Manitoba Curriculum Frameworks — Grade 6


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6-1.1.1

Express Ideas - Engage in exploratory communication to share personal responses, make predictions, and discover own interpretations.

6-1.1.2

Consider Others' Ideas - Select from others' ideas and observations to develop thinking and understanding.

6-1.1.3

Experiment with Language and Form - Experiment with new forms of self-expression.

6-1.1.4

Express Preferences - Assess personal collection of favourite oral, literary, and media texts and discuss preferences for particular forms.

6-1.1.5

Set Goals - Assess personal language use and revise personal goals to enhance language learning and use.

6-1.2.1

Develop Understanding - Reflect on prior knowledge and experiences to arrive at new understanding.

6-1.2.2

Explain Opinions - Explain personal viewpoints in clear and meaningful ways and revise personal understanding.

6-1.2.4

Extend Understanding - Appraise ideas for clarity and ask extending questions; select from others' experiences and ideas to extend ways of knowing the world.

6-2.1.1

Prior Knowledge - Seek connections between previous experiences, prior knowledge, and a variety of texts.

6-2.1.2

Comprehension Strategies - Use comprehension strategies [such as asking questions, making notes, adjusting reading rate . . .] appropriate to the type of text and purpose [including summarizing, outlining, remembering ideas, and responding personally].

6-2.1.3

Textual Cues - Use textual cues [such as organizational structures of narrative and expository texts, headings, glossaries, margin notes...] to construct and confirm meaning.

6-2.1.4

Cueing Systems - Use syntactic, semantic, and graphophonic cueing systems [including word order, context clues; and multiple meanings of words, structural analysis to identify roots, prefixes, and suffixes] to construct and confirm meaning; use a dictionary to determine word meaning in context.

6-2.2.1

Experience Various Texts - Seek opportunities to experience texts from a variety of forms and genres [such as autobiographies, travelogues, comics...] and cultural traditions; share responses.

6-2.2.2

Connect Self, Texts, and Culture - Discuss own and others' understanding of various community and cultural traditions in various places and times as portrayed in oral, literary, and media texts [including texts about Canada or by Canadian writers].

6-2.2.3

Appreciate the Artistry of Texts - Identify descriptive and figurative language in oral, literary, and media texts and discuss how it enhances understanding of people, places, and action.

6-2.3.1

Forms and Genre - Recognize key characteristics of various forms and genres of oral, literary, and media texts [such as novels, biographies, autobiographies, myths, poetry, drawings, and prints...].

6-2.3.2

Techniques and Elements - Identify significant elements and techniques in oral, literary, and media texts, and examine how they interact to create effects.

6-2.3.3

Vocabulary - Experiment with ambiguity in language [such as puns, jokes based on multiple meanings, poetry...] in a variety of contexts.

6-2.3.4

Experiment with Language - Alter words, forms, and sentence patterns to create new versions of texts for a variety of purposes [such as humour...]; explain ways in which figures of speech [such as similes, metaphors...] clarify and enhance meaning.

6-2.3.5

Create Original Texts - Create original texts [such as letters, short stories, media broadcasts, plays, poems, video presentations, readers' theater...] to communicate and demonstrate understanding of forms and techniques.

6-3.1.1

Use Personal Knowledge - Summarize and focus personal knowledge of a topic to determine information needs.

6-3.1.3

Contribute to Group Inquiry - Contribute to group knowledge of topics to help identify and focus information needs, sources, and purposes for group inquiry or research.

6-3.1.4

Create and Follow a Plan - Create and follow a plan to collect and record information within a pre-established time frame.

6-3.2.1

Identify Personal and Peer Knowledge - Recall, record and organize personal and peer knowledge of a topic for inquiry or research.

6-3.2.2

Identify Sources - Answer inquiry and research questions using a variety of information sources [such as bulletin boards, classroom displays art, music, skilled community people, CD-ROMs, Internet...].

6-3.2.3

Assess Sources - Recognize that information serves different purposes and determine its usefulness for inquiry or research focus using pre-established criteria.

6-3.2.4

Access Information - Use a variety of tools [including bibliographies, thesauri, and technology] to access information and ideas; use visual and auditory cues [such as captions, intonation, staging ...] to identify relevant information.

6-3.2.5

Make Sense of Information - Use organizational patterns of oral, visual, and written texts [including main ideas and supporting details, explanation, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, and sequence] to construct meaning; skim, scan and read closely to gather information.

6-3.3.1

Organize Information - Organize information and ideas using a variety of strategies and techniques [such as comparing and contrasting, classifying and sorting according to subtopics, sequences, order of priority or importance...].

6-3.3.2

Record Information - Make notes on a topic, combining information from more than one source; reference sources appropriately.

6-3.3.4

Develop New Understanding - Relate gathered information to prior knowledge to reach conclusions or develop points of view; establish goals for developing further inquiry or research skills.

6-4.1.1

Generate Ideas - Focus a topic for oral, written, and visual texts integrating ideas from experiences and a variety of other sources.

6-4.1.2

Choose Forms - Select specific forms [such as diaries, narratives, speeches, letters, poetry, mime...] that serve particular audiences and purposes.

6-4.1.3

Organize Ideas - Adapt models from listening, reading, and viewing experiences to enhance own oral, written, and visual texts using organizational patterns [such as stanzas, chronological order, paragraphs...].

6-4.2.1

Appraise Own and Others' Work - Share own stories and creations at appropriate times during revision and use criteria to provide feedback for others and to revise and assess own work and presentations.

6-4.2.2

Revise Content - Revise to eliminate unnecessary information.

6-4.2.3

Enhance Legibility - Write legibly and at a pace appropriate to context and purpose when composing and revising; select and use a variety of formatting options [such as spacing, graphics, titles and headings, variety of font sizes and styles...] when appropriate.

6-4.2.4

Enhance Artistry - Choose language, sounds, and images [including transitional devices] to enhance meaning and emphasis.

6-4.2.5

Enhance Presentation - Prepare detailed and organized compositions, presentations, reports, and inquiry or research projects using templates or pre-established organizers.

6-4.3.1

Grammar and Usage - Edit for subject-verb agreement, appropriate verb tense, and correct pronoun references.

6-4.3.2

Spelling (see Strategies) - Know and apply spelling conventions using appropriate strategies [including structural analysis, syllabication, and visual memory] and spelling patterns when editing and proofreading; use a variety of resources to determine the spelling of common exceptions to conventional spelling patterns.

6-4.3.3

Punctuation and Capitalization - Know and apply capitalization and punctuation conventions in compound sentences, titles, headings, salutations, and addresses when editing and proofreading.

6-4.4.1

Share Ideas and Information - Share information on a topic with class members in a planned and focused group session using a variety of strategies [such as interactive dialogues, demonstrations, dramatizations, audio-visual and artistic representations...].

6-4.4.2

Effective Oral Communication - Use appropriate volume, phrasing, intonation, non-verbal cues [such as body language, facial expression...], and presentation space to enhance communication.

6-4.4.3

Attentive Listening and Viewing - Demonstrate critical listening and viewing skills and strategies [such as recognizing main idea and details, identifying inference...] and show respect for presenter(s) through appropriate audience behaviours [such as giving non-verbal encouragement, responding to emotional aspects of the presentation...].

6-5.1.1

Compare Responses - Compare personal ways of responding and thinking with those of others.

6-5.1.2

Relate Texts to Culture - Incorporate language from oral, literary, and media texts to describe personal perspectives on cultural representations.

6-5.1.3

Appreciate Diversity - Observe and discuss aspects of human nature revealed in personal experiences and in oral, literary, and media texts; recognize personal participation and responsibility in communities.

6-5.1.4

Celebrate Special Occasions - Explore and experiment with various ways in which language is used across cultures, age groups, and genders to honour and celebrate people and events.

6-5.2.1

Cooperate with Others - Assist group members to maintain focus and complete tasks; identify and solve group process issues.

6-5.2.2

Work in Groups - Select and assume roles to assist in the achievement of group goals; engage in on-going feedback.

6-5.2.3

Use Language to Show Respect - Demonstrate sensitivity to appropriate language use and tone when communicating orally.

6-5.2.4

Evaluate Group Process - Assess own contributions to group process, set personal goals for enhancing work with others, monitor group process using checklists, and set group goals.

6-6-0-1a.

Formulate specific questions that lead to investigations. (GLO: A1, C2)

6-6-0-1b.

Identify various methods for finding the answer to a specific question and select one to implement. (GLO: C2)

6-6-0-1c.

Identify practical problems to solve. (GLO: C3)

6-6-0-1d.

Identify various methods to solve a practical problem and select and justify one to implement. (GLO: C3)

6-6-0-2a.

Access information using a variety of sources. (GLO: C6)

6-6-0-2b.

Review information to determine its usefulness using pre-determined criteria. (GLO: C6, C8)

6-6-0-2c.

Make notes on a topic, combining information from more than one source and reference sources appropriately. (GLO: C6)

6-6-0-3a.

Formulate a prediction/hypothesis that identifies a cause and effect relationship. (GLO: A2, C2)

6-6-0-3b.

Identify variables that have an impact on their experiments and variables to hold constant to ensure a fair test. (GLO: A2, C2)

6-6-0-3c.

Create a written plan to answer a specific question. (GLO: C1, C2)

6-6-0-3d.

Develop criteria to evaluate a prototype or consumer product. (GLO: C3)

6-6-0-3e.

Create a written plan to solve a problem. (GLO: C1, C3, C6)

6-6-0-4b.

Construct a prototype. (GLO: C3)

6-6-0-4c.

Work cooperatively with group members to carry out a plan, and troubleshoot problems as they arise. (GLO: C7)

6-6-0-4d.

Assume various roles to achieve group goals. (GLO: C7)

6-6-0-4e.

Use tools and materials in a manner that ensures personal safety and the safety of others. (GLO: C1)

6-6-0-5a.

Make observations that are relevant to a specific question. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

6-6-0-5b.

Test a prototype or consumer product with respect to pre-determined criteria. (GLO: C3, C5)

6-6-0-5c.

Select and use tools and instruments to observe, measure, and construct. (GLO: C2, C3, C5)

6-6-0-5d.

Evaluate the appropriateness of units and measuring tools in practical contexts. (GLO: C2, C5)

6-6-0-5e.

Estimate and measure accurately using SI and other standard units. (GLO: C2, C5)

6-6-0-5f.

Record and organize observations in a variety of ways. (GLO: C2, C6)

6-6-0-6a.

Construct graphs to display data, and interpret and evaluate these and other graphs. (GLO: C2, C6)

6-6-0-6b.

Identify and suggest explanations for patterns and discrepancies in data. (GLO: A1, A2, C2, C5)

6-6-0-6c.

Identify and make improvements to a prototype and explain the rationale for the changes. (GLO: C3, C4)

6-6-0-6d.

Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a consumer product based on pre-determined criteria. (GLO: C3, C4)

6-6-0-6e.

Evaluate the methods used to answer a question or solve a problem. (GLO: C2, C3)

6-6-0-7a.

Draw a conclusion that explains investigation results. (GLO: A1, A2, C2)

6-6-0-7b.

Base conclusions on evidence rather than preconceived ideas or hunches. (GLO: C2, C4)

6-6-0-7c.

Identify a new prediction/hypothesis based on results of investigations. (GLO: A1, C2)

6-6-0-7d.

Propose and justify a solution to the initial problem. (GLO: C3)

6-6-0-7e.

Identify new practical problems to solve. (GLO: C3)

6-6-0-7f.

Reflect on prior knowledge and experiences to construct new understanding and apply this new knowledge in other contexts. (GLO: A2, C4)

6-6-0-7g.

Communicate methods, results, conclusions, and new knowledge in a variety of ways. (GLO: C6)

6-6-0-7h.

Identify connections between the investigation results and everyday life. (GLO: C4)

6-6-0-8a.

Recognize that science is a way of answering questions about the world and that there are questions that science cannot answer. (GLO: A1, A3)

6-6-0-8b.

Identify examples of scientific knowledge that have developed as a result of the gradual accumulation of evidence. (GLO: A2)

6-6-0-8c.

Recognize that technology is a way of solving problems in response to human needs. (GLO: A3, B2)

6-6-0-8d.

Provide examples of technologies from the past and describe how they have evolved over time. (GLO: B1)

6-6-0-8e.

Describe hobbies and careers related to science and technology. (GLO: B4)

6-6-0-8f.

Recognize that science is organized into specialized disciplines. (GLO: A1, B4)

6-6-0-8g.

Describe positive and negative effects of scientific and technological endeavours. (GLO: A1, B1, B3, B5)

6-6-0-9a.

Appreciate that women and men of diverse cultural backgrounds can contribute equally to science. (GLO: A4)

6-6-0-9b.

Show interest in the activities of individuals working in scientific and technological fields. (GLO: B4)

6-6-0-9c.

Demonstrate confidence in their ability to carry out investigations in science and technology. (GLO: C5)

6-6-0-9d.

Appreciate the importance of creativity, accuracy, honesty, and perseverance as scientific and technological habits of mind. (GLO: C5)

6-6-0-9e.

Be sensitive to and develop a sense of responsibility for the welfare of other humans, other living things, and the environment. (GLO: B5)

6-6-0-9f.

Frequently and thoughtfully evaluate the potential consequences of their actions. (GLO: B5, C4)

6-6-1-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of the diversity of living things. (GLO: C6, D1)

6-6-1-02.

Describe various kinds of classification systems used in everyday life, and identify related advantages and disadvantages. (GLO: B1, B2, E1, E2)

6-6-1-03.

Develop a system to classify common objects or living things into groups and subgroups, and explain the reasoning used in the system's development. (GLO: A1, C2, E1, E2)

6-6-1-04.

Identify living things using an existing classification key, and explain the rationale used. (GLO: A1, C2, D1, E2)

6-6-1-05.

Identify advantages and disadvantages of having a common classification system for living things, and recognize that the system changes as new evidence comes to light. (GLO: A1, A2, D1, E2)

6-6-1-06.

Identify the five kingdoms commonly used for the classification of living things, and provide examples of organisms from each to illustrate the diversity of living things. (GLO: A1, D1, E1, E2)

6-6-1-07.

Recognize that many living things are difficult to see with the unaided eye, and observe and describe some examples. (GLO: C2, D1, E1)

6-6-1-08.

Observe and describe the diversity of living things within the local environment. (GLO: A1, C2, D1, E1)

6-6-1-09.

Recognize that the animal kingdom is divided into two groups, vertebrates and invertebrates, and differentiate between the two. (GLO: D1, E1)

6-6-1-10.

Provide examples of a variety of invertebrates to illustrate their diversity. (GLO: D1, E1)

6-6-1-11.

Compare and contrast adaptations of common arthropods, and describe how these adaptations enable them to live in particular habitats. (GLO: D1, D2, E1)

6-6-1-12.

Classify vertebrates as fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, and provide examples to illustrate the diversity within each group. (GLO: D1, E1)

6-6-1-13.

Compare and contrast the adaptations of closely related vertebrates living in different habitats, and suggest reasons that explain these adaptations. (GLO: D1, D2, E1)

6-6-1-14.

Identify, based on evidence gathered by paleontologists, similarities and differences in animals living today and those that lived in the past. (GLO: A1, A2, E1, E3)

6-6-1-15.

Identify and describe the contributions of scientists and naturalists who have increased our understanding of the diversity of living things. (GLO: A2, A4, B4, D1)

6-6-2-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of flight. (GLO: C6, D4)

6-6-2-02.

Describe properties of fluids using air and water as examples, and identify manifestations of these properties in daily life. (GLO: B1, D3, E1)

6-6-2-03.

Identify adaptations that enable living things to propel themselves through air, water, or to be transported by the wind. (GLO: D1, D4, E1)

6-6-2-04.

Recognize that in order for devices or living things to fly they must have sufficient lift to overcome the downward force of gravity, and that the force of gravity increases as mass increases. (GLO: D4)

6-6-2-05.

Describe how' lighter-than-air flying devices' are able to achieve lift. (GLO: D4)

6-6-2-06.

Test models of aircraft to observe Bernoulli's Principle. (GLO: C2, C3, D3, D4)

6-6-2-07.

Explain how Bernoulli's Principle is applied in a device other than an aircraft. (GLO: A5, B1, D4)

6-6-2-08.

Provide examples of design features or adaptations that enhance or reduce drag, and explain how they work. (GLO: A5, B1, D1, D4)

6-6-2-10.

Identify and diagram the four forces that act on living things or devices that fly through the air. (GLO: C6, D4)

6-6-2-11.

Compare a variety of propulsion methods that are used to produce thrust in animals and flying devices. (GLO: B1, D1, D4, E4)

6-6-2-12.

Describe how unbalanced forces are used to steer aircraft and spacecraft. (GLO: A5, D4, D6)

6-6-2-13.

Explain why the design of aircraft and spacecraft differ. (GLO: B1, C3, D4, D6)

6-6-2-14.

Identify milestones in the history of air travel and describe their impacts on daily life. (GLO: A4, B1, B2, D4)

6-6-2-15.

Use the design process to construct a prototype that can fly and meet specific performance criteria. (GLO: C3, D4)

6-6-3-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of electricity. (GLO: C6, D4, E4)

6-6-3-02.

Explain the attraction and repulsion of electrostatically charged materials. (GLO: D4)

6-6-3-03.

Explain current electricity, and compare the characteristics of current and static electricity, by using a model. (GLO: A2, D4)

6-6-3-04.

Identify dangers associated with static and current electricity, and demonstrate and describe appropriate safety precautions. (GLO: C1, D4)

6-6-3-05.

List electrical devices used at home, at school, and in the community, and identify the human needs that they fulfill. (GLO: B1, B2, D4)

6-6-3-06.

Develop a definition of an electrical circuit, based on classroom explorations. (GLO: C2, D4)

6-6-3-07.

Experiment to classify a variety of materials as insulators or conductors. (GLO: C2, D3, D4, E1)

6-6-3-08.

Demonstrate and describe the function of switches in electrical circuits. (GLO: D4)

6-6-3-09.

Construct and diagram simple series circuits and simple parallel circuits. (GLO: C2, C6, D4, E1)

6-6-3-10.

Explore to determine factors that affect bulb brightness in simple series and parallel circuits. (GLO: C2, D4)

6-6-3-11.

Use the design process to construct an electrical circuit that performs a useful function. (GLO: C3, D4)

6-6-3-12.

Demonstrate, using a simple electromagnet constructed in class, that an electric current can create a magnetic field. (GLO: C2, D4)

6-6-3-13.

Explore motors and generators to determine that electromagnets transform electricity into motion and motion, into electricity. (GLO: A5, D4, E2, E4)

6-6-3-14.

Identify forms of energy that may result from the transformation of electrical energy, and recognize that energy can only be changed from one form into another, not created or destroyed. (GLO: D4, E4)

6-6-3-15.

Identify the two major sources of electrical energy, and provide examples of each. (GLO: B1, D4, E4)

6-6-3-16.

Identify renewable and non-renewable sources of electrical energy, and discuss advantages and disadvantages of each. (GLO: B5, E4)

6-6-3-17.

Evaluate an electrical device using the design process. (GLO: B5, C4)

6-6-3-18.

Describe factors that affect the consumption of electrical energy, and outline an action plan to reduce electrical energy consumption at home, at school, or in the community. (GLO: B5, C4, E4)

6-6-3-19.

Describe ways in which electricity has had an impact on daily life. (GLO: B1, B2, B5)

6-6-4-01.

Use appropriate vocabulary related to their investigations of Earth and space. (GLO: C6, D6)

6-6-4-02.

Identify technological developments that enable astronauts to meet their basic needs in space. (GLO: B1, B2, D1, D6)

6-6-4-04.

Investigate past and present space research programs involving astronauts, and explain the contributions to scientific knowledge. (GLO: A1, A2, A5, D6)

6-6-4-05.

Describe positive and negative impacts arising from space research programs. (GLO: A1, B1, B5, D6)

6-6-4-06.

Identify technological devices placed in space that help humans learn more about the Earth and communicate more efficiently. (GLO: B1, B2, D6)

6-6-4-07.

Describe how the conception of the Earth and its position in space have been continuously questioned and how our understanding has evolved over time. (GLO: A1, A2, B2, C5)

6-6-4-08.

Recognize that the Sun is the centre of the solar system and it is the source of energy for life on Earth. (GLO: D6, E2, E4)

6-6-4-09.

Identify the planets in the solar system and describe their size relative to the Earth and their position relative to the Sun. (GLO: D6, E1, E2)

6-6-4-10.

Classify planets as inner or outer planets, based on their position relative to the asteroid belt, and describe characteristics of each type. (GLO: D6, E1)

6-6-4-11.

Recognize that mass is the amount of matter in an object, that weight is the force of gravity on the mass of an object, and that the force of gravity varies from planet to planet. (GLO: D3)

6-6-4-12.

Explain, using models and simulations, how the Earth's rotation causes the cycle of day and night, and how the Earth's tilt of axis and revolution cause the yearly cycle of seasons. (GLO: A2, D6, E2, E4)

6-6-4-14.

Explain how the relative positions of the Earth, moon, and Sun are responsible for moon phases and eclipses. (GLO: D6, E2)

6-6-4-15.

Identify points of reference in the night sky and recognize that the apparent movement of celestial objects is regular, predictable, and related to the Earth's rotation and revolution. (GLO: D6, E2, E3)

6-6-4-16.

Identify and describe how people from various cultures, past and present, apply astronomy in daily life. (GLO: A4, A5, B1, B2)

6-6-4-17.

Differentiate between astrology and astronomy, and explain why astrology is considered unscientific. (GLO: A1, A2, C5, C8)

6-GLO-A1.

Recognize both the power and limitations of science as a way of answering questions about the world and explaining natural phenomena

6-GLO-A2.

Recognize that scientific knowledge is based on evidence, models and explanations, and evolves as new evidence appears and new conceptualizations develop

6-GLO-A3.

Distinguish critically between science and technology in terms of their respective contexts, goals, methods, products, and values

6-GLO-A4.

Identify and appreciate contributions made by women and men from many societies and cultural backgrounds towards increasing our understanding of the world and in bringing about technological innovations

6-GLO-A5.

Recognize that science and technology interact with and advance one another

6-GLO-B1.

Describe scientific and technological developments, past and present, and appreciate their impact on individuals, societies and the environment, both locally and globally.

6-GLO-B2.

Recognize that scientific and technological endeavors have been and continue to be influenced by human needs and the societal context of the time

6-GLO-B3.

Identify the factors that affect health and explain the relationships among personal habits, lifestyle choices, and human health, both individual and social

6-GLO-B4.

Demonstrate a knowledge of, and personal consideration for, a range of possible science- and technology-related interests, hobbies, and careers

6-GLO-B5.

Identify and demonstrate actions that promote a sustainable environment, society and economy, both locally and globally

6-GLO-C1.

Recognize safety symbols and practices related to scientific and technological activities and to their daily lives, and apply this knowledge in appropriate situations

6-GLO-C2.

Demonstrate appropriate scientific inquiry skills when seeking answers to questions

6-GLO-C3.

Demonstrate appropriate problem-solving skills while seeking solutions to technological challenges

6-GLO-C4.

Demonstrate appropriate critical thinking and decision-making skills when choosing a course of action based on scientific and technological information

6-GLO-C5.

Demonstrate curiosity, scepticism, creativity, open-mindedness, accuracy, precision, honesty, and persistence, and appreciate their importance as scientific and technological habits of mind

6-GLO-C6.

Employ effective communication skills and utilize information technology to gather and share scientific and technological ideas and data

6-GLO-C7.

Work cooperatively and value the ideas and contributions of others while carrying out scientific and technological activities

6-GLO-C8.

Evaluate, from a scientific perspective, information and ideas encountered during investigations and in daily life

6-GLO-D1.

Understand essential life structures and processes pertaining to a wide variety of organisms, including humans

6-GLO-D2.

Understand various biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems, as well as their interaction and interdependence within ecosystems and within the biosphere as a whole

6-GLO-D3.

Understand the properties and structures of matter as well as various common manifestations and applications of the actions and interactions of matter

6-GLO-D4.

Understand how stability, motion, forces, and energy transfers and transformations play a role in a wide range of natural and constructed contexts

6-GLO-D5.

Understand the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere, as well as the processes involved within and between them

6-GLO-D6.

Understand the composition of the universe, the interactions within it, and the impacts of humankind's continued attempts to understand and explore it

6-GLO-E1.

Describe and appreciate the similarity and diversity of forms, functions, and patterns within the natural and constructed world

6-GLO-E2.

Describe and appreciate how the natural and constructed world is made up of systems and how interactions take place within and among these systems

6-GLO-E3.

Recognize that characteristics of materials and systems can remain constant or change over time, and describe the conditions and processes involved

6-GLO-E4.

Recognize that energy, whether transmitted or transformed, is the driving force of both movement and change, and is inherent within materials and in the interactions among them

6-KC-001.

Explain the significance of the British North America Act.

6-KC-002.

Compare responsibilities and rights of citizens of Canada at the time of Confederation to those of today. Include: Aboriginal peoples, francophones, women.

6-KC-003.

Recognize Remembrance Day as a commemoration of Canadian participation in world conflicts.

6-KC-004.

Identify the ideals of democracy and describe the influence of democracy on quality of life for Canadians.

6-KC-005.

Identify rights and freedoms described in the 1982 Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and explain why they are important.

6-KC-006.

Identify current issues related to citizenship in Canada.

6-KE-055.

Explain the importance of agriculture in the development of Canada from 1867 to 1914.

6-KE-056.

Relate stories of the Depression and describe its impact on Canada.

6-KE-057.

Give examples of the impact of technological development on life in Canada from 1914 to 1945.

6-KE-058.

Give examples of ways in which industry and technology have changed life in Canada since 1945.

6-KE-059.

Give examples of inventions and technologies created in Canada.

6-KG-039

Identify major causes and events of the First World War.

6-KG-040.

Describe Canada's involvement in the First World War and identify its impact on Canadian individuals and communities.

6-KG-041.

Identify major causes and events of the Second World War.

6-KG-042.

Describe Canada's involvement in the Second World War and identify its impact on Canadian individuals and communities.

6-KG-043.

Give examples of Canada's involvement in world conflicts since 1945.

6-KG-044.

Give examples of global events and forces that have affected Canadians from 1945 to the present.

6-KG-045.

Give examples of Canada's participation in the United Nations and other international organizations.

6-KG-047.

Give examples of Canada's connections to other regions of the world.

6-KH-027.

Identify individuals and events connected with Manitoba's entry into Confederation.

6-KH-027F.

Identify the roles of Father Noel-Joseph Ritchot and Archbishop Alexandre-Antonin Tache in Manitoba's entry into Confederation.

6-KH-028.

Identify causes, events, individuals, and consequences of the 1885 Resistance.

6-KH-029.

Describe the role of the North West Mounted Police.

6-KH-030.

Relate stories about the gold rushes and describe the impact of the gold rushes on individuals and communities.

6-KH-031.

Identify events and issues related to the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway.

6-KH-032.

Identify contributions of Aboriginal leaders from 1867 to 1914.

6-KH-033.

Identify factors leading to the entry into Confederation of Manitoba, Northwest Territories, British Columbia, Prince Edward Island, Yukon, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Nunavut, and specify the year of entry.

6-KH-034.

Identify the prime ministers of Canada from 1867 to 1914 and give examples of their achievements.

6-KH-035.

Describe the causes, main events, and results of the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike.

6-KH-036.

Identify the prime ministers of Canada from 1914 to 1945 and give examples of their achievements.

6-KH-037.

Describe changing roles for women in Canada from 1914 to 1945.

6-KH-038.

Identify the prime ministers of Canada from 1945 to the present and give examples of their achievements.

6-KI-0017.

Describe characteristics that define Canada as a country.

6-KI-007.

Give reasons for the establishment of treaties and reserves and describe their impact on individuals, families, and communities.

6-KI-008.

Identify various groups that immigrated to Canada in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and give reasons for their emigration.

6-KI-009.

Describe ways in which immigration was encouraged by and important to the Canadian government from 1867 to 1914.

6-KI-010.

Describe various challenges faced by new immigrants to Canada.

6-KI-011.

Describe daily life on a prairie homestead between 1890 and 1914.

6-KI-012.

Identify contributions of First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples to Canada's war efforts.

6-KI-013.

Identify historical reasons for bilingual and multicultural policies in Canada.

6-KI-013F.

Describe the impact of the Affaire Forest on the linguistic rights of Franco-manitobains.

6-KI-014.

Identify changes and developments regarding Aboriginal rights in Canada from 1867 to the present.

6-KI-015.

Give examples of changes to francophone populations in Canada since Confederation.

6-KI-015F.

Identify events surrounding the creation of the Division scolaire franco-manitobaine (DSFM).

6-KI-016.

Describe factors that shape personal and national identities and explain how they may coexist.

6-KI-016F.

Describe the influence of their social, cultural, and linguistic choices on their francophone identities.

6-KI-018.

Give examples of ways in which the government helps protect Canadian identity.

6-KI-019.

Give examples from the arts and media that are expressions of Canadian culture and/or identity.

6-KI-020.

Identify various groups and organizations that may contribute to personal identity.

6-KI-020A.

Identify the roles of Aboriginal organizations and give examples of ways in which they promote Aboriginal rights.

6-KI-020F.

Describe the role of francophone organizations and identify ways in which they promote francophone rights.

6-KI-021.

Identify various individuals from Canada's past and present, and describe their achievements.

6-KL-022.

Locate on a map of Canada the major landforms and bodies of water.

6-KL-023.

Locate on a map the major settlements of Rupert's Land and the original provinces of Canada in 1867.

6-KL-024.

Give examples of the influence of the natural environment on daily life for various groups during the Depression.

6-KL-025.

Locate on a map of Canada the provinces, territories, and capital cities.

6-KL-026.

Describe the influence of the natural environment on life in Canada.

6-KL-026A.

Describe the influence of the land on their First Nation, Inuit, or Metis identity

6-KP-046.

Describe the struggle for and identify individuals involved in women's suffrage in Manitoba and Canada.

6-KP-048.

Identify First Nations, Inuit, and Metis perspectives regarding self-determination.

6-KP-049.

Describe the main features of the Canadian government.

6-KP-050.

Define the term political party and identify political parties and their leaders in Canada.

6-KP-051.

Describe characteristics of the electoral processes in Canada.

6-KP-052.

Identify the main responsibilities of municipal, provincial, First Nations, and federal governments in Canada.

6-KP-053.

Identify elected or appointed municipal, provincial, and federal government representatives and describe their main responsibilities.

6-KP-053A.

Identify and describe the main responsibilities of elected representatives of their Aboriginal community.

6-KP-054.

Identify factors that contribute to inequities in Canada and propose solutions.

6-S-101.

Use a variety of strategies to resolve conflicts peacefully and fairly.

6-S-102.

Make decisions that reflect fairness and equality in their interactions with others.

6-S-103.

Make decisions that reflect care, concern, and responsibility for the environment.

6-S-105.

Recognize bias and discrimination and propose solutions.

6-S-200.

Select information from oral, visual, material, print, or electronic sources.

6-S-201.

Organize and record information in a variety of formats and reference sources appropriately.

6-S-202.

Distinguish between primary and secondary information sources for research.

6-S-203.

Select and use appropriate tools and technologies to accomplish tasks.

6-S-204.

Create timelines and other visual organizers to sequence and represent historical figures, relationships, or chronological events.

6-S-206.

Select and interpret various types of maps for specific purposes.

6-S-207.

Use latitude and longitude to locate and describe places on maps and globes.

6-S-207A.

Use traditional knowledge to read the land.

6-S-208.

Orient themselves by observing the landscape, using traditional knowledge, or using a compass or other tools and technologies.

6-S-300.

Plan topics, goals, and methods for historical inquiry and research.

6-S-302.

Draw conclusions based on research and evidence.

6-S-303.

Evaluate personal assumptions based on new information and ideas.

6-S-304.

Distinguish fact from opinion and interpretation.

6-S-305.

Observe and analyze material and visual evidence for research.

6-S-306.

Assess the validity of information sources.

6-S-307.

Compare differing accounts of historical events.

6-S-308.

Compare diverse perspectives in a variety of information sources.

6-S-309.

Interpret information and ideas in a variety of media.

6-S-310.

Recognize that interpretations of history are subject to change as new information is uncovered or acknowledged.

6-S-400.

Listen to others to understand their perspectives.

6-S-401.

Use language that is respectful of human diversity.

6-S-403.

Present information and ideas orally, visually, concretely, or electronically.

6-S-404.

Elicit and clarify questions and ideas in discussions.

6-S-405.

Articulate their beliefs and perspectives on issues.

6.N.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of place value for numbers: greater than one million; less than one-thousandth [C, CN, R, T]

6.N.1.1.

Explain how the pattern of the place value system (e.g., the repetition of ones, tens, and hundreds) makes it possible to read and write numerals for numbers of any magnitude.

6.N.2.

Solve problems involving large numbers, using technology. [ME, PS, T]

6.N.2.2.

Determine the reasonableness of an answer.

6.N.2.4.

Identify and correct errors in a solution to a problem that involves large numbers.

6.N.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of factors and multiples by: determining multiples and factors of numbers less than 100; identifying prime and composite numbers; solving problems involving factors or multiples [PS, R, V]

6.N.3.1.

Identify multiples for a number and explain the strategy used to identify them.

6.N.3.2.

Determine all the whole-number factors of a number using arrays.

6.N.3.3.

Identify the factors for a number and explain the strategy used (e.g., concrete or visual representations, repeated division by prime numbers or factor trees).

6.N.3.4.

Identify common factors and common multiples for 2 or 3 numbers.

6.N.3.5.

Provide an example of a prime number and explain why it is a prime number.

6.N.3.6.

Provide an example of a composite number and explain why it is a composite number.

6.N.3.7.

Sort a set of numbers as prime and composite.

6.N.3.8.

Solve a problem involving factors, multiples, the largest common factor or the lowest common multiple.

6.N.3.9.

Explain why 0 and 1 are neither prime nor composite.

6.N.4.

Relate improper fractions to mixed numbers. [CN, ME, R, V]

6.N.4.1.

Demonstrate using models that an improper fraction represents a number greater than 1.

6.N.4.2.

Express improper fractions as mixed numbers.

6.N.4.3.

Express mixed numbers as improper fractions.

6.N.4.4.

Place a set of fractions, including mixed numbers and improper fractions, on a horizontal or vertical number line, and explain strategies used to determine position.

6.N.5.

Demonstrate an understanding of ratio, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.N.5.1.

Provide a concrete or pictorial representation for a ratio.

6.N.5.2.

Write a ratio from a concrete or pictorial representation.

6.N.5.3.

Express a ratio in multiple forms, such as 3:5, 3/5, or 3 to 5.

6.N.5.4.

Identify and describe ratios from real-life contexts and record them symbolically.

6.N.5.5.

Explain the part/whole and part/part ratios of a set (e.g., for a group of 3 girls and 5 boys, explain the ratios 3:5, 3:8, and 5:8).

6.N.5.6.

Solve a problem involving ratio.

6.N.6.

Demonstrate an understanding of percent (limited to whole numbers), concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.N.6.1.

Explain that "percent" means "out of 100."

6.N.6.2.

Explain that percent is the ratio of a certain number of units to 100 units.

6.N.6.3.

Use concrete materials and pictorial representations to illustrate a percent.

6.N.6.4.

Record the percent displayed in a concrete or pictorial representation.

6.N.6.5.

Express a percent as a fraction and a decimal.

6.N.6.6.

Identify and describe percents from real-life contexts and record them symbolically.

6.N.6.7.

Solve a problem involving percents.

6.N.7.

Demonstrate an understanding of integers, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, R, V]

6.N.7.1.

Extend a horizontal or vertical number line by adding numbers less than zero and explain the pattern on each side of zero.

6.N.7.2.

Place a set of integers on a horizontal or vertical number line and explain how integers are ordered.

6.N.7.3.

Describe contexts in which integers are used (e.g., on a thermometer).

6.N.7.4.

Compare two integers, represent their relationship using the symbols <, >, and =, and verify using a horizontal or vertical number line.

6.N.7.5.

Order a set of integers in ascending or descending order.

6.N.8.

Demonstrate an understanding of multiplication and division of decimals (involving 1-digit whole-number multipliers, 1-digit natural number divisors, and multipliers and divisors that are multiples of 10), concretely, pictorially, and symbolically, by: using personal strategies; using the standard algorithms; using estimation; solving problems [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

6.N.8.1.

Estimate a product using front-end estimation (e.g., for 15.205 m x 4, think 15 m x 4, so the product is greater than 60 m), and place the decimal in the appropriate place.

6.N.8.10.

Refine personal strategies, such as mental math, to increase their efficiency when appropriate (e.g., 4.46 / 2 think 446 / 2 = 223, and then use front-end estimation to determine the placement of the decimal 2.23).

6.N.8.2.

Estimate a quotient using front-end estimation (e.g., for $26.83 / 4, think 24 / 4, so the quotient is greater than $6), and place the decimal in the appropriate place.

6.N.8.3.

Predict products and quotients of decimals using estimation strategies.

6.N.8.4.

Identify and correct errors of decimal point placement in a product or quotient by estimating.

6.N.8.5.

Solve a problem that involves multiplication and division of decimals using multipliers from 0 to 9 and divisors from 1 to 9.

6.N.8.6.

Use mental math to determine products or quotients involving decimals when the multiplier or divisor is a multiple of 10 (e.g., 2.47 / 10 = 24.7; 31.9 / 100 = 0.319).

6.N.8.7.

Model and explain the relationship that exists between an algorithm, place value, and number properties.

6.N.8.8.

Determine products and quotients using the standard algorithms of vertical multiplication (numbers arranged vertically and multiplied using single digits which are added to form a final product) and long division (the multiples of the divisor are subtracted from the dividend).

6.N.8.9.

Solve multiplication and division problems in context using personal strategies, and record the process.

6.N.9.

Explain and apply the order of operations, excluding exponents (limited to whole numbers). [CN, ME, PS, T]

6.N.9.1.

Demonstrate and explain with examples why there is a need to have a standardized order of operations.

6.N.9.2.

Apply the order of operations to solve multi-step problems with or without technology.

6.PR.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of the relationships within tables of values to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, R]

6.PR.1.1.

Generate values in one column of a table of values, values in the other column, and a pattern rule.

6.PR.1.2.

State, using mathematical language, the relationship in a table of values.

6.PR.1.4.

Predict the value of an unknown term using the relationship in a table of values and verify the prediction.

6.PR.1.5.

Formulate a rule to describe the relationship between two columns of numbers in a table of values.

6.PR.1.6.

Identify missing elements in a table of values.

6.PR.1.7.

Identify and correct errors in a table of values.

6.PR.1.8.

Describe the pattern within each column of a table of values.

6.PR.1.9.

Create a table of values to record and reveal a pattern to solve a problem.

6.PR.2.

Represent and describe patterns and relationships using graphs and tables. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

6.PR.2.1.

Translate a pattern to a table of values and graph the table of values (limit to linear graphs with discrete elements).

6.PR.2.2.

Create a table of values from a pattern or a graph.

6.PR.2.3.

Describe, using everyday language, orally or in writing, the relationship shown on a graph.

6.PR.3.

Represent generalizations arising from number relationships using equations with letter variables. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.PR.3.1.

Write and explain the formula for finding the perimeter of any rectangle.

6.PR.3.2.

Write and explain the formula for finding the area of any rectangle.

6.PR.3.3.

Develop and justify equations using letter variables that illustrate the commutative property of addition and multiplication (e.g., a + b = b + a or a - b = b - a).

6.PR.3.4.

Describe the relationship in a table using a mathematical expression.

6.PR.3.5.

Represent a pattern rule using a simple mathematical expression, such as 4d or 2n + 1.

6.PR.4.

Demonstrate and explain the meaning of preservation of equality, concretely, pictorially, and symbolically. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.PR.4.5.

Write equivalent forms of an equation by applying the preservation of equality, and verify using concrete materials [e.g., 3b = 12 is the same as 3b + 5 = 12 + 5 or 2r = 7 is the same as 3(2r) = 3(7)].

6.SP.1.

Create, label, and interpret line graphs to draw conclusions. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.SP.1.1.

Determine the common attributes (title, axes, and intervals) of line graphs by comparing a set of line graphs.

6.SP.1.3.

Create a line graph from a table of values or set of data.

6.SP.1.4.

Interpret a line graph to draw conclusions.

6.SP.2.

Select, justify, and use appropriate methods of collecting data, including: questionnaires; experiments; databases; electronic media [C, PS, T]

6.SP.2.1.

Select a method for collecting data to answer a question, and justify the choice.

6.SP.2.2.

Design and administer a questionnaire for collecting data to answer a question and record the results.

6.SP.3.

Graph collected data and analyze the graph to solve problems. [C, CN, PS]

6.SP.3.1.

Select a type of graph for displaying a set of collected data, and justify the choice of graph.

6.SP.3.2.

Solve a problem by graphing data and interpreting the resulting graph.

6.SP.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of probability by: identifying all possible outcomes of a probability experiment; differentiating between experimental and theoretical probability; determining the theoretical probability of outcomes in a probability experiment; determining the experimental probability of outcomes in a probability experiment; comparing experimental results with the theoretical probability for an experiment [C, ME, PS, T]

6.SP.4.1.

List the possible outcomes of a probability experiment, such as:

6.SP.4.1.b.

Rolling a die with any number of sides

6.SP.4.1.c.

Spinning a spinner with any number of sectors

6.SP.4.2.

Determine the theoretical probability of an outcome occurring for a probability experiment.

6.SP.4.3.

Predict the probability of an outcome occurring for a probability experiment by using theoretical probability.

6.SP.4.4.

Conduct a probability experiment, with or without technology, and compare the experimental results to the theoretical probability.

6.SP.4.5.

Explain that as the number of trials in a probability experiment increases, the experimental probability approaches theoretical probability of a particular outcome.

6.SP.4.6.

Distinguish between theoretical probability and experimental probability, and explain the differences.

6.SS.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of angles by: identifying examples of angles in the environment; classifying angles according to their measure; estimating the measure of angles using 45 degrees, 90 degrees, and 180 degrees as reference angles; determining angle measures in degrees; drawing and labelling angles when the measure is specified [C, CN, ME, V]

6.SS.1.1.

Provide examples of angles found in the environment.

6.SS.1.2.

Classify a set of angles according to their measure (e.g., acute, right, obtuse, straight, reflex).

6.SS.1.3.

Sketch 45 degree, 90 degree, and 180 degree angles without the use of a protractor, and describe the relationship among them.

6.SS.1.4.

Estimate the measure of an angle using 45 degree, 90 degree, and 180 degree as reference angles.

6.SS.1.5.

Measure, using a protractor, angles in various orientations.

6.SS.1.6.

Draw and label an angle in various orientations using a protractor.

6.SS.1.7.

Describe the measure of an angle as the measure of rotation of one of its sides.

6.SS.1.8.

Describe the measure of angles as the measure of an interior angle of a polygon.

6.SS.2.

Demonstrate that the sum of interior angles is: 180 degrees in a triangle; 360 degrees in a quadrilateral [C, R]

6.SS.2.1.

Explain, using models, that the sum of the interior angles of a triangle is the same for all triangles.

6.SS.2.2.

Explain, using models, that the sum of the interior angles of a quadrilateral is the same for all quadrilaterals.

6.SS.3.

Develop and apply a formula for determining the: perimeter of polygons; area of rectangles; volume of right rectangular prisms [C, CN, PS, R, V]

6.SS.3.1.

Explain, using models, how the perimeter of any polygon can be determined.

6.SS.3.3.

Explain, using models, how the area of any rectangle can be determined.

6.SS.3.4.

Generalize a rule for determining the area of rectangles.

6.SS.3.5.

Explain, using models, how the volume of any right rectangular prism can be determined.

6.SS.3.6.

Generalize a rule for determining the volume of right rectangular prisms.

6.SS.3.7.

Solve a problem involving the perimeter of polygons, the area of rectangles, or the volume of right rectangular prisms.

6.SS.4.

Construct and compare triangles, including: scalene; isosceles; equilateral; right; obtuse; acute in different orientations. [C, PS, R, V]

6.SS.4.1.

Sort a set of triangles according to the length of the sides.

6.SS.4.2.

Sort a set of triangles according to the measures of the interior angles.

6.SS.4.3.

Identify the characteristics of a set of triangles according to their sides or their interior angles.

6.SS.4.4.

Sort a set of triangles and explain the sorting rule.

6.SS.4.5.

Draw a triangle (e.g., scalene).

6.SS.4.6.

Replicate a triangle in a different orientation and show that the two are congruent.

6.SS.5.

Describe and compare the sides and angles of regular and irregular polygons. [C, PS, R, V]

6.SS.5.1.

Sort a set of 2-D shapes into polygons and non-polygons, and explain the sorting rule.

6.SS.5.4.

Demonstrate that the sides of a regular polygon are of the same length and that the angles of a regular polygon are of the same measure.

6.SS.5.5.

Sort a set of polygons as regular or irregular and justify the sorting.

6.SS.5.6.

Identify and describe regular and irregular polygons in the environment.

6.SS.6.

Perform a combination of transformations (translations, rotations, or reflections) on a single 2-D shape, and draw and describe the image. [C, CN, PS, T, V]

6.SS.6.1.

Demonstrate that a 2-D shape and its transformation image are congruent.

6.SS.6.5.

Describe the transformations performed on a 2-D shape to produce a given image.

6.SS.6.7.

Perform and record one or more transformations of a 2-D shape that will result in a given image.

6.SS.7.

Perform a combination of successive transformations of 2-D shapes to create a design, and identify and describe the transformations. [C, CN, T, V]

6.SS.7.1.

Analyze a design created by transforming one or more 2-D shapes, and identify the original shape and the transformations used to create the design.

6.SS.7.2.

Create a design using one or more 2-D shapes and describe the transformations used.

6.SS.8.

Identify and plot points in the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane using whole-number ordered pairs. [C, CN, V]

6.SS.8.1.

Label the axes of the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane and identify the origin.

6.SS.8.2.

Plot a point in the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane given its ordered pair.

6.SS.8.3.

Match points in the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane with their corresponding ordered pair.

6.SS.8.4.

Plot points in the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane with intervals of 1, 2, 5, or 10 on its axes, given whole-number ordered pairs.

6.SS.8.5.

Draw shapes or designs, given ordered pairs in the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane.

6.SS.8.6.

Determine the distance between points along horizontal and vertical lines in the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane.

6.SS.8.7.

Draw shapes or designs in the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane and identify the points used to produce them.

6.SS.9.

Perform and describe single transformations of a 2-D shape in the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane (limited to whole-number vertices). [C, CN, PS, T, V]

6.SS.9.1.

Identify the coordinates of the vertices of a 2-D shape (limited to the first quadrant of a Cartesian plane).

6.SS.9.2.

Perform a transformation on a given 2-D shape and identify the coordinates of the vertices of the image (limited to the first quadrant).

6.SS.9.3.

Describe the positional change of the vertices of a 2-D shape to the corresponding vertices of its image as a result of a transformation (limited to first quadrant).