Ontario Curriculum — Grade 6


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6-1.1.1.

Identify a range of purposes for listening in a variety of situations, formal and informal, and set goals related to specific listening tasks

6-1.1.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate listening behaviour by adapting active listening strategies to suit a variety of situations, including work in groups

6-1.1.3.

Identify a variety of listening comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during, and after listening in order to understand and clarify the meaning of increasingly complex oral texts

6-1.1.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in increasingly complex oral texts in a variety of ways

6-1.1.5.

Interpret oral texts by using stated and implied ideas from the texts

6-1.1.6.

Extend understanding of oral texts by connecting, comparing, and contrasting the ideas and information in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights; to other texts, including print and visual texts; and to the world around them

6-1.1.7.

Analyse oral texts in order to evaluate how well they communicate ideas, opinions, themes, and information

6-1.1.8.

Identify the point of view presented in oral texts, determine whether they agree with the point of view, and suggest other possible perspectives

6-1.1.9.

Identify a variety of presentation strategies used in oral texts and analyse their effect on the audience

6-1.2.1.

Identify a variety of purposes for speaking and explain how the purpose and intended audience influence the choice of form

6-1.2.2.

Demonstrate an increasingly sophisticated understanding of appropriate speaking behaviour in a variety of situations, including paired sharing, dialogue, and small- and large-group discussions

6-1.2.3.

Communicate orally in a clear, coherent manner, using appropriate organizing strategies and formats to link and sequence ideas and information

6-1.2.4.

Use appropriate words and phrases from the full range of their vocabulary including inclusive and non-discriminatory language, and stylistic devices appropriate to the purpose and context, to communicate their meaning accurately and engage the interest of their intended audience

6-1.2.5.

Identify a range of vocal effects, including tone, pace, pitch, volume, and a variety of sound effects, and use them appropriately and with sensitivity towards cultural differences to help communicate their meaning

6-1.2.6.

Identify a variety of non-verbal cues, including facial expression, gestures, and eye contact, and use them in oral communications, appropriately and with sensitivity towards cultural differences, to help convey their meaning

6-1.2.7.

Use a variety of appropriate visual aids, to support or enhance oral presentations

6-1.3.1.

Identify, in conversation with the teacher and peers, what strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after listening and speaking and what steps they can take to improve their oral communication skills

6-1.3.2.

Identify, in conversation with the teacher and peers, how their skills as viewers, representers, readers, and writers help them improve their oral communication skills

6-2.1.1.

Read a wide variety of texts from diverse cultures, including literary texts, graphic texts, and informational texts

6-2.1.2.

Identify a variety of purposes for reading and choose reading materials appropriate for those purposes

6-2.1.3.

Identify a variety of reading comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during, and after reading to understand increasingly complex texts

6-2.1.4.

Demonstrate understanding of increasingly complex texts by summarizing and explaining important ideas and citing relevant supporting details

6-2.1.5.

Develop interpretations about texts using stated and implied ideas to support their interpretations

6-2.1.6.

Extend understanding of texts by connecting, comparing, and contrasting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them

6-2.1.7.

Analyse increasingly complex texts and explain how the different elements in them contribute to meaning

6-2.1.8.

Make judgements and draw conclusions about ideas in texts and cite stated or implied evidence from the text to support their views

6-2.1.9.

Identify the point of view presented in texts; determine whether they can agree with the view, in whole or in part; and suggest some other possible perspectives

6-2.2.1.

Analyse a variety of text forms and explain how their particular characteristics help communicate meaning, with a focus on literary texts such as a myth, graphic texts such as an advertisement, and informational texts such as an editorial

6-2.2.3.

Identify a variety of text features and explain how they help readers understand texts

6-2.2.4.

Identify various elements of style - including voice, word choice, and the use of hyperbole, strong verbs, dialogue, and complex sentences - and explain how they help communicate meaning

6-2.3.2.

Predict the meaning of and rapidly solve unfamiliar words using different types of cues, including: semantic (meaning) cues; syntactic (language structure) cues; graphophonic (phonological and graphic) cues

6-2.3.3.

Read appropriate texts with expression and confidence, adjusting reading strategies and reading rate to match the form and purpose

6-2.4.1.

Identify the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading and explain, in conversation with the teacher and/or peers, or in a reader's notebook, how they can use these and other strategies to improve as readers

6-2.4.2.

Explain, in conversation with the teacher and/or peers or in a reader's notebook, how their skills in listening, speaking, writing, viewing, and representing help them make sense of what they read

6-3.1.1.

Identify the topic, purpose, and audience for a variety of writing forms

6-3.1.2.

Generate ideas about a potential topic and identify those most appropriate for the purpose

6-3.1.3.

Gather information to support ideas for writing, using a variety of strategies and a range of print and electronic resources

6-3.1.5.

Identify and order main ideas and supporting details and group them into units that could be used to develop a structured, multi-paragraph piece of writing, using a variety of strategies

6-3.2.2.

Establish a distinctive voice in their writing appropriate to the subject and audience

6-3.2.4.

Create complex sentences by combining phrases, clauses, and/or simple sentences

6-3.2.5.

Identify their point of view and other possible points of view; determine, when appropriate, if their own view is balanced and supported by the evidence; and adjust their thinking and expression if appropriate

6-3.2.6.

Identify elements in their writing that need improvement, selectively using feedback from the teacher and peers, with a focus on supporting details and precise language

6-3.2.7.

Make revisions to improve the content, clarity, and interest of their written work, using a variety of strategies

6-3.2.8.

Produce revised draft pieces of writing to meet identified criteria based on the expectations

6-3.3.1.

Spell familiar words correctly

6-3.3.2.

Spell unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies that involve understanding sound-symbol relationships, word structures, word meanings, and generalizations about spelling

6-3.3.3.

Confirm spellings and word meanings or word choice using a variety of resources appropriate for the purpose

6-3.3.4.

Use punctuation appropriately to communicate their intended meaning in longer and more complex sentences, with a focus on the use of: commas to separate words in a list or after an introductory word or phrase; quotation marks in dialogue; and some uses of the colon, semi-colon, and brackets

6-3.3.5.

Use parts of speech correctly to communicate their meaning clearly, with a focus on the use of: personal subject and object pronouns (e.g., I, me) indefinite pronouns (e.g., someone, nobody); conjunctions; subordinate clauses; adverb phrases; and present, past, and future verb tenses

6-3.3.6.

Proofread and correct their writing using guidelines developed with peers and the teacher

6-3.3.8.

Produce pieces of published work to meet identified criteria based on the expectations

6-3.4.1.

Identify a variety of strategies they used before, during, and after writing, explain which ones were most helpful, and suggest further steps they can take to improve as writers

6-4.1.1.

Explain how a variety of media texts address their intended purpose and audience

6-4.1.2.

Interpret media texts, using overt and implied messages as evidence for their interpretations

6-4.1.3.

Evaluate the effectiveness of the presentation and treatment of ideas, information, themes, opinions, issues, and/or experiences in media texts

6-4.1.4.

Explain why different audiences (e.g., boys, girls, adults, seniors, various cultural groups) might have different responses to media texts

6-4.1.5.

Identify whose point of view is presented in a media text, identify missing or alternative points of view, and, where appropriate, determine whether the chosen view achieves a particular goal

6-4.1.6.

Identify who produces various media texts, the reason for their production, how they are produced, and how they are funded

6-4.2.1.

Describe in detail the main elements of some media forms

6-4.2.2.

Identify the conventions and techniques used in some familiar media forms and explain how they help convey meaning and influence or engage the audience

6-4.3.1.

Describe in specific detail the topic, purpose, and audience for media texts they plan to create, and identify challenges they may face in achieving their purpose

6-4.3.2.

Identify an appropriate form to suit the specific purpose and audience for a media text they plan to create, and explain why it is an appropriate choice

6-4.3.3.

Identify conventions and techniques appropriate to the form chosen for a media text they plan to create, and explain how they will use the conventions and techniques to help communicate their message

6-4.3.4.

Produce a variety of media texts for specific purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques

6-4.4.1.

Identify what strategies they found most helpful in making sense of and creating media texts, and explain how these and other strategies can help them improve as media viewers/ listeners/producers

6-4.4.2.

Explain how their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing help them to make sense of and produce media texts

6-A.1.1.

Represent, compare, and order whole numbers and decimal numbers from 0.001 to 1 000 000, using a variety of tools;

6-A.1.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of place value in whole numbers and decimal numbers from 0.001 to 1 000 000, using a variety of tools and strategies;

6-A.1.3.

Read and print in words whole numbers to one hundred thousand, using meaningful contexts;

6-A.1.4.

Represent, compare, and order fractional amounts with unlike denominators, including proper and improper fractions and mixed numbers, using a variety of tools and using standard fractional notation;

6-A.1.5.

Estimate quantities using benchmarks of 10%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%;

6-A.1.6.

Solve problems that arise from real-life situations and that relate to the magnitude of whole numbers up to 1 000 000;

6-A.1.7.

Identify composite numbers and prime numbers, and explain the relationship between them (i.e., any composite number can be factored into prime factors).

6-A.2.1.

Use a variety of mental strategies to solve addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division problems involving whole numbers;

6-A.2.2.

Solve problems involving the multiplication and division of whole numbers (four-digit by two-digit), using a variety of tools and strategies;

6-A.2.3.

Add and subtract decimal numbers to thousandths, using concrete materials, estimation, algorithms, and calculators;

6-A.2.4.

Multiply and divide decimal numbers to tenths by whole numbers, using concrete materials, estimation, algorithms, and calculators;

6-A.2.5.

Multiply whole numbers by 0.1, 0.01, and 0.001 using mental strategies;

6-A.2.6.

Multiply and divide decimal numbers by 10, 100, 1000, and 10 000 using mental strategies;

6-A.2.7.

Use estimation when solving problems involving the addition and subtraction of whole numbers and decimals, to help judge the reasonableness of a solution;

6-A.2.8.

Explain the need for a standard order for performing operations, by investigating the impact that changing the order has when performing a series of operations.

6-A.3.1.

Represent ratios found in real-life contexts, using concrete materials, drawings, and standard fractional notation;

6-A.3.2.

Determine and explain, through investigation using concrete materials, drawings, and calculators, the relationships among fractions (i.e., with denominators of 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, and 100), decimal numbers, and percents;

6-A.3.3.

Represent relationships using unit rates.

6-A.3.4.

Describe ways in which biodiversity within and among communities is important for maintaining the resilience of these communities (e.g., having a variety of species of wheat allows for some part of the crop to survive adverse conditions)

6-A.3.5.

Describe interrelationships within species (e.g., wolves travel in packs to defend their territory, raise their cubs, and hunt large prey), between species (e.g., the brightly-coloured anemone fish protects its eggs by laying them among the poisonous tentacles of the sea anemone, and in return the fish's bright colours attract prey for the anemone to eat; birds and bees take sustenance from plants and carry pollen between plants), and between species and their environment (e.g., algae and water lilies compete for sunlight in a pond), and explain how these interrelationships sustain biodiversity

6-A.3.6.

Identify everyday products that come from a diversity of organisms (e.g., traditional pain relievers are derived from the bark of the white willow tree; tofu is made from soybeans; silk is made from silkworm cocoons; nutritional supplements, shampoos, toothpastes, and deodorants contain pollen collected by bees)

6-A.3.7.

Explain how invasive species (e.g., zebra mussel, Asian longhorned beetle, purple loosestrife) reduce biodiversity in local environments

6-B.1.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between estimated and precise measurements, and determine and justify when each kind is appropriate;

6-B.1.2.

Estimate, measure, and record length, area, mass, capacity, and volume, using the metric measurement system.

6-B.2.1.

Select and justify the appropriate metric unit (i.e., millimetre, centimetre, decimetre, metre, decametre, kilometre) to measure length or distance in a given real-life situation;

6-B.2.10.

Solve problems involving the estimation and calculation of the surface area and volume of triangular and rectangular prisms.

6-B.2.2.

Solve problems requiring conversion from larger to smaller metric units;

6-B.2.3.

Construct a rectangle, a square, a triangle, and a parallelogram, using a variety of tools, given the area and/or perimeter;

6-B.2.4.

Determine, through investigation using a variety of tools and strategies, the relationship between the area of a rectangle and the areas of parallelograms and triangles, by decomposing and composing;

6-B.2.5.

Develop the formulas for the area of a parallelogram (i.e., Area of parallelogram = base x height) and the area of a triangle [i.e., Area of triangle = (base x height) / 2], using the area relationships among rectangles, parallelograms, and triangles;

6-B.2.6.

Solve problems involving the estimation and calculation of the areas of triangles and the areas of parallelograms;

6-B.2.7.

Determine, using concrete materials, the relationship between units used to measure area (i.e., square centimetre, square metre), and apply the relationship to solve problems that involve conversions from square metres to square centimetres;

6-B.2.8.

Determine, through investigation using a variety of tools and strategies, the relationship between the height, the area of the base, and the volume of a triangular prism, and generalize to develop the formula (i.e., Volume = area of base x height);

6-B.2.9.

Determine, through investigation using a variety of tools and strategies, the surface area of rectangular and triangular prisms;

6-B.3.1.

Identify the properties of air that make flight possible (e.g., air takes up space, has mass, expands, can exert a force when compressed)

6-B.3.2.

Identify common applications of the properties of air, such as its compressibility and insulating qualities (e.g., home insulation, tires, sleeping bags, layered clothing)

6-B.3.3.

Identify and describe the four forces of flight - lift, weight, drag, and thrust

6-B.3.4.

Describe, in qualitative terms, the relationships between the forces of lift, weight, thrust, and drag that are required for flight (e.g., lift must be greater than weight for a plane to take off; thrust must be greater than drag for a plane to take off; lift must be less than weight for a plane to land; thrust must be less than drag for a plane to land)

6-B.3.5.

Describe ways in which flying devices or living things use unbalanced forces to control their flight (e.g., a plane can be steered up or down by tilting the elevators on the tail; when a bird flaps its wings, the wings develop lift as well as forward and upward force, thus causing it to take off)

6-B.3.6.

Describe ways in which the four forces of flight can be altered (e.g., increasing the angle of attack increases the lift; lightweight materials help to keep the overall mass of the plane down, so that it can fly with smaller lift force; jet engines can vary the amount of thrust, which enables the plane to move forward; using the flaps on airplane wings changes the amount of drag, which reduces the speed of the plane)

6-C.1.1.

Sort and classify quadrilaterals by geometric properties related to symmetry, angles, and sides, through investigation using a variety of tools;

6-C.1.2.

Sort polygons according to the number of lines of symmetry and the order of rotational symmetry, through investigation using a variety of tools;

6-C.1.3.

Measure and construct angles up to 180 degrees using a protractor, and classify them as acute, right, obtuse, or straight angles;

6-C.2.1.

Build three-dimensional models using connecting cubes, given isometric sketches or different views (i.e., top, side, front) of the structure;

6-C.2.2.

Design and build series and parallel circuits, draw labelled diagrams identifying the components used in each, and describe the role of each component in the circuit

6-C.2.3.

Use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to investigate the characteristics of static electricity

6-C.2.4.

Design, build, and test a device that produces electricity (e.g., a battery built from a lemon or potato; a wind turbine)

6-C.2.5.

Use technological problem-solving skills to design, build, and test a device that transforms electrical energy into another form of energy in order to perform a function (e.g., a device that makes a sound, that moves, that lights up)

6-C.2.6.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including current, battery, circuit, transform, static, electrostatic, and energy, in oral and written communication

6-C.2.7.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., using scientific and technological conventions, create a labelled diagram showing the component parts of the device they created to transform electrical energy into another form of energy and perform a function)

6-C.3.1.

Explain how a coordinate system represents location, and plot points in the first quadrant of a Cartesian coordinate plane;

6-C.3.2.

Identify, perform, and describe, through investigation using a variety of tools, rotations of 180 degrees and clockwise and counterclockwise rotations of 90 degrees, with the centre of rotation inside or outside the shape;

6-C.3.3.

Create and analyse designs made by reflecting, translating, and/or rotating a shape, or shapes, by 90 degrees or 180 degrees.

6-C.3.4.

Describe how various forms of energy can be transformed into electrical energy (e.g., batteries use chemical energy; hydroelectric plants use water power; nuclear generating stations use nuclear energy; wind turbines use wind power; solar panels use energy from the sun; wave power stations use energy from ocean waves)

6-C.3.5.

Identify ways in which electrical energy is transformed into other forms of energy (e.g., electrical energy is transformed into heat energy in a toaster, light and sound energy in a television, mechanical energy in a blender)

6-C.3.6.

Explain the functions of the components of a simple electrical circuit (e.g., a battery is the power source; a length of wire is the conductor that carries the electrical current to the load; a light bulb or motor is the load)

6-C.3.7.

Describe series circuits (components connected in a daisy chain) and parallel circuits (components connected side by side like the rungs of a ladder), and identify where each is used (e.g., some strings of patio lights are in series circuits - when one light burns out, the whole string goes out; parallel circuits are used for wiring lighting and electrical outlets in your house - when one light burns out, the others keep burning)

6-C.3.8.

Describe ways in which the use of electricity by society, including the amount of electrical energy used, has changed over time (e.g., drying clothes in a dryer instead of using a clothesline; playing video games instead of playing board games; using electric lights instead of candles)

6-D.1.1.

Identify geometric patterns, through investigation using concrete materials or drawings, and represent them numerically;

6-D.1.2.

Make tables of values for growing patterns, given pattern rules in words, then list the ordered pairs (with the first coordinate representing the term number and the second coordinate representing the term) and plot the points in the first quadrant, using a variety of tools;

6-D.1.3.

Determine the term number of a given term in a growing pattern that is represented by a pattern rule in words, a table of values, or a graph;

6-D.1.4.

Describe pattern rules (in words) that generate patterns by adding or subtracting a constant, or multiplying or dividing by a constant, to get the next term, then distinguish such pattern rules from pattern rules, given in words, that describe the general term by referring to the term number;

6-D.1.5.

Determine a term, given its term number, by extending growing and shrinking patterns that are generated by adding or subtracting a constant, or multiplying or dividing by a constant, to get the next term;

6-D.1.6.

Extend and create repeating patterns that result from rotations, through investigation using a variety of tools.

6-D.2.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of different ways in which variables are used;

6-D.2.2.

Identify, through investigation, the quantities in an equation that vary and those that remain constant;

6-D.2.3.

Solve problems that use two or three symbols or letters as variables to represent different unknown quantities;

6-D.2.4.

Determine the solution to a simple equation with one variable, through investigation using a variety of tools and strategies.

6-D.2.5.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., use a graphic organizer to identify and order main ideas and supporting details for a report about how science and technology can help humans adapt to life in space)

6-D.3.1.

Identify components of the solar system, including the sun, the earth, and other planets, natural satellites, comets, asteroids, and meteoroids, and describe their physical characteristics in qualitative terms (e.g., The earth's surface is very young; much of it is covered with water. The moon is the earth's only natural satellite. Comets are the largest objects in our solar system; their centres contain rock particles trapped in frozen liquid; their tails are made up of gas and dust.)

6-D.3.2.

Identify the bodies in space that emit light (e.g., stars) and those that reflect light (e.g., moons and planets)

6-D.3.3.

Explain how humans meet their basic biological needs in space (e.g., obtaining air, water, and food and managing bodily functions)

6-D.3.4.

Identify the technological tools and devices needed for space exploration (e.g., telescopes, spectroscopes, spacecraft, life-support systems)

6-D.3.5.

Describe the effects of the relative positions and motions of the earth, moon, and sun (e.g., use models or simulations to show solar and lunar eclipses, phases of the moon, tides)

6-E.1.1.

Collect data by conducting a survey or an experiment to do with themselves, their environment, issues in their school or community, or content from another subject, and record observations or measurements;

6-E.1.2.

Collect and organize discrete or continuous primary data and secondary data and display the data in charts, tables, and graphs (including continuous line graphs) that have appropriate titles, labels, and scales that suit the range and distribution of the data, using a variety of tools;

6-E.1.3.

Select an appropriate type of graph to represent a set of data, graph the data using technology, and justify the choice of graph (i.e., from types of graphs already studied, such as pictographs, horizontal or vertical bar graphs, stem-and-leaf plots, double bar graphs, broken-line graphs, and continuous line graphs);

6-E.1.4.

Determine, through investigation, how well a set of data represents a population, on the basis of the method that was used to collect the data.

6-E.2.1.

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions from primary data and from secondary data;

6-E.2.2.

Compare, through investigation, different graphical representations of the same data;

6-E.2.3.

Explain how different scales used on graphs can influence conclusions drawn from the data;

6-E.2.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of mean, and use the mean to compare two sets of related data, with and without the use of technology;

6-E.2.5.

Demonstrate, through investigation, an understanding of how data from charts, tables, and graphs can be used to make inferences and convincing arguments.

6-E.3.1.

Express theoretical probability as a ratio of the number of favourable outcomes to the total number of possible outcomes, where all outcomes are equally likely;

6-E.3.2.

Represent the probability of an event (i.e., the likelihood that the event will occur), using a value from the range of 0 (never happens or impossible) to 1 (always happens or certain);

6-E.3.3.

Predict the frequency of an outcome of a simple probability experiment or game, by calculating and using the theoretical probability of that outcome.