Washington State K-12 Social Studies Learning Standards — Grade 5


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5.1.1.1

Understands the key ideals of liberty and patriotism as outlined in the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution, and other fundamental documents. Examples: Explains that the Declaration of Independence was written to declare the freedom of the thirteen colonies from Great Britain. Explains how the First Amendment promotes liberty. Suggested Unit: U.S.Founding the Nation

5.1.1.2

Evaluates how a public issue is related to constitutional rights and the common good. Examples: Justifies how a position on the issue of censorship relates to freedom of speech. Justifies how a position on the phrase under God in the Pledge of Allegiance relates to freedom of religion. Suggested Unit: U.S.The Legacy for Us Today OSPI-developed Assessment: You Decide

5.1.2.1

Understands the organization of the U.S. government. Page 48 Examples: Explains that the national government is organized into three branches: executive, legislative, and judicial. Explains who is involved in each of the branches of government. Explains that the President and the Cabinet are part of the federal executive branch. Suggested Unit: U.S.Founding the Nation

5.1.2.2

Understands the function of the U.S. government. Examples: Explains how the legislative branch makes laws. Explains how the judicial branch judges laws according to the U.S. Constitution. Suggested Unit: U.S.Founding the Nation

5.1.3.1

This component is addressed in grades 6 12.

5.1.4.1

Understands that civic participation involves being informed about how public issues are related to rights and responsibilities. Examples: Explains how the public issue of censorship is related to the right to freedom of speech. Explains how the public issue of under God in the Pledge of Allegiance is related to the right to freedom of religion. Explains how the public issue of maintaining public parks is related to the responsibility of paying taxes. Suggested Unit: U.S.The Legacy for Us Today OSPI-developed Assessment: You Decide

5.2.1.1

Analyzes the costs and benefits of decisions colonists made to meet their needs and wants. Page 49 Examples: Examines the reasons why colonists chose to dump tea into the Boston Harbor on December 16, 1773. Examines reasons why colonists chose to move away from Britain, including needs such as economic opportunities and wants such as freedom of religion. Examines the costs colonists faced when deciding to move to the Americas, including the costs of lost possessions and risks to personal safety and the benefits of economic opportunities and freedoms once settlements were formed. Suggested Unit: U.S.Encounter, Colonization, and Devastation

5.2.2.2

Understands how trade affected the economy of the thirteen colonies. Examples: Explains how the triangular trade between Britain, Africa, and the thirteen colonies supported cotton, tobacco, and sugar production in the colonies. Explains the causes and effects of Eastern Woodland tribes trading with the French. Explains how and why the colonists traded cotton, tobacco, and sugar. Explains that the African slave trade provided labor for the farming in the colonies. Explains the fur trade system between Eastern Woodland tribes and European colonists. Suggested Unit: U.S.Encounter, Colonization, and Devastation

5.2.3.1

Understands the impact of the British government on the economy of the thirteen colonies. Examples: Explains how British taxes on tea and sugar affected the distribution of goods in the colonies. Explains how the Stamp Act imposed by British Parliament affected the economy of the colonies by requiring the purchase of a tax stamp for all legal documents. Examines the reasons why colonists chose to dump tea into the Boston Harbor on December 16, 1773. Suggested Unit: U.S.Independence

5.2.4.1

This component is addressed in grades 4, and 6 12.

5.3.1.1

Constructs and uses maps to show and analyze information about European settlement in the Americas. Examples: Constructs maps that show the location of the thirteen colonies, major landforms, climate, natural resources, and economic products. Suggested Unit: U.S.Independence

5.3.1.2

Understands the physical and cultural characteristics of the thirteen colonies. Examples: Explains the differences in the physical characteristics, including landforms, climate, and natural resources, of the thirteen colonies. Explains the cultural characteristics, including distribution of population and languages, of the people in the thirteen colonies. Suggested Unit: U.S.Encounter, Colonization, and Devastation

5.3.2.3

Understands and analyzes the impact of the European colonists movement to the Americas on the land and the indigenous peoples. Examples: Explains and analyzes how the movement of the colonists to the Americas forced the movement of native peoples from their land. Explains how the triangular trade route between Africa, Britain, and the thirteen colonies forced the movement of African people as slave labor. Suggested Unit: U.S.Encounter, Colonization, and Devastation

5.3.3.1

This component is addressed in grades 3, 4, 6, and 8 12.

5.4.1.1

Understands and creates timelines to show how historical events are caused by other important events. Page 51 Examples: Constructs and explains a timeline that shows the major eras in U.S. history up to 1776. Constructs a timeline that relates events involving historical, economic, geographic, and civic factors to the causes of the Revolutionary War. Suggested Unit: U.S.Independence OSPI-developed Assessment: Causes of Conflict

5.4.1.2

Understands how the following themes and developments help to define eras in U.S. history from time immemorial to 1791: Development of indigenous societies in North America (time immemorial to 1791). Encounter, colonization, and devastation (14921763). Revolution and the Constitution (17631791). Examples: Explains how the rise of the Anasazi civilization helps to define the history of North America prior to European settlement as a time when indigenous societies were developing. Explains how the interaction between the Puritans and the Wampanoag defines the history of the Americans between 1492 and 1763 as a time of encounter. Explains how the establishment of the colony of Virginia, the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and the Pennsylvania Colony helps to define the history of the Americas between 1492 and 1763 as a time of settlement and colonization. Explains how the effects of disease on indigenous peoples in the Americas between 1492 and 1763 define this era as a time of devastation. Explains how the Revolution and Constitution help to define U.S. history from 1763 to 1791.

5.4.2.1

Understands and analyzes how individuals caused change in U.S. history. Examples: Examines the impact Crispus Attucks had on the colonists desire to fight for freedom from Great Britain. Explains how George Washington led troops to victory over Great Britain in the Revolutionary War. Suggested Unit: U.S.Independence

5.4.2.2

Analyzes how people from various cultural groups have shaped the history of the United States. Examples: Examines how African slaves and free people of color contributed to the establishment and growth of agriculture in the thirteen colonies. Examines how Germans and Swiss contributed to the development of Pennsylvania. Page 52 Examines how native peoples helped the colonists establish survival skills in their new environment. Suggested Unit: U.S.Encounter, Colonization, and Devastation

5.4.2.3

Understands how technology and ideas have affected the way people lived and changed their values, beliefs, and attitudes. Examples: Explains how the idea of individual rights led to the creation of the Bill of Rights. Explains how the printing press was used to print the Declaration of Independence in newspapers throughout the thirteen colonies, which led to an interest in democratic movements. Explains how the idea of democracy led the colonists to seek change by fighting Great Britain in the Revolutionary War. Suggested Unit: U.S.Founding the Nation OSPI-developed Assessment: Whats the Big Idea?

5.4.3.1

Analyzes the multiple perspectives and interpretations of historical events in U.S. history. Examples: Examines different accounts of the colonization era, including colonists perspective of settlement and indigenous peoples perspective of genocide. Examines different accounts of colonists and indentured servants. Differentiates between historical facts, evidence, and historical interpretations of the Boston Massacre as a turning point igniting the Revolutionary War. Suggested Unit: U.S.Encounter, Colonization, and Devastation

5.4.3.2

Analyzes the multiple causes of change and conflict in U.S. history. Examples: Analyzes the historical, economic, civic, and geographical causes of the Revolution. Analyzes the historical, economic, civic, and geographical causes of the Boston Tea Party. Explains how the distance between England and the thirteen colonies was a factor in the Revolutionary War. Suggested Unit: U.S.Independence OSPI-developed Assessment: Causes of Conflict

5.4.4.1

Understands that significant historical events in the United States have implications for current decisions and influence the future. Examples: Explains how the slogan of no taxation without representation has influenced initiative processes in states across the United States. Explains how the principles and ideals set forth in the Constitution affect current government and citizen decisions. Suggested Unit: U.S.Legacy for Us Today

5.5.1.1

Understands the purpose of documents and the concepts used in them. Examples: Explains the purposes of the Declaration of Independence and how Thomas Jefferson used the concept of rights in this document. Explains how the concept of rights outlined in the Declaration of Independence relates to a particular public issue. Explains the purposes of the Constitution and how the framers of the Constitution expressed the concept of government responsibilities. Explains how the concept of government responsibilities in the Constitution relates to a particular public issue. Explains how the founders expressed the concept of individual rights in the Bill of Rights. Suggested Unit: U.S.Founding the Nation OSPI-developed Assessment: You Decide

5.5.1.2

Evaluates the relevance of facts used in forming a position on an issue or event. Examples: Determines which facts are relevant in supporting a position on whether there should be a ban on smoking in public places. Determines which facts are relevant in supporting a position on whether students should say the Pledge of Allegiance. Suggested Unit: U.S.The Legacy for Us Today OSPI-developed Assessment: You Decide

5.5.2.1

Understands how essential questions define the significance of researching an issue or event. Examples: Explains how the essential question Why do people want to be free? reminds us why we study the American Revolution. Explains how the essential question How can we be heard by our government? reminds us why we study the writing of the Declaration of Independence. Suggested Unit: U.S.Independence OSPI-developed Assessment: Causes of Conflict

5.5.3.1

Engages others in discussions that attempt to clarify and address multiple viewpoints on public issues based on key ideals. Examples: Engages classmates in a discussion to clarify the multiple viewpoints surrounding censorship based on the key ideal of individual rights. Engages classmates in a discussion to clarify the multiple viewpoints surrounding the inclusion of under God in the Pledge of Allegiance based on the key ideal of freedom. Suggested Unit: U.S.Legacy for Us Today OSPI-developed Assessment: You Decide

5.5.4.1

Researches multiple perspectives to take a position on a public or historical issue in a paper or presentation. Examples: Researches multiple perspectives on the public issue of mandating school uniforms. Researches multiple perspectives on the public issue of banning cell phones in school. Researches multiple perspectives on the public issue of removing dams to save salmon. Researches multiple perspectives on the public issue of mandating recycling. Suggested Unit: U.S.The Legacy for Us Today OSPI-developed Assessments: You Decide; Causes of Conflict; Whats the Big Idea?

5.5.4.2

Prepares a list of resources, including the title, author, type of source, date published, and publisher for each source, and arranges the sources alphabetically. Examples: Using an online program, completes an alphabetical list of resources on the American Revolution, including the title, author, type of source, date published, and publisher for each source.