Indiana Learning Standards for English Language Arts — Grade 4


Click on any standard to search for aligned resources. This data may be subject to copyright. You may download a CSV of the Indiana Learning Standards for English Language Arts if your intention constitutes fair use.


Plan, assess, and analyze learning aligned to these standards using Kiddom.

Learn more: How Kiddom Empowers Teachers.

4.ML.1

Identify how information found in electronic, print, and mass media is used to inform, persuade, entertain, and transmit culture.

4.ML.2.1

Recognize claims in print, image, and multimedia and identify evidence used to support these claims.

4.ML.2.2

Standard begins in fifth grade.

4.RF.1

Apply foundational reading skills to demonstrate reading fluency and comprehension.

4.RF.2.1

Students are expected to build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously.

4.RF.3.1

Students are expected to build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously.

4.RF.4.1

Students are expected to build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously.

4.RF.4.2

Use the six major syllable patterns (CVC, CVr, V, VV, VCe, Cle) to read unknown words.

4.RF.4.3

Students are expected to build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously.

4.RF.4.6

Use knowledge of all letter-sound correspondences, syllabication patterns, and morphology (e.g., roots and affixes) to read accurately unfamiliar multi-syllabic words in context.

4.RF.5

Orally read grade-level appropriate or higher texts smoothly and accurately, with expression that connotes comprehension at the independent level.

4.RL.1

Read and comprehend a variety of literature within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 4-5. By the end of grade 4, students interact with texts proficiently and independently at the low end of the range and with scaffolding as needed at the high end.

4.RL.2.1

Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what a text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

4.RL.2.2

Paraphrase or retell the main events in a story, myth, legend, or novel; identify the theme and provide evidence for the interpretation.

4.RL.2.3

Describe a character, setting, or event in a story or play, drawing on specific details in the text, and how that impacts the plot.

4.RL.2.4

Students are expected to build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously.

4.RL.3.1

Explain major differences between poems, plays, and prose, and refer to the structural elements of poems and drama.

4.RL.3.2

Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations.

4.RL.4.1

Describe how visual and multimedia presentations and representations can enhance the meaning of a text.

4.RL.4.2

Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes and topics and patterns of events in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

4.RN.1

Read and comprehend a variety of nonfiction within a range of complexity appropriate for grades 4-5. By the end of grade 4, students interact with texts proficiently and independently at the low end of the range and with scaffolding as needed at the high end.

4.RN.2.1

Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what a text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

4.RN.2.2

Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

4.RN.2.3

Explain the relationships between events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, based on specific information in the text.

4.RN.3.1

Apply knowledge of text features to locate information and gain meaning from a text (e.g., charts, tables, graphs, headings, subheadings, font/format).

4.RN.3.2

Describe the organizational structure (e.g., chronological, problem-solution, comparison/contrast, procedural, cause/effect, sequential, description) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.

4.RN.3.3

Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided in the accounts.

4.RN.4.1

Distinguish between fact and opinion; explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support a statement or position (claim) in a text.

4.RN.4.2

Combine information from two texts on the same topic in order to demonstrate knowledge about the subject.

4.RN.4.3

Standard begins at sixth grade.

4.RV.1

Build and use accurately general academic and content-specific words and phrases.

4.RV.2.1

Apply context clues (e.g., word, phrase, sentence, and paragraph clues) and text features (e.g., charts, headings/subheadings, font/format) to determine the meanings of unknown words.

4.RV.2.2

Identify relationships among words, including more complex homographs, homonyms, synonyms, antonyms, and multiple meanings.

4.RV.2.3

Standard begins at sixth grade.

4.RV.2.4

Apply knowledge of word structure elements (e.g., suffixes, prefixes, common Greek and Latin affixes and roots), known words, and word patterns to determine meaning.

4.RV.2.5

Consult reference materials, both print and digital (e.g., dictionary), to find the pronunciation and clarify the precise meanings of words and phrases.

4.RV.3.1

Determine how words and phrases provide meaning to works of literature, including figurative language (e.g., similes, metaphors, or hyperbole).

4.RV.3.2

Determine the meanings of general academic and content-specific words and phrases in a nonfiction text relevant to a fourth grade topic or subject area.

4.RV.3.3

Explain the meanings of proverbs, adages, and idioms in context.

4.SL.1

Listen actively and adjust the use of spoken language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

4.SL.2.1

Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) on grade-appropriate topics and texts, building on others ideas and expressing personal ideas clearly.

4.SL.2.2

Explore ideas under discussion by drawing on readings and other information.

4.SL.2.3

Demonstrate knowledge and use of agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles.

4.SL.2.4

Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others.

4.SL.2.5

Review the key ideas expressed and explain personal ideas in reference to the discussion.

4.SL.3.1

Summarize major ideas and supportive evidence from text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

4.SL.3.2

Identify and use evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.

4.SL.4.1

Using appropriate language, report on a topic or text or provide a narrative in an organized manner, with effective introductions and conclusions, using appropriate structure, appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly and concisely at an understandable pace.

4.SL.4.2

Create oral presentations that maintain a clear focus, using multimedia to enhance the development of main ideas and themes that engage the audience.

4.SL.4.3

Students are expected to build upon and continue applying conventions learned previously.

4.W.1

Write routinely over a variety of time frames and for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences; apply reading standards to support reflection and response to literature and nonfiction texts.

4.W.2.1

Write legibly in print or cursive, forming letters and words that can be read by others.

4.W.2.2

Students are expected to build upon and continue applying concepts learned previously.

4.W.3.1

Write persuasive compositions in a variety of forms that In an introductory statement, clearly state an opinion to a particular audience. Support the opinion with facts and details from various sources, including texts. Use an organizational structure to group related ideas that support the purpose. Connect opinion and reasons using words and phrases. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the position presented.

4.W.3.2

Write informative compositions on a variety of topics that Provide an introductory paragraph with a clear main idea. Provide supporting paragraphs with topic and summary sentences. Provide facts, specific details, and examples from various sources and texts to support ideas and extend explanations. Connect ideas using words and phrases. Include text features (e.g., formatting, pictures, graphics) and multimedia when useful to aid comprehension. Use language and vocabulary appropriate for audience and topic. Provide a concluding statement or section.

4.W.3.3

Write narrative compositions in a variety of forms that Establish an introduction, with a context to allow the reader to imagine the world of the event or experience. Organize events that unfold naturally, using meaningful paragraphing and transitional words and phrases. Use dialogue and descriptive details to develop events and reveal characters personalities, feelings, and responses to situations. Employ vocabulary with sufficient sensory (sight, sound, smell, touch, taste) details to give clear pictures of ideas and events. Provide an ending that follows the narrated experiences or events.

4.W.4

Apply the writing process to Generate a draft by developing, selecting and organizing ideas relevant to topic, purpose, and genre; revise to improve writing, using appropriate reference materials (e.g., quality of ideas, organization, sentence fluency, word choice); edit writing for format and conventions (e.g., spelling, capitalization, usage, punctuation). Use technology to interact and collaborate with others to publish legible documents.

4.W.5

Conduct short research on a topic. Identify a specific question to address (e.g., What is the history of the Indy 500?). Use organizational features of print and digital sources to efficiently to locate further information. Determine the reliability of the sources. Summarize and organize information in their own words, giving credit to the source. Present the research information, choosing from a variety of formats.

4.W.6.1

Demonstrate command of English grammar and usage, focusing on

4.W.6.1a

Nouns/Pronouns Writing sentences that include relative pronouns (e.g., who, which) and reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves) and explaining their functions in the sentence.

4.W.6.1b

Verbs Writing sentences that use the progressive verb tenses. Recognizing and correcting inappropriate shifts in verb tense. Using modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must).

4.W.6.1c

Adjectives/ Adverbs Writing sentences using relative adverbs (e.g., where, when) and explaining their functions in the sentence.

4.W.6.1d

Prepositions Writing sentences that include prepositions, explaining their functions in the sentence.

4.W.6.1e

Usage Writing correctly complete simple, compound, and complex declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences, using coordinating and subordinating conjunctions (e.g., yet, nor, so).

4.W.6.2

Demonstrate command of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling, focusing on

4.W.6.2a

Capitalization Capitalizing names of magazines, newspapers, works of art, musical compositions, organizations, and the first word in quotations, when appropriate.

4.W.6.2b

Punctuation Correctly using apostrophes to form possessives and contractions. Correctly using quotation marks and commas to mark direct speech. Using a comma before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence.

4.W.6.2c

Spelling Using spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts, homophones/homographs) in writing single and multisyllable words.