Ontario Curriculum — Grade 1


Click on any standard to search for aligned resources. This data may be subject to copyright. You may download a CSV of the Ontario Curriculum if your intention constitutes fair use.


Plan, assess, and analyze learning aligned to these standards using Kiddom.

Learn more: How Kiddom Empowers Teachers.

1-1.1.1.

Identify purposes for listening in a few different situations, formal and informal

1-1.1.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate listening behaviour by using active listening strategies in a few different situations

1-1.1.3.

Identify a few listening comprehension strategies and use them before, during, and after listening in order to understand and clarify the meaning of oral texts, initially with support and direction

1-1.1.5.

Use stated and implied information and ideas in oral texts, initially with support and direction, to make simple inferences and reasonable predictions

1-1.1.6.

Extend understanding of oral texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge and experience; to other familiar texts, including print and visual texts; and to the world around them

1-1.2.1.

Identify a few purposes for speaking

1-1.2.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate speaking behaviour in a few different situations, including paired sharing and small- and large-group discussions

1-1.2.3.

Communicate ideas and information orally in a clear, coherent manner

1-1.3.2.

Begin to identify how their skills as viewers, representers, readers, and writers help them improve their oral communication skills

1-2.1.1.

Read a few different types of literary texts, graphic texts, and informational texts

1-2.1.2.

Identify a few different purposes for reading and choose reading materials appropriate for those purposes

1-2.1.3.

Identify a few reading comprehension strategies and use them before, during, and after reading to understand texts, initially with support and direction

1-2.1.4.

Demonstrate understanding of a text by retelling the story or restating information from the text, including the main idea

1-2.1.5.

Use stated and implied information and ideas in texts, initially with support and direction, to make simple inferences and reasonable predictions about them

1-2.1.6.

Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge and experience, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them

1-2.1.7.

Identify the main idea and a few elements of texts, initially with support and direction

1-2.1.8.

Express personal thoughts and feelings about what has been read

1-2.1.9.

Begin to identify, with support and direction, the speaker and the point of view presented in a text and suggest a possible alternative perspective

1-2.2.1.

Identify and describe the characteristics of a few simple text forms, with a focus on literary texts such as a simple fictional story, graphic texts such as a calendar, and informational texts such as a simple ''All About ___'' book

1-2.3.1.

Automatically read and understand some high-frequency words and words of personal interest or significance, in a variety of reading contexts

1-2.3.2.

Predict the meaning of and solve unfamiliar words using different types of cues, including: semantic (meaning) cues; syntactic (language structure) cues; graphophonic (phonological and graphic) cues

1-2.3.3.

Read appropriate, familiar texts at a sufficient rate and with sufficient expression to convey the sense of the text to the reader

1-2.4.1.

Begin to identify, with support and direction, a few strategies they found helpful before, during, and after reading

1-2.4.2.

Explain, initially with support and direction, how their skills in listening, speaking, writing, viewing, and representing help them make sense of what they read

1-3.1.1.

Identify the topic, purpose, audience, and form for writing, initially with support and direction

1-3.1.2.

Generate ideas about a potential topic, using a variety of strategies and resources

1-3.1.3.

Gather information to support ideas for writing in a variety of ways and/or from a variety of sources

1-3.1.5.

Identify and order main ideas and supporting details, initially with support and direction, using simple graphic organizers

1-3.2.2.

Begin to establish a personal voice in their writing by using pictures and words that convey their attitude or feeling towards the subject or audience

1-3.2.8.

Produce revised draft pieces of writing to meet criteria identified by the teacher, based on the expectations

1-3.3.1.

Spell some high-frequency words correctly

1-3.3.2.

Spell unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies that involve understanding sound-symbol relationships, word structures, and word meanings

1-3.3.4.

Use punctuation to help communicate their intended meaning, with a focus on the use of: a capital letter at the beginning of a sentence; a period, question mark, or exclamation mark at the end

1-3.3.5.

Use parts of speech appropriately to communicate their meaning clearly, with a focus on the use of: nouns for names of people, places, and things; the personal subject pronouns I, you, he, she, it, we, they; verbs to tell what they do and feel; some adjectives; and simple prepositions of place (e.g., in, on, at, to)

1-3.3.6.

Proofread and correct their writing using a simple checklist or a few guiding questions posted by the teacher for reference

1-4.1.2.

Identify overt and implied messages, initially with support and direction, in simple media texts

1-4.1.3.

Express personal thoughts and feelings about some simple media works

1-4.1.4.

Describe how different audiences might respond to specific media texts

1-4.2.2.

Identify, initially with support and direction, the conventions and techniques used in some familiar media forms

1-4.4.2.

Begin to explain, initially with support and direction, how their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing help them to make sense of and produce media texts

1-A.1.1.

Represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 50, using a variety of tools and contexts;

1-A.1.2.

Read and print in words whole numbers to ten, using meaningful contexts;

1-A.1.3.

Demonstrate, using concrete materials, the concept of conservation of number;

1-A.1.4.

Relate numbers to the anchors of 5 and 10;

1-A.1.5.

Identify and describe various coins (i.e., penny, nickel, dime, quarter, one-dollar coin, two-dollar coin), using coin manipulatives or drawings, and state their value;

1-A.1.6.

Represent money amounts to 20 cents, through investigation using coin manipulatives;

1-A.1.7.

Estimate the number of objects in a set, and check by counting;

1-A.1.8.

Compose and decompose numbers up to 20 in a variety of ways, using concrete materials;

1-A.1.9.

Divide whole objects into parts and identify and describe, through investigation, equal-sized parts of the whole, using fractional names.

1-A.2.1.

Demonstrate, using concrete materials, the concept of one-to-one correspondence between number and objects when counting;

1-A.2.2.

Count forward by 1's, 2's, 5's, and 10's to 100, using a variety of tools and strategies;

1-A.2.3.

Count backwards by 1's from 20 and any number less than 20, with and without the use of concrete materials and number lines;

1-A.2.4.

Count backwards from 20 by 2's and 5's, using a variety of tools;

1-A.2.5.

Use ordinal numbers to thirty-first in meaningful contexts.

1-A.2.6.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including investigation, explore, needs, space, and food, in oral and written communication

1-A.2.7.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., create a diorama to illustrate the basic needs of plants and animals, including humans)

1-A.3.1.

Solve a variety of problems involving the addition and subtraction of whole numbers to 20, using concrete materials and drawings;

1-A.3.2.

Solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of single-digit whole numbers, using a variety of mental strategies;

1-A.3.3.

Add and subtract money amounts to 10 cents, using coin manipulatives and drawings.

1-A.3.4.

Describe the characteristics of a healthy environment, including clean air and water and nutritious food, and explain why it is important for all living things to have a healthy environment

1-A.3.5.

Describe how showing care and respect for all living things helps to maintain a healthy environment (e.g., leaving all living things in their natural environment; feeding birds during cold winter months; helping to plant and care for plants in the gardens that attract birds and butterflies; caring for the school and the schoolyard as an environment)

1-A.3.6.

Identify what living things provide for other living things (e.g., trees produce the oxygen that other living things breathe; plants such as tomatoes and apple trees and animals such as cows and fish provide food for humans and for other animals; a tree stump provides a home for a chipmunk; porcupines chew off the tips of hemlock limbs, providing food for deer in winter)

1-A.3.7.

Describe how the things plants and animals use to meet their needs are changed by their use and are returned to the environment in different forms (e.g., the food animals eat and the water they drink are returned to the earth as scat and urine)

1-B.1.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of the use of non-standard units of the same size for measuring;

1-B.1.2.

Estimate, measure (i.e., by placing nonstandard units repeatedly, without overlaps or gaps), and record lengths, heights, and distances;

1-B.1.3.

Construct, using a variety of strategies, tools for measuring lengths, heights, and distances in non-standard units;

1-B.1.4.

Estimate, measure (i.e., by minimizing overlaps and gaps), and describe area, through investigation using non-standard units;

1-B.1.5.

Estimate, measure, and describe the capacity and/or mass of an object, through investigation using non-standard units;

1-B.1.7.

Read demonstration digital and analogue clocks, and use them to identify benchmark times and to tell and write time to the hour and half-hour in everyday settings;

1-B.1.8.

Name the months of the year in order, and read the date on a calendar;

1-B.1.9.

Relate temperature to experiences of the seasons.

1-B.2.1.

Compare two or three objects using measurable attributes, and describe the objects using relative terms;

1-B.2.2.

Compare and order objects by their linear measurements, using the same non-standard unit;

1-B.2.3.

Use the metre as a benchmark for measuring length, and compare the metre with non-standard units;

1-B.2.4.

Describe, through investigation using concrete materials, the relationship between the size of a unit and the number of units needed to measure length.

1-B.2.5.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including experiment, explore, purpose, rigid, flexible, solid, and smooth, in oral and written communication

1-B.2.6.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., orally explain their choices of materials and design decisions when presenting their structures)

1-B.3.1.

Describe objects as things that are made of one or more materials

1-B.3.2.

Describe structures as supporting frameworks

1-B.3.3.

Describe materials as the substances from which something is made

1-B.3.4.

Describe the function/purpose of the observable characteristics (e.g., texture, height, shape, colour) of various objects and structures, using information gathered through their senses (e.g., sandpaper is rough to help take the rough edges off wood; a traffic light is tall so it can be easily seen; a stop sign is the same shape and colour in many countries around the world to make it easily recognizable)

1-B.3.5.

Identify the materials that make up objects and structures (e.g., wood, plastic, steel, paper, polystyrene foam, cloth)

1-B.3.7.

Describe the properties of materials that enable the objects and structures made from them to perform their intended function

1-B.3.9.

Identify the sources in nature of some common materials that are used in making structures (e.g., paper and rubber come from trees; plastic comes from petroleum; steel comes from metals and minerals in the ground)

1-C.1.1.

Identify and describe common two-dimensional shapes and sort and classify them by their attributes, using concrete materials and pictorial representations;

1-C.1.2.

Trace and identify the two-dimensional faces of three-dimensional figures, using concrete models;

1-C.1.3.

Identify and describe common three-dimensional figures and sort and classify them by their attributes, using concrete materials and pictorial representations;

1-C.1.4.

Describe similarities and differences between an everyday object and a three-dimensional figure;

1-C.1.5.

Locate shapes in the environment that have symmetry, and describe the symmetry.

1-C.2.1.

Compose patterns, pictures, and designs, using common two-dimensional shapes;

1-C.2.2.

Identify and describe shapes within other shapes;

1-C.2.4.

Cover outline puzzles with two-dimensional shapes.

1-C.2.5.

Use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills, and knowledge acquired from previous investigations, to explore the effects of light and heat from the sun (e.g., by growing plants in the presence and absence of sunlight; by feeling the temperature of dark papers that have been in the sun and in the shade; by covering a portion of a piece of coloured paper and exposing the paper to the sun)

1-C.2.6.

Investigate how the sun's energy allows humans to meet their basic needs, including the need for food (e.g., trace the flow of energy from the sun, which provides energy to plants, which make food for animals to eat, and then from plants and animals, which provide food for humans to eat)

1-C.2.7.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including explore, investigate, design, energy, and survival, in oral and written communication

1-C.2.8.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., use labelled diagrams to show what happened when plants were grown in varying light conditions)

1-C.3.1.

Describe the relative locations of objects or people using positional language;

1-C.3.2.

Describe the relative locations of objects on concrete maps created in the classroom;

1-C.3.3.

Identify food as a source of energy for themselves and other living things

1-C.3.4.

Identify everyday uses of various sources of energy (e.g., food to help animals, including humans, survive and move; natural gas to heat homes and schools; petroleum to power cars and buses; electricity to power lights; batteries to power toys)

1-C.3.5.

Demonstrate an understanding that humans get the energy resources they need from the world around them (e.g., the wood, oil, and gas to heat our homes and cook our food) and that the supply of many of these resources is limited so care needs to be taken in how we use them

1-D.1.1.

Identify, describe, and extend, through investigation, geometric repeating patterns involving one attribute;

1-D.1.2.

Identify and extend, through investigation, numeric repeating patterns;

1-D.1.3.

Describe numeric repeating patterns in a hundreds chart;

1-D.1.4.

Identify a rule for a repeating pattern;

1-D.1.5.

Create a repeating pattern involving one attribute;

1-D.1.6.

Represent a given repeating pattern in a variety of ways.

1-D.2.1.

Create a set in which the number of objects is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in a given set;

1-D.2.2.

Demonstrate examples of equality, through investigation, using a ''balance'' mode;

1-D.2.3.

Investigate the changes in the amount of heat from the sun that occur throughout the day and in the various seasons (e.g., use their prior experience of the sun's warmth, and measure, record, and compare outdoor temperatures at different times of day and in different months of the year)

1-D.2.4.

Use scientific inquiry/research skills, including generating questions and knowledge acquired from previous investigations, to identify daily and/or seasonal changes and their effects (e.g., the sun shines during the day, and the moon and stars are visible at night; leaves change colour in the fall; there are fewer birds in winter; dogs' fur gets thicker in winter; trees and flowers bloom in spring)

1-D.2.5.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including investigate, temperature, hibernate, dormant, energy, and survival, in oral and written communication

1-D.2.6.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., contribute to a class book about their observations of seasonal changes; keep a weekly pictorial journal in which they record and describe the weather through the seasons)

1-D.3.1.

Identify the sun as Earth's principal source of heat and light

1-D.3.2.

Define a cycle as a circular sequence of events

1-D.3.3.

Describe changes in the amount of heat and light from the sun that occur throughout the day and the seasons

1-D.3.4.

Describe and compare the four seasons (e.g., in terms of amount of daylight, type of precipitation, temperature)

1-D.3.5.

Describe changes in the appearance or behaviour of living things that are adaptations to seasonal changes (e.g., in fall, some plants shed their leaves and some birds migrate; in winter some animals change colour)

1-D.3.6.

Describe how humans prepare for and/or respond to daily and seasonal changes (e.g., by wearing appropriate clothing, carrying an umbrella, turning on an air conditioner or heater)

1-E.1.1.

Demonstrate an ability to organize objects into categories by sorting and classifying objects using one attribute, and by describing informal sorting experiences;

1-E.1.2.

Collect and organize primary data that is categorical, and display the data using one-to-one correspondence, prepared templates of concrete graphs and pictographs (with titles and labels), and a variety of recording methods.

1-E.2.1.

Read primary data presented in concrete graphs and pictographs, and describe the data using comparative language;

1-E.2.2.

Pose and answer questions about collected data.

1-E.3.1.

Describe the likelihood that everyday events will occur, using mathematical language (i.e., impossible, unlikely, less likely, more likely, certain).