or by Canadian writers].

5-2.2.3

Appreciate the Artistry of Texts - Identify descriptive and figurative language in oral, literary, and media texts.

5-2.3.1

Forms and Genre - Understand and use a variety of forms and genres of oral, literary, and media texts [such as poetry, articles, news reports, documentaries...].

5-2.3.2

Techniques and Elements - Identify key elements [including plot, setting, and characterization] and techniques [such as colour, music, speed...] in oral, literary, and media texts, and explore their impact.

5-2.3.3

Vocabulary - Identify how and why word structures and meaning change, and use accurate word meaning according to context.

5-2.3.4

Experiment with Language - Experiment with words and sentence patterns to create word pictures; identify figures of speech [including personification] and ways in which they convey meaning.

5-3.1.1

Use Personal Knowledge - Summarize personal knowledge of a topic in categories to determine information needs.

5-3.1.4

Create and Follow a Plan - Gather and record information and ideas using a plan.

5-3.2.1

Identify Personal and Peer Knowledge - Record personal knowledge of a topic and collaborate to generate information for inquiry or research.

5-3.2.2

Identify Sources - Answer inquiry or research questions using a variety of information sources (such as newspapers, series by the same name writer, scripts, diaries, elders, interviews, trips, oral traditions...).

5-3.2.3

Assess Sources - Determine the usefulness of information for inquiry or research purpose and focus using pre-established criteria.

5-3.2.4

Access Information - Use a variety of tools (including chapter headings and encyclopedia guide words) to access information and ideas; use visual and auditory cues ( such as graphics, voice-overs, scene changes, body language, background music...) to identify key ideas.

5-3.2.5

Make Sense of Information - Recognize organizational patterns of oral, visual, and written texts [including main ideas and supporting details, explanation, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, and sequence]; skim scan and listen for key words and phrases.

5-3.3.1

Organize Information - Organize information and ideas into categories [such as who, what where, when, why, how...] using a variety of strategies such as webbing, using graphic organizers, sequencing, charting...].

5-4.1.1

Generate Ideas - Focus a topic for oral, written, and visual texts by integrating ideas from experiences and a variety of other sources.

5-4.1.2

Choose Forms - Choose forms [such as news stories, interviews, reports, diagrams...] appropriate to a variety of audiences and purposes.

5-4.1.3

Organize Ideas - Use listening, reading, and viewing experiences as models for organizing ideas in own oral, written, and visual texts.

5-4.2.1

Appraise Own and Others' Work - Participate in developing criteria to respond to own and others' oral, written, and visual creations and use the criteria to suggest revisions.

5-4.2.3

Enhance Legibility - Write legibly and use appropriate formatting and word processing when composing and revising.

5-4.2.4

Enhance Artistry - Select words, sounds, and images for appropriate connotations, and use varied sentence lengths and structures [including compound sentences].

5-4.2.5

Enhance Presentation - Prepare organized compositions, presentations, reports, and inquiry or research projects using pre-established organizers.

5-4.3.2

Spelling (see Strategies) - Know and apply spelling conventions using a variety of strategies [including structural analysis, syllabication, and visual memory] and spelling patterns when editing and proofreading; predict the spelling of unfamiliar words using a variety of resources to confirm correctness.

5-4.3.3

Punctuation and Capitalization - Know how to capitalize and punctuate compound sentences, headings, and titles, and apply these conventions when editing and proofreading.

5-4.4.2

Effective Oral Communication - Use gestures and facial expression to enhance oral presentations; use and monitor emphasis and appropriate pacing; arrange presentation space to focus audience attention.

5-4.4.3

Attentive Listening and Viewing - Show respect for presenter(s) through active listening and viewing and other audience behaviours [such as giving polite feedback, responding to the speaker's gestures, showing attentive body language...].

5-5-0-1b.

Identify various methods for finding the answer to a specific question and, with guidance, select one to implement. (GLO: C2)

5-5-0-1c.

Identify practical problems to solve. (GLO: C3)

5-5-0-1d.

Identify various methods to solve a practical problem and select and justify one to implement. (GLO: C3)

5-5-0-2a.

Access information using a variety of sources. (GLO: C6)

5-5-0-2b.

Review information to determine its usefulness using pre-determined criteria. (GLO: C6, C8)

5-5-0-2c.

Record information in own words and reference sources appropriately. (GLO: C6)

5-5-0-3a.

Formulate, with guidance, a prediction/hypothesis that identifies a cause and effect relationship. (GLO: A2, C2)

5-5-0-3c.

Create a written plan to answer a specific question. (GLO: C2)

5-5-0-3d.

Develop criteria to evaluate a prototype or consumer product. (GLO: C3)

5-5-0-3e.

Create a written plan to solve a problem. (GLO: C1, C3, C6)

5-5-0-4b.

Construct a prototype. (GLO: C3)

5-5-0-4c.

Work cooperatively with group members to carry out a plan, and troubleshoot problems as they arise. (GLO: C7)

5-5-0-4d.

Assume various roles and share responsibilities as group members. (GLO: C7)

5-5-0-4e.

Use tools and materials in a manner that ensures personal safety and the safety of others. (GLO: C1)

5-5-0-5a.

Make observations that are relevant to a specific question. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

5-5-0-5b.

Test a prototype or consumer product with respect to pre-determined criteria. (GLO: C3, C5)

5-5-0-5c.

Select and use tools and instruments to observe, measure, and construct. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

5-5-0-5d.

Evaluate the appropriateness of units and measuring tools in practical contexts. (GLO: C2, C5)

5-5-0-5e.

Estimate and measure mass/weight, length, volume, and temperature using SI and other standard units. (GLO: C2, C5)

5-5-0-5f.

Record and organize observations in a variety of ways. (GLO: C2, C6)

5-5-0-6a.

Construct graphs to display data, and interpret and evaluate these and other graphs. (GLO: C2, C6)

5-5-0-6b.

Identify and suggest explanations for patterns and discrepancies in data. (GLO: A1, A2, C2, C5)

5-5-0-6c.

Identify and make improvements to a prototype and explain the rationale for the (GLO: C3, C4)

5-5-0-6e.

Evaluate the methods used to answer a question or solve a problem. (GLO: C2, C3)

5-5-0-7a.

Draw, with guidance, a conclusion that explains investigation results. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

5-5-0-7b.

Base conclusions on evidence rather than preconceived ideas or hunches. (GLO: C2, C4)

5-5-0-7c.

Identify, with guidance, a new prediction/hypothesis based on results of investigations. (GLO: A1, C2)

5-5-0-7d.

Propose and justify a solution to the initial problem. (GLO: C3)

5-5-0-7e.

Identify new practical problems to solve. (GLO: C3)

5-5-0-7f.

Use prior knowledge and experiences selectively to make sense of new information in a variety of contexts. (GLO: A2, C4)

5-5-0-7g.

Communicate methods, results, conclusions, and new knowledge in a variety of ways. (GLO: C6)

5-5-0-7h.

Identify, with guidance, connections between the investigation results and everyday life. (GLO: C4)

5-5-0-8a.

Recognize that science is a way of answering questions about the world and that there are questions that science cannot answer. (GLO: A1, A3)

5-5-0-8b.

Identify examples of scientific knowledge that have developed as a result of the gradual accumulation of evidence. (GLO: A2)

5-5-0-8c.

Recognize that technology is a way of solving problems in response to human needs. (GLO: A3, B2)

5-5-0-8d.

Provide examples of technologies from the past and describe how they have evolved over time. (GLO: B1)

5-5-0-8e.

Describe hobbies and careers related to science and technology. (GLO: B4)

5-5-0-8f.

Recognize that science is organized into specialized disciplines. (GLO: A1, B4)

5-5-0-8g.

Describe positive and negative effects of scientific and technological endeavours. (GLO: A1, B1, B3, B5)

5-5-0-9a.

Appreciate that women and men of diverse cultural backgrounds can contribute equally to science. (GLO: A4)

5-5-0-9b.

Show interest in the activities of individuals working in scientific and technological fields. (GLO: B4)

5-5-0-9c.

Demonstrate confidence in their ability to carry out investigations in science and technology. (GLO: C5)

5-5-0-9d.

Appreciate the importance of creativity, accuracy, honesty, and perseverance as scientific and technological habits of mind. (GLO: C5)

5-5-0-9e.

Be sensitive to and develop a sense of responsibility for the welfare of other humans, other living things, and the environment. (GLO: B5)

5-5-0-9f.

Frequently and thoughtfully evaluate the potential consequences of their actions. (GLO: B5, C4)

5-5-1-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of human health. (GLO: B3, C6, D1)

5-5-1-02.

Interpret nutritional information found on food labels. (GLO: B3, C4, C5, C8)

5-5-1-03.

Describe the types of nutrients in foods and their function in maintaining a healthy body. (GLO: B3, D1)

5-5-1-04.

Evaluate a daily menu plan and suggest changes to make it align more closely with Canada's Food Guide to Healthy Eating. (GLO: B3, C3, C4, C8)

5-5-1-05.

Evaluate prepared food products using the design process. (GLO: B3, C3, C4, C8)

5-5-1-06.

Identify the major components of the digestive system, and describe its role in the human body. (GLO: D1, E2)

5-5-1-07.

Identify the major components of the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems, and describe the role of each system in the human body. (GLO: D1, E2)

5-5-1-08.

Identify skin as the major component of the integumentory system, and describe its role in protecting and supporting the human body. (GLO: D1, E2)

5-5-1-09.

Identify components of the human body's defenses against infections, and describe their role in defending the body against infection. (GLO: D1, E2)

5-5-1-10.

Identify the major components of the respiratory and circulatory systems, and describe the role of each system in the human body. (GLO: D1, E2)

5-5-1-11.

Describe how the human body gets rid of waste. (GLO: D1, E2)

5-5-1-12.

Give examples of how systems of the human body work together. (GLO: D1, E2)

5-5-1-13.

Identify and describe factors necessary to maintain a healthy body. (GLO: B3, C4, D1)

5-5-1-14.

Evaluate information related to body image and health from media sources for science content and bias. (GLO: B3, C4, C5, C8)

5-5-1-15.

Explain how human health may be affected by lifestyle choices and natural- and human-caused environmental factors. (GLO: B3, B5, C4, D1)

5-5-2-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of properties of, and changes in, substances. (GLO: C6, D3)

5-5-2-02.

Identify characteristics and properties that allow substances to be distinguished from one another. (GLO: D3, E1)

5-5-2-03.

Investigate to determine how characteristics and properties of substances may change when they interact with one other. (GLO: C2, D3, E3)

5-5-2-04.

Recognize that matter is anything that has mass/weight and takes up space. (GLO: D3)

5-5-2-05.

Identify properties of the three states of matter. (GLO: D3)

5-5-2-06.

Experiment to compare the mass/weight of a substance in its liquid and solid states. (GLO: C2, D3, E3)

5-5-2-07.

Demonstrate that the mass/weight of a whole object is equal to the sum of the mass/weight of its parts. (GLO: C2, D3, E3)

5-5-2-08.

Demonstrate that changes of state are reversible through the addition or removal of heat. (GLO: D3, E3, E4)

5-5-2-09.

Explore to identify reversible and non-reversible changes that can be made to substances. (GLO: C2, D3, E3)

5-5-2-10.

Recognize that a physical change alters the characteristics of a substance without producing a new substance, and that a chemical change produces a new substance with distinct characteristics and properties. (GLO: D3, E3)

5-5-2-11.

Observe examples of changes in substances, classify them as physical or chemical changes, and justify the designation. (GLO: C2, D3, E3)

5-5-2-12.

Identify potentially harmful chemical products used at home, and describe practices to ensure personal safety. (GLO: B1, C1, D3)

5-5-2-14.

Research and describe how raw materials are transformed into useful products. (GLO: B1, B4, C2, E3)

5-5-3-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of forces and simple machines. (GLO: C6, D4)

5-5-3-03.

Investigate a variety of levers used to accomplish particular tasks in order to compare them qualitatively with respect to fulcrum position, applied force, and load. (GLO: C2, D4, E1)

5-5-3-04.

Identify objects in the school and at home that use wheels and axles, and describe the forces involved. (GLO: B1, D4, E1)

5-5-3-05.

Recognize that a gear is a wheel and axle used to turn another wheel and axle. (GLO: D4, E2)

5-5-3-06.

Identify common devices and systems that incorporate pulleys and/or gears. (GLO: A5, B1, D4, E1)

5-5-3-07.

Explore to determine how the direction and amount of the applied force and the speed of rotation vary within a two-gear system. (GLO: C2, D4, E2)

5-5-3-08.

Compare, quantitatively, the force required to lift a load using a pulley system versus a single fixed pulley, and recognize the relationship between the force required and the distance over which the force is applied. (GLO: C2, D4, E2)

5-5-3-09.

Identify and make modifications to their own pulley and/or gear systems to improve how they move loads. (GLO: C3, D4, E2)

5-5-3-10.

Identify and describe types of simple machines. (GLO: D4)

5-5-3-11.

Describe the advantage of using simple machines to move or lift a given load. (GLO: D4)

5-5-3-12.

Investigate to identify advantages and disadvantages of using different simple machines to accomplish the same task. (GLO: B1, C2, C4, D4)

5-5-3-13.

Compare devices that use variations of simple machines to accomplish similar tasks. (GLO: B1, C3, C4, D4)

5-5-3-14.

Use the design process to construct a prototype containing a system of two or more different simple machines that move in a controlled way to perform a specific function. (GLO: C3, D4, E2)

5-5-4-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of weather. (GLO: C6, D5)

5-5-4-02.

Describe how weather conditions may affect the activities of humans and other animals. (GLO: D5)

5-5-4-03.

Describe properties of air. (GLO: D3)

5-5-4-04.

Recognize that warm and cold air masses are important components of weather, and describe what happens when these air masses meet along a front. (GLO: D5, E2)

5-5-4-05.

Use the design process to construct a weather instrument. (GLO: C3, D5)

5-5-4-06.

Observe and measure local weather conditions over a period of time, using student-constructed or standard instruments, and record and analyze these data. (GLO: A2, C2, C5, D5)

5-5-4-07.

Identify and describe components of public weather reports from a variety of sources. (GLO: C6, D5)

5-5-4-08.

Describe the key features of a variety of weather phenomena. (GLO: D5, E1, E2)

5-5-4-09.

Provide examples of severe weather forecasts, and describe preparations for ensuring personal safety during severe weather and related natural disasters. (GLO: B3, C1, D5)

5-5-4-10.

Investigate various ways of predicting the weather, and evaluate their usefulness. (GLO: A2, A4, B2, C8)

5-5-4-11.

Contrast the accuracy of short- and long-term weather forecasts, and discuss possible reasons for the discrepancies. (GLO: A1, C2)

5-5-4-12.

Describe examples of technological advances that have enabled humans to deepen their scientific understanding of weather and improve the accuracy of weather predictions. (GLO: A2, A5, B1, D5)

5-5-4-13.

Explain how the transfer of energy from the Sun affects weather conditions. (GLO: D4, D5, E4)

5-5-4-14.

Explain how clouds form, and relate cloud formation and precipitation to the water cycle. (GLO: D5, E2)

5-5-4-15.

Identify and describe common cloud formations. (GLO: D5, E1)

5-5-4-16.

Differentiate between weather and climate. (GLO: D5, E1)

5-5-4-17.

Identify factors that influence weather and climate in Manitoba and across Canada, and describe their impacts. (GLO: D5, E2)

5-5-4-18.

Recognize that climates around the world are ever changing, and identify possible explanations. (GLO: B5, D5, E2, E3)

5-5-GLO-1.

Students will explore concepts of identity, culture, and community in relation to individuals, societies, and nations.

5-5-GLO-2.

Students will explore the dynamic relationships of people with the land, places, and environments.

5-5-GLO-3.

Students will explore how people, events, and ideas of the past shape the present and influence the future.

5-5-GLO-4.

Students will explore the global interdependence of people, communities, societies, nations, and environments.

5-5-GLO-5.

Students will explore the processes and structures of power and authority, and their implications for individuals, relationships, communities, and nations.

5-5-GLO-6.

Students will explore the distribution of resources and wealth in relation to individuals, communities, and nations.

5-5-KC-001.

Give examples of the responsibilities and rights of citizens of Canada in 1867.

5-5-KC-002.

Identify differences in citizenship rights for various groups in 1867.

5-5-KC-003.

Compare what it meant to be a citizen of Canada in 1867 to what it means today.

5-5-KE-050.

Describe various ways in which First Peoples communities interacted with each other.

5-5-KE-051.

Compare First Peoples' and European approaches to natural resource use in early Canada.

5-5-KE-052.

Describe how the fur trade was dependent on the men and women of the First Nations and Metis Nation.

5-5-KE-053.

Compare and contrast the operations of the Hudson's Bay and the North West Companies and describe the competition between them.

5-5-KG-043.

Identify European countries that established colonial empires and locate on a world map their areas of colonization.

5-5-KG-044.

Identify global factors that influenced the fur trade in Canada.

5-5-KG-045.

Identify global factors that influenced immigration to Canada.

5-5-KH-024.

Relate First Peoples' stories of their pre-contact and early contact with Europeans.

5-5-KH-025.

Relate stories of European explorers and traders in their search for new lands or the Northwest Passage.

5-5-KH-026.

Give examples of the impact of interactions between First Peoples and European explorers, colonists, and missionaries.

5-5-KH-027.

Describe the impact of European wars on First Peoples and French and British colonies in early Canada.

5-5-KH-028.

Describe the reasons for and the impact of the Acadian deportation.

5-5-KH-029.

Describe the major events and impact of the British conquest of Nouvelle-France.

5-5-KH-030.

Describe the influence of the fur trade on the historical development of Canada.

5-5-KH-031.

Describe factors that led to the development and expansion of the fur trade into the west and north of Canada.

5-5-KH-032.

Relate stories of the people and events of the fur trade.

5-5-KH-033.

Describe contributions of individuals in the settlement of Nouvelle-France.

5-5-KH-034.

Describe the historical significance of Canadian place names.

5-5-KH-035.

Describe events related to the origins and rise of the Metis Nation.

5-5-KH-036.

Give examples of the impact of interactions between First Peoples and European traders and settlers.

5-5-KH-037.

Give reasons for the migration of the United Empire Loyalists and describe their impact on Canada.

5-5-KH-038.

Identify the causes, major events, and results of the War of 1812.

5-5-KH-039.

Describe the reasons for, main events of, and impact of the Selkirk Settlement of the Red River.

5-5-KH-040.

Identify people, events, and results of the 1837 to 1838 Rebellions and explain their impact on the development of Canada.

5-5-KH-041.

Describe the origins of Confederation and give arguments for and against Canadian Confederation.

5-5-KH-042.

Describe the roles of individuals in building Canadian Confederation.

5-5-KI-004.

Describe First Peoples' stories of their origins, as well as current theories of migration to the North American continent.

5-5-KI-005.

Describe characteristics of diverse First Peoples cultures before contact with Europeans.

5-5-KI-006.

Compare daily life in diverse First Peoples communities.

5-5-KI-007.

Describe daily life in early French and British settlements in Atlantic Canada.

5-5-KI-008.

Describe the organization and daily life of Nouvelle-France.

5-5-KI-009.

Describe daily life and challenges for various groups involved in the fur trade.

5-5-KI-010.

Describe the cultural diversity of pre- Confederation Canada.

5-5-KI-011.

Describe ways in which migration to another country or contact with other cultures may affect identities.

5-5-KI-012.

Describe how European views of First Peoples changed from 1763 to 1867.

5-5-KI-013.

Compare daily life in Canada East and Canada West.

5-5-KL-015.

Locate on a map of Canada the major physical regions, vegetation zones, and bodies of water.

5-5-KL-016.

Locate on a map of North America the traditional territories of First Peoples.

5-5-KL-017.

Describe practices and beliefs that reflected First Peoples' connections with the land and the natural environment.

5-5-KL-018.

Locate on a map of Canada places of historical significance during early European colonization.

5-5-KL-019.

Identify factors that influenced the movement and settlement of Europeans in early Canada.

5-5-KL-020.

Locate on a map of Canada places and regions of historical significance to the fur trade and the Metis Nation.

5-5-KL-021.

Give examples of ways in which the fur trade operations were influenced by the land.

5-5-KL-022.

Locate on a map of Canada the four provinces of Confederation in 1867.

5-5-KL-023.

Locate on a map of western Canada traditional Metis lands and communities.

5-5-KP-046.

Compare types of leadership in diverse First Peoples communities.

5-5-KP-047.

Identify reasons why Europeans expanded their territories to include North America.

5-5-KP-048.

Describe the organization of the royal government in Nouvelle-France.

5-5-KP-049.

Give examples of conflicting priorities between the demands of the fur trade and agricultural settlement.

5-5-S-204.

Create timelines and other visual organizers to sequence and represent historical figures, relationships, or chronological events.

5-5-S-205.

Construct maps that include a title, legend, compass rose, grid, and scale.

5-5-S-300.

Plan topics and goals for historical inquiry and research.

5-5-S-302.

Draw conclusions based on research and evidence.

5-5-S-307.

Compare differing accounts of historical events.

5-5-S-308.

Compare diverse perspectives in a variety of information sources.

5-5-S-310.

Recognize that interpretations of history are subject to change as new information is uncovered or acknowledged.

5-5-S-401.

Use language that is respectful of human diversity.

5-5-S-405.

Articulate their beliefs and perspectives on issues.

5-5.1.2

Relate Texts to Culture - Draw on oral, literary, and media texts to explain personal perspectives on cultural representations.

5-5.1.3

Appreciate Diversity - Compare individuals and situations portrayed in oral, literary, and media texts to those encountered in real life; recognize personal participation and responsibility in communities.

5-GLO-A1.

Recognize both the power and limitations of science as a way of answering questions about the world and explaining natural phenomena

5-GLO-A2.

Recognize that scientific knowledge is based on evidence, models and explanations, and evolves as new evidence appears and new conceptualizations develop

5-GLO-A3.

Distinguish critically between science and technology in terms of their respective contexts, goals, methods, products, and values

5-GLO-A4.

Identify and appreciate contributions made by women and men from many societies and cultural backgrounds towards increasing our understanding of the world and in bringing about technological innovations

5-GLO-A5.

Recognize that science and technology interact with and advance one another

5-GLO-B1.

Describe scientific and technological developments, past and present, and appreciate their impact on individuals, societies and the environment, both locally and globally.

5-GLO-B2.

Recognize that scientific and technological endeavors have been and continue to be influenced by human needs and the societal context of the time

5-GLO-B3.

Identify the factors that affect health and explain the relationships among personal habits, lifestyle choices, and human health, both individual and social

5-GLO-B4.

Demonstrate a knowledge of, and personal consideration for, a range of possible science- and technology-related interests, hobbies, and careers

5-GLO-B5.

Identify and demonstrate actions that promote a sustainable environment, society and economy, both locally and globally

5-GLO-C1.

Recognize safety symbols and practices related to scientific and technological activities and to their daily lives, and apply this knowledge in appropriate situations

5-GLO-C2.

Demonstrate appropriate scientific inquiry skills when seeking answers to questions

5-GLO-C3.

Demonstrate appropriate problem-solving skills while seeking solutions to technological challenges

5-GLO-C4.

Demonstrate appropriate critical thinking and decision-making skills when choosing a course of action based on scientific and technological information

5-GLO-C5.

Demonstrate curiosity, scepticism, creativity, open-mindedness, accuracy, precision, honesty, and persistence, and appreciate their importance as scientific and technological habits of mind

5-GLO-C6.

Employ effective communication skills and utilize information technology to gather and share scientific and technological ideas and data

5-GLO-C7.

Work cooperatively and value the ideas and contributions of others while carrying out scientific and technological activities

5-GLO-C8.

Evaluate, from a scientific perspective, information and ideas encountered during investigations and in daily life

5-GLO-D1.

Understand essential life structures and processes pertaining to a wide variety of organisms, including humans

5-GLO-D2.

Understand various biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, as well as their interaction and interdependence within ecosystems and within the biosphere as a whole

5-GLO-D3.

Understand the properties and structures of matter as well as various common manifestations and applications of the actions and interactions of matter

5-GLO-D4.

Understand how stability, motion, forces, and energy transfers and transformations play a role in a wide range of natural and constructed contexts

5-GLO-D5.

Understand the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere, as well as the processes involved within and between them

5-GLO-D6.

Understand the composition of the universe, the interactions within it, and the impacts of humankind's continued attempts to understand and explore it

5-GLO-E1.

Describe and appreciate the similarity and diversity of forms, functions, and patterns within the natural and constructed world

5-GLO-E2.

Describe and appreciate how the natural and constructed world is made up of systems and how interactions take place within and among these systems

5-GLO-E3.

Recognize that characteristics of materials and systems can remain constant or change over time, and describe the conditions and processes involved

5-GLO-E4.

Recognize that energy, whether transmitted or transformed, is the driving force of both movement and change, and is inherent within materials and in the interactions among them

5.N.1.

Represent and describe whole numbers to 1 000 000. [C, CN, T, V]

5.N.1.1.

Write a numeral using proper spacing without commas (e.g., 934 567 and not 934,567).

5.N.1.2.

Describe the pattern of adjacent place positions moving from right to left.

5.N.1.3.

Describe the meaning of each digit in a numeral.

5.N.1.4.

Provide examples of large numbers used in print or electronic media.

5.N.1.5.

Express a given numeral in expanded notation (e.g., 45 321 = [4 X 10 000] + [5 X 1000] + [3 X 100] + [2 X 10] + [1 X 1] or 40 000 + 5000 + 300 + 20 + 1).

5.N.1.6.

Write the numeral represented in expanded notation.

5.N.10.

Compare and order decimals (tenths, hundredths, thousandths) by using: benchmarks; place value; equivalent decimals [CN, R, V]

5.N.10.1.

Order a set of decimals by placing them on a number line (vertical or horizontal) that contains benchmarks, 0.0, 0.5, 1.0.

5.N.10.2.

Order a set of decimals including only tenths using place value.

5.N.10.3.

Order a set of decimals including only hundredths using place value.

5.N.10.4.

Order a set of decimals including only thousandths using place value.

5.N.10.5.

Explain what is the same and what is different about 0.2, 0.20, and 0.200.

5.N.10.6.

Order a set of decimals including tenths, hundredths, and thousandths using equivalent decimals.

5.N.11.

Demonstrate an understanding of addition and subtraction of decimals (to thousandths), concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, by: using personal strategies; using the standard algorithms; using estimation; solving problems [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

5.N.11.1.

Estimate a sum or difference using front-end estimation (e.g., for 6.3 + 0.25 + 306.158, think 6 + 306, so the sum is greater than 312) and place the decimal in the appropriate place.

5.N.11.2.

Correct errors of decimal point placements in sums and differences without using paper and pencil.

5.N.11.3.

Explain why keeping track of place value positions is important when adding and subtracting decimals.

5.N.11.4.

Predict sums and differences of decimals using estimation strategies.

5.N.11.5.

Solve a problem that involves addition and subtraction of decimals, to thousandths.

5.N.11.6.

Model and explain the relationship that exists between an algorithm, place value, and number properties.

5.N.11.7.

Determine the sum and difference using the standard algorithms of vertical addition and subtraction. (Numbers are arranged vertically with corresponding place value digits aligned.)

5.N.11.8.

Refine personal strategies, such as mental math, to increase efficiency when appropriate (e.g., 3.36 + 9.65 think, 0.35 + 0.65 = 1.00, therefore, 0.36 + 0.65 = 1.01 and 3 + 9 = 12 for a total of 13.01).

5.N.2.

Apply estimation strategies, including: front-end rounding; compensation; compatible numbers in problem-solving contexts. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

5.N.2.1.

Provide a context for when estimation is used to:

5.N.2.1.c.

Determine approximate answers

5.N.2.3.

Determine the approximate solution to a problem not requiring an exact answer.

5.N.2.4.

Estimate a sum or product using compatible numbers.

5.N.2.5.

Estimate the solution to a problem using compensation, and explain the reason for compensation.

5.N.2.6.

Select and use an estimation strategy to solve a problem.

5.N.2.7.

Apply front-end rounding to estimate:

5.N.2.7.a.

Sums (e.g., 253 + 615 is more than 200 + 600 = 800)

5.N.2.7.b.

Differences (e.g., 974 - 250 is close to 900 - 200 = 700)

5.N.2.7.c.

Products (e.g., the product of 23 X 24 is greater than 20 X 20 or 400 and less than 25 X 25 or 625)

5.N.2.7.d.

Quotients (e.g., the quotient of 831 / 4 is greater than 800 / 4 or 200)

5.N.3.

Apply mental math strategies to determine multiplication and related division facts to 81 (9 x 9). [C, CN, ME, R, V]

5.N.3.1.

Describe the mental mathematics strategy used to determine a basic fact, such as:

5.N.3.1.a.

Skip-count up by one or two groups from a known fact (e.g., if 5 X 7 = 35, then 6 X 7 is equal to 35 + 7 and 7 X 7 is equal to 35 + 7 + 7)

5.N.3.1.b.

Skip-count down by one or two groups from a known fact (e.g., if 8 X 8 = 64, then 7 X 8 is equal to 64 - 8 and 6 X 8 is equal to 64 - 8 - 8)

5.N.3.1.d.

Use patterns when multiplying by 9 (e.g., for 9 X 6, think 10 X 6 = 60, then 60 - 6 = 54; for 7 X 9, think 7 X 10 = 70, and 70 - 7 = 63)

5.N.3.1.g.

Relating multiplication to division facts (e.g., for 7 x 8, think 56 / 7 = __)

5.N.3.1.h.

Use multiplication facts that are squares (1 x 1, 2 x 2, up to 9 x 9)

5.N.3.2.

Refine personal strategies to increase efficiency (e.g., for 7 x 6, use known square 6 x 6 + 6 instead of repeated addition 6 + 6 + 6 + 6 + 6 + 6 + 6).

5.N.4.

Apply mental mathematics strategies for multiplication, such as: annexing then adding zeros; halving and doubling; using the distributive property [C, ME, R]

5.N.4.1.

Determine the products when one factor is a multiple of 10, 100, or 1000 by annexing zero or adding zeros (e.g., for 3 X 200 think 3 X 2 and then add two zeros).

5.N.4.3.

Apply the distributive property to determine a product involving multiplying factors that are close to multiples of 10 [e.g., 98 X 7 = (100 X 7) - (2 X7)].

5.N.5.

Demonstrate an understanding of multiplication (1- and 2-digit multipliers and up to 4-digit multiplicands), concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, by: using personal strategies; using the standard algorithm; estimating products to solve problems. [C, CN, ME, PS, V]

5.N.5.1.

Illustrate partial products in expanded notation for both factors [e.g., for 36 X 42, determine the partial products for (30 + 6) X (40 + 2)].

5.N.5.2.

Represent both 2-digit factors in expanded notation to illustrate the distributive property [e.g., to determine the partial products of 36 X 42, (30 + 6) X (40 + 2) = 30 X 40 + 30 X 2 + 6 X 40 + 6 X 2 = 1200 + 60 + 240 + 12 = 1512].

5.N.5.3.

Model the steps for multiplying 2-digit factors using an array and base-10 blocks, and record the process symbolically.

5.N.5.4.

Describe a solution procedure for determining the product of two 2-digit factors using a pictorial representation, such as an area model.

5.N.5.5.

Model and explain the relationship that exists between an algorithm, place value, and number properties.

5.N.5.6.

Determine products using the standard algorithm of vertical multiplication. (Numbers arranged vertically and multiplied using single digits which are added to form a final product.)

5.N.5.7.

Solve a multiplication problem in context using personal strategies, and record the process.

5.N.5.8.

Refine personal strategies such as mental math strategies to increase efficiency when appropriate [e.g., 16 x 25 think 4 x (4 x 25) = 400].

5.N.6.

Demonstrate an understanding of division (1- and 2-digit divisors and up to 4-digit dividends), concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, and interpret remainders by: using personal strategies; using the standard algorithm; estimating quotients to solve problems. [C, CN, ME, PS]

5.N.6.1.

Model the division process as equal sharing using base-10 blocks, and record it symbolically.

5.N.6.2.

Explain that the interpretation of a remainder depends on the context:

5.N.6.2.a.

Ignore the remainder (e.g., making teams of 4 from 22 people)

5.N.6.2.b.

Round up the quotient (e.g., the number of five passenger cars required to transport 13 people)

5.N.6.2.c.

Express remainders as fractions (e.g., five apples shared by two people)

5.N.6.2.d.

Express remainders as decimals (e.g., measurement or money)

5.N.6.3.

Model and explain the relationship that exists between algorithm, place value, and number properties.

5.N.6.4.

Determine quotients using the standard algorithm of long division. (The multiples of the divisor are subtracted from the dividend.)

5.N.6.5.

Solve a division problem in context using personal strategies, and record the process.

5.N.6.6.

Refine personal strategies such as mental math strategies to increase efficiency when appropriate (e.g., 860 / 2 think 86 / 2 = 43 then 860 / 2 is 430).

5.N.7.

Demonstrate an understanding of fractions by using concrete and pictorial representations to: create sets of equivalent fractions; compare fractions with like and unlike denominators [C, CN, PS, R, V]

5.N.7.1.

Create a set of equivalent fractions and explain why there are many equivalent fractions for any fraction using concrete materials.

5.N.7.2.

Model and explain that equivalent fractions represent the same quantity.

5.N.7.3.

Determine if two fractions are equivalent using concrete materials or pictorial representations.

5.N.7.4.

Formulate and verify a rule for developing a set of equivalent fractions.

5.N.7.5.

Identify equivalent fractions for a fraction.

5.N.7.6.

Compare two fractions with unlike denominators by creating equivalent fractions.

5.N.7.7.

Position a set of fractions with like and unlike denominators on a number line (vertical or horizontal), and explain strategies used to determine the order.

5.N.8.

Describe and represent decimals (tenths, hundredths, thousandths) concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, R, V]

5.N.8.1.

Write the decimal for a concrete or pictorial representation of part of a set, part of a region, or part of a unit of measure.

5.N.8.2.

Represent a decimal using concrete materials or a pictorial representation.

5.N.8.3.

Represent an equivalent tenth, hundredth, or thousandth for a decimal, using a grid.

5.N.8.4.

Express a tenth as an equivalent hundredth and thousandth.

5.N.8.5.

Express a hundredth as an equivalent thousandth.

5.N.8.6.

Describe the value of each digit in a decimal.

5.N.9.

Relate decimals to fractions (tenths, hundredths, thousandths). [CN, R, V]

5.N.9.1.

Write a decimal in fractional form.

5.N.9.2.

Write a fraction with a denominator of 10, 100, or 1000 as a decimal.

5.N.9.3.

Express a pictorial or concrete representation as a fraction or decimal (e.g., 250 shaded squares on a thousandth grid can be expressed as 0.250 or 250/1000).

5.PR.1.

Determine the pattern rule to make predictions about subsequent elements. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

5.PR.1.1.

Extend a pattern with or without concrete materials, and explain how each element differs from the proceeding one.

5.PR.1.2.

Describe, orally or in writing, a pattern using mathematical language, such as one more, one less, five more.

5.PR.1.3.

Write a mathematical expression to represent a pattern, such as r + 1, r - 1, r + 5.

5.PR.1.4.

Describe the relationship in a table or chart using a mathematical expression.

5.PR.1.5.

Determine and explain why a number is or is not the next element in a pattern.

5.PR.1.6.

Predict subsequent elements in a pattern.

5.PR.1.7.

Solve a problem by using a pattern rule to determine subsequent elements.

5.PR.1.8.

Represent a pattern visually to verify predictions.

5.PR.2.

Solve problems involving single-variable (expressed as symbols or letters), one-step equations with whole-number coefficients, and whole-number solutions. [C, CN, PS, R]

5.PR.2.1.

Express a problem in context as an equation where the unknown is represented by a letter variable.

5.PR.2.2.

Solve a single-variable equation with the unknown in any of the terms (e.g., n + 2 = 5, 4 + a = 7, 6 = r - 2, 10 = 2c).

5.PR.2.3.

Create a problem in context for an equation.

5.SP.1.

Differentiate between first-hand and second-hand data. [C, R, T, V]

5.SP.1.2.

Formulate a question that can best be answered using first-hand data and explain why.

5.SP.1.3.

Formulate a question that can best be answered using second-hand data and explain why.

5.SP.3.

Describe the likelihood of a single outcome occurring, using words such as: impossible; possible; certain [C, CN, PS, R]

5.SP.3.1.

Provide examples of events that are impossible, possible, or certain from personal contexts.

5.SP.3.2.

Classify the likelihood of a single outcome occurring in a probability experiment as impossible, possible, or certain.

5.SP.3.3.

Design and conduct a probability experiment in which the likelihood of a single outcome occurring is impossible, possible, or certain.

5.SP.3.4.

Conduct a probability experiment a number of times, record the outcomes, and explain the results.

5.SP.4.

Compare the likelihood of two possible outcomes occurring, using words such as: less likely; equally likely; more likely [C, CN, PS, R]

5.SP.4.1.

Identify outcomes from a probability experiment which are less likely, equally likely, or more likely to occur than other outcomes.

5.SP.4.2.

Design and conduct a probability experiment in which one outcome is less likely to occur than the other outcome.

5.SP.4.3.

Design and conduct a probability experiment in which one outcome is equally as likely to occur as the other outcome.

5.SP.4.4.

Design and conduct a probability experiment in which one outcome is more likely to occur than the other outcome.

5.SS.1.

Design and construct different rectangles given either perimeter or area or both (whole numbers), and draw conclusions. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

5.SS.1.1.

Construct or draw two or more rectangles for a given perimeter in a problem-solving context.

5.SS.1.2.

Construct or draw two or more rectangles for a given area in a problem-solving context.

5.SS.1.3.

Illustrate that for any perimeter, the square or shape closest to a square will result in the greatest area.

5.SS.1.4.

Illustrate that for any perimeter, the rectangle with the smallest possible width will result in the least area.

5.SS.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of measuring length (mm) by: selecting and justifying referents for the unit mm; modelling and describing the relationship between mm and cm units, and between mm and m units [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

5.SS.2.4.

Show that 10 millimetres is equivalent to 1 centimetre using concrete materials (e.g., ruler).

5.SS.2.5.

Show that 1000 millimetres is equivalent to 1 metre using concrete materials (e.g., metre stick).

5.SS.2.6.

Provide examples of when millimetres are used as the unit of measure.

5.SS.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of volume by: selecting and justifying referents for cm^3 or m^3 units; estimating volume by using referents for cm^3 or m^3; measuring and recording volume (cm^3 or m^3); constructing rectangular prisms for a given volume [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

5.SS.3.1.

Identify the cube as the most efficient unit for measuring volume and explain why.

5.SS.3.6.

Determine the volume of a 3-D object using manipulatives and explain the strategy.

5.SS.3.7.

Construct a rectangular prism for a given volume.

5.SS.3.8.

Explain that many rectangular prisms are possible for a given volume by constructing more than one rectangular prism for the same volume.

5.SS.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of capacity by: describing the relationship between mL and L; selecting and justifying referents for mL or L units; estimating capacity by using referents for mL or L; measuring and recording capacity (mL or L) [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

5.SS.4.1.

Demonstrate that 1000 millilitres is equivalent to 1 litre by filling a 1-litre container using a combination of smaller containers.

5.SS.4.4.

Determine which capacity unit (mL or L) is represented by a given referent.

5.SS.4.6.

Determine the capacity of a container using materials that take the shape of the inside of the container (e.g., a liquid, rice, sand, beads), and explain the strategy.

5.SS.5.

Describe and provide examples of edges and faces of 3-D objects, and sides of 2-D shapes, that are: parallel; intersecting; perpendicular; vertical; horizontal [C, CN, R, T, V]

5.SS.5.1.

Identify parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical, and horizontal edges and faces on 3-D objects.

5.SS.5.2.

Identify parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical, and horizontal sides on 2-D shapes.

5.SS.5.3.

Provide examples from the environment that show parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical, and horizontal line segments.

5.SS.5.4.

Find examples of edges, faces, and sides that are parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical, and horizontal in print and electronic media, such as newspapers, magazines, and the Internet.

5.SS.5.5.

Draw 2-D shapes or 3-D objects that have edges, faces, and sides that are parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical, or horizontal.

5.SS.5.6.

Describe the faces and edges of a 3-D object using terms such as parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical, or horizontal.

5.SS.5.7.

Describe the sides of a 2-D shape using terms such as parallel, intersecting, perpendicular, vertical, or horizontal.

5.SS.6.

Identify and sort quadrilaterals, including: rectangles; squares; trapezoids; parallelograms; rhombuses according to their attributes. [C, R, V]

5.SS.6.1.

Identify and describe the characteristics of a pre-sorted set of quadrilaterals.

5.SS.6.2.

Sort a set of quadrilaterals and explain the sorting rule.

5.SS.6.3.

Sort a set of quadrilaterals according to the lengths of the sides.

5.SS.6.4.

Sort a set of quadrilaterals according to whether or not opposite sides are parallel.

5.SS.7.

Perform a single transformation (translation, rotation, or reflection) of a 2-D shape, and draw and describe the image. [C, CN, T, V]

5.SS.7.1.

Translate a 2-D shape horizontally, vertically, or diagonally, and describe the position and orientation of the image.

5.SS.7.2.

Rotate a 2-D shape about a point, and describe the position and orientation of the image.

5.SS.7.3.

Reflect a 2-D shape in a line of reflection, and describe the position and orientation of the image.

5.SS.7.4.

Perform a transformation of a 2-D shape by following instructions.

5.SS.7.5.

Draw a 2-D shape, translate the shape, and record the translation by describing the direction and magnitude of the movement (e.g., the circle moved 3 cm to the left).

5.SS.7.6.

Draw a 2-D shape, rotate the shape, and describe the direction of the turn (clockwise or counter-clockwise), the fraction of the turn, and point of rotation.

5.SS.7.7.

Draw a 2-D shape, reflect the shape, and identify the line of reflection and the distance of the image from the line of reflection.

5.SS.7.8.

Predict the result of a single transformation of a 2-D shape and verify the prediction.

5.SS.8.

Identify a single transformation (translation, rotation, or reflection) of 2-D shapes. [C, T, V]

5.SS.8.1.

Provide an example of a translation, a rotation, and a reflection.

5.SS.8.2.

Identify a single transformation as a translation, rotation, or reflection.

5.SS.8.3.

Describe a rotation by the direction of the turn (clockwise or counter-clockwise).