Ontario Curriculum — Grade 2


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2-1.1.1.

Identify purposes for listening in a variety of situations, formal and informal, and set personal goals for listening, initially with support and direction

2-1.1.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate listening behaviour by using active listening strategies in a variety of situations

2-1.1.3.

Identify several listening comprehension strategies and use them before, during, and after listening in order to understand and clarify the meaning of oral texts

2-1.1.5.

Use stated and implied information and ideas in oral texts to make simple inferences and reasonable predictions, and support the inferences with evidence from the text

2-1.1.6.

Extend understanding of oral texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge and experience; to other familiar texts, including print and visual texts; and to the world around them

2-1.2.1.

Identify a variety of purposes for speaking

2-1.2.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate speaking behaviour in a variety of situations, including paired sharing and small- and large-group discussions

2-1.3.2.

Identify, initially with support and direction, how their skills as viewers, representers, readers, and writers help them improve their oral communication skills

2-2.1.1.

Read some different literary texts, graphic texts, and informational texts

2-2.1.2.

Identify several different purposes for reading and choose reading materials appropriate for those purposes

2-2.1.3.

Identify several reading comprehension strategies and use them before, during, and after reading to understand texts

2-2.1.4.

Demonstrate understanding of a text by retelling the story or restating information from the text, with the inclusion of a few interesting details

2-2.1.5.

Use stated and implied information and ideas in texts to make simple inferences and reasonable predictions about them

2-2.1.6.

Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge and experience, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them

2-2.1.7.

Identify the main idea and some additional elements of texts

2-2.1.8.

Express personal thoughts and feelings about what has been read

2-2.1.9.

Identify, initially with support and direction, the speaker and the point of view presented in a text and suggest one or two possible alternative perspectives

2-2.2.1.

Identify and describe the characteristics of a few simple text forms, with a focus on literary texts such as a fairy tale

2-2.3.1.

Automatically read and understand many high-frequency words, some words with common spelling patterns, and words of personal interest or significance, in a variety of reading contexts

2-2.3.2.

Predict the meaning of and quickly solve unfamiliar words using different types of cues, including: semantic (meaning) cues; syntactic (language structure) cues; graphophonic (phonological and graphic) cues

2-2.3.3.

Read appropriate texts at a sufficient rate and with sufficient expression to convey the sense of the text to the reader and to an audience

2-2.4.1.

Identify, initially with support and direction, a few strategies that they found helpful before, during, and after reading

2-2.4.2.

Explain, initially with support and direction, how their skills in listening, speaking, writing, viewing, and representing help them make sense of what they read

2-3.1.1.

Identify the topic, purpose, audience, and form for writing

2-3.1.2.

Generate ideas about a potential topic, using a variety of strategies and resources

2-3.1.3.

Gather information to support ideas for writing in a variety of ways and/or from a variety of sources

2-3.1.5.

Identify and order main ideas and supporting details, using graphic organizers

2-3.2.4.

Use a variety of sentence types (e.g., questions, statements, exclamations)

2-3.2.6.

Identify elements of their writing that need improvement, using feedback from the teacher and peers, with a focus on content and word choice

2-3.2.8.

Produce revised, draft pieces of writing to meet criteria identified by the teacher, based on the expectations

2-3.3.1.

Spell many high-frequency words correctly

2-3.3.2.

Spell unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies that involve understanding sound-symbol relationships, word structures, word meanings, and generalizations about spelling

2-3.3.4.

Use punctuation to help communicate their intended meaning, with a focus on the use of: question marks, periods, or exclamation marks at the end of a sentence; commas to mark pauses; and some uses of quotation marks

2-3.3.5.

Use parts of speech appropriately to communicate their meaning clearly, with a focus on the use of: proper nouns for local, provincial, and national place names and for holidays; the personal object pronouns me, you, him, her, us, them; adjectives to describe a noun; verbs in the simple present and past tenses; joining words (e.g., and, but); simple prepositions of place and time (e.g., under, with, before, after)

2-3.3.6.

Proofread and correct their writing using a simple checklist or a few guiding questions developed with the teacher and posted for reference

2-4.1.2.

Identify overt and implied messages in simple media texts

2-4.1.3.

Express personal thoughts and feelings about simple media works and explain their responses

2-4.1.4.

Describe how different audiences might respond to specific media texts

2-4.2.2.

Identify the conventions and techniques used in some familiar media forms

2-4.4.2.

Explain, initially with support and direction, how their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing help them to make sense of and produce media texts

2-A.1.1.

Represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 100, including money amounts to 100 cents, using a variety of tools;

2-A.1.2.

Read and print in words whole numbers to twenty, using meaningful contexts;

2-A.1.3.

Compose and decompose two-digit numbers in a variety of ways, using concrete materials;

2-A.1.5.

Determine, through investigation using concrete materials, the relationship between the number of fractional parts of a whole and the size of the fractional parts;

2-A.1.7.

Compare fractions using concrete materials, without using standard fractional notation;

2-A.1.8.

Estimate, count, and represent (using the cents symbol) the value of a collection of coins with a maximum value of one dollar.

2-A.2.1.

Count forward by 1's, 2's, 5's, 10's, and 25's to 200, using number lines and hundreds charts, starting from multiples of 1, 2, 5, and 10;

2-A.2.2.

Count backwards by 1's from 50 and any number less than 50, and count backwards by 10's from 100 and any number less than 100, using number lines and hundreds charts;

2-A.2.3.

Locate whole numbers to 100 on a number line and on a partial number line.

2-A.2.4.

Observe and compare changes in the appearance and activity of animals as they go through a complete life cycle (e.g., frog, butterfly)

2-A.2.5.

Investigate the ways in which a variety of animals adapt to their environment and/or to changes in their environment, using various methods (e.g., read simple non-fiction texts and Aboriginal stories; observe animal activity in the schoolyard and surrounding areas, and record findings)

2-A.2.6.

Use scientific inquiry/research skills, and knowledge acquired from previous investigations, to investigate the basic needs, characteristics, behaviour, and adaptations of an animal of their choice

2-A.2.7.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including life cycle, migration, adaptation, body coverings, and classify, in oral and written communication

2-A.2.8.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., use a model constructed of modelling clay and a tree branch to explain how a caterpillar feeds)

2-A.3.1.

Solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of whole numbers to 18, using a variety of mental strategies;

2-A.3.2.

Describe relationships between quantities by using whole-number addition and subtraction;

2-A.3.3.

Represent and explain, through investigation using concrete materials and drawings, multiplication as the combining of equal groups;

2-A.3.4.

Represent and explain, through investigation using concrete materials and drawings, division as the sharing of a quantity equally;

2-A.3.5.

Solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of two-digit numbers, with and without regrouping, using concrete materials, student-generated algorithms, and standard algorithms;

2-A.3.6.

Add and subtract money amounts to 100 cents, using a variety of tools and strategies.

2-B.1.1.

Choose benchmarks - in this case, personal referents - for a centimetre and a metre to help them perform measurement tasks;

2-B.1.11.

Use a standard thermometer to determine whether temperature is rising or falling.

2-B.1.2.

Estimate and measure length, height, and distance, using standard units (i.e., centimetre, metre) and non-standard units;

2-B.1.3.

Record and represent measurements of length, height, and distance in a variety of ways;

2-B.1.4.

Select and justify the choice of a standard unit;

2-B.1.5.

Estimate, measure, and record the distance around objects, using non-standard units;

2-B.1.6.

Estimate, measure, and record area, through investigation using a variety of non-standard units;

2-B.1.7.

Estimate, measure, and record the capacity and/or mass of an object, using a variety of non-standard units;

2-B.1.8.

Tell and write time to the quarter-hour, using demonstration digital and analogue clocks;

2-B.1.9.

Construct tools for measuring time intervals in non-standard units;

2-B.2.1.

Describe, through investigation, the relationship between the size of a unit of area and the number of units needed to cover a surface;

2-B.2.2.

Compare and order a collection of objects by mass and/or capacity, using non-standard units;

2-B.2.3.

Investigate the structure and function of simple machines (e.g., by building a wheel and axle for a toy car; by exploring the effects of changing the slope of a ramp)

2-B.2.4.

Use technological problem-solving skills, and knowledge and skills acquired from previous investigations, to design, build, and test a mechanism that includes one or more simple machines (e.g., a toy, a model vehicle)

2-B.2.5.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including push, pull, beside, above, wheel, axle, and inclined plane, in oral and written communication

2-B.2.6.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., orally explain to the class the process they followed in building a mechanism that includes one or more simple machines)

2-B.3.1.

Describe different ways in which objects move (e.g., turning, spinning, swinging, bouncing, vibrating, rolling)

2-B.3.2.

Identify ways in which the position of an object can be changed (e.g., by pushing, by pulling, by dropping)

2-B.3.3.

Identify the six basic types of simple machines - lever; inclined plane; pulley; wheel and axle, including gear; screw; and wedge - and give examples of ways in which each is used in daily life to make tasks easier

2-B.3.4.

Describe how each type of simple machine allows humans to move objects with less force than otherwise would be needed (e.g., an inclined plane allows a heavy object to be moved upwards more easily than if it were lifted and carried up stairs; a wheel and axle allow an object to roll, which creates less friction than if it were dragged; a lever activated by a piano key strikes [pushes] a string, which vibrates to make a sound)

2-B.3.5.

Identify simple machines used in devices that move people (e.g., the wheel and axle on a bicycle or a car; the pulleys on an elevator; the inclined planes of moving ramps in parking garages and malls)

2-C.1.1.

Distinguish between the attributes of an object that are geometric properties and the attributes that are not geometric properties, using a variety of tools;

2-C.1.2.

Identify and describe various polygons (i.e., triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, heptagons, octagons) and sort and classify them by their geometric properties (i.e., number of sides or number of vertices), using concrete materials and pictorial representations;

2-C.1.3.

Identify and describe various three-dimensional figures (i.e., cubes, prisms, pyramids) and sort and classify them by their geometric properties (i.e., number and shape of faces), using concrete materials;

2-C.1.5.

Locate the line of symmetry in a two-dimensional shape.

2-C.2.1.

Compose and describe pictures, designs, and patterns by combining two-dimensional shapes;

2-C.2.2.

Compose and decompose two-dimensional shapes;

2-C.2.3.

Cover an outline puzzle with two-dimensional shapes in more than one way;

2-C.2.4.

Use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to investigate liquids and solids in terms of their capacity for buoyancy (e.g., wood floats, coins sink) and/or absorption (e.g., paper towel absorbs liquid, plastic wrap repels liquid)

2-C.2.5.

Use technological problem-solving skills, and knowledge acquired from previous investigations, to design, build, and test a structure that involves interactions between liquids and solids (e.g., an object that floats)

2-C.2.6.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including clear, opaque, runny, hard, greasy, and granular, in oral and written communication

2-C.2.7.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., use a simple drawing program to write a booklet for the school library describing class experiments in investigating liquids and solids)

2-C.3.1.

Describe the relative locations and the movements of objects on a map;

2-C.3.2.

Draw simple maps of familiar settings, and describe the relative locations of objects on the maps;

2-C.3.3.

Create and describe symmetrical designs using a variety of tools.

2-C.3.4.

Identify conditions in which the states of liquids and solids remain constant (e.g., solids remain solid when broken; liquids remain liquid when poured) and conditions that can cause their states to change (e.g., liquids may freeze when the temperature drops; solids may melt when heated)

2-C.3.6.

Explain the meaning of international symbols that give us information on the safety of substances (e.g., a skull-and-crossbones symbol means that the substance is poisonous; a flame inside a hexagon means that the substance is flammable)

2-D.1.1.

Identify and describe, through investigation, growing patterns and shrinking patterns generated by the repeated addition or subtraction of 1's, 2's, 5's, 10's, and 25's on a number line and on a hundreds chart;

2-D.1.2.

Identify, describe, and create, through investigation, growing patterns and shrinking patterns involving addition and subtraction, with and without the use of calculators

2-D.1.3.

Identify repeating, growing, and shrinking patterns found in real-life contexts

2-D.1.4.

Represent a given growing or shrinking pattern in a variety of ways;

2-D.1.5.

Create growing or shrinking patterns;

2-D.1.6.

Create a repeating pattern by combining two attributes;

2-D.1.7.

Demonstrate, through investigation, an understanding that a pattern results from repeating an operation or making a repeated change to an attribute.

2-D.2.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of equality by partitioning whole numbers to 18 in a variety of ways, using concrete materials;

2-D.2.2.

Represent, through investigation with concrete materials and pictures, two number expressions that are equal, using the equal sign;

2-D.2.3.

Investigate, through experimentation, the characteristics of water (e.g., water takes up space, flows or moves when not contained, has mass) and its uses (e.g., living things need water to stay alive; water makes things move: spins a water wheel; water makes certain activities possible: keeps a white-water raft afloat)

2-D.2.4.

Investigate the stages of the water cycle, including evaporation (e.g., heat water in a kettle), condensation (e.g., collect the water vapour from the kettle on an overturned mirror), precipitation (e.g., allow the water vapour on the overturned mirror to collect, cool, and drop), and collection (e.g., let the dripping water accumulate in a container)

2-D.2.5.

Investigate water in the natural environment (e.g., observe and measure precipitation; observe and record cloud formations; observe water flow and describe where it goes; observe a puddle over time and record observations)

2-D.2.6.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including solid, liquid, vapour, evaporation, condensation, and precipitation, in oral and written communication

2-D.2.7.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., create posters or media ads that encourage care and concern for water and air in the community)

2-D.3.1.

Identify air as a gaseous substance that surrounds us and whose movement we feel as wind

2-D.3.2.

Identify water as a clear, colourless, odourless, tasteless liquid that exists in three states and that is necessary for the life of most animals and plants

2-D.3.3.

Describe ways in which living things, including humans, depend on air and water (e.g., most animals, including humans breathe air to stay alive; wind generates energy, disperses seeds; all living things need to drink or absorb water to stay alive; water is used for washing and bathing, transportation, energy generation)

2-D.3.4.

Identify sources of water in the natural and built environment (e.g., natural: oceans, lakes, ponds, streams, springs, water tables; human-made: wells, sewers, water-supply systems, reservoirs, water towers)

2-D.3.5.

Identify the three states of water in the environment, give examples of each (e.g., solid - visible as ice, snow, sleet, hail, frost; liquid - visible as rain, dew; gas - visible as fog, water vapour), and show how they fit into the water cycle when the temperature of the surrounding environment changes (e.g., heat - evaporation; cooling - condensation and precipitation)

2-D.3.6.

State reasons why clean water is an increasingly scarce resource in many parts of the world

2-E.1.1.

Demonstrate an ability to organize objects into categories, by sorting and classifying objects using two attributes simultaneously;

2-E.1.3.

Collect and organize primary data that is categorical or discrete (i.e., that can be counted, such as the number of students absent), and display the data using one-to-one correspondence in concrete graphs, pictographs, line plots, simple bar graphs, and other graphic organizers, with appropriate titles and labels and with labels ordered appropriately along horizontal axes, as needed.

2-E.2.1.

Read primary data presented in concrete graphs, pictographs, line plots, simple bar graphs, and other graphic organizers, and describe the data using mathematical language;

2-E.2.2.

Pose and answer questions about class generated data in concrete graphs, pictographs, line plots, simple bar graphs, and tally charts;

2-E.2.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of data displayed in a graph, by comparing different parts of the data and by making statements about the data as a whole.

2-E.3.1.

Describe probability as a measure of the likelihood that an event will occur, using mathematical language (i.e., impossible, unlikely, less likely, equally likely, more likely, certain);

2-E.3.2.

Describe the probability that an event will occur, through investigation with simple games and probability experiments and using mathematical language.