Washington State K-12 Social Studies Learning Standards — Grade 3


Click on any standard to search for aligned resources. This data may be subject to copyright. You may download a CSV of the Washington State K-12 Social Studies Learning Standards if your intention constitutes fair use.


Plan, assess, and analyze learning aligned to these standards using Kiddom.

Learn more: How Kiddom Empowers Teachers.

3.1.1.1

Understands the key ideals of unity and diversity. Examples: Explains that the community is made up of people from various cultures. Explains the benefits of diversity for a community, including the increased range of viewpoints, ideas, customs, and choices available. Suggested Unit: Cultures in our Community

3.1.1.2

Understands and applies the key ideals of unity and diversity within the context of the community. Examples: Explains the diverse perspectives of cultural groups in the community. Contributes ones own diverse cultural perspective to the classroom community. Suggested Unit: Cultures in Our Community

3.1.2.1

This component is addressed in grades K, 1, and 3 12.

3.1.3.1

This component is addressed in grades 6 12.

3.1.4.1

This component is addressed in grades 2, 4-8, and 11-12.

3.2.1.1

This component is addressed in grades 1, 2, and 4 - 12.

3.2.2.1

Understands how the economic systems of groups are influenced by laws, values, and customs. Examples: Explains how the farming and herding practices of Eastern Woodland peoples reflected how they viewed their environment. Explains how the basket and rug-weaving customs of the Southwest tribes contributed to their economy through trade. Compares how laws, values, and customs affected the ways in which Pueblo tribes and Plains tribes built homes; produced, gathered, or hunted food; and made clothing and tools. Suggested Unit: First Nations of North America OSPI-developed Assessment: Meeting Needs and Wants

3.2.3.1

This component is addressed in grades 5 12.

3.2.4.1

This component is addressed in grades 4, and 6 12.

3.3.1.1

Understands and applies how maps and globes are used to display the regions of North America in the past and present. Examples: Uses maps to identify physical features of the regions where the Plains and Eastern Woodland Indians lived. Explains the regions of North America based on current and historical maps. Uses maps of North America to explain the interaction between indigenous peoples and their environment. Suggested Unit: First Nations of North America OSPI-developed Assessment: Humans and the Environment

3.3.1.2

Understands the physical, political, and cultural characteristics of places, regions, and people in North America, including the location of the fifty states within the regions of the U.S. Examples: Explains the physical geography, including landforms and climate, of Mexico, Canada, and the U.S. Explains the unique cultural characteristics of regions in North America, including language, food, customs, religion, stories, music, and art. Explains which states are located in the southwest region of the United States. Suggested Unit: Cultures of North America

3.3.2.1

Understands how the environment affects cultural groups and how cultural groups affect the environment. Examples: Explains how the environment influenced the development of a native cultures lifestyle, traditions, and beliefs. Explains ways native people affected their environment as they met their needs. Uses different maps, such as climate and vegetation maps, to explain the interaction between native people and their environment. Suggested Unit: First Nations of North America OSPI-Developed Assessment: Humans and the Environment

3.3.2.2

Understands the cultural universals of place, time, family life, economics, communication, arts, recreation, food, clothing, shelter, transportation, government, and education. Examples: Explains the variety of ways that people in North America use language to communicate, including spoken, written, sign, and body language in the past or present. Compares the forms of literature, music, art, dance, and games that belong to cultures in Mexico, Canada, and the United States. Compares the traditions, beliefs, and values of cultural groups in North America. Explains how children gain knowledge formally through school and informally through family, friends, and media. Explains how people make a living in different communities. Explains the variety of ways that people in ones community use money or trade to meet their needs and wants. Suggested Unit: Cultures in Our Community OSPI-Developed Assessment: Cultural Contributions

3.3.3.1

Explains that learning about the geography of North America helps us understand cultures from around the world. Examples: Explains that cultural groups in North America have traditions, beliefs, and celebrations that have been brought from countries all around the world. Suggested Unit: Cultures of North America

3.4.1.1

This component is addressed in grades K 2, and 4 11.

3.4.2.2

Understands how contributions made by various cultural groups have shaped the history of the community and world. Page 37 Examples: Explains the technology, art, and music contributions made by the Southwest native tribes and the Eastern Woodland native tribes. Compares the contributions to transportation made by the Northern Plains native tribes with those of the Southeast native tribes. Compare the contributions that people from Mexico, Canada, or other countries have made to art, food, music, literature, and sports in your community. Explains the contributions that Asian immigrants have made to strawberry farming in Bainbridge Island. Explains the contributions that Hispanic workers have made to farming in the Yakima Valley. Suggested Unit: Cultures in Our Community OSPI-Developed Assessment: Cultural Contributions

3.4.3.1

This component is addressed in grades 4 12.

3.4.4.1

This component is addressed in grades 1, and 4 12.

3.5.1.2

Evaluates if information is clear, specific, and detailed. Examples: Determines whether there are details to support a conclusion about tools as a cultural contribution of the Eastern Woodlands tribe. Determines whether there are details to support a conclusion about apple farming as a contribution of Japanese Americans in your community. Determines whether a conclusion on the cultural contribution of the Eastern Woodlands tribes is clearly stated. Suggested Unit: Cultures in Our Community OSPI-developed Assessment: Cultural Contributions

3.5.2.2

Uses a graphic organizer to organize main ideas and supporting details from visuals and literary, narrative, informational, and expository texts. Page 38 Examples: Uses a graphic organizer to organize main ideas and supporting details from sources on the cultural contributions of Eastern Woodland tribes. Uses a graphic organizer to organize main ideas and supporting details from sources on the cultural contributions of Northern Plains tribes and Southeast tribes. Suggested Unit: First Nations of North America OSPI-developed Assessments: Meeting Needs and Wants; Humans and the Environment; Cultural Contributions

3.5.3.1

Engages in discussions that attempt to answer questions about cultural similarities and differences. Examples: Engages in discussion on creation legends to learn about the differences in tribes beliefs. Engages in discussion to learn about the different ways tribes affected their environments as they met their needs. Suggested Unit: First Nations of North America OSPI-developed Assessment: Humans and the Environment

3.5.4.1

Draws conclusions using at least two clear, specific, and accurate examples in a paper or presentation. Examples: Draws a conclusion using at least two clear, specific, and accurate examples in a paper about the trading systems of different tribes. Draws a conclusion using at least two clear, specific, and accurate examples in a presentation about how different tribes met their needs. Suggested Unit: First Nations of North America OSPI-developed Assessments: Meeting Needs and Wants; Humans and the Environment; Cultural Contributions

3.5.4.2

Prepares a list of resources, including the title and author for each source. Examples: Completes a graphic organizer listing resources on various cultures, including the title and author for each source.