Indiana Learning Standards for Mathematics — Grade 11


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A1.QE.3

Graph exponential and quadratic equations in two variables with and without technology.

AI.DS.1

Distinguish between random and non-random sampling methods, identify possible sources of bias in sampling, describe how such bias can be controlled and reduced, evaluate the characteristics of a good survey and well-designed experiment, design simple experiments or investigations to collect data to answer questions of interest, and make inferences from sample results.

AI.DS.2

Graph bivariate data on a scatter plot and describe the relationship between the variables.

AI.DS.3

Use technology to find a linear function that models a relationship for a bivariate data set to make predictions; interpret the slope and yintercept, and compute (using technology) and interpret the correlation coefficient.

AI.DS.4

Distinguish between correlation and causation.

AI.DS.5

Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns (including joint, marginal, and conditional relative frequencies) to describe possible associations and trends in the data.

AI.DS.6

Understand that statistics and data are non-neutral and designed to serve a particular interest. Analyze the possibilities for whose interest might be served and how the representations might be misleading.

AI.F.1

Understand that a function from one set (called the domain) to another set (called the range) assigns to each element of the domain exactly one element of the range. Understand that if f is a function and x is an element of its domain, then f(x) denotes the output of f corresponding to the input x. Understand the graph of f is the graph of the equation y = f(x).

AI.F.2

Describe qualitatively the functional relationship between two quantities by analyzing a graph (e.g., where the function is increasing or decreasing, linear or nonlinear, has a maximum or minimum value). Sketch a graph that exhibits the qualitative features of a function that has been verbally described. Identify independent and dependent variables and make predictions about the relationship.

AI.F.3

Identify the domain and range of relations represented in tables, graphs, verbal descriptions, and equations.

AI.F.4

Understand and interpret statements that use function notation in terms of a context; relate the domain of the function to its graph and to the quantitative relationship it describes.

AI.L.1

Understand that the steps taken when solving linear equations create new equations that have the same solution as the original. Solve fluently linear equations and inequalities in one variable with integers, fractions, and decimals as coefficients. Explain and justify each step in solving an equation, starting from the assumption that the original equation has a solution. Justify the choice of a solution method.

AI.L.10

Graph absolute value linear equations in two variables.

AI.L.11

Solve equations and formulas for a specified variable, including equations with coefficients represented by variables.

AI.L.2

Represent real-world problems using linear equations and inequalities in one variable and solve such problems. Interpret the solution and determine whether it is reasonable.

AI.L.3

Represent real-world and other mathematical problems using an algebraic proportion that leads to a linear equation and solve such problems.

AI.L.4

Represent linear functions as graphs from equations (with and without technology), equations from graphs, and equations from tables and other given information (e.g., from a given point on a line and the slope of the line).

AI.L.5

Represent real-world problems that can be modeled with a linear function using equations, graphs, and tables; translate fluently among these representations, and interpret the slope and intercepts.

AI.L.6

Translate among equivalent forms of equations for linear functions, including slope-intercept, point-slope, and standard. Recognize that different forms reveal more or less information about a given situation.

AI.L.7

Represent real-world problems using linear inequalities in two variables and solve such problems; interpret the solution set and determine whether it is reasonable. Solve other linear inequalities in two variables by graphing.

AI.L.8

Solve compound linear inequalities in one variable, and represent and interpret the solution on a number line. Write a compound linear inequality given its number line representation.

AI.L.9

Solve absolute value linear equations in one variable.

AI.QE.1

Distinguish between situations that can be modeled with linear functions and with exponential functions. Understand that linear functions grow by equal differences over equal intervals, and that exponential functions grow by equal factors over equal intervals. Compare linear functions and exponential functions that model real-world situations using tables, graphs, and equations.

AI.QE.2

Represent real-world and other mathematical problems that can be modeled with exponential functions using tables, graphs, and equations of the form y = ab^x (for integer values of x > 1, rational values of b > 0 and b 1 ); translate fluently among these representations and interpret the values of a and b.

AI.QE.4

Solve quadratic equations in one variable by inspection (e.g., for x^2 = 49), finding square roots, using the quadratic formula, and factoring, as appropriate to the initial form of the equation.

AI.QE.5

Represent real-world problems using quadratic equations in one or two variables and solve such problems with and without technology. Interpret the solution and determine whether it is reasonable.

AI.QE.6

Use the process of factoring to determine zeros, lines of symmetry, and extreme values in real-world and other mathematical problems involving quadratic functions; interpret the results in the real-world contexts.

AI.QE.7

Describe the relationships among the solutions of a quadratic equation, the zeros of the function, the x-intercepts of the graph, and the factors of the expression.

AI.RNE.1

Understand the hierarchy and relationships of numbers and sets of numbers within the real number system.

AI.RNE.2

Explain why the sum or product of two rational numbers is rational; that the sum of a rational number and an irrational number is irrational; and that the product of a nonzero rational number and an irrational number is irrational.

AI.RNE.3

Rewrite and evaluate numeric expressions with positive rational exponents using the properties of exponents.

AI.RNE.4

Simplify square roots of non-perfect square integers and algebraic monomials.

AI.RNE.5

Simplify algebraic rational expressions, with numerators and denominators containing monomial bases with integer exponents, to equivalent forms

AI.RNE.6

Factor common terms from polynomials and factor polynomials completely. Factor the difference of two squares, perfect square trinomials, and other quadratic expressions.

AI.RNE.7

Understand polynomials are closed under the operations of addition, subtraction, and multiplication with integers; add, subtract, and multiply polynomials and divide polynomials by monomials.

AI.SEI.1

Understand the relationship between a solution of a pair of linear equations in two variables and the graphs of the corresponding lines. Solve pairs of linear equations in two variables by graphing; approximate solutions when the coordinates of the solution are non-integer numbers.

AI.SEI.2

Understand that, given a system of two equations in two variables, replacing one equation by the sum of that equation and a multiple of the other produces a system with the same solutions. Solve pairs of linear equations in two variables using substitution and elimination.

AI.SEI.3

Write a system of two linear equations in two variables that represents a real-world problem and solve the problem with and without technology. Interpret the solution and determine whether the solution is reasonable.

AI.SEI.4

Represent real-world problems using a system of two linear inequalities in two variables and solve such problems; interpret the solution set and determine whether it is reasonable. Solve other pairs of linear inequalities by graphing with and without technology.

AII.CNE.1

Know there is an imaginary number, i, such that i^2 = -1, and every complex number can be written in the form a + bi, with a and b real. Use the relation i^2 = 1 and the commutative, associative, and distributive properties to add, subtract, and multiply complex numbers.

AII.CNE.2

Translate expressions between radical and exponent form and simplify them using the laws of exponents.

AII.CNE.3

Understand that rational expressions form a system analogous to the rational numbers, closed under addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division by a nonzero rational expression; add, subtract, multiply, and divide algebraic rational expressions.

AII.CNE.4

Rewrite algebraic rational expressions in equivalent forms (e.g., using laws of exponents and factoring techniques).

AII.CNE.5

Rewrite rational expressions in different forms; write a(x)/b(x) in the form q(x) + r(x)/b(x), where a(x), b(x), q(x), and r(x) are polynomials with the degree of r(x) less than the degree of b(x), using long division and synthetic division.

AII.CNE.6

Find partial sums of arithmetic and geometric series and represent them using sigma notation.

AII.DSP.1

Make inferences and justify conclusions from sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies. Recognize the purposes of and differences among sample surveys, experiments, and observational studies; explain how randomization relates to each.

AII.DSP.2

Use technology to find a linear, quadratic, or exponential function that models a relationship for a bivariate data set to make predictions; compute (using technology) and interpret the correlation coefficient.

AII.DSP.3

Organize, graph (e.g., line plots and box plots), and compare univariate data of two or more different data sets using measures of center (mean and median) and spread (range, inter-quartile range, standard deviation, percentiles, and variance). Understand the effects of outliers on the statistical summary of the data.

AII.DSP.4

Record multiple observations (or simulated samples) of random events and construct empirical models of the probability distributions. Construct a theoretical model and apply the law of large numbers to show the relationship between the two models.

AII.DSP.5

Understand dependent and independent events, and conditional probability; apply these concepts to calculate probabilities.

AII.DSP.6

Understand the multiplication counting principle, permutations, and combinations; apply these concepts to calculate probabilities.

AII.EL.1

Write arithmetic and geometric sequences both recursively and with an explicit formula; use them to model situations and translate between the two forms.

AII.EL.2

Graph exponential functions with and without technology. Identify and describe features, such as intercepts, zeros, domain and range, and asymptotic and end behavior.

AII.EL.3

Identify the percent rate of change in exponential functions written as equations, such as y = (1.02)^t, y = (0.97)^t, y = (1.01)12^t, y = (1.2)^t/10, and classify them as representing exponential growth or decay.

AII.EL.4

Use the properties of exponents to transform expressions for exponential functions (e.g., the expression 1.15^t can be rewritten as (1.15^1/12)^12t 1.012^12t to reveal the approximate equivalent monthly interest rate if the annual rate is 15%).

AII.EL.5

Know that the inverse of an exponential function is a logarithmic function. Represent exponential and logarithmic functions using graphing technology and describe their inverse relationship.

AII.EL.6

Use the laws of exponents to derive the laws of logarithms. Use the laws of logarithms and the inverse relationship between exponential functions and logarithms to evaluate expressions and solve equations in one variable.

AII.EL.7

Represent real-world problems using exponential equations in one or two variables and solve such problems with and without technology. Interpret the solutions and determine whether they are reasonable.

AII.F.1

Determine whether a relation represented by a table, graph, or equation is a function.

AII.F.2

Understand composition of functions and combine functions by composition.

AII.F.3

Understand that an inverse function can be obtained by expressing the dependent variable of one function as the independent variable of another, as f and g are inverse functions if and only if f(x)=y and g(y)=x, for all values of x in the domain of f and all values of y in the domain of g. Find the inverse of a function that has an inverse.

AII.F.4

Understand that if the graph of a function contains a point (a, b), then the graph of the inverse relation of the function contains the point (b, a); the inverse is a reflection over the line y = x.

AII.F.5

Describe the effect on the graph of f(x) by replacing f(x) with f(x) + k, k f(x), f(kx), and f(x + k) for specific values of k (both positive and negative) with and without technology. Find the value of k given the graph of f(x) and the graph of f(x) + k, k f(x), f(kx), or f(x + k).

AII.PR.1

Solve real-world and other mathematical problems involving polynomial equations with and without technology. Interpret the solutions and determine whether the solutions are reasonable.

AII.PR.2

Graph relations and functions including polynomial, square root, and piecewise-defined functions (including step functions and absolute value functions) with and without technology. Identify and describe features, such as intercepts, zeros, domain and range, end behavior, and lines of symmetry.

AII.PR.3

Solve real-world and other mathematical problems involving rational and radical functions, including direct, inverse, and joint variation. Give examples showing how extraneous solutions may arise.

AII.Q.1

Represent real-world problems that can be modeled with quadratic functions using tables, graphs, and equations; translate fluently among these representations. Solve such problems with and without technology. Interpret the solutions and determine whether they are reasonable.

AII.Q.2

Use completing the square to rewrite quadratic functions into the form y = a(x + h)^2 + k, and graph these functions with and without technology. Identify intercepts, zeros, domain and range, and lines of symmetry. Understand the relationship between completing the square and the quadratic formula.

AII.Q.3

Use the discriminant to determine the number and type of solutions of a quadratic equation in one variable with real coefficients; find all solutions and write complex solutions in the form of a bi for real numbers a and b.

AII.SE.1

Solve a system of equations consisting of a linear equation and a quadratic equation in two variables algebraically and graphically with and without technology (e.g., find the points of intersection between the line y = 3x and the circle x^2 + y^2 = 3).

AII.SE.2

Solve systems of two or three linear equations in two or three variables algebraically and using technology.

AII.SE.3

Represent real-world problems using a system of linear equations in three variables and solve such problems with and without technology. Interpret the solution and determine whether it is reasonable.

C.AD.1

Find the slope of a curve at a point, including points at which there are vertical tangents and no tangents.

C.AD.10

Find average and instantaneous rates of change. Understand the instantaneous rate of change as the limit of the average rate of change. Interpret a derivative as a rate of change in applications, including distance, velocity, and acceleration.

C.AD.11

Find the velocity and acceleration of a particle moving in a straight line.

C.AD.12

Model rates of change, including related rates problems.

C.AD.2

Find a tangent line to a curve at a point and a local linear approximation.

C.AD.3

Decide where functions are decreasing and increasing. Understand the relationship between the increasing and decreasing behavior of f and the sign of f'.

C.AD.4

Solve real-world and other mathematical problems finding local and absolute maximum and minimum points with and without technology.

C.AD.5

Analyze real-world problems modeled by curves, including the notions of monotonicity and concavity with and without technology.

C.AD.6

Find points of inflection of functions. Understand the relationship between the concavity of f and the sign of f'. Understand points of inflection as places where concavity changes.

C.AD.7

Use first and second derivatives to help sketch graphs modeling real-world and other mathematical problems with and without technology. Compare the corresponding characteristics of the graphs of f, f', and f'.

C.AD.8

Use implicit differentiation to find the derivative of an inverse function.

C.AD.9

Solve optimization real-world problems with and without technology.

C.AI.1

Find specific antiderivatives using initial conditions, including finding velocity functions from acceleration functions, finding position functions from velocity functions, and applications to motion along a line.

C.AI.2

Solve separable differential equations and use them in modeling real-world problems with and without technology.

C.AI.3

Solve differential equations of the form y' = ky as applied to growth and decay problems.

C.AI.4

Use definite integrals to find the area between a curve and the x-axis, or between two curves.

C.AI.5

Use definite integrals to find the average value of a function over a closed interval.

C.AI.6

Use definite integrals to find the volume of a solid with known cross-sectional area.

C.AI.7

Apply integration to model and solve (with and without technology) real-world problems in physics, biology, economics, etc., using the integral as a rate of change to give accumulated change and using the method of setting up an approximating Riemann Sum and representing its limit as a definite integral.

C.D.1

Understand the concept of derivative geometrically, numerically, and analytically, and interpret the derivative as a rate of change.

C.D.10

Understand and apply the relationship between differentiability and continuity.

C.D.11

Understand and apply the Mean Value Theorem.

C.D.2

State, understand, and apply the definition of derivative.

C.D.3

Find the derivatives of functions, including algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions.

C.D.4

Find the derivatives of sums, products, and quotients.

C.D.5

Find the derivatives of composite functions, using the chain rule.

C.D.6

Find the derivatives of implicitly-defined functions.

C.D.7

Find the derivatives of inverse functions.

C.D.8

Find second derivatives and derivatives of higher order.

C.D.9

Find derivatives using logarithmic differentiation.

C.I.1

Use rectangle approximations to find approximate values of integrals.

C.I.2

Calculate the values of Riemann Sums over equal subdivisions using left, right, and midpoint evaluation points.

C.I.3

Interpret a definite integral as a limit of Riemann Sums.

C.I.4

Understand the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus Interpret a definite integral of the rate of change of a quantity over an interval as the change of the quantity over the interval,

C.I.5

Use the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus to evaluate definite and indefinite integrals and to represent particular antiderivatives. Perform analytical and graphical analysis of functions so defined.

C.I.6

Understand and use these properties of definite integrals.

C.I.7

Understand and use integration by substitution (or change of variable) to find values of integrals.

C.I.8

Understand and use Riemann Sums, the Trapezoidal Rule, and technology to approximate definite integrals of functions represented algebraically, geometrically, and by tables of values.

C.LC.1

Understand the concept of limit and estimate limits from graphs and tables of values.

C.LC.10

Find the types of discontinuities of a function.

C.LC.11

Understand and use the Intermediate Value Theorem on a function over a closed interval.

C.LC.12

Understand and apply the Extreme Value Theorem If f(x) is continuous over a closed interval, then f has a maximum and a minimum on the interval.

C.LC.2

Find limits by substitution.

C.LC.3

Find limits of sums, differences, products, and quotients.

C.LC.4

Find limits of rational functions that are undefined at a point.

C.LC.5

Find limits at infinity.

C.LC.6

Decide when a limit is infinite and use limits involving infinity to describe asymptotic behavior. Find special limits lim ? 0 sin ? ?

C.LC.7

Find one-sided limits.

C.LC.8

Understand continuity in terms of limits.

C.LC.9

Decide if a function is continuous at a point.

FM.MA.1

Add, subtract, and multiply matrices of appropriate dimensions (i.e. up to 3x3 matrices). Multiply matrices by scalars. Calculate row and column sums for matrix equations.

FM.MA.2

Understand that the zero and identity matrices play a role in matrix addition and multiplication similar to the role of 0 and 1 in the real numbers.

FM.MA.3

Understand the determinant of a square matrix is nonzero if and only if the matrix has a multiplicative inverse.

FM.MA.4

Solve problems represented by matrices using row-reduction techniques and properties of matrix multiplication, including identity and inverse matrices.

FM.MA.5

Use matrices to solve real-world problems that can be modeled by a system of equations (i.e. up to 3 linear equations) in two or three variables using technology.

FM.MA.6

Build and use matrix representations to model polygons, transformations, and computer animations.

FM.N.1

Use networks, traceable paths, tree diagrams, Venn diagrams, and other pictorial representations to find the number of outcomes in a problem situation.

FM.N.2

Optimize networks in different ways and in different contexts by finding minimal spanning trees, shortest paths, and Hamiltonian paths including real-world problems.

FM.N.3

Use critical-path analysis in the context of scheduling problems and interpret the results.

FM.N.4

Construct and interpret directed and undirected graphs, decision trees, networks, and flow charts that model real-world contexts and problems.

FM.N.5

Use graph-coloring techniques to solve problems.

FM.N.6

Construct vertex-edge graph models involving relationships among a finite number of elements. Describe a vertex-edge graph using an adjacency matrix. Use vertex-edge graph models to solve problems in a variety of real-world settings.

FM.O.1

Use bin-packing techniques to solve problems of optimizing resource usage.

FM.O.2

Use geometric and algebraic techniques to solve optimization problems with and without technology.

FM.O.3

Use the Simplex method to solve optimization problems with and without technology.

FM.P.1

Use Markov chains to solve problems with and without technology.

FM.P.10

Use the relative frequency of a specified outcome of an event to estimate the probability of the outcome and apply the law of large numbers in simple examples.

FM.P.2

Understand and use the addition rule to calculate probabilities for mutually exclusive and nonmutually exclusive events.

FM.P.3

Understand and use the multiplication rule to calculate probabilities for independent and dependent events. Understand that two events A and B are independent if the probability of A and B occurring together is the product of their probabilities, and use this characterization to determine if they are independent.

FM.P.4

Understand the multiplication counting principle, permutations, and combinations; use them to solve real-world problems. Use simulations with and without technology to solve counting and probability problems.

FM.P.5

Calculate the probabilities of complementary events.

FM.P.6

Calculate the expected value of a random variable; interpret it as the mean of the probability distribution.

FM.P.7

Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts. Analyze probabilities to interpret odds and risk of events.

FM.P.8

Describe events as subsets of a sample space (the set of outcomes) using characteristics (or categories) of the outcomes, or as unions, intersections, or complements of other events.

FM.P.9

Develop a probability distribution for a random variable defined for a sample space in which theoretical probabilities can be calculated; find the expected value.

FM.S.1

Know and use the concepts of sets, elements, and subsets.

FM.S.2

Perform operations on sets (union, intersection, complement, cross product) and illustrate using Venn diagrams.

G.CI.1

Define, identify and use relationships among the following: radius, diameter, arc, measure of an arc, chord, secant, tangent, and congruent concentric circles.

G.CI.2

Derive using similarity the fact that the length of the arc intercepted by an angle is proportional to the radius; derive the formula for the area of a sector.

G.CI.3

Identify and describe relationships among inscribed angles, radii, and chords, including the following: the relationship that exists between central, inscribed, and circumscribed angles; inscribed angles on a diameter are right angles; and the radius of a circle is perpendicular to a tangent where the radius intersects the circle.

G.CI.4

Solve real-world and other mathematical problems that involve finding measures of circumference, areas of circles and sectors, and arc lengths and related angles (central, inscribed, and intersections of secants and tangents).

G.CI.5

Construct a circle that passes through three given points not on a line and justify the process used.

G.CI.6

Construct a tangent line to a circle through a point on the circle, and construct a tangent line from a point outside a given circle to the circle; justify the process used for each construction.

G.CI.7

Construct the inscribed and circumscribed circles of a triangle with or without technology, and prove properties of angles for a quadrilateral inscribed in a circle.

G.LP.1

Understand and describe the structure of and relationships within an axiomatic system (undefined terms, definitions, axioms and postulates, methods of reasoning, and theorems). Understand the differences among supporting evidence, counterexamples, and actual proofs.

G.LP.2

Know precise definitions for angle, circle, perpendicular line, parallel line, and line segment, based on the undefined notions of point, line, and plane. Use standard geometric notation.

G.LP.3

State, use, and examine the validity of the converse, inverse, and contrapositive of conditional (if then) and bi-conditional (if and only if) statements.

G.LP.4

Develop geometric proofs, including direct proofs, indirect proofs, proofs by contradiction and proofs involving coordinate geometry, using twocolumn, paragraphs, and flow charts formats.

G.PL.1

Identify, justify, and apply properties of planes.

G.PL.2

Describe the intersection of two or more geometric figures in the same plane.

G.PL.3

Prove and apply theorems about lines and angles, including the following: vertical angles are congruent; when a transversal crosses parallel lines, alternate interior angles are congruent, alternate exterior angles are congruent, and corresponding angles are congruent; when a transversal crosses parallel lines, same side interior angles are supplementary; and points on a perpendicular bisector of a line segment are exactly those equidistant from the endpoints of the segment

G.PL.4

Know that parallel lines have the same slope and perpendicular lines have opposite reciprocal slopes. Determine if a pair of lines are parallel, perpendicular, or neither by comparing the slopes in coordinate graphs and in equations. Find the equation of a line, passing through a given point, that is parallel or perpendicular to a given line.

G.PL.5

Explain and justify the process used to construct, with a variety of tools and methods (compass and straightedge, string, reflective devices, paper folding, dynamic geometric software, etc.), congruent segments and angles, angle bisectors, perpendicular bisectors, altitudes, medians, and parallel and perpendicular lines.

G.QP.1

Prove and apply theorems about parallelograms, including the following: opposite sides are congruent; opposite angles are congruent; the diagonals of a parallelogram bisect each other; and rectangles are parallelograms with congruent diagonals.

G.QP.2

Prove that given quadrilaterals are parallelograms, rhombuses, rectangles, squares or trapezoids. Include coordinate proofs of quadrilaterals in the coordinate plane.

G.QP.3

Find measures of interior and exterior angles of polygons. Explain and justify the method used.

G.QP.4

Identify types of symmetry of polygons, including line, point, rotational, and self-congruencies.

G.QP.5

Deduce formulas relating lengths and sides, perimeters, and areas of regular polygons. Understand how limiting cases of such formulas lead to expressions for the circumference and the area of a circle.

G.T.1

Prove and apply theorems about triangles, including the following: measures of interior angles of a triangle sum to 180; base angles of isosceles triangles are congruent; the segment joining midpoints of two sides of a triangle is parallel to the third side and half the length; the medians of a triangle meet at a point; a line parallel to one side of a triangle divides the other two proportionally, and conversely; the Pythagorean Theorem, using triangle similarity; and the isosceles triangle theorem and its converse.

G.T.10

Use trigonometric ratios (sine, cosine and tangent) and the Pythagorean Theorem to solve real-world and mathematical problems involving right triangles.

G.T.11

Use special right triangles (30 - 60 and 45 - 45) to solve real-world and mathematical problems.

G.T.2

Explain how the criteria for triangle congruence (ASA, SAS, and SSS) follow from the definition of congruence in terms of rigid motions.

G.T.3

Explain and justify the process used to construct congruent triangles with a variety of tools and methods (compass and straightedge, string, reflective devices, paper folding, dynamic geometric software, etc.).

G.T.4

Given two triangles, use the definition of similarity in terms of similarity transformations to decide if they are similar; explain using similarity transformations the meaning of similarity for triangles as the equality of all corresponding pairs of angles and the proportionality of all corresponding pairs of sides, and to establish the AA criterion for two triangles to be similar.

G.T.5

Use properties of congruent and similar triangles to solve real-world and mathematical problems involving sides, perimeters, and areas of triangles.

G.T.6

Prove and apply the inequality theorems, including the following: triangle inequality, inequality in one triangle, and the hinge theorem and its converse.

G.T.7

State and apply the relationships that exist when the altitude is drawn to the hypotenuse of a right triangle. Understand and use the geometric mean to solve for missing parts of triangles.

G.T.8

Develop the distance formula using the Pythagorean Theorem. Find the lengths and midpoints of line segments in one- or two-dimensional coordinate systems. Find measures of the sides of polygons in the coordinate plane; apply this technique to compute the perimeters and areas of polygons in real-world and mathematical problems.

G.T.9

Understand that by similarity, side ratios in right triangles are properties of the angles in the triangle, leading to definitions of trigonometric ratios for acute angles.

G.TR.1

Use geometric descriptions of rigid motions to transform figures and to predict and describe the results of translations, reflections and rotations on a given figure. Describe a motion or series of motions that will show two shapes are congruent.

G.TR.2

Understand a dilation takes a line not passing through the center of the dilation to a parallel line, and leaves a line passing through the center unchanged. Verify experimentally the properties of dilations given by a center and a scale factor. Understand the dilation of a line segment is longer or shorter in the ratio given by the scale factor.

G.TS.1

Describe relationships between the faces, edges, and vertices of three-dimensional solids. Create a net for a given three-dimensional solid. Describe the three-dimensional solid that can be made from a given net (or pattern).

G.TS.2

Describe symmetries of three-dimensional solids.

G.TS.3

Know properties of congruent and similar solids, including prisms, regular pyramids, cylinders, cones, and spheres; solve problems involving congruent and similar solids.

G.TS.4

Describe sets of points on spheres, including chords, tangents, and great circles.

G.TS.5

Solve real-world and other mathematical problems involving volume and surface area of prisms, cylinders, cones, spheres, and pyramids, including problems that involve algebraic expressions.

G.TS.6

Apply geometric methods to solve design problems (e.g., designing an object or structure to satisfy physical constraints or minimize cost; working with typographic grid systems based on ratios).

G.TS.7

Graph points on a three-dimensional coordinate plane. Explain how the coordinates relate the point as the distance from the origin on each of the three axes.

G.TS.8

Determine the distance of a point to the origin on the three-dimensional coordinate plane using the distance formula.

G.TS.9

Identify the shapes of two-dimensional cross-sections of three-dimensional objects, and identify three-dimensional objects generated by rotations of two-dimensional objects.

PC.EL.1

Use the definition of logarithms to convert logarithms from one base to another and prove simple laws of logarithms.

PC.EL.2

Use the laws of logarithms to simplify logarithmic expressions and find their approximate values.

PC.EL.3

Graph and solve real-world and other mathematical problems that can be modeled using exponential and logarithmic equations and inequalities; interpret the solution and determine whether it is reasonable.

PC.EL.4

Use technology to find a quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, or power function that models a relationship for a bivariate data set to make predictions; compute (using technology) and interpret the correlation coefficient.

PC.F.1

For a function that models a relationship between two quantities, interpret key features of graphs and tables in terms of the quantities, and sketch graphs showing key features given a verbal description of the relationship. Key features include: intercepts; intervals where the function is increasing, decreasing, positive, or negative; relative maximums and minimums; symmetries; end behavior; and periodicity.

PC.F.10

Describe the concept of the limit of a sequence and a limit of a function. Decide whether simple sequences converge or diverge. Recognize an infinite series as the limit of a sequence of partial sums.

PC.F.2

Find linear models by using median fit and least squares regression methods. Decide which among several linear models gives a better fit. Interpret the slope and intercept in terms of the original context.

PC.F.3

Recognize that sequences are functions, sometimes defined recursively, whose domain is a subset of the integers.

PC.F.4

Determine if a graph or table has an inverse, and justify if the inverse is a function, relation, or neither. Identify the values of an inverse function/relation from a graph or a table, given that the function has an inverse. Derive the inverse equation from the values of the inverse.

PC.F.5

Produce an invertible function from a non-invertible function by restricting the domain.

PC.F.6

Describe the effect on the graph of replacing f(x) by f(x) + k, k f(x),f(kx), and f(x + k) for specific values of k (both positive and negative). Find the value of k given the graph f(x) and the graph of f(x) + k, k f(x), f(kx), or f(x + k). Experiment with cases and illustrate an explanation of the effects on the graph using technology. Recognize even and odd functions from their graphs and algebraic expressions.

PC.F.7

Decide if a function is continuous at a point. Find the types of discontinuities of a function and relate them to finding limits of a function. Use the concept of limits to describe discontinuity and end-behavior of the function.

PC.F.8

Define arithmetic and geometric sequences recursively. Use a variety of recursion equations to describe a function. Model and solve word problems involving applications of sequences and series, interpret the solutions and determine whether the solutions are reasonable.

PC.F.9

Use iteration and recursion as tools to represent, analyze, and solve problems involving sequential change

PC.PCN.1

Calculate the distance between numbers in the complex plane as the modulus of the difference, and the midpoint of a segment as the average of the numbers at its endpoints.

PC.PCN.2

Understand and use complex numbers, including real and imaginary numbers, on the complex plane in rectangular and polar form, and explain why the rectangular and polar forms of a given complex number represent the same number.

PC.PCN.3

Understand and use addition, subtraction, multiplication, and conjugation of complex numbers, including real and imaginary numbers, on the complex plane in rectangular and polar form.

PC.PCN.4

State, prove, and use DeMoivres Theorem.

PC.PE.1

Convert between a pair of parametric equations and an equation in x and y. Model and solve problems using parametric equations.

PC.PE.2

Analyze planar curves, including those given in parametric form.

PC.QPR.1

Use the method of completing the square to transform any quadratic equation into an equation of the form (x p)^2 = q that has the same solutions. Derive the quadratic formula from this form.

PC.QPR.2

Graph rational functions with and without technology. Identify and describe features such as intercepts, domain and range, and asymptotic and end behavior.

PC.QPR.3

Know and apply the Remainder Theorem: For a polynomial p(x) and a number a, the remainder on division by x a is p(a), so p(a) = 0 if and only if (x a) is a factor of p(x).

PC.QPR.4

Understand the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra. Find a polynomial function of lowest degree with real coefficients when given its roots.

PS.DA.1

Create, compare, and evaluate different graphic displays of the same data, using histograms, frequency polygons, cumulative frequency distribution functions, pie charts, scatterplots, stem-and-leaf plots, and box-and-whisker plots. Draw these with and without technology.

PS.DA.10

Use data from a sample survey to estimate a population mean or proportion; develop a margin of error through the use of simulation models for random sampling

PS.DA.11

Find linear models by using median fit and least squares regression methods to make predictions. Decide which among several linear models gives a better fit. Interpret the slope and intercept in terms of the original context. Informally assess the fit of a function by plotting and analyzing residuals.

PS.DA.12

Evaluate reports based on data by considering the source of the data, the design of the study, the way the data are analyzed and displayed, and whether the report confuses correlation with causation. Distinguish between correlation and causation.

PS.DA.2

Compute and use mean, median, mode, weighted mean, geometric mean, harmonic mean, range, quartiles, variance, and standard deviation. Use tables and technology to estimate areas under the normal curve. Fit a data set to a normal distribution and estimate population percentages. Recognize that there are data sets not normally distributed for which such procedures are inappropriate.

PS.DA.3

Understand the central limit theorem and use it to solve problems.

PS.DA.4

Understand hypothesis tests of means and differences between means and use them to reach conclusions. Compute and use confidence intervals to make estimates. Construct and interpret margin of error and confidence intervals for population proportions.

PS.DA.5

Recognize how linear transformations of univariate data affect shape, center, and spread.

PS.DA.6

Construct and interpret two-way frequency tables of data when two categories are associated with each object being classified. Use the two-way table as a sample space to decide if events are independent and to approximate conditional probabilities.

PS.DA.7

Decide if a specified model is consistent with results from a given data-generating process, e.g., using simulation.

PS.DA.8

Understand the meaning of measurement data and categorical data, of univariate and bivariate data, and of the term variable.

PS.DA.9

Understand statistics and use sampling distributions as a process for making inferences about population parameters based on a random sample from that population.

PS.ED.1

Formulate questions that can be addressed with data. Collect, organize, and display relevant data to answer the questions formulated.

PS.ED.2

Use election theory techniques to analyze election data. Use weighted voting techniques to decide voting power within a group.

PS.ED.3

Construct simulated sampling distributions of sample proportions and use sampling distributions to identify which proportions are likely to be found in a sample of a given size.

PS.ED.4

Use simulations to explore the variability of sample statistics from a known population and to construct sampling distributions.

PS.ED.5

Model and solve real-world problems using the geometric distribution or waiting-time distribution, with or without technology.

PS.ED.6

Model and solve real-world problems involving patterns using recursion and iteration, growth and decay, and compound interest.

PS.ED.7

Understand and apply basic ideas related to the design, analysis, and interpretation of surveys and sampling, such as background information, random sampling, causality and bias.

PS.ED.8

Understand how basic statistical techniques are used to monitor process characteristics in the workplace.

PS.ED.9

Understand the differences among various kinds of studies and which types of inferences can legitimately be drawn from each.

PS.P.1

Understand and use the addition rule to calculate probabilities for mutually exclusive and nonmutually exclusive events.

PS.P.10

Describe events as subsets of a sample space (the set of outcomes) using characteristics (or categories) of the outcomes, or as unions, intersections, or complements of other events.

PS.P.2

Understand and use the multiplication rule to calculate probabilities for independent and dependent events. Understand that two events A and B are independent if the probability of A and B occurring together is the product of their probabilities, and use this characterization to determine if they are independent.

PS.P.3

Understand the multiplication counting principle, permutations, and combinations; use them to solve real-world problems. Use simulations with and without technology to solve counting and probability problems.

PS.P.4

Calculate the probabilities of complementary events.

PS.P.5

Calculate the expected value of a random variable; interpret it as the mean of the probability distribution.

PS.P.6

Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts. Analyze probabilities to interpret odds and risk of events.

PS.P.7

Define a random variable for a quantity of interest by assigning a numerical value to each event in a sample space; graph the corresponding probability distribution using the same graphical displays as for data distributions.

PS.P.8

Develop a probability distribution for a random variable defined for a sample space in which theoretical probabilities can be calculated; Compute and interpret the expected value of random variables.

PS.P.9

Derive the binomial theorem by combinatorics. Use combinatorial reasoning to solve problems.

QR. RP.2

Understand and communicate percentages as rates per 100, and identify uses and misuses of percentages related to a proper understanding of the base in real-world and mathematical problems

QR. RP.6

Determine the constant of proportionality in proportional situations (both real-life and mathematical), leading to a symbolic model for the situation (i.e. an equation based upon a rate of change, y = kx).

QR. S.1

Analyze statistical information from studies, surveys, and polls (including when reported in condensed form or using summary statistics) to make informed judgments as to the validity of claims or conclusions, such as when interpreting and comparing the results of polls using margin of error.

QR. S.2

Identify limitations, strengths, or lack of information in studies, including data collection methods (e.g. sampling, experimental, observational) and possible sources of bias, and identify errors or misuses of statistics to justify particular conclusions.

QR. S.3

Create (with and without technology) and use visual displays of real world data, such as charts, tables and graphs.

QR. S.4

Interpret and analyze visual representations of data, and describe strengths, limitations, and fallacies of various graphical displays.

QR. S.6

Summarize, represent, and interpret data sets on a single count or measurement variable using plots and statistics appropriate to the shape of the data distribution to represent it.

QR. S.7

Compare center, shape, and spread of two or more data sets and interpret the differences in context

QR.M.1

Analyze and critique mathematical models and be able to describe their limitations, including distinguishing between correlation and causation and determine whether interpolation and/or extrapolation are appropriate.

QR.M.2

Use models, including models created with spreadsheets or other tools, to estimate solutions to contextual questions, such as functional models to estimate future population or spreadsheets to model financial applications (e.g. credit card debt, installment savings, amortization schedules, mortgage and other loan scenarios). Identify patterns and identify how changing parameters affect the results.

QR.M.3

Choose and create, with and without technology, linear, exponential, logistic, or periodic models and curves of best fit for bivariate data sets. Use the models to answer questions and draw conclusions or make decisions, addressing limitations and long-term ramifications of chosen models when appropriate. Recognize when a change in model is needed.

QR.M.4

Analyze real-world problem situations and use variables to construct and solve equations involving one or more unknown or variable quantities to answer questions about the situations, such as creating spreadsheet formulas to calculate prices based on percentage mark-up or solving formulas for specified values. Demonstrate understanding of the meaning of a solution. Identify when there is insufficient information given to solve a problem.

QR.M.5

Apply geometric concepts to model situations and solve problems such as those arising in art, architecture, and other fields.

QR.M.6

The student uses a variety of network models represented graphically to organize data in quantitative situations, make informed decisions, and solve problems, such as in scheduling or routing situations that can be modeled using different methods, e.g., vertex-edge graphs using critical paths, Euler paths, or minimal spanning trees.

QR.N.1

Represent quantities in equivalent forms (fractions, decimals, and percentages) to investigate and describe quantitative relationships and solve real-world problems in a variety of contexts. Compare the size of numbers in different forms arising in authentic real-world contexts, such as growth expressed as a fraction versus as a percentage. Interpret the meaning of numbers in different forms, such as the meaning of a fraction or the meaning of a percentage greater than 100 and its validity in a given context. Recognize incorrect or deceptive uses of fractions, decimals, or percentages.

QR.N.2

Solve problems involving calculations with percentages and interpret the results, such as calculating percentage rates or differentiating between a discount of 30% and two consecutive discounts of 15%. Calculate relative change and explain how it differs from absolute change. Recognize incorrect or deceptive uses of percentages

QR.N.3

Interpret numbers in different forms in terms of authentic contexts to solve real-world problems, such as interpreting a growth rate less than 1%. Compare and precisely communicate with numbers in different forms (including words, fractions, decimals, standard notation, and scientific notation), such as comparing relative and absolute changes in quantities.

QR.N.4

Compare magnitudes of numbers in context, such as the population of the US compared to the population of the world. Perform such comparisons when numbers are in different forms (including words, fractions, decimals, standard notation, and scientific notation).

QR.N.5

Perform accurate and efficient calculations using large and small numbers in different forms, to an appropriate precision, with and without technology. Include calculations in context, such as ratios representing water use per capita for a large population.

QR.N.6

Use estimation skills, and know why, how, and when to estimate results. Identify and use numeric benchmarks for estimating calculations (e.g., using 25% as an estimate for 23%). Identify and use contextual benchmarks for comparison to other numbers (e.g., using US population as a benchmark to evaluate reasonableness of statistical claims or giving context to numbers). Check for reasonableness using both types of benchmarks.

QR.N.7

Use dimensional analysis to convert between units of measurements and to solve problems involving multiple units of measurement, such as converting between currencies, calculating the cost of gasoline to drive a given car a given distance, or calculating dosages of medicine.

QR.P.1

Determine the nature and number of elements in a finite sample space to model the outcomes of real-world events using counting techniques, and build the sample space by making lists, tables, or tree diagrams.

QR.P.2

Determine the number of ways an event may occur using the Fundamental Counting Principle.

QR.P.3

Evaluate the validity of claims based on empirical, theoretical, and subjective probabilities. Draw conclusions or make decisions related to risk, pay-off, expected value, and false negatives/positives in various probabilistic contexts.

QR.P.4

Use data displays and models, such as two-way tables, tree diagrams, Venn diagrams, and area models, to determine probabilities (including conditional probabilities) and use these probabilities to make informed decisions.

QR.RP.1

Solve real-life problems requiring interpretation and comparison of complex numeric summaries which extend beyond simple measures of center, such as problems requiring interpreting and/or comparing weighted averages, indices, coding, and ranking. Evaluate claims based on complex numeric summaries

QR.RP.3

Solve real-life problems requiring interpretation and comparison of various representations of ratios, (i.e. fractions, decimals, rate, and percentages), such as problems that involve non-standard ratios (e.g., media and risk reporting ) or part-to-part versus part-to-whole ratios taken from meaningful context.

QR.RP.4

Analyze growth and decay using absolute and relative change and make comparisons using absolute and relative difference.

QR.RP.5

Distinguish between proportional and non-proportional situations, and, when appropriate, apply proportional reasoning, such as when solving for an unknown quantity in proportional situations; solving real-life problems requiring conversion of units using dimensional analysis; or applying scale factors to perform indirect measurements (e.g., maps, blueprints, concentrations, dosages, and densities). Recognize when proportional techniques do not apply.

QR.S.5

Read, interpret, and make decisions about data summarized numerically using measures of center and spread, in tables, and in graphical displays (line graphs, bar graphs, scatterplots, and histograms), e.g., explain why the mean may not represent a typical salary; explain the difference between bar graphs and histograms; critique a graphical display by recognizing that the choice of scale can distort information.

QR.S.8

Use properties of distributions, including uniform and normal distributions, to analyze data and answer questions

QR.S.9

Recognize when data are normally distributed and use the mean and standard deviation of the data to fit it to a normal distribution.

TR.CO.1

Determine how the graph of a parabola changes if a, b and c changes in the equation y = a(x b)^2 + c. Find an equation for a parabola when given sufficient information.

TR.CO.2

Derive the equation of a parabola given a focus and directrix.

TR.CO.3

Derive the equation of a circle of given center and radius using the Pythagorean Theorem; complete the square to find the center and radius of a circle given by an equation.

TR.CO.4

Derive the equations of ellipses and hyperbolas given the foci, using the fact that the sum or difference of distances from the foci is constant.

TR.CO.5

Graph conic sections. Identify and describe features like center, vertex or vertices, focus or foci, directrix, axis of symmetry, major axis, minor axis, and eccentricity.

TR.CO.6

Give an informal argument for the formulas for the circumference of a circle, area of a circle, volume of a cylinder, pyramid, and cone. Use dissection arguments, Cavalieris principle, and informal limit arguments.

TR.G.1

Solve real-world problems with and without technology that can be modeled using right triangles, including problems that can be modeled using trigonometric ratios. Interpret the solutions and determine whether the solutions are reasonable.

TR.G.2

Explain and use the relationship between the sine and cosine of complementary angles.

TR.G.3

Use special triangles to determine the values of sine, cosine, and tangent for /3, /4, and /6. Apply special right triangles to the unit circle and use them to express the values of sine, cosine, and tangent for x, + x, and 2 x in terms of their values for x, where x is any real number.

TR.G.4

Prove the Laws of Sines and Cosines and use them to solve problems.

TR.G.5

Understand and apply the Laws of Sines and Cosines to solve real-world and other mathematical problems involving right and non-right triangles.

TR.G.6

Derive the formula A = 1/2 ab sin(C) for the area of a triangle by drawing an auxiliary line. Use the formula to find areas of triangles.

TR.ID.1

Prove the Pythagorean identity sin^2(x) + cos^2(x) = 1 and use it to find trigonometric ratios, given sin(x), cos(x), or tan(x), and the quadrant of the angle.

TR.ID.2

Verify basic trigonometric identities and simplify expressions using these and other trigonometric identities.

TR.PC.1

Define polar coordinates and relate polar coordinates to Cartesian coordinates.

TR.PC.2

Translate equations from rectangular coordinates to polar coordinates and from polar coordinates to rectangular coordinates. Graph equations in the polar coordinate plane.

TR.PF.1

Find a sinusoidal function to model a data set and explain the parameters of the model.

TR.PF.2

Graph trigonometric functions with and without technology. Use the graphs to model and analyze periodic phenomena, stating amplitude, period, frequency, phase shift, and midline (vertical shift).

TR.PF.3

Construct the inverse trigonometric functions of sine, cosine, and tangent by restricting the domain.

TR.PF.4

Use inverse functions to solve trigonometric equations that arise in modeling contexts; evaluate the solutions using technology, and interpret them in terms of the context.

TR.PF.5

Prove the addition and subtraction formulas for sine, cosine, and tangent. Use the formulas to solve problems.

TR.PF.6

Prove the double- and half-angle formulas for sine, cosine, and tangent. Use the formulas to solve problems.

TR.PF.7

Define and use the trigonometric ratios (sine, cosine, tangent, cotangent, secant, cosecant) in terms of angles of right triangles and the coordinates on the unit circle

TR.UC.1

Understand radian measure of an angle as the length of the arc on the unit circle subtended by the angle

TR.UC.2

Explain how the unit circle in the coordinate plane enables the extension of trigonometric functions to all real numbers, interpreted as radian measures of angles traversed counterclockwise around the unit circle.

TR.UC.3

Use the unit circle to explain symmetry (odd and even) and periodicity of trigonometric functions.

TR.V.1

Solve problems involving velocity and other quantities that can be represented by vectors.

TR.V.2

Represent scalar multiplication graphically by scaling vectors and possibly reversing their direction; perform scalar multiplication component-wise, e.g., as c(vx, vy) = (cvx, cvy).

TR.V.3

Compute the magnitude of a scalar multiple cv using ||cv|| = |c|v. Compute the direction of cv knowing that when |c|v 0, the direction of cv is either along v (for c > 0) or against v (for c < 0).