Ontario Curriculum — Grade 7


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7-1.1.1.

Identify a range of purposes for listening in a variety of situations, formal and informal, and set goals appropriate for specific listening tasks

7-1.1.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate listening behaviour by adapting active listening strategies to suit a wide variety of situations, including work in groups

7-1.1.3.

Identify a variety of listening comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during, and after listening in order to understand and clarify the meaning of increasingly complex or challenging oral texts

7-1.1.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in increasingly complex oral texts in a variety of ways

7-1.1.5.

Develop and explain interpretations of oral texts using stated and implied ideas from the texts to support their interpretation

7-1.1.6.

Extend understanding of oral texts, including increasingly complex texts, by connecting, comparing, and contrasting the ideas and information in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights; to other texts, including print and visual texts; and to the world around them

7-1.1.7.

Analyse oral texts in order to evaluate how effectively they communicate ideas, opinions, themes, or experiences, and suggest possible improvements

7-1.1.8.

Explain the connection between a speaker's tone and the point of view or perspective presented in oral texts

7-1.1.9.

Identify a wide variety of presentation strategies used in oral texts and evaluate their effectiveness

7-1.2.1.

Identify a range of purposes for speaking and explain how the purpose and intended audience might influence the choice of speaking strategies

7-1.2.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate speaking behaviour in most situations, adapting contributions and responses to suit the purpose and audience

7-1.2.3.

Communicate orally in a clear, coherent manner, using a structure and style appropriate to both the topic and the intended audience

7-1.2.4.

Use appropriate words, phrases, and terminology from the full range of their vocabulary, including inclusive and non-discriminatory language, and a range of stylistic devices, to communicate their meaning accurately and engage the interest of their intended audience

7-1.2.5.

Identify a range of vocal effects, including tone, pace, pitch, volume, and a variety of sound effects, and use them appropriately and with sensitivity towards cultural differences to communicate their meaning

7-1.2.6.

Identify a variety of non-verbal cues, including facial expression, gestures, and eye contact, and use them in oral communications, appropriately and with sensitivity towards cultural differences, to help convey their meaning

7-1.2.7.

Use a variety of appropriate visual aids (e.g., charts, videos, props, multimedia) to support and enhance oral presentations

7-1.3.1.

Identify what strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after listening and speaking and what steps they can take to improve their oral communication skills

7-1.3.2.

Identify how their skills as viewers, representers, readers, and writers help them improve their oral communication skills

7-2.1.1.

Read a wide variety of increasingly complex or difficult texts from diverse cultures, including literary texts

7-2.1.2.

Identify a variety of purposes for reading and choose reading materials appropriate for those purposes

7-2.1.3.

Identify a variety of reading comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during, and after reading to understand increasingly complex texts

7-2.1.4.

Demonstrate understanding of increasingly complex texts by summarizing important ideas and citing a variety of details that support the main idea

7-2.1.5.

Develop and explain interpretations of increasingly complex or difficult texts using stated and implied ideas from the texts to support their interpretations

7-2.1.6.

Extend understanding of texts, including increasingly complex or difficult texts, by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them

7-2.1.7.

Analyse a variety of texts, both simple and complex, and explain how the different elements in them contribute to meaning and influence the reader's reaction

7-2.1.8.

Evaluate the effectiveness of both simple and complex texts based on evidence from the texts

7-2.1.9.

Identify the point of view presented in texts, including increasingly complex or difficult texts; give evidence of any biases they may contain; and suggest other possible perspectives

7-2.2.1.

Analyse a variety of text forms and explain how their particular characteristics help communicate meaning, with a focus on literary texts such as a novel, graphic texts such as a photo essay, and informational texts such as a manual

7-2.2.3.

Identify a variety of text features and explain how they help communicate meaning

7-2.2.4.

Identify various elements of style - including foreshadowing, metaphor, and symbolism - and explain how they help communicate meaning and enhance the effectiveness of texts

7-2.3.2.

Predict the meaning of and rapidly solve unfamiliar words using different types of cues, including: semantic (meaning) cues; syntactic (language structure) cues; graphophonic (phonological and graphic) cues

7-2.3.3.

Read appropriate texts with expression and confidence, adjusting reading strategies and reading rate to match the form and purpose

7-2.4.1.

Identify a range of strategies they found helpful before, during, and after reading and explain, in conversation with the teacher and/or peers or in a reader's notebook, how they can use these and other strategies to improve as readers

7-2.4.2.

Explain, in conversation with the teacher and/or peers or in a reader's notebook, how their skills in listening, speaking, writing, viewing, and representing help them make sense of what they read

7-3.1.1.

Identify the topic, purpose, and audience for more complex writing forms

7-3.1.2.

Generate ideas about more challenging topics and identify those most appropriate for the purpose

7-3.1.3.

Gather information to support ideas for writing, using a variety of strategies and a wide range of print and electronic resources

7-3.1.5.

Identify and order main ideas and supporting details and group them into units that could be used to develop a multi-paragraph piece of writing, using a variety of strategies

7-3.2.2.

Establish a distinctive voice in their writing appropriate to the subject and audience

7-3.2.4.

Vary sentence structures to give their writing rhythm and pacing by using a variety of connecting and/or introductory words and phrases

7-3.2.5.

Identify their point of view and other possible points of view, evaluate other points of view, and find ways to acknowledge other points of view, if appropriate

7-3.2.6.

Identify elements in their writing that need improvement, selectively using feedback from the teacher and peers, with a focus on voice, diction, and an effective beginning and ending

7-3.2.7.

Make revisions to improve the content, clarity, and interest of their written work, using a variety of strategies

7-3.2.8.

Produce revised draft pieces of writing to meet identified criteria based on the expectations

7-3.3.1.

Spell familiar words correctly

7-3.3.2.

Spell unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies that involve understanding sound-symbol relationships, word structures, word meanings, and generalizations about spelling

7-3.3.3.

Confirm spellings and word meanings or word choice using a variety of resources appropriate for the purpose

7-3.3.4.

Use punctuation appropriately to communicate their intended meaning in more complex writing forms, including forms specific to different subject areas, with a focus on the use of: periods after initials, in abbreviations, and in decimal numbers; parentheses; punctuation to indicate intonation, pauses, or gestures

7-3.3.5.

Use parts of speech correctly to communicate their meaning clearly, with a focus on the use of: relative pronouns; prepositions, including prepositional phrases; adjectives; conjunctions; adverbs; present, past, and future verb tenses; present and past participles

7-3.3.6.

Proofread and correct their writing using guidelines developed with peers and the teacher

7-3.3.8.

Produce pieces of published work to meet identified criteria based on the expectations

7-3.4.1.

Identify a variety of strategies they used before, during, and after writing, explain which ones were most helpful, and suggest future steps they can take to improve as writers

7-4.1.1.

Explain how various media texts address their intended purpose and audience

7-4.1.2.

Interpret increasingly complex or difficult media texts, using overt and implied messages as evidence for their interpretations

7-4.1.3.

Evaluate the effectiveness of the presentation and treatment of ideas, information, themes, opinions, issues, and/or experiences in media texts

7-4.1.4.

Explain why different audiences (e.g., with respect to gender, age, nationality, ability/disability income level) might have different responses to a variety of media texts

7-4.1.5.

Demonstrate understanding that different media texts reflect different points of view

7-4.1.6.

Identify who produces various media texts and determine the commercial, ideological, political, cultural, and/or artistic interests or perspectives that the texts may involve

7-4.2.1.

Explain how individual elements of various media forms combine to create, reinforce, and/or enhance meaning

7-4.2.2.

Identify the conventions and techniques used in a variety of media forms and explain how they help convey meaning and influence or engage the audience

7-4.3.1.

Explain why they have chosen the topic for a media text they plan to create

7-4.3.2.

Identify an appropriate form to suit the specific purpose and audience for a media text they plan to create , and explain why it is an appropriate choice

7-4.3.3.

Identify conventions and techniques appropriate to the form chosen for a media text they plan to create, and explain how they will use the conventions and techniques to help communicate their message

7-4.3.4.

Produce a variety of media texts of some technical complexity for specific purposes and audiences, using appropriate forms, conventions, and techniques

7-4.4.1.

Identify what strategies they found most helpful in making sense of and creating media texts, and explain how these and other strategies can help them improve as media viewers/listeners/producers

7-4.4.2.

Explain how their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing help them to make sense of and produce media texts

7-A.1.1.

Represent, compare, and order decimals to hundredths and fractions, using a variety of tools;

7-A.1.2.

Generate multiples and factors, using a variety of tools and strategies;

7-A.1.3.

Identify and compare integers found in real-life contexts;

7-A.1.4.

Represent and order integers, using a variety of tools;

7-A.1.6.

Represent perfect squares and square roots, using a variety of tools;

7-A.2.1.

Divide whole numbers by simple fractions and by decimal numbers to hundredths, using concrete materials;

7-A.2.2.

Use a variety of mental strategies to solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of fractions and decimals;

7-A.2.3.

Solve problems involving the multiplication and division of decimal numbers to thousandths by one-digit whole numbers, using a variety of tools and strategies;

7-A.2.4.

Solve multi-step problems arising from real-life contexts and involving whole numbers and decimals, using a variety of tools and strategies;

7-A.2.5.

Use estimation when solving problems involving operations with whole numbers, decimals, and percents, to help judge the reasonableness of a solution;

7-A.2.6.

Evaluate expressions that involve whole numbers and decimals, including expressions that contain brackets, using order of operations;

7-A.2.7.

Add and subtract fractions with simple like and unlike denominators, using a variety of tools and algorithms;

7-A.2.8.

Demonstrate, using concrete materials, the relationship between the repeated addition of fractions and the multiplication of that fraction by a whole number;

7-A.2.9.

Add and subtract integers, using a variety of tools.

7-A.3.1.

Determine, through investigation, the relationships among fractions, decimals, percents, and ratios;

7-A.3.2.

Solve problems that involve determining whole number percents, using a variety of tools;

7-A.3.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of rate as a comparison, or ratio, of two measurements with different units;

7-A.3.4.

Solve problems involving the calculation of unit rates.

7-A.3.5.

Describe how matter is cycled within the environment and explain how it promotes sustain-ability (e.g., bears carry salmon into the forest, where the remains decompose and add nutrients to the soil, thus supporting plant growth; through crop rotation, nutrients for future crops are created from the decomposition of the waste matter of previous crops)

7-A.3.6.

Distinguish between primary succession (e.g., the growth of native grasses on a sand dune) and secondary succession (e.g., the growth of grasses and shrubs in a ploughed field) within an ecosystem

7-A.3.7.

Explain why an ecosystem is limited in the number of living things (e.g., plants and animals, including humans) that it can support

7-A.3.8.

Describe ways in which human activities and technologies alter balances and interactions in the environment (e.g., clear-cutting a forest, overusing motorized water vehicles, managing wolf-killings in Yukon)

7-A.3.9.

Describe Aboriginal perspectives on sustain-ability and describe ways in which they can be used in habitat and wildlife management (e.g., the partnership between the Anishinabek Nation and the Ministry of Natural Resources for managing natural resources in Ontario)

7-B.1.1.

Research and report on real-life applications of area measurements.

7-B.1.2.

Evaluate the impact of ergonomic design on the safety and efficiency of workplaces, tools, and everyday objects (e.g., furniture, computer equipment, home tools and equipment), and describe changes that could be made in personal spaces and activities on the basis of this information (e.g., use computer keyboards and mice that are ergonomically designed; use kitchen tools such as knives with ergonomic handles; use equipment for household jobs that is designed to ease strain on the body, such as ergonomically designed snow shovels and garden tools)

7-B.2.1.

Sketch different polygonal prisms that share the same volume;

7-B.2.2.

Solve problems that require conversion between metric units of measure;

7-B.2.3.

Investigate the factors that determine the ability of a structure to support a load (e.g., the weight of the structure itself; the magnitude of the external loads it will need to support; the strength of the materials used to build it)

7-B.2.4.

Determine, through investigation using a variety of tools and strategies, the relationship for calculating the area of a trapezoid, and generalize to develop the formula [i.e., Area = (sum of lengths of parallel sides x height) / 2];

7-B.2.5.

Solve problems involving the estimation and calculation of the area of a trapezoid;

7-B.2.6.

Estimate and calculate the area of composite two-dimensional shapes by decomposing into shapes with known area relationships;

7-B.2.7.

Determine, through investigation using a variety of tools and strategies e.g., decomposing right prisms; stacking congruent layers of concrete materials to form a right prism), the relationship between the height, the area of the base, and the volume of right prisms with simple polygonal bases, and generalize to develop the formula (i.e., Volume = area of base x height);

7-B.2.8.

Determine, through investigation using a variety of tools, the surface area of right prisms;

7-B.2.9.

Solve problems that involve the surface area and volume of right prisms and that require conversion between metric measures of capacity and volume (i.e., millilitres and cubic centimetres).

7-B.3.1.

Classify structures as solid structures (e.g., dams), frame structures (e.g., goal posts), or shell structures (e.g., airplane wings)

7-B.3.2.

Describe ways in which the centre of gravity of a structure (e.g., a child's high chair, a tower) affects the structure's stability

7-B.3.3.

Identify the magnitude, direction, point of application, and plane of application of the forces applied to a structure

7-B.3.4.

Distinguish between external forces (e.g., wind, gravity, earthquakes) and internal forces (tension, compression, shear, and torsion) acting on a structure

7-B.3.5.

Describe the role of symmetry in structures (e.g., aesthetic appeal, structural stability)

7-B.3.6.

Identify and describe factors that can cause a structure to fail (e.g., bad design, faulty construction, foundation failure, extraordinary loads)

7-B.3.7.

Identify the factors (e.g., properties of the material as they relate to the product, availability, costs of shipping, aesthetic appeal, disposal) that determine the suitability of materials for use in manufacturing a product (e.g., a running shoe)

7-C.1.1.

Construct related lines (i.e., parallel; perpendicular; intersecting at 30 degrees, 45 degrees, and 60 degrees), using angle properties and a variety of tools and strategies;

7-C.1.2.

Sort and classify triangles and quadrilaterals by geometric properties related to symmetry, angles, and sides, through investigation using a variety of tools and strategies;

7-C.1.3.

Construct angle bisectors and perpendicular bisectors, using a variety of tools and strategies, and represent equal angles and equal lengths using mathematical notation;

7-C.2.2.

Determine, through investigation using a variety of tools, relationships among area, perimeter, corresponding side lengths, and corresponding angles of congruent shapes;

7-C.2.3.

Demonstrate an understanding that enlarging or reducing two-dimensional shapes creates similar shapes;

7-C.2.4.

Distinguish between and compare similar shapes and congruent shapes, using a variety of tools and strategies.

7-C.2.5.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including mechanical mixture, solution, solute, insoluble, saturated, unsaturated, and dilute, in oral and written communication

7-C.2.6.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., using appropriate mathematical conventions, make a scatter plot to show the relationship between solute, solvent, and temperature)

7-C.3.1.

Plot points using all four quadrants of the Cartesian coordinate plane;

7-C.3.10.

Explain why water is referred to as the universal solvent

7-C.3.2.

Identify, perform, and describe dilatations (i.e., enlargements and reductions), through investigation using a variety of tools;

7-C.3.3.

Create and analyse designs involving translations, reflections, dilatations, and/or simple rotations of two-dimensional shapes, using a variety of tools and strategies;

7-C.3.4.

Determine, through investigation using a variety of tools, polygons or combinations of polygons that tile a plane, and describe the transformation(s) involved.

7-C.3.5.

Describe the processes (e.g., evaporation, sifting, filtration, distillation, magnetism) used to separate mixtures or solutions into their components, and identify some industrial applications of these processes (e.g., use of cheesecloth to separate seeds and skins from juice and pulp to make fruit jellies; use of evaporation in maple syrup production; use of different sizes of sieves to separate wheat grains in white bread production; use of strainers in industries to separate slurry into solids and liquids)

7-C.3.6.

Identify the components of a solution (e.g., solvent, solute)

7-C.3.7.

Identify solutes and solvents in various kinds of solutions (e.g., copper and tin in bronze; iodine and alcohol in iodine solution)

7-C.3.9.

Describe the difference between saturated and unsaturated solutions

7-D.1.1.

Represent linear growing patterns, using a variety of tools and strategies;

7-D.1.2.

Make predictions about linear growing patterns, through investigation with concrete materials;

7-D.1.3.

Develop and represent the general term of a linear growing pattern, using algebraic expressions involving one operation;

7-D.1.4.

Compare pattern rules that generate a pattern by adding or subtracting a constant, or multiplying or dividing by a constant, to get the next term with pattern rules that use the term number to describe the general term.

7-D.2.1.

Model real-life relationships involving constant rates where the initial condition starts at 0 through investigation using tables of values and graphs;

7-D.2.2.

Model real-life relationships involving constant rates, using algebraic equations with variables to represent the changing quantities in the relationship;

7-D.2.3.

Translate phrases describing simple mathematical relationships into algebraic expressions, using concrete materials;

7-D.2.4.

Evaluate algebraic expressions by substituting natural numbers for the variables;

7-D.2.5.

Make connections between evaluating algebraic expressions and determining the term in a pattern using the general term;

7-D.2.6.

Solve linear equations of the form ax = c or c = ax and ax + b = c or variations such as b + ax = c and c = bx + a (where a, b, and c are natural numbers) by modelling with concrete materials, by inspection, or by guess and check, with and without the aid of a calculator.

7-D.3.1.

Use the particle theory to compare how heat affects the motion of particles in a solid, a liquid, and a gas

7-D.3.2.

Identify ways in which heat is produced (e.g., burning fossil and renewable fuels, electrical resistance, physical activity)

7-D.3.3.

Use the particle theory to explain the effects of heat on volume in solids (e.g., rails, sidewalks, and bridge segments expand in hot weather), liquids (e.g., sea levels are rising partly because global warming is making the oceans warmer and the water in them is expanding), and gases (e.g., the air in car tires expands on hot pavement)

7-D.3.4.

Explain how heat is transmitted through conduction (e.g., the transmission of heat from a stove burner to a pot and from the pot to the pot handle), and describe natural processes that are affected by conduction (e.g., the formation of igneous and metamorphic rocks and diamonds)

7-D.3.5.

Explain how heat is transmitted through convection, and describe natural processes that depend on convection (e.g., thunderstorms, land and sea breezes)

7-D.3.6.

Explain how heat is transmitted through radiation, and describe the effects of radiation from the sun on different kinds of surfaces (e.g., an ice-covered lake, a forest, an ocean, an asphalt road)

7-D.3.7.

Describe the role of radiation in heating and cooling the earth, and explain how greenhouse gases affect the transmission of radiated heat through the atmosphere (e.g., The earth is warmed by absorbing radiation from the sun. It cools by radiating thermal energy back to space. Greenhouse gases absorb some of the radiation that the earth emits to space and reradiate it back to the earth's surface. If the quantity of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere increases, they absorb more outgoing radiation, and the earth becomes warmer.)

7-D.3.8.

Identify common sources of greenhouse gases (e.g., carbon dioxide comes from plant and animal respiration and the burning of fossil fuels; methane comes from wetlands, grazing livestock, termites, fossil fuel extraction, and landfills; nitrous oxide comes from soils and nitrogen fertilizers), and describe ways of reducing emissions of these gases

7-E.1.1.

Collect data by conducting a survey or an experiment to do with themselves, their environment, issues in their school or community, or content from another subject and record observations or measurements;

7-E.1.2.

Collect and organize categorical, discrete, or continuous primary data and secondary data and display the data in charts, tables, and graphs (including relative frequency tables and circle graphs) that have appropriate titles, labels, and scales that suit the range and distribution of the data, using a variety of tools;

7-E.1.3.

Select an appropriate type of graph to represent a set of data, graph the data using technology, and justify the choice of graph (i.e., from types of graphs already studied);

7-E.1.4.

Distinguish between a census and a sample from a population;

7-E.1.5.

Identify bias in data collection methods.

7-E.2.1.

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions from primary data and from secondary data presented in charts, tables, and graphs (including relative frequency tables and circle graphs);

7-E.2.2.

Identify, through investigation, graphs that present data in misleading ways;

7-E.2.4.

Identify and describe trends, based on the distribution of the data presented in tables and graphs, using informal language;

7-E.2.5.

Make inferences and convincing arguments that are based on the analysis of charts, tables, and graphs.

7-E.3.1.

Research and report on real-world applications of probabilities expressed in fraction, decimal, and percent form;

7-E.3.2.

Make predictions about a population when given a probability;

7-E.3.3.

Represent in a variety of ways all the possible outcomes of a probability experiment involving two independent events (i.e., one event does not affect the other event), and determine the theoretical probability of a specific outcome involving two independent events;

7-E.3.4.

Perform a simple probability experiment involving two independent events, and compare the experimental probability with the theoretical probability of a specific outcome.