Saskatchewan Curriculum — Grade 2


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2-AN2.1.a.

Pose questions about the growth and development of familiar animals.

2-AN2.1.b.

Use a variety of resources (e.g., Elder, naturalist, zookeeper, park warden, pet store, books, pictures, and videos) to find information about the life cycles of living things.

2-AN2.1.c.

Identify the names of the offspring (e.g., cub, pup, calf, kitten, chick, fawn, fingerling, maggot, tadpole, gosling, and infant) of familiar animals.

2-AN2.1.d.

Recognize the cyclic nature of Mother Earth expressed by the Medicine Wheel, including life cycles and seasonal behaviours of animals.

2-AN2.1.e.

Compare the length and stages of life cycles of familiar animals.

2-AN2.1.f.

Describe the characteristics common to each stage (e.g., birth, youth, adulthood, and old age) of the life cycle of familiar animals (e.g., dog, cat, beaver, frog, fish, bird, ant, wasp, and chicken).

2-AN2.1.g.

Analyze which traits (e.g., body size, head size to body ratio, and number of limbs) remain relatively constant and which change in specific animals as they grow and develop.

2-AN2.1.h.

Create a physical, visual, or dramatic representation of the growth and development of familiar animals during their life cycles.

2-AN2.1.i.

Predict how big a specific animal will grow based on observed patterns of animal growth and changes.

2-AN2.1.j.

Design an animal suited for life in a particular environment (real or imaginary) and represent its growth and changes throughout its life cycle.

2-AN2.2.a.

Pose questions about similarities and differences between animal and human growth.

2-AN2.2.b.

Predict ways in which humans change as they grow.

2-AN2.2.c.

Create representations of changes in the growth and development of humans throughout their life cycle (e.g., baby, preschooler, elementary student, teenager, adult, and elderly person).

2-AN2.2.d.

Sequence pictures or illustrations of humans and familiar animals according to stage of life cycle.

2-AN2.2.e.

Compare patterns in human growth and development to that of familiar animals.

2-AN2.2.f.

Examine the implications of traditional and contemporary food choices and eating habits on human growth and development.

2-AN2.2.g.

Compare the food choices and eating habits of various familiar animals as they relate to growth and development.

2-AN2.2.h.

Communicate personal thoughts and feelings related to personal growth and change, including transitions that are celebrated in various cultures.

2-AN2.3.a.

Predict which animals live in various locations (e.g., tree, underground, nest, cave, water, and soil) within a variety of natural and constructed environments.

2-AN2.3.b.

Observe familiar animals in natural (e.g., tree, stream, pond, forest, and beneath a rock) and constructed (e.g., garden, sports field, zoo, aquarium, and city) environments safely and respectfully.

2-AN2.3.d.

Assess features of natural (e.g., woodland, stream, grassland, and forest) and constructed (e.g., backyard, zoo, schoolyard, and classroom) environments that support or hinder the health and growth of familiar animals.

2-AN2.3.e.

Analyze ways in which human activities intentionally or unintentionally can help or harm wild and domesticated animals.

2-AN2.3.f.

Examine ways in which humans and animals interact with each other (e.g., pet, companionship, transportation guide dog, search and rescue, and providing food), including ways in which animals can cause harm to humans.

2-AN2.3.g.

Discuss the care and handling of wild and domesticated animals (e.g., fish, dog, bird, horse, cow), including keeping animals as pets, housing animals in zoos and aquariums, and identifying careers related to animal care.

2-AR2.1.a.

Reflect, with guidance, on viewing, listening, reading, representing, speaking, and writing by explaining what is effective or what they like in a text.

2-AR2.1.b.

Reflect, with guidance, on own strategies (''What do I do well? How could I be better?'').

2-AR2.1.c.

Use a range of strategies (e.g., unfamiliar word - rereads the sentence, uses picture cues, uses initial letter cues, breaks word into parts) when something does not make sense.

2-AR2.1.e.

Review own work and set goals to improve it (e.g., check for missing words in writing).

2-AW2.1.a.

Observe, using all of their senses, physical properties of air (e.g., generally invisible, odourless, and fills and assumes shape of container) and of water (e.g., assumes shape of container, clear, tasteless, and odourless).

2-AW2.1.b.

Select appropriate tools (e.g., thermometer, wind sock, rain gauge, garden hose, fan, oar, propeller, and vacuum) and materials to carry out safely their own explorations of air and water in their environment through processes such as collecting dew, rainfall, and snow; measuring wind speed; and measuring temperature.

2-AW2.1.d.

Provide evidence indicating air takes up space, has mass, and can be felt when it moves.

2-AW2.1.e.

Categorize examples of water in indoor and outdoor environments, and in living things, including themselves, according to state of matter (i.e., solid, liquid, and gaseous).

2-AW2.1.f.

Investigate physical (e.g., mass, shape, texture, colour, and odour) changes in water during each change of state (i.e., freezing, melting, evaporation, condensation, sublimation, and deposition).

2-AW2.1.g.

Carry out procedures to investigate methods of increasing or decreasing the rate water changes state (i.e., freezing or boiling).

2-AW2.1.i.

Classify or sequence materials according to attributes such as how quickly they absorb water, how much water they absorb, and whether they are waterproof or water repellent.

2-AW2.1.j.

Communicate procedures and results of observations of the physical properties of air and water, using drawings, demonstrations, and written and oral descriptions.

2-AW2.2.a.

Pose questions that lead to exploration and investigation about air and water conditions (e.g., Why does skin feel wet in the summer? Why is it harder to breathe in winter than in summer? Why might people wear a filter over their nose and mouth?).

2-AW2.2.b.

Describe changes in the location, amount, and form of moisture in different locations in the environment, and factors such as exposure to heat and moving air that can affect these conditions.

2-AW2.2.d.

Explain how living things, including humans, require clean air and water for breathing, cooling, drinking, cooking, bathing, and prevention of illness to maintain a healthy body.

2-AW2.2.e.

Explain how water is obtained, distributed, and used in personal, local, and regional environments (e.g., home, classroom, school, town, city, and province).

2-AW2.2.f.

Communicate questions, ideas, and intentions while conducting personal and group explorations of air and water in the environment.

2-AW2.2.g.

Record, using tables, diagrams, pictographs, or bar graphs, individual, classroom, and/or household use of water for a given period.

2-AW2.2.h.

Suggest explanations for how air and water in the environment can become polluted.

2-AW2.2.i.

Suggest ways that individuals can contribute to protecting and improving the quality of air and water in their environment (e.g., conserving water, not pouring chemicals down the drain, not burning hazardous materials, and reducing travel via motorized vehicles).

2-AW2.2.j.

Propose an answer to a question or problem related to the importance of air and water for living things.

2-CC2.1.b.

Create spoken, written, and other representations that include:

2-CC2.1.b.3.

Ideas and information which are clear and complete.

2-CC2.1.b.4.

Appropriate use of language and conventions including conventional print.

2-CC2.1.c.

Use personal knowledge and experiences in communications.

2-CC2.1.d.

Share own stories and creations with peers and respond to questions or comments.

2-CC2.1.e.

Tell, draw, write, and dramatize stories about self, family, community, and family/community traditions to express ideas and understanding.

2-CC2.1.f.

Use inquiry to explore a question or topic that is of individual or group interest including:

2-CC2.1.f.1.

Considering personal knowledge and understanding of a topic to identify information needs.

2-CC2.1.f.3.

Accessing ideas using a variety of sources such as simple chapter books, multimedia and online resources, computers, and Elders.

2-CC2.1.f.5.

Categorizing related information and ideas using a variety of strategies such as linking significant details and sequencing ideas in a logical order.

2-CC2.2.a.

Design a visual representation (e.g., a picture, puppetry, a chart, a model, physical movement, a concrete graph, a pictographic, a demonstration, an advertisement for a toy) to demonstrate understanding.

2-CC2.2.c.

Understand and apply the appropriate cues and conventions (pragmatic, textual, syntactical, semantic/lexical/morphological, graphophonic, and other) to construct and communicate meaning when using other forms of representing.

2-CC2.2.f.

Combine illustrations and written text (e.g., captions, labels) to express ideas, feelings, and information.

2-CC2.2.g.

Use sound or movement to demonstrate understanding.

2-CC2.2.i.

Create dramatizations to express ideas and understanding.

2-CC2.3.a.

Use oral language to initiate and sustain a conversation with a number of exchanges, interact with others, exchange ideas on a topic, and engage in play.

2-CC2.3.c.

Understand and apply the appropriate cues and conventions (pragmatic, textual, syntactical, semantic/lexical/morphological, graphophonic, and other) to construct and communicate meaning when speaking.

2-CC2.3.d.

Recount experiences, stories (including contemporary and traditional First Nations and Mtis stories), or current events, in a logical sequence and with necessary details.

2-CC2.3.f.

Deliver brief recitations (e.g., recite poems, rhymes, verses, and finger plays), participate in choral readings, and give oral presentations about familiar experiences or interests, organized around a coherent focus.

2-CC2.3.h.

Make relevant contributions to class discussions and take turns.

2-CC2.3.i.

Dramatize a scene from a folktale or traditional First Nations or Mtis narrative.

2-CC2.4.a.

Employ a writing process (e.g., planning, drafting, and ''fixing up'').

2-CC2.4.c.

Understand and apply the appropriate cues and conventions (pragmatic, textual, syntactical, semantic/lexical/morphological, graphophonic, and other) to construct and communicate meaning when writing.

2-CC2.4.e.

Write stories, poems, songs, friendly letters, reports, and observations using techniques observed in reading texts (including First Nations and Mtis resources).

2-CC2.4.f.

Write short pieces in the form of reports that describe and explain familiar objects, events, and experiences.

2-CC2.4.g.

Write brief narratives based on own experiences and imaginations that move through a logical sequence of events and describe the setting, characters, character traits, goals, and events.

2-CC2.4.i.

Write a response with supporting details from a text viewed, listened to, or read.

2-CC2.4.j.

Polish at least eight pieces through the year.

2-CR2.1.a.

View, listen to, read, and respond to a variety of texts including First Nations and Mtis resources that present different viewpoints and perspectives on issues and topics related to identity, community, and social responsibility and relate to own experiences.

2-CR2.1.b.

Discuss the experiences and traditions of various communities and cultures portrayed in texts including First Nations and Mtis resources.

2-CR2.1.c.

Connect situations portrayed in texts (including First Nations and Mtis texts) to personal experiences and prior learning.

2-CR2.1.d.

Identify similarities and differences between what is known and what is presented in texts.

2-CR2.2.

View and explain (with support from the text) the key literal and inferential ideas (messages), important details, and how elements (such as colour, layout, medium, and special fonts) enhance meaning in grade-appropriate visual and multimedia texts.

2-CR2.2.a.

View and demonstrate comprehension of grade-appropriate visual and multimedia texts including multimedia clips, signs, illustrations, diagrams, photographs, graphs, simple charts, and posters.

2-CR2.2.b.

Select and use task-relevant before, during, and after strategies to construct meaning when viewing.

2-CR2.2.c.

Understand and apply the appropriate cues and conventions (pragmatic, textual, syntactical, semantic/lexical/morphological, graphophonic, and other) to construct and confirm meaning when viewing.

2-CR2.2.d.

Obtain information from different media (e.g., multimedia clips, websites, video clips, magazine photographs).

2-CR2.2.e.

Show courtesy and respect while viewing (e.g., presentations by individuals from various cultures including First Nations and Mtis).

2-CR2.2.i.

Distinguish between a commercial and a program on television.

2-CR2.2.j.

Explain how elements such as colour, sound, music, physical movement, and arrangement enhance visual and multimedia texts and products including First Nations and Mtis texts, visual art works, and performances such as music, dance, and drama.

2-CR2.3.a.

Listen and demonstrate comprehension by retelling key points (who, what, where, when, and why) in grade-appropriate literary and informational texts including First Nations and Mtis resources.

2-CR2.3.c.

Understand and apply the appropriate cues and conventions (pragmatic, textual, syntactical, semantic/lexical/morphological, graphophonic, and other) to construct and confirm meaning when listening.

2-CR2.3.d.

Listen to and follow independently a series of related directions or instructions related to class activities.

2-CR2.3.f.

Ask for clarification and explanation of oral stories and information (including stories and information from contemporary and traditional First Nations and Mtis resources).

2-CR2.3.g.

Follow and retell the important steps in demonstrations.

2-CR2.3.h.

Listen courteously during discussions and while working in pairs and small groups to share ideas, obtain information, solve problems, and ask and respond to relevant questions.

2-CR2.4.a.

Read and understand a variety of grade-level-appropriate narrative and informational texts including legends, traditional stories and folktales, poetry, environmental print, and predictable books including First Nations and Mtis resources.

2-CR2.4.b.

Select and use task-relevant before, during, and after strategies to construct meaning when reading.

2-CR2.4.c.

Understand and apply the appropriate cues and conventions (pragmatic, textual, syntactical, semantic/lexical/morphological, graphophonic, and other) to construct and confirm meaning when reading.

2-CR2.4.d.

Read and retell (with support from the text) the key events and elements of a story (including setting, characters, character traits, problem and solution, and sequence of events).

2-CR2.4.e.

Read and retell the key ideas and elements (including main idea, supporting details, diagrams, headings, table of contents, glossary) of informational texts including First Nations and Mtis resources.

2-CR2.4.f.

Read aloud with fluency, expression, and comprehension any familiar text that is appropriate for grade 2.

2-CR2.4.i.

Read familiar poem aloud with expression and attention to flow.

2-CR2.4.j.

Read most texts silently.

2-DR2.1.a..

Plan and implement a process to learn about the past experiences of members of the local community (e.g., talk to long term residents, view pictures or other artistic interpretations, visit an historic site).

2-DR2.1.b..

Research and represent the history of the local school and the local community (e.g., events, people).

2-DR2.1.c..

Describe events of the past in the local community that affect life today (e.g., Why was the current location chosen for the school? Other buildings? Why are streets or buildings named as they are?).

2-DR2.1.d..

Represent ways in which life in the local community has changed over time (e.g., change of place names, demographics, services, industries, businesses, transportation networks).

2-DR2.1.e..

Research the origins of, and reasons for, the names of public sites and landmarks in the local community (e.g., streets, rivers, buildings, parks).

2-DR2.1.f..

Research the heritage of various individuals and groups within the community, and why people came to live in the community.

2-DR2.2.b..

Compile examples of natural resources in the local community and explain the importance of conserving or restoring natural resources.

2-DR2.2.c..

Inventory ways in which the natural environment influences lifestyles of the local community.

2-DR2.2.d..

Identify ways that technology has been and is used to enable people to adapt to the natural environment (e.g., building technology, clothing, industrial equipment, personal care).

2-DR2.2.e..

Illustrate ways in which the natural landscape shapes daily life in the local community.

2-DR2.3.a..

Describe constructed features of the local community and examine the value and purpose of such constructions (e.g., bridges, buildings, statues, parks, water systems, roads).

2-DR2.3.c..

Interpret basic features of maps and globes.

2-DR2.4.b..

Investigate the relationship of traditional First Nations to the land

2-IN2.1.a..

Identify and record characteristics common to the school community (e.g., Who leads the school community? Who keeps the school community clean and physically pleasant? What kinds of special events happen in the school community?).

2-IN2.1.b..

Compile a list of various communities to which students belong (e.g., cultural, recreational, faith, sports, arts).

2-IN2.1.c..

Compare characteristics of other communities to which students belong with those of the school community, identifying the similarities in meeting needs and achieving common purpose.

2-IN2.1.d..

Identify needs met by the local community that cannot be met independently or individually, and describe the concept of interdependence.

2-IN2.1.e..

Create an inventory of ways in which individuals and groups contribute to the well-being of the school and local community.

2-IN2.1.f..

Identify characteristics common to local communities (e.g., transportation and communication networks, educational and health care systems, arts, culture, sport, and recreation infrastructure).

2-IN2.1.g..

Create a representation exemplifying interdependence within the local community.

2-IN2.2.a..

Describe diverse characteristics within the school and local communities, and describe similarities within and between diverse groups.

2-IN2.2.b..

Retell the shared experiences and stories of members of the local community experienced through active listening, viewing, and reading of stories in various formats.

2-IN2.2.c..

Identify the significance of a variety of cultural traditions, festivals, and celebrations in the school and local communities.

2-IN2.2.d..

Describe ways in which diverse individuals and groups contribute to the well-being of the local community (e.g., storekeepers, medical practitioners, law enforcement personnel, school support workers, spiritual or faith leaders, artisans, trades people, bus drivers, community maintenance workers).

2-LS2.1.a.

Pose questions that lead to investigation and exploration of the properties of familiar liquids and solids.

2-LS2.1.b.

Classify objects in various natural and constructed environments as liquids or solids.

2-LS2.1.c.

Identify examples of how liquids, in all three states of matter, are used at home, in the school, and throughout their communites.

2-LS2.1.d.

Interpret safety symbols (e.g., WHMIS and consumer chemical hazard symbols) and labels that are used on hazardous product containers for liquids and solids.

2-LS2.1.e.

Select and safely use materials and tools (e.g., magnifier, scale, measuring cup, and spatula) to carry out explorations of the observable physical properties of familiar liquids and solids.

2-LS2.1.f.

Record and compare observable physical properties (e.g., colour, taste, smell, shape, texture, transparency, and ability to adapt to the shape of container) of familiar liquids and solids.

2-LS2.1.g.

Distinguish between properties of familiar liquids and solids.

2-LS2.1.h.

Demonstrate that liquids and solids are matter because they have mass and take up space.

2-LS2.1.i.

Investigate to determine whether properties of familiar liquids and solids depend on factors such as the amount of substance present.

2-LS2.1.j.

Group or sequence liquids and solids according to one or more observable physical properties (e.g., colour, state, texture, smell, transparency, and buoyancy).

2-LS2.1.k.

Predict and test changes in characteristics (e.g., shape, colour, and volume) of liquids when they are changed into solids or gases.

2-LS2.2.b.

Investigate how liquids change when they are poured into different containers.

2-LS2.2.f.

Carry out an investigation to determine the relative viscosity of different liquids (e.g., water, milk, and syrup) when placed on various surfaces (e.g., paper, paper towel, cotton, plastic, and wax paper).

2-LS2.2.g.

Design and carry out an investigation to determine the rate and ability of various materials (e.g., paper, paper towel, cotton, plastic, and wax paper) to absorb liquids and explain how these capabilities determine their uses.

2-LS2.2.h.

Use a variety of sources (e.g., newspapers, Elders, anglers, books, videos, and Internet) to gather information about objects that sink and float (e.g., canoes, kayaks, barges, boats, buoys, and fishing lures).

2-LS2.2.i.

Demonstrate an understanding of sinking and floating by solving a related practical problem such as building an object that will float, carry a load, and be stable.

2-LS2.2.j.

Assess ways people use knowledge of solids and liquids to maintain a clean and healthy environment (e.g., filtering water, sorting solids for recycling, cleaning up a kitchen spill, washing dishes, cleaning paint brushes, using hand cleaners, wearing a paint smock).

2-MP2.2.a.

Pose questions about the motion of natural and constructed objects in their environment (e.g., How do we know if something is moving? What are some different types of motion? Why is it difficult to walk on some surfaces?).

2-MP2.2.d.

Examine a variety of toys, playground equipment, and other objects that move or which have components that move and ask questions that lead to exploration and investigation of the motion of objects.

2-MP2.2.e.

Investigate, describe, and represent different patterns of movement (e.g., walking, running, swinging, bouncing, sliding, rotating, spinning, crawling, and rolling) of familiar objects, including themselves.

2-MP2.2.f.

Relate the types of motion (e.g., crawling, walking, running, flying, swimming, slithering, galloping, crab walking, and rolling) to the physical characteristics of humans and familiar animals.

2-MP2.2.g.

Demonstrate how pushes and pulls can cause an object to speed up, slow down, stop, or change direction.

2-MP2.2.h.

Describe the movement of a specified object using appropriate vocabulary so that other students can duplicate the movement.

2-MP2.2.i.

Carry out a procedure to investigate the effects of pushes and pulls on the motion of objects using various objects and surfaces (e.g., paper, carpet, sandpaper, desktop, tile floor, wooden board, ice, sidewalk, grass, soil, and sand).

2-MP2.2.j.

Observe and record the effects of different textured surfaces on the friction between two objects or surfaces.

2-MP2.2.k.

Provide examples of technologies (e.g., skate, snowshoe, bicycle, ski, kayak, curling slider, and wheelchair) that are designed to make it easier for people and constructed objects to move on different surfaces.

2-MP2.2.l.

Generate new questions about the motion of objects that arise from what was learned (e.g., Do objects move the same way in space or in water or in another liquid? What causes motion?).

2-N2.1.

Demonstrate understanding of whole numbers to 100 (concretely, pictorially, physically, orally, in writing, and symbolically) by: representing (including place value), describing, skip counting, differentiating between odd and even numbers, estimating with referents, comparing two numbers, ordering three or more numbers.[C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

2-N2.1.a.

Describe the patterns related to quantity and place value of adjacent digit positions moving from right to left within a whole number.

2-N2.1.b.

Describe the meaning of quantities to 100 by relating them to self, family, or community and explain what effect each successive numeral position has on the actual quantity.

2-N2.1.c.

Pose and solve problems that explore the quantity of whole numbers to 100 (e.g., a student might wonder: ''How many pets would there be if everyone in the class brought their pets to class'').

2-N2.1.d.

Represent quantities to 100 using proportional materials (e.g., tallies, ten frames, and base ten blocks) and explain how the representation relates to the numeral used to represent the quantity.

2-N2.1.e.

Represent quantities to 100 using non-proportional materials (e.g., stir sticks and popsicle sticks, and coins) and explain how the representation relates to the numeral used to represent the quantity.

2-N2.1.f.

Identify whole numbers to 100 stated as a numeral or word form in everyday situations and read the number out loud (e.g., 24 on the classroom door would be read as twenty-four, and read out loud ''seventy-three'' when found in a piece of writing being read in class).

2-N2.1.g.

Create different decompositions for a given quantity using concrete manipulatives or pictures and explain orally how the different decompositions represent the original quantity.

2-N2.1.h.

Write numbers to twenty in words when said out loud or given as a numeral.

2-N2.1.i.

Analyze a sequence of numbers in order to describe the sequence in terms of a skip counting strategy (by 2s, 5s, or 10s as well as forward and backward) and extend the sequence using the pattern.

2-N2.1.j.

Analyze an ordered number sequence (including a hundred chart) for errors or omissions and explain the reasoning.

2-N2.1.k.

Sort a set of personally relevant numbers into odd and even numbers.

2-N2.1.l.

Hypothesize and verify strategies for skip counting by 10s beginning at any whole number from 0 to 9 (e.g., in a hundred chart, the skip counted numbers always lie on a vertical line; using base ten blocks, skip counting by 10s always increases the number of rods by one; or using numerals, the tens place value always increases by 1 (meaning 10) when skip counting by 10s forwards).

2-N2.1.m.

Order a set of personally relevant numbers in ascending or descending order and verify the resulting sequence (e.g., using a hundred chart, number line, ten frames, or place value).

2-N2.1.n.

Analyze a number relevant to one's self, family, or community to determine if it is odd or even and verify the conclusion by using concrete, pictorial, or physical representations.

2-N2.1.q.

Critique the statement ''A referent for 10 is always a good referent to use''.

2-N2.1.r.

Represent a 2-digit numeral using ten frames or other proportional base ten materials.

2-N2.1.s.

Create representations of different decompositions of the same quantity and explain how the representations represent the same amount.

2-N2.1.t.

Explain, using concrete or pictorial representations, the meaning of each digit within a 2-digit numeral with both digits the same (e.g., for the numeral 22, the first digit represents two tens - twenty counters - and the second digit represents two ones - two counters).

2-N2.1.u.

Defend the statement ''The value of a digit depends on its placement within a numeral''.

2-N2.1.v.

Demonstrate how to count objects using groupings of 10s and 1s and explain how those groups help in the writing of the 2-digit number that represents the quantity of objects.

2-N2.2.

Demonstrate understanding of addition (limited to 1 and 2-digit numerals) with answers to 100 and the corresponding subtraction by: representing strategies for adding and subtracting concretely, pictorially, and symbolically; creating and solving problems involving addition and subtraction; estimating ; using personal strategies for adding and subtracting with and without the support of manipulatives; analyzing the effect of adding or subtracting zero; analyzing the effect of the ordering of the quantities (addends, minuends, and subtrahends) in addition and subtraction statements.[C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

2-N2.2.c.

Model concretely, pictorially, or physically situations that involve the addition or subtraction of 1 and 2-digit numbers (with answers to 100) and explain how to record the process shown in the model symbolically.

2-N2.2.d.

Generalize and apply strategies for adding and subtracting 1 and 2-digit numbers (with answers to 100).

2-N2.2.e.

Create, model symbolically (and concretely, pictorially, or physically if desired), and solve addition and subtraction problems related to situations relevant to one's self, family, or community.

2-N2.2.g.

Select and explain a mental mathematics strategy that can be used to determine a sum of up to 18 (or related difference).

2-P2.1.

Demonstrate understanding of repeating patterns (three to five elements) by: describing; representing patterns in alternate modes; extending; comparing; creating patterns using manipulatives, pictures, sounds, and actions.[C, CN, PS, R, V]

2-P2.1.a.

Identify and describe repeating patterns found in familiar situations and justify why the descriptions are those of repeating patterns (e.g., ''Every day I get up, brush my hair, wash my face, have breakfast'' - this is a repeating pattern because I do the same pattern over and over again).

2-P2.1.b.

Analyze a repeating pattern to identify the core of the pattern.

2-P2.1.c.

Analyze a repeating pattern for its core and extend the pattern so the core appears twice more.

2-P2.1.d.

Analyze an intended repeating pattern to identify possible errors.

2-P2.1.e.

Create a repeating pattern and explain the reasoning.

2-P2.1.f.

Predict an upcoming element in a repeating pattern and verify the prediction.

2-P2.1.g.

Analyze two repeating patterns that are represented using different materials or modes (e.g., a diagram of a repeating pattern with a core of red, red, blue, blue, blue and a sound pattern with a core of buzz, buzz, snap, snap, snap) and present ways in which the patterns are related (e.g., there are two different elements in the core of each pattern, and the core pattern is element 1, element 1, element 2, element 2, element 2 in both patterns).

2-P2.2.

Demonstrate understanding of increasing patterns by: describing; reproducing; extending; creating patterns using manipulatives, pictures, sounds, and actions (numbers to 100).[C, CN, PS, R, V]

2-P2.2.a.

Identify and describe increasing patterns in familiar situations (e.g., hundred chart, number line, addition tables, calendar, a tiling pattern or drawings, apartment numbers, years, or age).

2-P2.2.b.

Analyze a numerical increasing pattern for its pattern rule and extend the pattern.

2-P2.2.c.

Analyze a non-numerical increasing pattern and extend the pattern.

2-P2.2.d.

Reproduce an increasing numerical pattern using an alternate form (e.g., sound, action, concrete objects, or diagrams) and explain the reasoning.

2-P2.2.e.

Reproduce a concrete or pictorial increasing pattern using numbers and explain the reasoning.

2-P2.2.f.

Solve problems involving increasing patterns (e.g., determine the house number for a particular house given the house numbers for the other homes on the block, or determining the number of cubes in the missing structure) and explain the reasoning.

2-P2.2.g.

Create an increasing pattern, represent the pattern in different modes (using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds, actions, and/or physical movements), and explain the pattern rule.

2-P2.3.

Demonstrate understanding of equality and inequality concretely and pictorially (0 to 100) by: relating equality and inequality to balance, comparing sets, recording equalities with an equal sign, recording inequalities with a not equal sign, solving problems involving equality and inequality.[C, CN, R, V]

2-P2.3.a.

Compare two quantities of the same object (same shape and mass) by using a balance scale to determine if the quantities are equal or not.

2-P2.3.b.

Construct two unequal sets using identical objects and verify orally and concretely that the sets are not equal.

2-P2.3.c.

Analyze the impact of changing one of two equal sets upon the equality of the two sets.

2-P2.3.d.

Analyze the impact of making changes (equal and unequal) to both of two equal sets upon the equality of the sets.

2-P2.3.e.

Analyze and sort sets according to equality and explain the reasoning.

2-P2.3.f.

Model two number expressions to determine if the expressions are equal (=) or not equal () and write a number sentence to show the relationship (e.g., 3 + 2 and 4 + 1 are both equal to 5, so the two expressions are = and I write 3 + 2 = 4 + 1; 7 - 5 and 3 are not the same quantity, so I write 7 - 5 3).

2-P2.3.g.

Create statements of equality and non-equality and model the statements to verify the relationship.

2-PA2.1.a..

Review examples of communities to which students belong, and identify leaders in those communities (e.g., sports teams, artistic groups, school clubs, classroom, school, family).

2-PA2.1.b..

Give examples of leadership in the local community, and describe ways leadership is demonstrated (e.g., mayor, reeve, chief, Elders, community volunteers).

2-PA2.1.c..

Identify decision makers in the local community in government, economic, community, faith, and cultural organizations, and the roles of each.

2-PA2.2.a..

Recognize that the existence of conflicting interests does not necessarily result in conflict, and that harmonious communities resolve conflicting interests in peaceful ways.

2-PA2.2.b..

Review processes for resolving conflicting interests in the classroom and school.

2-PA2.2.c..

Identify possible sources of conflict in groups to which students belong, and in the community.

2-PA2.2.d..

Identify and describe diverse viewpoints and perspectives in the local community.

2-PA2.2.e..

Identify ways of maintaining safety and harmony within communities (e.g., police, firefighters, signage).

2-PA2.2.g..

Identify attributes of successful approaches to resolution of conflicting interests.

2-PA2.2.h..

Apply successful approaches to resolving conflicting interests in the classroom and school communities.

2-PA2.3.a..

Differentiate between the nature of the rights of children and of adult citizens in the community.

2-PA2.3.c..

Relate the rights of citizens in the community to their responsibilities to the community.

2-PA2.3.d..

Identify opportunities for sharing responsibility in the school and community.

2-RW2.1.a..

Define the term resource, and inventory resources in the community that help to meet needs and wants.

2-RW2.2.a..

Investigate traditional First Nations worldviews of the relationship between humanity and the environment.

2-RW2.2.b..

Describe traditional western European worldviews of the relationship between humanity and the environment.

2-RW2.2.e..

Describe current worldviews in the community of the relationship between humanity and the natural environment.

2-RW2.3.c..

Develop a classroom action plan for harmonizing personal lifestyles with collective needs regarding social, environmental, and economic sustainability.

2-SP2.1.

Demonstrate understanding of concrete graphs and pictographs.[C, CN, PS, R, V]

2-SP2.1.c.

Pose questions related to gathered data and explain how the data can be used to answer those questions.

2-SP2.1.e.

Analyze pictographs to identify and define the common attributes of a pictograph.

2-SP2.1.g.

Create a pictograph (using one-to-one correspondence) to display collected data and make and support conclusions based on the graph.

2-SP2.1.h.

Create and solve a problem for which data can be collected from individuals in the class, at home, in the school, or within the community and give a presentation of how the collection, organization, display, and analysis of data were done to attain a solution to the problem.

2-SS2.1.

Demonstrate understanding of non-standard units for linear measurement by: describing the choice and appropriate use of non-standard units, estimating , measuring, comparing and analyzing measurements. [C, CN, ME, R, V]

2-SS2.1.a.

Defend the choice of a non-standard unit for measuring a length in a situation relevant to one's self, family, or community.

2-SS2.1.b.

Estimate a personally relevant length, including the distance around a space, using one's own choice of standard unit.

2-SS2.1.c.

Compare estimates of the same length made by different units and provide reasons for different values being stated for the measurements.

2-SS2.1.d.

Critique the statement ''It is possible to get an exact length measurement''.

2-SS2.1.e.

Devise and apply strategies for determining estimates for linear and non-linear lengths using non-standard units.

2-SS2.1.f.

Explain why overlapping or leaving gaps does not result in accurate measurements.

2-SS2.1.g.

Explain why the same non-standard unit should be used to determine length measurements that are to be compared.

2-SS2.1.h.

Compare and order sets of related objects, possibly including people, according to a length measurement.

2-SS2.2.

Demonstrate understanding of non-standard units for measurement of mass by: describing the choice and appropriate use of non-standard units, estimating , measuring, comparing and analyzing measurements. [C, CN, ME, R, V]

2-SS2.2.a.

Defend the choice of a non-standard unit for measuring a mass in a situation relevant to one's self, family, or community.

2-SS2.2.b.

Estimate the mass of a personally relevant object using one's own choice of standard unit.

2-SS2.2.c.

Identify a non-standard unit for measuring mass that would not be a good choice in a particular situation and explain the reasoning (e.g., to measure the mass of a desk, it would not make sense to use an eraser as the standard unit because a desk has so much more mass than an eraser and so it would take too many erasers, or to measure the mass of a library book using the standard unit of a student in the class because the student already has a greater mass than the book).

2-SS2.2.d.

Compare estimates of the mass of the same object determined using different standard units and provide reasons for different values being stated for the measurements.

2-SS2.2.e.

Explain why the same non-standard unit should be used to determine mass measurements that are to be compared.

2-SS2.2.f.

Compare and order sets of related objects according to mass measurements and explain the reasoning.

2-SS2.3.

Describe, compare, and construct 3-D objects, including:, cubes, spheres, cones, cylinders, pyramids.[C, CN, R, V]

2-SS2.3.a.

Identify examples of cubes, spheres, cones, cylinders, and pyramids as found in the classroom, home, and community.

2-SS2.3.b.

Sort a set of personally relevant 3-D objects and explain the sorting rule used.

2-SS2.3.c.

Compare the attributes of cubes, spheres, cones, cylinders, and pyramids and generalize descriptions of each category of 3-D objects.

2-SS2.3.e.

Compare two 3-D objects in different orientations (e.g., ''If I was to flip this object over, the two objects would have the same height.'').

2-SS2.3.g.

Sort 3-D objects according to two attributes and explain the sorting rule used.

2-SS2.4.

Describe, compare, and construct 2-D shapes, including: triangles, squares, rectangles, circles.[C, CN, R, V]

2-SS2.4.a.

Identify examples of triangles, rectangles, squares, and circles as found in personal experiences.

2-SS2.4.b.

Compare the attributes of triangles, squares, rectangles, and circles and generalize descriptions of each category of 2-D shapes objects.

2-SS2.4.c.

Critique the statement ''A 2-D shape can either be a rectangle or a square, but not both''.

2-SS2.4.d.

Compare two 2-D shapes of the same type (e.g., both are circles) and explain how the dimensions of the shapes can be used to compare the shapes (one-to-one correspondence or non-standard units).

2-SS2.4.e.

Classify 2-D shapes arranged in different orientations according to the type (triangle, rectangle, square, or circle) and explain the impact of the orientation of shape on its classification.

2-SS2.4.f.

Create a model to represent a 2-D shape.

2-SS2.4.g.

Sort regular and irregular 2-D shapes according to two attributes and explain the sorting rule used.

2-SS2.5.

Demonstrate understanding of the relationship between 2-D shapes and 3-D objects.[C, CN, R, V]

2-SS2.5.a.

Analyze the differences between two pre-sorted sets of objects and/or pictures of shapes and explain how the objects and shapes were sorted.

2-SS2.5.b.

Analyze a set of objects and/or pictures of shapes to identify two common attributes of each member of the set.

2-SS2.5.c.

Describe the faces of a personally relevant 3-D object by comparing the faces to 2-D shapes (such as triangles, squares, rectangles, or circles).

2-SS2.5.d.

Analyze (using concrete models of 3-D objects) a set of descriptions of the 2-D faces of a 3-D object to identify the 3-D object (e.g., ''A 3-D object has one rectangular face and four triangular faces - what type of object is it?'' ''A pyramid.'').

2-SS2.5.e.

Analyze and correct the statement ''The tissue box is a rectangle''.