Ohio Learning Standards for Social Studies — Grade 11


Click on any standard to search for aligned resources. This data may be subject to copyright. You may download a CSV of the Ohio Learning Standards for Social Studies if your intention constitutes fair use.


Plan, assess, and analyze learning aligned to these standards using Kiddom.

Learn more: How Kiddom Empowers Teachers.

HS.1

Historical events provide opportunities to examine alternative courses of action.

HS.10

The rise of corporations, heavy industry, mechanized farming and technological innovations transformed the American economy from an agrarian to an increasingly urban industrial society.

HS.11

The rise of industrialization led to a rapidly expanding workforce. Labor organizations grew amidst unregulated working conditions, laissez-faire policies toward big business, and violence toward supporters of organized labor

HS.12

Immigration, internal migration and urbanization transformed American life.

HS.13

Following Reconstruction, old political and social structures reemerged and racial discrimination was institutionalized.

HS.14

The Progressive era was an effort to address the ills of American society stemming from industrial capitalism, urbanization and political corruption.

HS.15

As a result of overseas expansion, the Spanish-American War and World War I, the United States emerged as a world power.

HS.16

After WWI, the United States pursued efforts to maintain peace in the world. However, as a result of the national debate over the Versailles Treaty ratification and the League of Nations, the United States moved away from the role of world peacekeeper and limited its involvement in international affairs

HS.17

Racial intolerance, anti-immigrant attitudes and the Red Scare contributed to social unrest after World War I.

HS.18

An improved standard of living for many, combined with technological innovations in communication, transportation and industry, resulted in social and cultural changes and tensions.

HS.19

Movements such as the Harlem Renaissance, African-American migration, womens suffrage and Prohibition all contributed to social change.

HS.2

The use of primary and secondary sources of information includes an examination of the credibility of each source

HS.20

The Great Depression was caused, in part, by the federal governments monetary policies, stock market speculation, and increasing consumer debt. The role of the federal government expanded as a result of the Great Depression.

HS.21

During the 1930s, the U.S. government attempted to distance the country from earlier interventionist policies in the Western Hemisphere as well as retain an isolationist approach to events in Europe and Asia until the beginning of WWII.

HS.22

The United States mobilization of its economic and military resources during World War II brought significant changes to American society.

HS.23

Use of atomic weapons changed the nature of war, altered the balance of power and began the nuclear age.

HS.24

The United States followed a policy of containment during the Cold War in response to the spread of communism

HS.25

The Second Red Scare and McCarthyism reflected Cold War fears in American society.

HS.26

The Cold War and conflicts in Korea and Vietnam influenced domestic and international politics.

HS.27

The collapse of communist governments in Eastern Europe and the U.S.S.R. brought an end to the Cold War.

HS.28

Following World War II, the United States experienced a struggle for racial and gender equality and the extension of civil rights.

HS.29

The postwar economic boom, greatly affected by advances in science, produced epic changes in American life.

HS.3

Historians develop theses and use evidence to support or refute positions.

HS.30

The continuing population flow from cities to suburbs, the internal migrations from the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt, and the increase in immigration resulting from passage of the 1965 Immigration Act have had social and political effects.

HS.31

Political debates focused on the extent of the role of government in the economy, environmental protection, social welfare and national security.

HS.32

Improved global communications, international trade, transnational business organizations, overseas competition and the shift from manufacturing to service industries have impacted the American economy.

HS.33

The United States faced new political, national security and economic challenges in the post-Cold War world and following the attacks on September 11, 2001.

HS.4

Historians analyze cause, effect, sequence and correlation in historical events, including multiple causation and long- and short-term causal relations

HS.5

The Declaration of Independence reflects an application of Enlightenment ideas to the grievances of British subjects in the American colonies

HS.6

The Northwest Ordinance addressed a need for government in the Northwest Territory and established precedents for the future governing of the United States.

HS.7

Problems facing the national government under the Articles of Confederation led to the drafting of the Constitution of the United States. The framers of the Constitution applied ideas of Enlightenment in conceiving the new government.

HS.8

The Federalist Papers and the Anti-Federalist Papers structured the national debate over the ratification of the Constitution of the United States.

HS.9

The Bill of Rights is derived from English law, ideas of the Enlightenment, the experiences of the American colonists, early experiences of selfgovernment and the national debate over the ratification of the Constitution of the United States.

HS.AG.1

Opportunities for civic engagement with the structures of government are made possible through political and public policy processes.

HS.AG.10

Amendments 16 through 19 responded to calls for reform during the Progressive Era.

HS.AG.11

Four amendments have provided for extensions of suffrage to disenfranchised groups.

HS.AG.12

Five amendments have altered provisions for presidential election, terms, and succession to address changing historical circumstances.

HS.AG.13

Amendments 11, 21 and 27 have addressed unique historical circumstances.

HS.AG.14

Law and public policy are created and implemented by three branches of government; each functions with its own set of powers and responsibilities.

HS.AG.15

The political process creates a dynamic interaction among the three branches of government in addressing current issues.

HS.AG.16

In the United States, people have rights which protect them from undue governmental interference. Rights carry responsibilities which help define how people use their rights and which require respect for the rights of others.

HS.AG.17

Historically, the United States has struggled with majority rule and the extension of minority rights. As a result of this struggle, the government has increasingly extended civil rights to marginalized groups and broadened opportunities for participation.

HS.AG.18

The Ohio Constitution was drafted in 1851 to address difficulties in governing the state of Ohio.

HS.AG.19

As a framework for the state, the Ohio Constitution complements the federal structure of government in the United States

HS.AG.2

Political parties, interest groups and the media provide opportunities for civic involvement through various means.

HS.AG.20

Individuals in Ohio have a responsibility to assist state and local governments as they address relevant and often controversial problems that directly affect their communities.

HS.AG.21

A variety of entities within the three branches of government, at all levels, address public policy issues which arise in domestic and international affairs.

HS.AG.22

Individuals and organizations play a role within federal, state and local governments in helping to determine public (domestic and foreign) policy.

HS.AG.23

The federal government uses spending and tax policy to maintain economic stability and foster economic growth. Regulatory actions carry economic costs and benefits.

HS.AG.24

The Federal Reserve System uses monetary tools to regulate the nations money supply and moderate the effects of expansion and contraction in the economy

HS.AG.3

Issues can be analyzed through the critical use of information from public records, surveys, research data and policy positions of advocacy groups.

HS.AG.4

The processes of persuasion, compromise, consensus building and negotiation contribute to the resolution of conflicts and differences.

HS.AG.5

As the supreme law of the land, the U.S. Constitution incorporates basic principles which help define the government of the United States as a federal republic including its structure, powers and relationship with the governed.

HS.AG.6

The Federalist Papers and the Anti-Federalist Papers framed the national debate over the basic principles of government encompassed by the Constitution of the United States.

HS.AG.7

Constitutional government in the United States has changed over time as a result of amendments to the U.S. Constitution, Supreme Court decisions, legislation and informal practices.

HS.AG.8

The Bill of Rights was drafted in response to the national debate over the ratification of the Constitution of the United States

HS.AG.9

The Reconstruction Era prompted Amendments 13 through 15 to address the aftermath of slavery and the Civil War.

HS.AH.1

Historical events provide opportunities to examine alternative courses of action.

HS.AH.10

The rise of corporations, heavy industry, mechanized farming and technological innovations transformed the American economy from an agrarian to an increasingly urban industrial society.

HS.AH.11

The rise of industrialization led to a rapidly expanding workforce. Labor organizations grew amidst unregulated working conditions, laissez-faire policies toward big business, and violence toward supporters of organized labor

HS.AH.12

Immigration, internal migration and urbanization transformed American life.

HS.AH.13

Following Reconstruction, old political and social structures reemerged and racial discrimination was institutionalized.

HS.AH.14

The Progressive era was an effort to address the ills of American society stemming from industrial capitalism, urbanization and political corruption.

HS.AH.15

As a result of overseas expansion, the Spanish-American War and World War I, the United States emerged as a world power.

HS.AH.16

After WWI, the United States pursued efforts to maintain peace in the world. However, as a result of the national debate over the Versailles Treaty ratification and the League of Nations, the United States moved away from the role of world peacekeeper and limited its involvement in international affairs

HS.AH.17

Racial intolerance, anti-immigrant attitudes and the Red Scare contributed to social unrest after World War I.

HS.AH.18

An improved standard of living for many, combined with technological innovations in communication, transportation and industry, resulted in social and cultural changes and tensions.

HS.AH.19

Movements such as the Harlem Renaissance, African-American migration, womens suffrage and Prohibition all contributed to social change.

HS.AH.2

The use of primary and secondary sources of information includes an examination of the credibility of each source

HS.AH.20

The Great Depression was caused, in part, by the federal governments monetary policies, stock market speculation, and increasing consumer debt. The role of the federal government expanded as a result of the Great Depression.

HS.AH.21

During the 1930s, the U.S. government attempted to distance the country from earlier interventionist policies in the Western Hemisphere as well as retain an isolationist approach to events in Europe and Asia until the beginning of WWII.

HS.AH.22

The United States mobilization of its economic and military resources during World War II brought significant changes to American society.

HS.AH.23

Use of atomic weapons changed the nature of war, altered the balance of power and began the nuclear age.

HS.AH.24

The United States followed a policy of containment during the Cold War in response to the spread of communism

HS.AH.25

The Second Red Scare and McCarthyism reflected Cold War fears in American society.

HS.AH.26

The Cold War and conflicts in Korea and Vietnam influenced domestic and international politics.

HS.AH.27

The collapse of communist governments in Eastern Europe and the U.S.S.R. brought an end to the Cold War.

HS.AH.28

Following World War II, the United States experienced a struggle for racial and gender equality and the extension of civil rights.

HS.AH.29

The postwar economic boom, greatly affected by advances in science, produced epic changes in American life.

HS.AH.3

Historians develop theses and use evidence to support or refute positions.

HS.AH.30

The continuing population flow from cities to suburbs, the internal migrations from the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt, and the increase in immigration resulting from passage of the 1965 Immigration Act have had social and political effects.

HS.AH.31

Political debates focused on the extent of the role of government in the economy, environmental protection, social welfare and national security.

HS.AH.32

Improved global communications, international trade, transnational business organizations, overseas competition and the shift from manufacturing to service industries have impacted the American economy.

HS.AH.33

The United States faced new political, national security and economic challenges in the post-Cold War world and following the attacks on September 11, 2001.

HS.AH.4

Historians analyze cause, effect, sequence and correlation in historical events, including multiple causation and long- and short-term causal relations

HS.AH.5

The Declaration of Independence reflects an application of Enlightenment ideas to the grievances of British subjects in the American colonies

HS.AH.6

The Northwest Ordinance addressed a need for government in the Northwest Territory and established precedents for the future governing of the United States.

HS.AH.7

Problems facing the national government under the Articles of Confederation led to the drafting of the Constitution of the United States. The framers of the Constitution applied ideas of Enlightenment in conceiving the new government.

HS.AH.8

The Federalist Papers and the Anti-Federalist Papers structured the national debate over the ratification of the Constitution of the United States.

HS.AH.9

The Bill of Rights is derived from English law, ideas of the Enlightenment, the experiences of the American colonists, early experiences of selfgovernment and the national debate over the ratification of the Constitution of the United States.

HS.CWI.1

Trade, alliances, treaties and international organizations contribute to the increasing interconnectedness of nations and peoples in the 21st century.

HS.CWI.10

. Modern instances of genocide and ethnic cleansing present individual, organizational and national issues related to the responsibilities of participants and non-participants.

HS.CWI.11

Decisions about human activities made by individuals and societies have implications for both current and future generations, including intended and unintended consequences.

HS.CWI.12

Sustainability issues are interpreted and treated differently by people viewing them from various political, economic and cultural perspectives.

HS.CWI.13

International associations and nongovernmental organizations offer means of collaboration to address sustainability issues on local, national and international levels.

HS.CWI.14

The development and use of technology influences economic, political, ethical and social issues

HS.CWI.15

Technologies inevitably involve trade-offs between costs and benefits. Decisions about the use of products and systems can result in intended and unintended consequences.

HS.CWI.16

Nations seek to ensure the security of their geographic territories, political institutions, economic systems and ways of life. Maintaining security has political, social and economic costs

HS.CWI.17

Economic, political and social differences between global entities can lead to conflict unless mitigated through diplomacy or cooperative efforts.

HS.CWI.18

Individuals and organizations work within, or outside of, established systems of power, authority and governance to influence their own security and the security of others.

HS.CWI.19

The global economy creates advantages and disadvantages for different segments of the worlds population.

HS.CWI.2

Advances in communications technology have profound effects on the ability of governments, interest groups, individuals and the media to share information across national and cultural borders.

HS.CWI.20

Trade agreements, multinational organizations, embargoes and protectionism impact markets.

HS.CWI.21

The distribution of wealth and economic power among countries changes over time.

HS.CWI.22

The global economy creates interdependence so that economic circumstances in one country impact events in other countries.

HS.CWI.3

Individuals can evaluate media messages that are constructed using particular tools, characteristics and conventions for unique purposes. Different communication methods affect how people define and act on issues.

HS.CWI.4

Individuals can assess how effective communicators address diverse audiences

HS.CWI.5

Individuals can identify, assess and evaluate world events, engage in deliberative civil debate and influence public processes to address global issues.

HS.CWI.6

Effective civic participation involves identifying problems or dilemmas, proposing appropriate solutions, formulating action plans, and assessing the positive and negative results of actions taken.

HS.CWI.7

Individuals can participate through non-governmental organizations to help address humanitarian needs.

HS.CWI.8

Beliefs about civil and human rights vary among social and governmental systems.

HS.CWI.9

Nations and international organizations pursue their own interests on issues related to civil and human rights, resulting in both conflict and cooperation particularly as it relates to injustices against minority groups.

HS.EF.1

Economists analyze multiple sources of data to predict trends, make inferences and arrive at conclusions

HS.EF.10

Government actions, such as tariffs, quotas, subsidies, trade agreements and membership in multinational economic organizations, significantly impact international trade.

HS.EF.11

Income is determined by many factors including individual skills and abilities, work ethic and market conditions.

HS.EF.12

Employee earning statements include information about gross wages, benefits, taxes and other deductions.

HS.EF.13

Financial decision-making involves considering alternatives by examining costs and benefits.

HS.EF.14

A personal financial plan includes financial goals and a budget, including spending on goods and services, savings and investments, insurance and philanthropy

HS.EF.15

Different payment methods have advantages and disadvantages.

HS.EF.16

Saving and investing help to build wealth.

HS.EF.17

Savings can serve as a buffer against economic hardship.

HS.EF.18

Different costs and benefits are associated with saving and investing alternatives.

HS.EF.19

Banks, brokerages and insurance companies provide access to investments such as certificates of deposit, stocks, bonds and mutual funds.

HS.EF.2

Reading financial reports (bank statements, stock market reports, mutual fund statements) enables individuals to make and analyze decisions about personal finances.

HS.EF.20

There are costs and benefits associated with various sources of credit available from different types of financial institutions.

HS.EF.21

Credit and debt can be managed to maintain credit worthiness.

HS.EF.22

Consumer protection laws provide financial safeguards

HS.EF.23

Property and liability insurance protect against risks associated with use of property.

HS.EF.24

Health, disability and life insurance protect against risks associated with increased expenses and loss of income.

HS.EF.25

Steps can be taken to safeguard ones personal financial information and reduce the risk of loss.

HS.EF.3

People cannot have all the goods and services they want and, as a result, must choose some things and give up others

HS.EF.4

Different economic systems (traditional, market, command, and mixed) utilize different methods to allocate limited resources

HS.EF.5

Markets exist when consumers and producers interact. When supply or demand changes, market prices adjust. Those adjustments send signals and provide incentives to consumers and producers to change their own decisions.

HS.EF.6

Competition among sellers lowers costs and prices, and encourages producers to produce more of what consumers are willing and able to buy. Competition among buyers increases prices and allocates goods and services to those people who are willing and able to pay the most for them

HS.EF.7

A nations overall level of economic well-being is determined by the interaction of spending and production decisions made by all households, firms, government agencies and others in the economy. Economic wellbeing can be assessed by analyzing economic indicators gathered by the government

HS.EF.8

Economic policy decisions made by governments result in both intended and unintended consequences.

HS.EF.9

When regions and nations use comparative advantage to produce at the lowest cost and then trade with others, production, consumption and interdependence increase.

HS.MW.1

Historical events provide opportunities to examine alternative courses of action.

HS.MW.10

Imperial expansion had political, economic and social roots.

HS.MW.11

Imperialism involved land acquisition, extraction of raw materials, spread of Western values and direct political control.

HS.MW.12

The consequences of imperialism were viewed differently by the colonizers and the colonized.

HS.MW.13

Advances in technology, communication and transportation improved lives, but also had negative consequences.

HS.MW.14

The causes of World War I included militarism, imperialism, nationalism and alliances

HS.MW.15

The consequences of World War I and the worldwide depression set the stage for the Russian Revolution, the rise of totalitarianism, aggressive Axis expansion and the policy of appeasement which in turn led to World War II.

HS.MW.16

Oppression and discrimination resulted in the Armenian Genocide during World War I and the Holocaust, the state-sponsored mass murder of Jews and other groups, during World War II.

HS.MW.17

World War II devastated most of Europe and Asia, led to the occupation of Eastern Europe and Japan, and began the atomic age.

HS.MW.18

The United States and the Soviet Union became superpowers and competed for global influence.

HS.MW.19

Treaties and agreements at the end of World War II changed national boundaries and created multinational organizations.

HS.MW.2

The use of primary and secondary sources of information includes an examination of the credibility of each source.

HS.MW.20

Religious diversity, the end of colonial rule and rising nationalism have led to regional conflicts in the Middle East.

HS.MW.21

Postwar global politics led to the rise of nationalist movements in Africa and Southeast Asia.

HS.MW.22

Political and social struggles have resulted in expanded rights and freedoms for women and indigenous peoples.

HS.MW.23

The break-up of the Soviet Union ended the Cold War and created challenges for its former allies, the former Soviet republics, Europe, the United States and the non- aligned world.

HS.MW.24

Regional and ethnic conflicts in the post-Cold War era have resulted in acts of terrorism, genocide and ethnic cleansing.

HS.MW.25

Political and cultural groups have struggled to achieve self-governance and self- determination

HS.MW.26

Emerging economic powers and improvements in technology have created a more interdependent global economy

HS.MW.27

Proliferation of nuclear weapons has created a challenge to world peace.

HS.MW.28

The rapid increase of global population, coupled with an increase in life expectancy and mass migrations have created societal and governmental challenges.

HS.MW.29

Environmental concerns, impacted by population growth and heightened by international competition for the worlds energy supplies, have resulted in a new environmental consciousness and a movement for the sustainability of the worlds resources.

HS.MW.3

Historians develop theses and use evidence to support or refute positions.

HS.MW.4

Historians analyze cause, effect, sequence, and correlation in historical events, including multiple causation and long- and short-term causal relations.

HS.MW.5

The Scientific Revolution impacted religious, political, and cultural institutions by challenging how people viewed the world.

HS.MW.6

Enlightenment thinkers applied reason to discover natural laws guiding human nature in social, political and economic systems and institutions.

HS.MW.7

Enlightenment ideas challenged practices related to religious authority, absolute rule and mercantilism.

HS.MW.8

Enlightenment ideas on the relationship of the individual and the government influenced the American Revolution, French Revolution and Latin American wars for independence.

HS.MW.9

Industrialization had social, political and economic effects on Western Europe and the world.

HS.WG.1

Properties and functions of geographic representations (e.g., maps, globes, graphs, diagrams, Internet-based mapping applications, geographic information systems, global positioning systems, remote sensing, and geographic visualizations) affect how they can be used to represent, analyze and interpret geographic patterns and processes.

HS.WG.10

Activities and patterns of trade and communication create interdependence among countries in different regions (e.g., seed corn grown in Iowa and planted in South America, high-definition televisions manufactured in Japan and viewed in the United States, news outlets from many countries available around the world via the Internet, instant access to data affects stock markets in different countries).

HS.WG.11

Criteria are used to organize regions and as the criteria change, the identified regions change (e.g., types of economic activities, ethnic groups, natural vegetation).

HS.WG.12

The characteristics of regions change over time and there are consequences related to those changes (e.g., industrial belt to rust belt, pristine locations to tourist attractions, colony to independent state).

HS.WG.13

There are interconnections within and among physical and human regions (e.g., river systems, transportation linkages, common currency).

HS.WG.14

Regions are used as a basis to analyze global geographic issues (e.g., desertification, political disputes, economic unions).

HS.WG.15

Patterns of settlement change over time in terms of functions, sizes, and spatial patterns (e.g., a canal town becomes an industrial city, a rural area becomes a transportation hub, cities merge into a megalopolis).

HS.WG.16

Urbanization provides opportunities and challenges for physical and human systems in cities and their surrounding regions (e.g., development of suburbs, loss of habitat, central markets, squatter settlements on city outskirts, regional specialization in services or products, creation of ethnic enclaves).

HS.WG.17

Globalization has shaped new cultural, economic, and political ideas and entities (e.g., universal human rights, European Union, terrorist networks).

HS.WG.18

Globalization has cultural, economic, physical and political consequences (e.g., Internet access increases availability of information, outsourcing leads to regional unemployment, development of infrastructure impacts local ecosystems and economies, computer hacking into sensitive data bases leads to insecurity).

HS.WG.19

Global trade and communication systems reduce the effect of time on the distribution of goods, services, and information (e.g., reliance on local foods versus global trade in perishable foods, online brokering versus personal brokers, Internet access versus library access).

HS.WG.2

Geographic representations and geospatial technologies are used to investigate, analyze and communicate the results of geographic problem solving.

HS.WG.3

Human modifications of the physical environment in one place often lead to changes in other places (e.g., construction of a dam provides downstream flood control, construction of a city by-pass reduces commercial activity in the city center, implementation of dry farming techniques in a region leads to new transportation links and hubs).

HS.WG.4

Human societies use a variety of strategies to adapt to the opportunities and constraints presented by the physical environment (e.g., farming in flood plains and terraced farming, building hydroelectric plants by waterfalls and constructing hydroelectric dams, using solar panels as heat source and using extra insulation to retain heat).

HS.WG.5

Physical processes influence the formation and distribution of renewable, nonrenewable, and flow resources (e.g., tectonic activity plays a role in the formation and location of fossil fuels, erosion plays a role in the formation of sedimentary rocks, rainfall patterns affect regional drainage patterns).

HS.WG.6

There are costs and benefits of using renewable, nonrenewable, and flow resources (e.g., availability, sustainability, environmental impact, expense).

HS.WG.7

Human interaction with the environment is affected by cultural characteristics (e.g., plowing with oxen or with tractors, development of water resources for industry or recreation, resource conservation or development).

HS.WG.8

Physical, cultural, economic, and political factors contribute to human migrations (e.g., drought, religious conflicts, job opportunities, immigration laws).

HS.WG.9

Human migrations impact physical and human systems (e.g., stress on food supplies in refugee camps, removal of natural obstacles to movement, harvest productivity and migrant labor, calls for an official language in countries with high immigration, reduction in city tax revenues due to urban emigration).