Arizona Social Studies Standards — Grade K


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SS00-S1C1

Historical research is a process in which students examine topics or questions related to historical studies and/or current issues. By using primary and secondary sources effectively students obtain accurate and relevant information.

SS00-S1C1.a

Retell personal events to show an understanding of how history is the story of events, people, and places in the past.

SS00-S1C1.b

Listen to recounts of historical events and people and discuss how they relate to present day.

SS00-S1C1.c

Sequence recounts of historical events and people using the concepts of before and after.

SS00-S1C1.d

Use primary source materials (e.g., photos, artifacts) to study people and events from the past.

SS00-S1C10

Current events and issues continue to shape our nation and our involvement in the global community.

SS00-S1C10.a

Use information from written documents, oral presentations, and the media to discuss current local events.

SS00-S1C2

The geographic, political, economic and cultural characteristics of early civilizations made significant contributions to the later development of the United States.

SS00-S1C2.a

Recognize that Native Americans are the original inhabitants of North America.

SS00-S1C3

The varied causes and effects of exploration, settlement, and colonization shaped regional and national development of the U.S.

SS00-S1C3.a

Recognize that explorers (e.g., Columbus, Leif Ericson) traveled to places in the world that were new to them.

SS00-S1C3.b

Recognize that exploration resulted in the exchange of ideas, culture, and goods (e.g., foods, animals, plants, artifacts).

SS00-S1C4

The development of American constitutional democracy grew from political, cultural and economic issues, ideas and event.

SS00-S1C4.a

Recognize that George Washington was our first president.

SS00-S1C4.b

Recognize that the Fourth of July is our nation's birthday.

SS00-S1C9

Postwar tensions led to social change in the U.S. and to a heightened focus on foreign policy.

SS00-S1C9.a

Recognize that astronauts (e.g., John Glenn, Neil Armstrong, Sally Ride) are explorers of space.

SS00-S2C1

Historical research is a process in which students examine topics or questions related to historical studies and/or current issues.

SS00-S2C1.a

Retell personal events to show an understanding of how history is the story of events, people, and places in the past.

SS00-S2C1.b

Listen to recounts of historical events and people and discuss how they relate to present day.

SS00-S2C1.c

Sequence recounts of historical events and people using the concepts of before and after.

SS00-S2C1.d

Use primary source materials (e.g., photos, artifacts) to study people and events from the past.

SS00-S2C2

The geographic, political, economic and cultural characteristics of early civilizations significantly influenced the development of later civilizations.

SS00-S2C2.a

Recognize that groups of people in early civilizations (e.g., people of the Americas, Europeans, Asians, Africans) moved from place to place to hunt and gather food.

SS00-S2C2.b

Recognize that early civilizations improved their lives through advancements (e.g., domestication of animals, tools, farming methods, calendars).

SS00-S2C5

Innovations, discoveries, exploration, and colonization accelerated contact, conflict, and interconnection among societies world wide, transforming and creating nations.

SS00-S2C5.a

Recognize that explorers (e.g., Marco Polo, Magellan) traveled to places in the world that were new to them.

SS00-S2C5.b

Recognize that exploration resulted in the exchange of ideas, culture, and goods (e.g., foods, animals, plants, artifacts).

SS00-S2C9

The nations of the contemporary world are shaped by their cultural and political past. Current events, developments and issues continue to shape the global community.

SS00-S2C9.a

Use information from written documents, oral presentations, and the media to discuss current events.

SS00-S3C1

The United States democracy is based on principles and ideals that are embodied by symbols, people and documents.

SS00-S3C1.a

a) American flag; b) Bald Eagle; c) Statue of Liberty ; d) White House.

SS00-S3C1.b

Recognize the Pledge of Allegiance and the National Anthem.

SS00-S3C1.c

a) Thanksgiving; b) Presidents' Day; c) Martin Luther King, Jr. Day; d) Constitution Day.

SS00-S3C1.d

Construct maps of a familiar place (e.g., classroom, bedroom, playground, neighborhood).

SS00-S3C1.e

Recognize that classmates have varied backgrounds but may share principles, goals, customs, and traditions.

SS00-S3C2

The United States structure of government is characterized by the separation and balance of powers.

SS00-S3C2.a

Identify the current President of the United States and Governor of Arizona.

SS00-S3C4

The rights, responsibilities and practices of United States citizenship are founded in the Constitution and the nation's history.

SS00-S3C4.a

Identify examples of responsible citizenship in the school setting and in stories about the past and present.

SS00-S3C4.b

a) elements of fair play, good sportsmanship, and the idea of treating others the way you want to be treated; b) importance of participation and cooperation in a classroom and community; c) why there are rules and the consequences for violating them; d) responsibility of voting (every vote counts).

SS00-S3C4.c

Discuss the importance of students contributing to a community (e.g., helping others, working together, cleaning up the playground).

SS00-S3C4.d

Identify people who help keep communities and citizens safe (e.g., police, firefighters, nurses, doctors).

SS00-S4C1

The spatial perspective and associated geographic tools are used to organize and interpret information about people, places and environments.

SS00-S4C1.a

Recognize the differences between maps and globes.

SS00-S4C1.b

Construct maps of a familiar place (e.g., classroom, bedroom, playground, neighborhood).

SS00-S4C1.c

Determine the relative location of objects using the terms near/far, behind/in front, over/under, left/right, up/down.

SS00-S4C1.d

Identify land and water on maps, illustrations, images, and globes.

SS00-S4C1.e

Locate continents and oceans on a map or globe.

SS00-S4C2

Places and regions have distinct physical and cultural characteristics.

SS00-S4C2.a

Recognize through images how people live differently in other places and times.

SS00-S4C3

Physical processes shape the Earth and interact with plant and animal life to create, sustain, and modify ecosystems. These processes affect the distribution of resources and economic development.

SS00-S4C3.a

Identify plants and animals in the local environment.

SS00-S4C3.b

Identify the basic properties of earth materials (rocks, soil, water; natural or man-made; reusable and recyclable).

SS00-S4C3.c

Understand the characteristics of weather and how it affects people.

SS00-S4C4

Human cultures, their nature, and distribution affect societies and the Earth.

SS00-S4C4.a

Discuss the food, clothing, housing, recreation, and celebrations practiced by cultural groups in the local community.

SS00-S4C4.b

Discuss how land in the students' community is used for industry, housing, business, agriculture, and recreation.

SS00-S4C4.c

Describe how people earn a living in the community and the places they work.

SS00-S4C5

Human and environmental interactions are interdependent upon one another. Humans interact with the environment- they depend upon it, they modify it; and they adapt to it. The health and well-being of all humans depends upon an understanding of the interconnections and interdependence of human and physical systems.

SS00-S4C5.a

Identify the origin of natural resources (e.g., fish from sea, minerals from the ground, wood from trees, food from farms).

SS00-S4C5.b

Recognize that resources are renewable, recyclable, and non-renewable.

SS00-S4C6

Geographic thinking (asking and answering geographic questions) is used to understand spatial patterns of the past, the present, and to plan for the future.

SS00-S4C6.a

Discuss geographic concepts related to current events.

SS00-S5C1

The foundations of economics are the application of basic economic concepts and decision-making skills. This includes scarcity and the different methods of allocation of goods and services.

SS00-S5C1.a

Discuss different types of jobs that people do.

SS00-S5C1.b

Match simple descriptions of work with the names of those jobs.

SS00-S5C1.c

Give examples of work activities that people do at home.

SS00-S5C1.d

Discuss differences between needs and wants.

SS00-S5C1.e

Recognize various forms of U.S. currency.

SS00-S5C1.f

Recognize that people use money to purchase goods and services.