Alaska Learning Standards for Science — Grade 10


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10.SA1.1

asking questions, predicting, observing, describing, measuring, classifying, making generalizations, analyzing data, developing models, inferring, and communicating

10.SA1.2

reviewing pertinent literature, hypothesizing, making qualitative and quantitative observations, controlling experimental variables, analyzing data statistically (i.e., mean, median, mode), and using this information to draw conclusions, compare results to others, suggest further experimentation, and apply students conclusions to other problems (L)

10.SA2.1

examining methodology and conclusions to identify bias and determining if evidence logically supports the conclusions

10.SB1.1

using the periodic table to describe atoms in terms of their base components (i.e., protons, neutrons, electrons)

10.SB2.1

examining energy (i.e., nuclear, electromagnetic, chemical, mechanical, thermal) transfers, transformations, and efficiencies by comparing useful energy to total energy

10.SB3.1

describing the behavior of electrons in chemical bonding

10.SB3.2

recognizing that radioactivity is a result of the decay of unstable nuclei

10.SB3.3

comparing the relative wavelengths and applications of different forms of electromagnetic radiation (i.e., x-ray, visible, infrared, microwaves, radio)

10.SB4.1

recognizing that when one thing exerts a force on another, an equal amount of force is exerted back on it

10.SB4.2

explaining that different kinds of materials respond to electric and magnetic forces (i.e., conductors, insulators, magnetic, and non-magnetic materials)

10.SC1.2

explaining how the processes of n

10.SC1.3

examining issues related to genetics (L)

10.SC2.1

describing the structure-function relationship (e.g., joints, lungs)

10.SC2.2

explaining that cells have specialized structures in which chemical reactions occur

10.SC2.3

explaining the functions of organs of major systems (i.e., respiratory, digestive, circulatory, reproductive, nervous, musculoskeletal, and excretory)

10.SC2.4

tracing the pathways of the digestive, circulatory, and excretory systems

10.SC3.1

relating the carbon cycle to global climate change

10.SC3.2

exploring ecological relationships (e.g., competition, niche, feeding relationships, symbiosis) (L)

10.SD1

describing the Big Bang Theory

10.SD1.1

using a model to explain the processes (i.e., formation, sedimentation, erosion, reformation) of the rock cycle

10.SD1.2

describing their interrelationships (i.e., water cycle, carbon cycle, oxygen cycle)

10.SD2

explaining that the position of stars changes in the expanding universe*

10.SD2.1

recognizing the dynamic interaction of erosion and deposition including human causes*

10.SD2.2

describing how the theory of plate tectonics explains the dynamic nature of its surface*

10.SD3

recognizing phenomena in the universe (i.e., black holes, nebula)

10.SD3.1

describing causes, effects, preventions, and mitigations of human impact on climate

10.SE1.1

identifying that progress in science and invention is highly interrelated to what else is happening in society

10.SE2.1

questioning, researching, modeling, simulating, and testing multiple solutions to a problem (L)

10.SE3.1

researching a current problem, identifying possible solutions, and evaluating the impact of each solution (L)

10.SF3.1

analyzing the competition for resources by various user groups to describe these interrelationships. Cross referenced with SA3.1

10.SG1.1

describing how those perspectives (i.e., cultural, political, religious, philosophical) have impacted the advancement of science

10.SG2.1

using an account of an event to recognize the processes of science used by historically significant scientists (e.g., Goodall, Watson & Crick, Newton)

10.SG3.1

using experimental or observational data to evaluate a hypothesis

10.SG4.1

recognizing the role of these factors on scientific advancements