Michigan Social Studies Standards — Grade 1


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1-C1.0.1.

Identify some reasons for rules in school (e.g., provide order, predictability, and safety).

1-C1.0.2.

Give examples of the use of power with authority in school (e.g., principal, teacher or bus driver enforcing school rules).

1-C1.0.3.

Give examples of the use of power without authority in school (e.g., types of bullying, taking cuts in line).

1-C2.0.1.

Explain how decisions can be made or how conflicts might be resolved in fair and just ways (e.g., majority rules).

1-C2.0.2.

Identify important symbols of the United States of America (e.g., Statue of Liberty, Uncle Sam, White House, Bald Eagle).

1-C5.0.1.

Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).

1-C5.0.2.

Identify situations in which people act as good citizens in the school community (e.g., thoughtful and effective participation in the school decisions, respect for the rights of others, respect for rule of law, voting, volunteering, compassion, courage, honesty).

1-E1.0.1.

Distinguish between producers and consumers of goods and services.

1-E1.0.2.

Describe ways in which families consume goods and services.

1-E1.0.3.

Using examples, explain why people cannot have everything they want (scarcity) and describe how people respond (choice).

1-E1.0.4.

Describe reasons why people voluntarily trade.

1-E1.0.5.

Describe ways in which people earn money (e.g., providing goods and services to others, jobs).

1-E1.0.6.

Describe how money simplifies trade.

1-G1.0.1.

Construct simple maps of the classroom to demonstrate aerial perspective.

1-G1.0.2.

Give examples of places that have absolute locations (e.g., home address, school address).

1-G1.0.3.

Use personal directions (left, right, front, back) to describe the relative location of significant places in the school environment.

1-G1.0.4.

Distinguish between landmasses and bodies of water using maps and globes.

1-G2.0.1.

Distinguish between physical (e.g., clouds, trees, weather) and human (e.g., buildings, playgrounds, sidewalks) characteristics of places.

1-G2.0.2.

Describe the unifying characteristics and/or boundaries of different school regions (e.g., playground, reading corner, library, restroom).

1-G4.0.1.

Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in family life.

1-G5.0.1.

Describe ways in which people modify (e.g., cutting down trees, building roads) and adapt to the environment (e.g., clothing, housing, transportation).

1-H2.0.1.

Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future using family or school events.

1-H2.0.2.

Use a calendar to distinguish among days, weeks, and months.

1-H2.0.3.

Investigate a family history for at least two generations, identifying various members and their connections in order to tell a narrative about family life.

1-H2.0.4.

Retell in sequence important ideas and details from stories about families or schools.

1-H2.0.5.

Use historical records and artifacts (e.g., photos, diaries, oral histories, and videos) to draw possible conclusions about family or school life in the past.

1-H2.0.6.

Compare life today with life in the past using the criteria of family, school, jobs, or communication.

1-H2.0.7.

Identify the events or people celebrated during United States national holidays and why we celebrate them (e.g., Independence Day, Constitution Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day; Presidents' Day).

1-P3.1.1.

Identify public issues in the school community.

1-P3.1.2.

Use graphic data to analyze information about a public issue in the school community.

1-P3.1.3.

Identify alternative resolutions to a public issue in the school community.

1-P3.3.1.

Express a position on a public policy issue in the school community and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

1-P4.2.1.

Develop and implement an action plan to address or inform others about a public issue.

1-P4.2.2.

Participate in projects to help or inform others.