Australian Curriculum Standards (ACARA) — Grade K


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Based on the ACARA curriculum.


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ACELA.K.1.

Language variation and change

ACELA.K.1.1.1.

Learning that different languages exist; discussing the various languages encountered in the community and at school; acknowledging the home languages of students who speak another language, and valuing the ability to speak more than one language

ACELA.K.1.2.3.

Learning to ask relevant questions and to express requests and opinions in ways that suit different contexts

ACELA.K.1.3.1.

Recognising some of the ways we can use speech, gesture, writing and media to communicate feelings

ACELA.K.1.3.2.

Recognising some of the ways emotions and feelings can be conveyed and influenced by visual representations, for example in advertising and animations

ACELA.K.2.

Text structure and organisation

ACELA.K.2.1.1.

Sharing experiences of different texts and discussing some differences

ACELA.K.2.1.3.

Repeating parts of texts, for example characteristic refrains, predicting cumulative storylines, reciting poetic and rhyming phrases

ACELA.K.2.3.1.

Pointing to the letters and the punctuation in a text

ACELA.K.2.3.2.

Commenting on punctuation encountered in the everyday texts, for example Thats the letter that starts my name, The name of my family and my town has a capital letter

ACELA.K.2.4.1.

Learning about print: direction of print and return sweep, spaces between words

ACELA.K.2.4.2.

Learning that Standard Australian English in written texts is read from left to right and from top to bottom of the page and that direction of print may differ in other cultures, for example Japanese texts

ACELA.K.2.4.3.

Learning about front and back covers; title and author, layout and navigation of digital/screen texts

ACELA.K.3.

Expressing and developing ideas

ACELA.K.3.1.1.

Learning that word order in sentences is important for meaning (for example 'The boy sat on the dog', 'The dog sat on the boy')

ACELA.K.3.10.1.

Identifying and manipulating sounds (phonemes) in spoken words, for example c-a-n

ACELA.K.3.10.2.

Identifying onset and rime in one-syllable spoken words, for example d-og and b-ig

ACELA.K.3.10.3.

Blending phonemes to form one-syllable spoken words, for example s-u-n is orally expressed as sun and b-a-g is orally expressed as bag

ACELA.K.3.2.1.

Exploring spoken, written and multimodal texts and identifying elements, for example words and images

ACELA.K.3.3.1.

Talking about how a different story is told if we read only the words, or only the pictures; and the story that words and pictures make when combined

ACELA.K.3.3.2.

Exploring how the combination of print and images in texts creates meaning

ACELA.K.3.4.1.

Building vocabulary through multiple speaking and listening experiences

ACELA.K.3.4.2.

Discussing new vocabulary found in texts

ACELA.K.3.4.3.

Bringing vocabulary from personal experiences, relating this to new experiences and building a vocabulary for thinking and talking about school topics

ACELA.K.3.5.1.

Recognising and producing rhyming words when listening to rhyming stories or rhymes, for example funny and money

ACELA.K.3.5.2.

Identifying patterns of alliteration in spoken words, for example 'helpful Henry'

ACELA.K.3.5.3.

Identifying syllables in spoken words, for example clapping the rhythm of Mon-day, Ja-cob or Si-en-na

ACELA.K.3.6.1.

Using familiar and common letters in handwritten and digital communications

ACELA.K.3.6.2.

Identifying familiar and recurring letters and the use of upper and lower case in written texts in the classroom and the community, for example 'Tom went to the park.'

ACELA.K.3.7.1.

Recognising the most common sound made by each letter of the alphabet, including consonants and short vowel sounds, for example p-op

ACELA.K.3.7.2.

Breaking words into onset and rime, noticing words that share the same pattern, for example p-at, b-at

ACELA.K.3.7.3.

Breaking words into onset and rime to learn how to spell words that share the same pattern, for example p-at, bat, t-all and f-all

ACELA.K.3.7.4.

Building word families using onset and rime, for example h-ot, g-ot, n-ot, sh-ot

ACELA.K.3.8.1.

Knowing how to write some high-frequency words recognised in shared texts and texts being read independently, for example and, my, is, the and went

ACELA.K.3.9.1.

Learning that words are made up of meaningful parts, for example dogs has two meaningful parts dog and s meaning more than one

ACELT.K.1.

Literature and context

ACELT.K.1.1.1.

Recognising that there are storytellers in all cultures

ACELT.K.1.1.2.

Viewing stories by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander storytellers from online sources

ACELT.K.1.1.3.

Comparing experiences depicted in stories with students own

ACELT.K.1.1.4.

Engaging with texts that reflect the social and cultural groups to which students belong

ACELT.K.2.

Responding to literature

ACELT.K.2.1.1.

Alking about stories and authors, choosing favourites, discussing how students feel about what happens in stories

ACELT.K.2.1.2.

Engaging with the humour in some stories and repeating favourite lines, jokes and ideas

ACELT.K.2.1.3.

Returning to preferred texts and commenting on reasons for selection

ACELT.K.2.2.1.

Talking about stories and authors, choosing favourites, discussing how students feel about what happens in stories

ACELT.K.2.2.2.

Using art forms and beginning forms of writing to express personal responses to literature and film experiences

ACELT.K.2.2.3.

Talking about people, events and ideas in texts, enabling students to connect them to their own experiences and to express their own opinions about what is depicted

ACELT.K.3.1.1.

Identifying some features of culture related to characters and events in literary texts, for example dress, food and daily routines

ACELT.K.3.1.2.

Listening, responding to and joining in with rhymes, poems, chants and songs

ACELT.K.3.2.1.

Recognising cultural patterns of storytelling, for example Once upon a time, A long, long time ago

ACELT.K.3.3.1.

Using music and actions to enhance appreciation of rhymes, poems, chants and songs

ACELT.K.4.1.1.

Drawing, labelling and role playing representations of characters or events

ACELT.K.4.1.3.

Using digital technologies to retell events and recreate characters from favourite print and film texts

ACELT.K.4.2.1.

Performing memorable actions or behaviours of favourite or humorous characters in texts

ACELY.K.2.

Interacting with others

ACELY.K.2.1.1.

Listening to, remembering and following simple instructions

ACELY.K.2.1.3.

Listening for specific things, for example the main idea of a short statement, the details of a story, or to answer a given question

ACELY.K.2.1.4.

Participating in informal situations, for example play-based experiences which involve the imaginative use of spoken language

ACELY.K.2.1.5.

Participating in class, group and pair discussions about shared experiences including shared texts

ACELY.K.2.1.6.

Asking and answering questions to clarify understanding

ACELY.K.2.2.2.

Learning to ask questions and provide answers that are more than one or two words

ACELY.K.2.2.3.

Participating in speaking and listening situations, exchanging ideas with peers in pairs and small groups and engaging in class discussions, listening to others and contributing ideas

ACELY.K.2.2.4.

Showing understanding of appropriate listening behaviour, such as listening without interrupting, and looking at the speaker if culturally appropriate

ACELY.K.2.2.5.

Listening and responding to oral and multimodal texts including rhymes and poems, texts read aloud and various types of digital texts

ACELY.K.2.2.7.

Asking and answering questions using appropriate intonation

ACELY.K.2.3.1.

Sharing a personal experience, interest or discovery with peers in a semi-formal situation

ACELY.K.3.

Interpreting, analysing, evaluating

ACELY.K.3.1.2.

Identifying and selecting texts for information purposes and commenting on how the text might help with a task

ACELY.K.3.2.1.

Navigating a text correctly, starting at the right place and reading in the right direction, returning to the next line as needed, matching one spoken word to one written word

ACELY.K.3.2.2.

Reading aloud with attempts at fluency and intonation

ACELY.K.3.2.3.

Attempting to work out unknown words by combining contextual, semantic, grammatical and phonic knowledge

ACELY.K.3.2.4.

Predicting what might happen on the basis of experience of this kind of text; at the sentence level predicting the meaning on the basis of syntax and word meaning

ACELY.K.3.3.1.

Talking about the meanings in texts listened to, viewed and read

ACELY.K.3.3.6.

Making links between events in a text and students own experiences

ACELY.K.3.3.7.

Making an inference about a character's feelings

ACELY.K.3.3.9.

Drawing events in sequence, recognising that for some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander stories the sequence of events may be cyclical

ACELY.K.4.1.1.

Using image-making and beginning writing to represent characters and events in written, film and web-based texts

ACELY.K.4.1.2.

Using speaking, writing and drawing to represent and communicate personal responses to ideas and events experienced through texts

ACELY.K.4.1.4.

Using beginning concepts about print, soundletter and word knowledge and punctuation to create short texts

ACELY.K.4.3.1.

Adopting correct posture and pencil grip

ACELY.K.4.3.2.

Learning to produce simple handwriting movements

ACELY.K.4.3.3.

Following clear demonstrations of how to construct each letter (for example where to start; which direction to write)

ACELY.K.4.3.4.

Learning to construct lower case letters and to combine these into words

ACELY.K.4.3.5.

Learning to construct some upper case letters

ACMMG.K.1.1.

Use direct and indirect comparisons to decide which is longer, heavier or holds more, and explain reasoning in everyday language (ACMMG006)

ACMMG.K.1.1.1.

Comparing objects directly, by placing one object against another to determine which is longer or by pouring from one container into the other to see which one holds more

ACMMG.K.1.1.2.

Using suitable language associated with measurement attributes, such as tall and taller, heavy and heavier, holds more and holds less

ACMMG.K.1.2.

Compare and order duration of events using everyday language of time (ACMMG007)

ACMMG.K.1.2.1.

Knowing and identifying the days of the week and linking specific days to familiar events

ACMMG.K.1.2.2.

Sequencing familiar events in time order

ACMMG.K.1.3.

Connect days of the week to familiar events and actions (ACMMG008)

ACMMG.K.1.3.1.

Choosing events and actions that make connections with students everyday family routines

ACMMG.K.2.1.

Sort, describe and name familiar two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects in the environment (ACMMG009)

ACMMG.K.2.1.1.

Sorting and describing squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, spheres and cubes

ACMMG.K.3.1.

Describe position and movement (ACMMG010)

ACMMG.K.3.1.1.

Interpreting the everyday language of location and direction, such as between, near, next to, forward, toward

ACMMG.K.3.1.2.

Following and giving simple directions to guide a friend around an obstacle path and vice versa

ACMNA.K.1.1.

Establish understanding of the language and processes of counting by naming numbers in sequences, initially to and from 20, moving from any starting point (ACMNA001)

ACMNA.K.1.1.1.

Reading stories from other cultures featuring counting in sequence to assist students to recognise ways of counting in local languages and across cultures

ACMNA.K.1.1.2.

Identifying the number words in sequence, backwards and forwards, and reasoning with the number sequences, establishing the language on which subsequent counting experiences can be built

ACMNA.K.1.1.3.

Developing fluency with forwards and backwards counting in meaningful contexts, including stories and rhymes

ACMNA.K.1.1.4.

Understanding that numbers are said in a particular order and there are patterns in the way we say them

ACMNA.K.1.2.

Connect number names, numerals and quantities, including zero, initially up to 10 and then beyond (ACMNA002)

ACMNA.K.1.2.1.

Understanding that each object must be counted only once, that the arrangement of objects does not affect how many there are, and that the last number counted answers the how many question

ACMNA.K.1.2.2.

Using scenarios to help students recognise that other cultures count in a variety of ways, such as the Wotjoballum number systems

ACMNA.K.1.3.

Subitise small collections of objects (ACMNA003)

ACMNA.K.1.3.1.

Using subitising as the basis for ordering and comparing collections of numbers

ACMNA.K.1.4.

Compare, order and make correspondences between collections, initially to 20, and explain reasoning (ACMNA289)

ACMNA.K.1.4.1.

Comparing and ordering items of like and unlike characteristics using the words more, less, same as and not the same as and giving reasons for these answers

ACMNA.K.1.4.2.

Understanding and using terms such as first and second to indicate ordinal position in a sequence.

ACMNA.K.1.4.3.

Using objects which are personally and culturally relevant to students

ACMNA.K.1.5.

Represent practical situations to model addition and sharing (ACMNA004)

ACMNA.K.1.5.1.

Using a range of practical strategies for adding small groups of numbers, such as visual displays or concrete materials

ACMNA.K.2.1.

Sort and classify familiar objects and explain the basis for these classifications. Copy, continue, and create patterns with objects and drawings (ACMNA005)

ACMNA.K.2.1.1.

Observing natural patterns in the world around us

ACMNA.K.2.1.2.

Creating and describing patterns using materials, sounds, movements or drawings

ACMSP.K.1.1.

Answer yes/no questions to collect information and make simple inferences

ACMSP.K.1.1.2.

Representing responses to questions using simple displays, including grouping students according to their answers

ACMSP.K.1.1.3.

Using data displays to answer simple questions such as how many students answered yes to having brown hair?