Alberta Programs of Study — Grade 2


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2-1.1.3.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Express or represent ideas and feelings resulting from activities or experiences with oral, print and other media texts.

2-1.1.4.

Experiment with language and forms: Use a variety of forms of oral, print and other media texts to organize and give meaning to experiences, ideas and information.

2-1.1.5.

Express preferences: Explain why particular oral, print or other media texts are personal favourites.

2-1.1.6.

Set goals: Recognize and talk about developing abilities as readers, writers and illustrators.

2-1.2.1.

Consider others' ideas: Connect own ideas and experiences with those shared by others.

2-10.1.

Recognize that there are many different kinds of small crawling and flying animals, and identify a range of examples that are found locally.

2-10.2.

Compare and contrast small animals that are found in the local environment. These animals should include at least three invertebrates - that is, animals such as insects, spiders, centipedes, slugs, worms.

2-10.3.

Recognize that small animals, like humans, have homes where they meet their basic needs of air, food, water, shelter and space; and describe any special characteristics that help the animal survive in its home.

2-10.4.

Identify each animal's role within the food chain. To meet this expectation, students should be able to identify the animals as plant eaters, animal eaters or decomposers and identify other animals that may use them as a food source.

2-10.5.

Describe the relationships of these animals to other living and nonliving things in their habitat, and to people.

2-10.6.

Identify and give examples of ways that small animals avoid predators, including camouflage, taking cover in burrows, use of keen senses and flight.

2-10.7.

Describe conditions for the care of a small animal, and demonstrate responsible care in maintaining the animal for a few days or weeks.

2-10.8.

Identify ways in which animals are considered helpful or harmful to humans and to the environment.

2-2.1.

Focus: Students will ask questions that lead to exploration and investigation identify one or more possible answers to questions asked by themselves and others. Ideas may take the form of predictions and hypotheses.

2-2.1.1.

Use prior knowledge: Use knowledge of how oral and written language is used in a variety of contexts to construct and confirm meaning.

2-2.1.10.

Use textual cues: Preview book covers and titles; look for familiar words, phrases and story patterns to assist with constructing and confirming meaning.

2-2.1.11.

Use textual cues: Use predictable phrases and sentence patterns, and attend to capital letters, periods, question marks and exclamation marks to read accurately, fluently and with comprehension during oral and silent reading.

2-2.1.12.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Apply phonic rules and generalizations to read unfamiliar words in context.

2-2.1.13.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Apply knowledge of long and short vowel sounds to read unfamiliar words in context.

2-2.1.14.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Use knowledge of word parts, contractions and compound words to read unfamiliar words in context.

2-2.1.15.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Associate sounds with some vowel combinations, consonant blends and digraphs, and letter clusters to read unfamiliar words in context.

2-2.1.17.

Use references: Use pictionaries and personal word books to confirm the spellings or locate the meanings of unfamiliar words in oral, print and other media texts.

2-2.1.2.

Use prior knowledge: Connect personal experiences and knowledge of words, sentences and story patterns from previous reading experiences to construct and confirm meaning.

2-2.1.3.

Use prior knowledge: Use knowledge of the organizational structures of print and stories, such as book covers, titles, pictures and typical beginnings, to construct and confirm meaning.

2-2.1.4.

Use comprehension strategies: Use knowledge of oral language to predict words when reading stories and poems.

2-2.1.5.

Use comprehension strategies: Apply a variety of strategies, such as asking questions, making predictions, recognizing relationships among story elements and drawing conclusions.

2-2.1.6.

Use comprehension strategies: Identify the main idea or topic and supporting details of simple narrative and expository texts.

2-2.1.7.

Use comprehension strategies: Identify by sight an increasing number of high frequency words and familiar words from favourite books.

2-2.1.8.

Use comprehension strategies: Read aloud with fluency, accuracy and expression.

2-2.1.9.

Use comprehension strategies: Figure out, predict and monitor the meaning of unfamiliar words to make sense of reading, using cues such as pictures, context, phonics, grammatical awareness and background knowledge.

2-2.2.

Explore and Investigate: Students will manipulate materials and make observations that are relevant to questions asked.

2-2.2.1.

Experience various texts: Engage in a variety of shared and independent listening, reading and viewing experiences, using oral, print and other media texts from a variety of cultural traditions and genres, such as legends, video programs, puppet plays, songs, riddles and informational texts.

2-2.2.2.

Experience various texts: Identify favourite kinds of oral, print and other media texts.

2-2.2.3.

Experience various texts: Model own oral, print and other media texts on familiar forms.

2-2.2.4.

Experience various texts: Respond to mood established in a variety of oral, print and other media texts.

2-2.2.5.

Construct meaning from texts: Connect situations portrayed in oral, print and other media texts to personal and classroom experiences.

2-2.2.6.

Construct meaning from texts: Retell the events portrayed in oral, print and other media texts in sequence.

2-2.2.7.

Construct meaning from texts: Suggest alternative endings for oral, print and other media texts.

2-2.2.8.

Construct meaning from texts: Discuss, represent or write about interesting or important aspects of oral, print and other media texts.

2-2.2.9.

Construct meaning from texts: Express thoughts or feelings related to the events and characters in oral, print and other media texts.

2-2.3.

Explore and Investigate: Students will carry out simple procedures identified by others.

2-2.3.1.

Understand forms and genres: Recognize that ideas and information can be expressed in a variety of oral, print and other media texts.

2-2.3.5.

Understand techniques and elements: Identify how pictures, illustrations and special fonts relate to and enhance print and other media texts.

2-2.3.6.

Experiment with language: Demonstrate interest in the sounds of words and word combinations in pattern books, poems, songs, and oral and visual presentations.

2-2.4.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify materials used and how they were used.

2-2.4.1.

Generate ideas: Use own and respond to others' ideas to create oral, print and other media texts Elaborate on the expression of ideas.

2-2.4.4.

Structure texts: Use traditional story beginnings, patterns and stock characters in own oral, print and other media texts.

2-2.5.

Explore and Investigate: Students will use, with guidance, print and other sources of information provided. Sources may include library, classroom, community and computer-based resources.

2-2.6.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will describe what was observed, using captioned pictures and oral language.

2-2.7.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will describe and explain results; explanations may reflect an early stage of concept development.

2-3.1.

Focus: Students will identify the purpose of the object to be constructed: What structure do we need to make? What does it need to do?

2-3.1.1.

Focus attention: Relate personal knowledge to ideas and information in oral, print and other media texts.

2-3.1.2.

Focus attention: Ask questions to determine the main idea of oral, print and other media texts.

2-3.2.

Explore and Investigate: Students will attempt, with guidance, a variety of strategies to complete tasks.

2-3.2.1.

Use a variety of sources: Find information on a topic using a variety of sources, such as simple chapter books, multimedia resources, computers and elders in the community.

2-3.2.4.

Access information: Use the library organizational system to locate information.

2-3.2.5.

Evaluate sources: Recognize when information answers the questions asked.

2-3.4.

Explore and Investigate: Students will engage in all parts of the task and allow others to make their contributions.

2-3.4.1.

Share ideas and information: Share, with familiar audiences, ideas and information on topics.

2-3.4.2.

Share ideas and information: Clarify information by responding to questions.

2-3.5.

Explore and Investigate: Students will identify materials used and how they were used.

2-3.7.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will communicate results of construction activities, using oral language, captioned pictures and simple graphs (pictographs and bar graphs).

2-3.8.

Reflect and Interpret: Students will describe the product and describe and explain the processes by which it was made.

2-4.1.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying curiosity.

2-4.1.2.

Revise and edit: Revise words and sentences to improve sequence or add missing information.

2-4.1.3.

Revise and edit: Check for capital letters, punctuation at the end of sentences and errors in spelling.

2-4.1.4.

Enhance legibility: Print legibly and efficiently, forming letters of consistent size and shape, and spacing words appropriately.

2-4.1.5.

Enhance legibility: Use margins and spacing appropriately.

2-4.1.8.

Expand knowledge of language: Use knowledge of word patterns, word combinations and parts of words to learn new words.

2-4.2.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying confidence in personal ability to explore materials and learn by direct study.

2-4.2.1.

Attend to grammar and usage: Write complete sentences, using capital letters and periods.

2-4.2.10.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Use commas after greetings and closures in friendly letters and to separate words in a series in own writing.

2-4.2.11.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Identify commas and apostrophes when reading, and use them to assist comprehension.

2-4.2.2.

Attend to grammar and usage: Use connecting words to join related ideas in a sentence.

2-4.2.3.

Attend to grammar and usage: Identify nouns and verbs, and use in own writing.

2-4.2.4.

Attend to grammar and usage: Identify adjectives and adverbs that add interest and detail to stories.

2-4.2.5.

Attend to spelling: Use phonic knowledge and skills and visual memory to spell words of more than one syllable, high frequency irregular words and regular plurals in own writing.

2-4.2.6.

Attend to spelling: Use phonic knowledge and skills and visual memory to attempt spelling of unfamiliar words in own writing.

2-4.2.7.

Attend to spelling: Use the conventional spelling of common words necessary for the efficient communication of ideas in writing.

2-4.2.8.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Use capital letters for proper nouns and at the beginning of sentences in own writing.

2-4.2.9.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Use periods and question marks, appropriately, as end punctuation in own writing.

2-4.3.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying inventiveness.

2-4.3.2.

Enhance presentation: Clarify ideas and information presented in own oral, print and other media texts, by responding to questions and comments.

2-4.3.3.

Use effective oral and visual communication: Speak in a clear voice, with appropriate volume, at an understandable pace and with expression.

2-4.3.4.

Demonstrate attentive listening and viewing: Ask relevant questions to clarify understanding and to have information explained.

2-4.3.5.

Demonstrate attentive listening and viewing: Show enjoyment and appreciation during listening and viewing activities.

2-4.3.6.

Appreciate diversity: Discuss the experiences and traditions of various communities portrayed in oral, print and other media texts.

2-4.3.7.

Appreciate diversity: Ask for and provide clarification and elaboration of stories and ideas.

2-4.4.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying perseverance: staying with an investigation over a sustained period of time.

2-4.5.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying appreciation of the value of experience and careful observation.

2-4.8.

Students will show growth in acquiring and applying respect for living things and environments, and commitment for their care.

2-5.1.1.

Relate texts to culture: Discuss similarities and differences in settings, characters and events in oral, print and other media texts from various communities.

2-5.1.2.

Celebrate accomplishments and events: Participate in shared language experiences to acknowledge and celebrate individual and class accomplishments.

2-5.1.3.

Use language to show respect: Adjust own language use according to the context, purpose and audience.

2-5.2.3.

Work in groups: Contribute relevant information and questions to extend group understanding of topics and tasks.

2-5.2.4.

Work in groups: Stay on topic during class and group discussions.

2-6.1.

Recognize and describe characteristics of liquids: recognize and describe liquid flow, describe the shape of drops and describe the surface of calm water.

2-6.2.

Compare water with one or more other liquids, such as cooking oil, glycerine or water mixed with liquid detergent. Comparisons.

2-6.3.

Compare the amount of liquid absorbed by different materials; e.g., students should recognize that some forms of paper are very absorbent but other forms of paper are not.

2-6.5.

Demonstrate an understanding that liquid water can be changed to other states: recognize that on cooling, liquid water freezes into ice and that on heating, it melts back into liquid water with properties the same as before; recognize that on heating, liquid water may be changed into steam or water vapor and that this change can be reversed on cooling; identify examples in which water is changed from one form to another.

2-6.6.

Predict that the water level in open containers will decrease due to evaporation, but the water level in closed containers will not decrease.

2-6.7.

Predict that a wet surface will dry more quickly when exposed to wind or heating and apply this understanding to practical situations, such as drying of paints, clothes and hair.

2-6.8.

Recognize that water is a component of many materials and of living things.

2-6.9.

Recognize human responsibilities for maintaining clean supplies of water, and identify actions that are taken to ensure that water supplies are safe.

2-7.1.

Describe, classify and order materials on the basis of their buoyancy. Students who have achieved this expectation will distinguish between materials that sink in water and those that float. They will also be aware that some 'floaters' sit mostly above water, while others sit mostly below water. The terms buoyancy and density may be introduced but are not required as part of this learning expectation.

2-7.2.

Alter or add to a floating object so that it will sink, and alter or add to a nonfloating object so that it will float.

2-7.3.

Assemble materials so they will float, carry a load and be stable in water.

2-7.4.

Modify a watercraft to increase the load it will carry.

2-7.5.

Modify a watercraft to increase its stability in water.

2-7.6.

Evaluate the appropriateness of various materials to the construction of watercraft, in particular: the degree to which the material is waterproof (not porous); the ability to form waterproof joints between parts; the stiffness or rigidity of the material; the buoyancy of the material.

2-7.7.

Develop or adapt methods of construction that are appropriate to the design task.

2-7.8.

Adapt the design of a watercraft so it can be propelled through water.

2-7.9.

Explain why a given material, design or component is appropriate to the design task.

2-8.1.

Identify where magnets are used in the environment and why they are used.

2-8.5.

Design and produce a device that uses a magnet.

2-8.6.

Demonstrate that most materials are transparent to the effects of a magnet. A magnetic field will pass through such materials, whereas other materials interact with a magnet.

2-8.7.

Compare and measure the strength of magnets.

2-9.1.

Describe temperature in relative terms, using expressions, such as hotter than, colder than.

2-9.10.

Design and construct a device to keep something hot or cold.

2-9.11.

Describe ways in which temperature changes affect us in our daily lives.

2-9.2.

Measure temperature in degrees Celsius.

2-9.3.

Describe how heating and cooling materials can often change them; e.g., melting and freezing, cooking, burning.

2-9.4.

Identify safe practices for handling hot and cold materials and for avoiding potential dangers from heat sources.

2-9.8.

Describe the role of insulation in keeping things hot or cold, and identify places where some form of insulation is used; e.g., clothing, refrigerator, coolers, homes.

2-9.9.

Identify materials that insulate animals from the cold; e.g., wool, fur and feathers; and identify materials that are used by humans for the same purpose.

2.[CN]

Connections: Students are expected to connect mathematical ideas to other concepts in mathematics, to everyday experiences and to other disciplines

2.[PS]

Problem Solving: Students are expected to develop and apply new mathematical knowledge through problem solving

2.[R]

Reasoning: Students are expected to develop mathematical reasoning

2.[T]

Technology: Students are expected to select and use technologies as tools for learning and for solving problems

2.[V]

Visualization: Students are expected to develop visualization skills to assist in processing information, making connections and solving problems.

2.1.1.

Say the number sequence 0 to 100 by: 2s, 5s and 10s, forward and backward, using starting points that are multiples of 2, 5 and 10 respectively; 10s, using starting points from 1 to 9; 2s, starting from 1. [C, CN, ME, R]

2.1.1.2.

Appreciate the diversity and vastness of Canada's land and peoples (CC, LPP)

2.1.1.5.

Demonstrate care and concern for the environment (C, ER, LPP)

2.1.10.

Apply mental mathematics strategies for basic addition facts and related subtraction facts to 18. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

2.1.2.

Demonstrate if a number (up to 100) is even or odd. [C, CN, PS, R]

2.1.3.

Describe order or relative position, using ordinal numbers (up to tenth). [C, CN, R]

2.1.4.

Represent and describe numbers to 100, concretely, pictorially and symbolically. [C, CN, V]

2.1.5.

Compare and order numbers up to 100. [C, CN, ME, R, V]

2.1.7.

Illustrate, concretely and pictorially, the meaning of place value for numerals to 100. [C, CN, R, V]

2.1.9.

Demonstrate an understanding of addition (limited to 1- and 2-digit numerals) with answers to 100 and the corresponding subtraction by: using personal strategies for adding and subtracting with and without the support of manipulatives; creating and solving problems that involve addition and subtraction; using the commutative property of addition (the order in which numbers are added does not affect the sum); using the associative property of addition (grouping a set of numbers in different ways does not affect the sum); explaining that the order in which numbers are subtracted may affect the difference. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, V]

2.2.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of repeating patterns (three to five elements) by: describing; extending; comparing; creating patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds and actions. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

2.2.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of increasing patterns by: describing; reproducing; extending; creating numerical (numbers to 100) and non-numerical patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds and actions. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

2.2.3.

Sort a set of objects, using two attributes, and explain the sorting rule. [C, CN, R, V]

2.2.4.

Demonstrate and explain the meaning of equality and inequality, concretely and pictorially. [C, CN, R, V]

2.2.5.

Record equalities and inequalities symbolically, using the equal symbol or the not equal symbol. [C, CN, R, V]

2.2.6.

Students will analyze how the community being studied emerged, by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions for inquiry:

2.2.6.1.

What characteristics define their community? (CC, I)

2.2.6.2.

What is unique about their community? (CC, I)

2.2.6.3.

What are the origins of their community? (TCC)

2.2.6.4.

What were the reasons for the establishment of their community (e.g., original fur trade fort, original inhabitants)? (CC, TCC)

2.2.6.5.

What individuals or groups contributed to the development of their community? (CC, TCC)

2.2.7.

Students will examine how the community being studied has changed, by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions for inquiry:

2.2.7.1.

In what ways has our community changed over time (e.g., changes in transportation, land use)? (CC, TCC)

2.2.7.2.

What has caused changes in their community? (CC, TCC)

2.2.7.3.

How has the population of their community changed over time (e.g., ethnic mix, age, occupations)? (CC, LPP, TCC)

2.2.7.4.

How have the people who live in the community contributed to change in the community? (CC, LPP, TCC)

2.3.2.

Relate the size of a unit of measure to the number of units (limited to nonstandard units) used to measure length and mass (weight). [C, CN, ME, R, V]

2.3.3.

Compare and order objects by length, height, distance around and mass (weight), using nonstandard units, and make statements of comparison. [C, CN, ME, R, V]

2.3.4.

Measure length to the nearest nonstandard unit by: using multiple copies of a unit; using a single copy of a unit (iteration process). [C, ME, R, V]

2.3.6.

Sort 2-D shapes and 3-D objects, using two attributes, and explain the sorting rule. [C, CN, R, V]

2.3.7.

Describe, compare and construct 3-D objects, including: cubes; spheres; cones; cylinders; pyramids. [C, CN, R, V]

2.3.8.

Describe, compare and construct 2-D shapes, including: triangles; squares; rectangles; circles. [C, CN, R, V]

2.3.9.

Identify 2-D shapes as parts of 3-D objects in the environment. [C, CN, R, V]

2.4.2.

Construct and interpret concrete graphs and pictographs to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, R, V] [ICT: C7-1.3]

2.S.1.1.

Distinguish between a fictional and a factual account about Canadian communities

2.S.1.2.

Choose and justify a course of action

2.S.2.2.

Arrange events, facts and/or ideas in sequence

2.S.3.1.

Use a simple map to locate communities studied in Canada

2.S.3.2.

Determine distance on a map, using relative terms such as near/far, here/there

2.S.3.3.

Apply the concept of relative location to determine locations of people and places

2.S.3.4.

Use cardinal directions to locate communities studied in relation to one's own community

2.S.4.1.

Apply ideas and strategies to decision making and problem solving

2.S.4.2.

Propose new ideas and strategies to contribute to decision making and problem solving

2.S.5.1.

Demonstrate the ability to deal constructively with diversity and disagreement

2.S.5.2.

Work and play in harmony with others to create a safe and caring environment

2.S.5.3.

Consider the needs and ideas of others

2.S.6.1.

Participate in activities that enhance their sense of belonging within their school and community

2.S.7.1.

Participate in formulating research questions

2.S.7.6.

Organize information from more than one source

2.S.7.7.

Process information from more than one source to retell what has been discovered

2.S.7.9.

Draw conclusions from organized information

2.S.8.3.

Interact with others in a socially appropriate manner

2.S.8.5.

Display data in a problem-solving context

2.S.9.1.

Identify key words from gathered information on a topic or issue

2.S.9.2.

Compare information on the same topic or issue from print media, television and photographs