Alberta Programs of Study — Grade 9


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10-1.a.1.1.

Generate and experiment with strategies that contribute to forming tentative understandings, interpretations and positions [for example, posing questions, suspending prejudgement as appropriate, recognizing that initial interpretations and positions may be inaccurate and incomplete, and recognizing that texts may be inaccurate, misleading or ambiguous].

10-1.a.1.2.

Experiment with language, image and structure to create different effects in particular situations and for particular purposes and audiences [for example, present the same information to two different audiences, and make appropriate changes to the content to suit the audiences].

10-1.a.1.3.

Describe personal responses to new perspectives, appraise whether such responses contribute to or inhibit understanding, and identify influences that have contributed to such responses.

10-1.a.1.4.

Reflect on personal text preferences, identify influences that have contributed to the formation of these preferences, and select strategies that may be used to expand interests in texts and text creators [for example, complete and share reading inventories, and examine the role marketing plays in shaping popular culture].

10-1.a.1.5.

Appraise own strengths and weaknesses as a language user and language learner; select appropriate strategies to increase strengths and address weaknesses; monitor the effectiveness of selected strategies; and modify selected strategies as needed to optimize growth [for example, assess growth in writing by using a writing portfolio and portfolio reflections].

10-1.a.2.1.

Identify a variety of different kinds of texts, audiences and purposes for creating texts [for example, purposes could include to inform, persuade, entertain or inspire; the purpose of a print advertisement is to sell a product].

10-1.a.2.2.

Use a variety of strategies to comprehend literature and other texts [for example, reading passages out loud, forming questions, making predictions, using context to determine the connotative meanings of words, using graphic organizers and making annotations], and develop strategies for close reading of literature in order to understand contextual elements [for example, understanding subtext].

10-1.a.2.3.

Reflect on and describe strategies used to engage prior knowledge as a means of assisting comprehension of new texts; and select, monitor and modify strategies as needed.

10-1.a.2.4.

Use a variety of appropriate reference strategies and reference technologies to aid understanding [for example, formulating and refining questions, exploring works cited in other references, taking notes, and using library catalogues and Internet search engines].

10-1.a.2.5.

Identify a variety of text forms, including communications forms and literary forms [for example, letters, memoranda, poems, narratives and dramatizations]; and describe the relationships of form to purpose and content.

10-1.a.2.6.

Describe rhetorical devices [such as parallel structure and repetition] and stylistic techniques [such as purposeful use of precise denotative language and straightforward sentence structure] that create clarity, coherence and emphasis in print and nonprint texts.

10-1.a.2.7.

Identify and consider personal, moral, ethical and cultural perspectives when studying literature and other texts; and reflect on and monitor how perspectives change as a result of interpretation and discussion.

10-1.a.2.8.

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

10-1.a.2.9.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

10-1.a.3.1.

Reflect on and describe strategies to determine the depth and breadth of inquiry or research and to identify the purpose, audience and potential forms of presentation [for example, define parameters of inquiry or research, analyze available resources, create a timeline to guide inquiry or research, and understand purpose and audience].

10-1.a.3.2.

Reflect on and describe strategies for developing an inquiry or research plan that will foster understanding, select and monitor appropriate strategies, and modify strategies as needed to plan inquiry or research effectively [for example, use a research journal to keep and record reflections on the research process, clarify thinking, revisit initial perceptions and ask questions that lead to new research].

10-1.a.3.3.

Reflect on and describe strategies that may be used to select, record and organize information; select and monitor appropriate strategies; and modify selected strategies as needed.

10-1.a.3.4.

Reflect on and describe strategies to evaluate information sources for credibility and bias and for quality; and select, monitor and modify strategies as needed to evaluate sources and detect bias.

10-1.a.3.5.

Form generalizations by integrating new information with prior knowledge.

10-1.a.3.6.

Reflect on and assess the effectiveness of strategies used to guide inquiry or research [such as the effective use of time and the division of labour when involved in group research].

10-1.a.4.1.

Reflect on the purposes for text creation [for example, to inform, explain, persuade, entertain or inspire] and on own motives for selecting strategies to engage an audience [for example, to communicate information, promote action or build relationships]; and consider potential consequences of choices regarding text creation [for example, follow - up action may be required to clarify information, a position may need to be defended and opposing viewpoints addressed, and tone and style must be appropriate for intended audience].

10-1.a.4.2.

Select a text form appropriate to the purpose for text creation and consistent with the content to be presented in the text [for example, select a photo essay to demonstrate a personal or critical/analytical response to poetry or other literature when the content to be presented is well suited to the creation of a visual text].

10-1.a.4.3.

Take ownership of text creation, by selecting or crafting a topic, concept or idea that is personally meaningful and engaging.

10-1.a.4.4.

Meet particular production, publication and display requirements for print texts [for example, adhere to a particular manuscript style when creating a research paper]; and explain requirements in light of purpose, audience and situation.

10-1.a.4.5.

Review the controlling idea or desired unifying effect of a text in progress for clarity and focus [for example, in a rehearsal, mock - up or draft], and modify the controlling idea or desired unifying effect as appropriate to meet the intended purpose.

10-1.a.4.6.

Assess the beginning of a text in progress, and revise it as needed to establish purpose [for example, the exposition of a narrative, the initial stanza or opening lines of a poem, or the introduction of a written or oral report].

10-1.a.4.7.

Reflect on personal vocabulary and repertoire of stylistic choices and on their effectiveness; and expand vocabulary and repertoire of stylistic choices.

10-1.a.4.8.

Use handbooks and other tools, including electronic tools, as resources to assist with text creation [for example, dictionaries, thesauri, spell checkers and handbooks].

10-1.a.5.1.

Monitor own use of verbal and nonverbal communication in order to convey respect and consideration, as appropriate [for example, use euphemism and body language appropriately and sensitively].

10-1.a.5.2.

Appreciate diversity of thought and expression, select and monitor appropriate strategies for appreciating diversity, and modify selected strategies as needed.

10-1.a.5.3.

Use language and image to honour own and others' accomplishments [for example, celebrate together when classmates have accomplished a particular task or produced, published or presented a particular text; or celebrate the completion of a portfolio with family and friends by holding a 'portfolio launch'].

10-1.a.5.4.

Set appropriate personal goals for participation in a group; respect, be open to, and be supportive of the thoughts, opinions and contributions of others in a group; and share personal knowledge, expertise and perspectives with others, as appropriate.

10-1.a.5.5.

Develop and use criteria to monitor and assess group processes [such as division of labour and time management].

10-1.b.1.1.

Form tentative understandings, interpretations and positions on ideas and issues communicated in literature and other texts by expressing own explorations and considering others' explorations.

10-1.b.1.2.

Experiment with a variety of strategies, activities and resources to explore ideas, observations, opinions, experiences and emotions [for example, stream-of-consciousness writing, free verse poetry, exploratory talk and improvisation].

10-1.b.1.3.

Identify own ideas, perspectives and interpretations and evaluate them for depth of explanation, evidence or support; and consider the ideas, perspectives and interpretations of others to broaden own understandings when exploring and responding to texts.

10-1.b.1.4.

Expand interests in a range of literary genres and in a variety of other text types and text creators [for example, graphic novels, Web sites, advertising and promotional texts, autobiographies, CD-ROMs, anecdotes, memoirs, monologues and folk songs].

10-1.b.1.5.

Set goals and identify and experiment with strategies for language growth in relation to formal and informal personal communications [for example, working in a group or taking a leadership role in a club].

10-1.b.2.1.

Use features found within a text as information to describe the communication situation within which the text was created [for example, use specialized terminology, jargon, acronyms and idioms within a text to describe context].

10-1.b.2.2.

Paraphrase a text's controlling idea, and identify supporting ideas and supporting details.

10-1.b.2.3.

Describe personal expectations for a text to be studied, by recalling prior experiences with and observations about similar contexts, content and text forms.

10-1.b.2.4.

Create and use own reference materials to aid understanding [for example, a personalized dictionary/glossary and a personalized World Wide Web/URL address list].

10-1.b.2.5.

Describe audience factors that may have influenced a text creator's choice of form and medium [for example, age, gender and culture of the audience].

10-1.b.2.6.

Describe aspects of a text that contribute to atmosphere, tone and voice [for example, textual elements, such as setting, music and lighting, and stylistic techniques, such as a text creator's choice of words and expressions].

10-1.b.2.7.

Respond personally and analytically to ideas developed in works of literature and other texts; and analyze the ways in which ideas are reflected in personal and cultural opinions, values, beliefs and perspectives.

10-1.b.2.8.

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

10-1.b.2.9.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

10-1.b.3.1.

Describe the purpose of inquiry or research and the scope of the inquiry or research topic; identify the target audience; and identify the potential form for the presentation of inquiry or research findings, when applicable [such as a narrative, report, diary entry or biography].

10-1.b.3.2.

Develop an appropriate inquiry or research plan that will address the topic and satisfy contextual requirements - purpose, audience and situation - and requirements of presentation form.

10-1.b.3.3.

Select information and other material appropriate to purpose from a variety of print and nonprint sources [for example, from museums, archives, government agencies, periodicals, microfiche, Internet, CD - ROMs, films, television and radio broadcasts, interviews, surveys, and print and online encyclopedias].

10-1.b.3.4.

Assess information sources for appropriateness to purpose, audience and presentation form.

10-1.b.3.6.

Identify strategies to improve future inquiry or research, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies.

10-1.b.4.1.

Identify purpose and target audience for text creation, and select strategies to accomplish purpose and engage audience [for example, plan a campaign - public relations, advertising or lobbying - identifying the text forms to be used to influence the attitudes of the audience with respect to the chosen issue].

10-1.b.4.2.

Identify and use structures consistent with form, content and purpose when creating texts [for example, chronological order to structure events in a narrative, and juxtaposed images to suggest contrast in a poster].

10-1.b.4.3.

Recognize and assess personal variables [such as personal experience and prior knowledge] and contextual variables [such as availability of time and resources] that influence the selection of a topic, concept or idea; and address these variables to increase the likelihood of successful text creation.

10-1.b.4.4.

Develop presentation materials; and select strategies and technologies appropriate to purpose, audience and situation [for example, use technologies such as presentation software, videos, CD - ROMs, DVDs, audiotaped interviews and handouts].

10-1.b.4.5.

Review the accuracy, specificity and precision of details, events, images, facts or other data intended to support a controlling idea or to develop a unifying effect; and add to details, events, images, facts or other data as needed to provide sufficient support or development.

10-1.b.4.6.

Review the organizational components of a text in progress [such as paragraphs, scenes or steps in a process], and revise them as needed to strengthen their effectiveness as units of thought or experience.

10-1.b.4.7.

Use words and expressions appropriately [for example, use words with straight forward denotations to strengthen clarity in informative and persuasive texts, and use words with connotative meanings to evoke images in poetry and narrative texts].

10-1.b.4.8.

Know and be able to apply capitalization and punctuation conventions correctly, including end punctuation, commas, semicolons, colons, apostrophes, quotation marks, hyphens, dashes, ellipses, parentheses, underlining and italics.

10-1.b.5.1.

Analyze and describe language and images used in literature and other texts to convey respectful and considerate, or disrespectful and inconsiderate, perspectives and attitudes [for example, stereotyping that contributes to negative portrayals of characters in literature and persons in life].

10-1.b.5.2.

Describe the ways in which selected works of literature and other print and nonprint texts influence individual and group values and behaviours.

10-1.b.5.3.

Identify formal and informal ways in which language and image are used appropriately to honour people and to celebrate events [for example, eulogy, toast and public service announcements].

10-1.b.5.4.

Reflect on and describe strategies used to negotiate, coordinate and cooperate with others; select appropriate strategies for negotiating, coordinating and cooperating with others; monitor selected strategies; and modify selected strategies as needed to accomplish group goals.

10-1.b.5.5.

Understand the various potential roles and responsibilities of group members [such as researcher and presenter; director and participant; and chairperson, recorder and timekeeper; or roles of Aboriginal Elders in teaching about the medicine wheel and about respect, humility, kindness, sharing, honesty, faith and perseverance], and appreciate the contribution that these roles make to group processes.

10-1.c.1.5.

Identify and access learning sources and opportunities; assess, weigh and manage risk; and demonstrate a willingness to continuously learn and grow.

10-1.c.2.1.

Describe the relationship between text and context [for example, constraints of time and space, issues of gender and culture, whether or not the audience is present].

10-1.c.2.2.

Summarize the plot of a narrative, describe its setting and atmosphere, describe development of conflict, and identify theme.

10-1.c.2.3.

Recall prior knowledge of rhetorical devices used in previously studied texts [such as anecdotes and rhetorical questions] and textual elements and structures employed or developed [such as characterization and narrative point of view] to assist in understanding new texts.

10-1.c.2.5.

Describe a variety of organizational patterns and structural features that contribute to purpose and content.

10-1.c.2.6.

Recognize irony and satire in print and nonprint texts, and identify language used to create irony and satire.

10-1.c.2.7.

Compare choices and motives of characters and people portrayed in texts with choices and motives of self and others.

10-1.c.2.8.

Describe settings and plots in terms of reality and plausibility, as appropriate.

10-1.c.3.1.

Refine the purpose of inquiry or research by limiting or expanding the topic as appropriate.

10-1.c.3.2.

Determine the breadth and depth of prior knowledge, and formulate questions to determine information needs and to guide the collection of required information.

10-1.c.3.3.

Record information accurately and completely; and document and reference sources, as appropriate [for example, document direct quotations, others' ideas and arguments, maps, charts, statistics, pictures and diagrams from books, magazines, bibliographies, newspapers, audiovisual materials, electronic sources, interviews and films to avoid plagiarism].

10-1.c.3.4.

Assess the accuracy, completeness, currency and relevance of information selected from sources; and assess the appropriateness of the information for purpose.

10-1.c.3.5.

Distinguish between support and generalization, and provide support for generalizations and conclusions.

10-1.c.3.6.

Review the appropriateness, accuracy and significance of findings, conclusions and generalizations drawn from gathered data and information; prepare a detailed record of references; determine how best to share the information; and determine next steps, if any.

10-1.c.4.1.

Describe and address audience factors that affect text creation [such as age, prior knowledge, gender, culture, values, interests, attitudes, position of authority and power of decision].

10-1.c.4.2.

Explore the interplay among medium, content and context [for example, explore the use of an electronic slide show to make a classroom presentation in terms of whether or not it is an effective way to communicate information].

10-1.c.4.3.

Establish a focus for text creation, and communicate scope by framing an effective controlling idea or describing a strong unifying effect.

10-1.c.4.4.

Develop and deliver oral, visual and multimedia presentations, using voice production factors [such as volume, tone and stress], nonverbal factors [such as gestures, posture, distance and eye contact] and visual production factors [such as colour and contrast] appropriate to purpose, audience and situation.

10-1.c.4.5.

Detect and correct logical fallacies.

10-1.c.4.6.

Review the closing of a text in progress, and revise it as needed to strengthen its relationship to purpose and to establish a sense of developed understanding.

10-1.c.4.8.

Know and be able to apply spelling conventions consistently and independently.

10-1.c.5.1.

Analyze and describe positive or negative portrayals of characters in literature and persons in life, and be sensitive to the feelings of others.

10-1.c.5.2.

Identify the underlying assumptions reflected in the ideas and opinions presented in a text.

10-1.c.5.4.

Ensure that a team's purpose and objectives are clear.

10-1.c.5.5.

Identify and use various means to facilitate completion of group projects [for example, establish clear purposes and procedures for solving problems, monitor progress, and make modifications to meet stated objectives].

10-1.d.2.1.

Identify the impact that personal context - experience, prior knowledge - has on constructing meaning from a text.

10-1.d.2.2.

Describe the personality traits, motivations, attitudes, values and relationships of characters developed/persons presented in literature and other texts; and identify how the use of archetypes adds to an appreciation of text.

10-1.d.2.3.

Classify the genre/form of new texts according to attributes of genres/forms previously studied.

10-1.d.2.5.

Describe the characteristics of various common communications media [such as the use of headlines in newspapers, and menus and tabs in Internet Web pages].

10-1.d.2.6.

Describe the effects of musical devices, figures of speech and sensory details in print and nonprint texts [for example, alliteration used to create emphasis, metaphor used to evoke images, and sensory details used to evoke pathos].

10-1.d.2.7.

Identify and examine ways in which cultural and societal influences are reflected in a variety of Canadian and international texts.

10-1.D.2.8.

Describe character and characterization in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility.

10-1.d.3.2.

Identify information sources intended to fill gaps between prior knowledge and required information.

10-1.d.3.4.

Identify and describe possible biases of sources [such as possible biases of text creators].

10-1.d.4.1.

Describe expectations and constraints of a communication situation, including assignment parameters, expected standards of quality and availability of resources; and select strategies to address expectations and constraints [for example, paraphrase assignment instructions to identify tasks; seek clarification regarding teacher expectations, including assessment criteria related to quality standards; assess supplies and resources needed; and develop a work plan for completion, which includes a timeline].

10-1.d.4.2.

Understand the concept of convention; and apply it to oral, print, visual and multimedia text forms when appropriate [for example, understand the common conventions of a modern play script; and include dialogue, stage directions, and directions for lighting and sound effects when creating a script, as appropriate].

10-1.d.4.3.

Develop supporting details, by using developmental aids appropriate to form and purpose [for example, use charts to collect and assemble details in creating character comparisons when developing a comparison and contrast essay, or use a think - aloud reading strategy to make notes from informational text when writing a summary].

10-1.d.4.4.

Experiment with various strategies to create rapport between the presenter and the audience [for example, ask questions to involve the audience].

10-1.d.4.5.

Review own critical/analytical response to literature for plausibility, appropriateness of interpretations, and precision, completeness and relevance of evidence; and revise interpretations and evidence, as necessary.

10-1.d.4.6.

Assess relationships among controlling idea, supporting ideas and supporting details; and strengthen relationships as needed to enhance the unity of texts.

10-1.d.4.7.

Describe the effects of own use of stylistic techniques and rhetorical devices [for example, describe the clarity achieved by arranging words and phrases in lists; describe the emphasis created by using repetition, balance or parallel structure; and describe the audience effects achieved by using visual elements and sounds in presentations and multimedia texts].

10-1.d.4.8.

Identify and be able to use parts of speech correctly, including nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions, definite and indefinite articles, and coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.

10-1.d.5.1.

Analyze and describe verbal and nonverbal communication that contributes to the inclusion or exclusion of individuals involved in a communication situation, and use verbal and nonverbal communication that is inclusive of other individuals [for example, use allusions and acronyms that will be familiar to an audience, and use gender inclusive nouns and pronouns].

10-1.d.5.5.

Analyze the function of teamwork tools [such as checklists, role descriptors, timelines and flow charts, whiteboards for brainstorming, electronic list servers, agendas, and meeting notes], and use such tools as appropriate.

10-1.e.2.2.

Describe a text creator's tone, and relate tone to purpose and audience.

10-1.e.2.6.

Explain the contribution of motif and symbol to controlling idea and theme.

10-1.e.2.8.

Describe images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose.

10-1.e.3.2.

Identify and select potential strategies and technologies for gathering, generating and recording information [for example, outlining, webbing, taking notes in point form, recording sources accurately during information gathering, writing direct quotations correctly and bookmarking Internet sites].

10-1.e.3.3.

Observe guidelines for Internet use [for example, keep passwords, telephone numbers and addresses confidential; visit appropriate sites; respect copyright; and observe rules for citing Internet sources, following correct procedures to avoid plagiarism].

10-1.e.4.3.

Develop content appropriate to purpose [for example, relate supporting information and examples to conclusions when creating a written or oral report; and relate imagery, figurative language and musical devices to purpose when developing a poem].

10-1.e.4.6.

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

10-1.e.4.7.

Recognize personal voice in texts created; and continue to develop personal craft through practice, using various methods.

10-1.e.4.8.

Identify parts of the sentence in own and others' texts, including subject, verb, predicate complement, and direct and indirect object.

10-1.e.5.1.

Differentiate between constructive criticism and ridicule, and between irony and sarcasm [for example, seek clarification by asking questions].

10-1.f.2.2.

Differentiate between literal and figurative statements and between imagery and nonsensory language, identify symbol, recognize familiar allusions, and describe how images are developed in texts.

10-1.f.2.6.

Recognize the use of elements of effective oral, visual and multimedia presentations [such as movement, gesture, use of space, shape and colour]; and describe their effects.

10-1.f.2.8.

Assess the significance of a text's theme or controlling idea, and the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of its supporting details, examples or illustrations, and content in general.

10-1.f.4.3.

Develop content appropriate to audience and situation [for example, use descriptive details to capture events in a narrative, and craft rich visual images to develop a video that will engage an audience].

10-1.f.4.8.

Review and revise texts in progress to correct common sentence faults - comma splice, run - on sentence and unintended sentence fragment.

10-1.g.2.2.

Describe visual elements [such as photographs, lists, tables, graphs, charts and other displays] and aural elements [such as sound effects, music and rhythm], and describe their contributions to the meaning of texts.

10-1.g.2.6.

Identify persuasive techniques used in a variety of print and nonprint texts [such as appealing to emotion and citing experts].

10-1.g.4.3.

Incorporate effective examples from personal experience, concepts and ideas from exploration, and findings from inquiry and research into created texts, when appropriate [for example, incorporate visual aids in a prepared speech and taped sound effects in a dramatization of a scene from a play].

10-1.g.4.8.

Know and be able to use common sentence structures correctly - simple, compound, complex and compound - complex.

10-1.h.2.2.

Differentiate between audience response to the content of a presentation and audience response to the performance of the presenter.

10-1.h.4.8.

Pay particular attention to punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage and sentence construction when using unfamiliar vocabulary, complex syntax and sophisticated rhetorical devices.

10-2-b.2.4.

Create and use own reference materials to aid understanding [for example, a personalized dictionary/glossary and a personalized World Wide Web/URL address list].

10-2.a.2.1.

Identify a variety of texts, purposes for creating texts and audiences [for example, purposes could include to inform, persuade, entertain or inspire].

10-2.a.2.2.

Use a variety of strategies to comprehend literature and other texts [for example, reading passages out loud, forming questions, making predictions, using context to determine the connotative meanings of words, using graphic organizers, making annotations, inferring, rereading, seeking assistance, using context clues, summarizing and visualizing], develop a daily practice of reading [for example, paired reading, reading log, nightly reading, taped reading], and develop strategies for close reading.

10-2.a.2.3.

Reflect on and describe strategies used to engage prior knowledge as a means of assisting comprehension of new texts; and select, monitor and modify strategies as needed.

10-2.a.2.4.

Use a variety of appropriate reference strategies and reference technologies to aid understanding [for example, formulating and refining questions, exploring works cited in other references, taking notes, and using library catalogues and Internet search engines].

10-2.a.2.5.

Identify common text forms and their purposes, including communications forms [such as letters and memoranda] and literary forms [such as poems, narratives and dramatizations].

10-2.a.2.6.

Identify rhetorical devices [such as repetition] and stylistic techniques [such as straightforward sentence structures] that create clarity, coherence and emphasis in print and nonprint texts.

10-2.a.2.7.

Identify and consider personal moral and ethical perspectives, as well as cultural perspectives, when studying literature and other texts; and reflect on and monitor how perspectives change as a result of interpretation and discussion.

10-2.a.2.8.

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

10-2.a.2.9.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

10-2.a.4.1.

Reflect on the purposes for text creation [for example, to inform, explain, persuade, entertain or inspire] and on own motives for selecting strategies to engage an audience [for example, to communicate information, promote action or build relationships]; and consider potential consequences of choices regarding text creation [for example, follow - up action may be required to clarify information, a position may need to be defended and opposing viewpoints addressed, and tone and style must be appropriate for intended audience].

10-2.a.4.2.

Select a text form appropriate to the purpose for text creation and consistent with the content to be presented in the text [for example, select a photo essay for the purpose of creating a persuasive or informative text when the content to be presented is well suited to the creation of a visual text].

10-2.a.4.3.

Take ownership of text creation, by selecting or crafting a topic, concept or idea that is personally meaningful and engaging.

10-2.a.4.4.

Meet production, publication and display requirements for print texts as appropriate to purpose, audience and situation [for example, consider layout, font and visuals, costs and timelines when publishing a brochure].

10-2.a.4.5.

Identify the controlling idea or desired unifying effect of a text in progress [for example, in a rehearsal, mock - up or draft].

10-2.a.4.6.

Assess the beginning of a text in progress, and revise it as needed to establish purpose [for example, the exposition of a narrative, the initial stanza of a poem, or the introduction of a written or oral report].

10-2.a.4.7.

Develop a list of effective vocabulary words and stylistic choices [for example, develop a list of effective verbs, by listing all the verbs used in own text and replacing frequently used verbs with new verbs as appropriate].

10-2.a.4.8.

Use handbooks and other tools, including electronic tools, as resources to assist with text creation [for example, dictionaries, thesauri, spell checkers and handbooks].

10-2.b.2.1.

Identify features of a text that provide information about the text [for example, specialized terminology, jargon, acronyms and idioms].

10-2.b.2.2.

Identify a text's controlling idea, supporting ideas and supporting details.

10-2.b.2.3.

Describe personal expectations for texts to be studied, by recalling prior experiences with and observations about similar contexts and content.

10-2.b.2.5.

Describe audience factors that may have influenced a text creator's choice of form and medium [for example, age, gender and culture of the audience].

10-2.b.2.6.

Identify aspects of a text that are effective in the creation of atmosphere [such as setting, music, lighting and choice of words].

10-2.b.2.7.

Respond personally and analytically to ideas developed in literature and other texts.

10-2.b.2.8.

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

10-2.b.2.9.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

10-2.b.4.1.

Identify the purpose and target audience for text creation, and select strategies to accomplish the purpose and engage the audience [for example, plan a campaign - public relations, advertising or lobbying - identifying the text forms to be used to influence the attitudes of the audience with respect to the chosen issue].

10-2.b.4.2.

Identify and use structures consistent with form, content and purpose when creating texts [for ,example, chronological order to structure events in a narrative, and juxtaposed images to suggest contrast in a poster].

10-2.b.4.3.

Recognize and assess personal variables [such as personal experience and prior knowledge] and contextual variables [such as availability of time and resources] that influence the selection of a topic, concept or idea; and address these variables to increase the likelihood of successful text creation.

10-2.b.4.4.

Develop presentation materials; and select strategies and technologies appropriate to purpose, audience and situation [for example, use technologies such as presentation software, videos, CD ROMs, DVDs, audiotaped interviews and handouts].

10-2.b.4.5.

Review the accuracy, specificity and precision of details, events, images, facts or other data intended to support a controlling idea or to develop a unifying effect; and add to details, events, images, facts or other data as needed to provide sufficient support or development [for example, use a revision strategy such as the Five R's to read, react, rework, reflect and refine work].

10-2.b.4.6.

Review the organizational components of a text in progress [such as paragraphs, scenes or steps in a process], and revise them as needed to strengthen their effectiveness as units of thought or experience.

10-2.b.4.7.

Develop the use of appropriate words and expressions [for example, use words with straightforward denotations to strengthen clarity in informative and persuasive texts, and use words with connotative meanings to evoke images in poetry and narrative texts].

10-2.b.4.8.

Know and be able to apply basic capitalization and punctuation conventions correctly.

10-2.c.2.1.

Describe elements found in a variety of communication situations, and explain how these elements influence the creation of texts [for example, constraints of time and space, issues of gender and culture, whether or not the audience is present in the communication situation].

10-2.c.2.2.

Retell the plot of a narrative, describe its setting, and identify the conflict developed.

10-2.c.2.3.

Recall prior knowledge of the development of textual elements in previously studied texts [such as plot, setting and character] to assist in understanding new texts.

10-2.c.2.5.

Identify and describe organizational patterns and structural features that contribute to purpose and content [such as the use of chronology to structure a narrative and the use of categories and headings to structure a report].

10-2.c.2.6.

Recognize irony and humour in print and nonprint texts, and identify language and ideas used to create irony and humour.

10-2.c.2.7.

Compare choices and motives of characters and people portrayed in texts with choices and motives of self and others.

10-2.c.2.8.

Describe settings and plots in terms of created reality and plausibility.

10-2.c.4.1.

Identify and address audience factors that affect text creation [such as age, prior knowledge, gender, culture, values, interests, attitudes, position of authority and power of decision].

10-2.c.4.2.

Identify and use a medium appropriate to content and context.

10-2.c.4.3.

Establish a focus for text creation, and communicate scope by framing an effective controlling idea or describing a strong unifying effect.

10-2.c.4.4.

Develop and deliver oral, visual and multimedia presentations, using voice production factors [such as volume, tone and stress], nonverbal factors [such as gestures, posture, distance and eye contact] and visual production factors [such as colour and contrast] appropriate to purpose, audience and situation.

10-2.c.4.5.

Assess own critical/analytical responses for consistency, completeness and relevance of evidence; and strengthen reasoning as needed by adding to, modifying or deleting details to provide reliable and pertinent evidence and make effective arguments [for example, work with a small group to use a revision strategy like Workshop Advice, where each person in the group provides one suggestion for a sentence change].

10-2.c.4.6.

Review the closing of a text in progress, and revise it as needed to strengthen its relationship to purpose [for example, to review the closing of a written text, learn two or three common structural patterns for writing conclusions, and practise writing two or three conclusions for a text in progress; then choose the most effective conclusion].

10-2.c.4.8.

Know and be able to apply spelling conventions independently or with the use of a handbook or other tools, such as a list of spelling strategies or rules.

10-2.d.2.1.

Identify the impact that personal context - experience, prior knowledge - has on constructing meaning from a text.

10-2.d.2.2.

Describe the personality traits, attitudes and relationships of characters developed/persons presented in works of literature and other texts.

10-2.d.2.5.

Identify and describe the characteristics of various common communications media [such as the use of headlines in newspapers, and menus and tabs in Internet Web pages].

10-2.d.2.6.

Recognize the use of simile and metaphor in print and nonprint texts, and describe their effects [for example, in making comparisons and evoking images].

10-2.d.2.7.

Recognize Canadian content in texts, and describe contextual elements that represent Canadian culture.

10-2.d.2.8.

Describe character and characterization in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility.

10-2.d.4.1.

Identify expectations and constraints of a communication situation, including assignment parameters, expected standards of quality and availability of resources; and select strategies to address expectations and constraints [for example, paraphrase assignment instructions to identify tasks; seek clarification regarding teacher expectations, including assessment criteria related to quality standards; assess supplies and resources needed; and develop a work plan for completion, which includes a timeline].

10-2.d.4.2.

Understand the concept of convention; and apply it to oral, print, visual and multimedia text forms when appropriate [for example, understand the common conventions of a modern play script; and include dialogue, stage directions, and directions for lighting and sound effects when creating a script, as appropriate].

10-2.d.4.3.

Develop supporting details, by using developmental aids appropriate to form and purpose [for example, use thought webs/mind maps to collect ideas and make connections when writing a personal response to literature, or use a think - aloud reading strategy to make notes from informational text when writing a summary].

10-2.d.4.4.

Experiment with various strategies to create rapport between the presenter and the audience [for example, use personal anecdotes and examples, ask questions to involve the audience, and use engaging body language].

10-2.d.4.6.

Assess relationships among controlling idea, supporting ideas and supporting details; and strengthen relationships as needed to enhance the unity of texts [for example, to analyze these relationships write an outline for another student's completed essay and review the outline for own completed essay created by the other student].

10-2.d.4.8.

Know and be able to identify parts of speech in own and others' texts, including nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives and adverbs.

10-2.e.2.2.

Identify a text creator's tone.

10-2.e.2.6.

Explain the contribution of symbol to theme.

10-2.e.2.8.

Describe images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose.

10-2.e.4.3.

Develop content appropriate to purpose [for example, relate supporting information and examples to conclusions when creating a written or oral report; and relate imagery, use of metaphor and use of musical devices to purpose when developing a poem].

10-2.e.4.6.

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

10-2.e.4.7.

Recognize personal voice as a text creator, and practise various methods to develop craft [for example, to recognize voice in own writing and to develop craft, note personal preferences related to the types and number of sentences used that follow various patterns; read a section of writing from a favourite author, and note the author's use of the same and different patterns; and rewrite some sentences in own work to achieve variety, noting the effect].

10-2.e.4.8.

Know and be able to identify parts of the sentence in own and others' texts, including subject, verb, direct object and indirect object.

10-2.f.2.2.

Differentiate between literal and figurative statements, describe images developed in texts, and recognize imagery.

10-2.f.2.6.

Recognize elements of effective oral, visual and multimedia presentations [such as movement, gesture, use of space, shape and colour]; and describe their effects.

10-2.f.2.8.

Assess the significance of a text's theme or controlling idea, and the effectiveness of the content in terms of adequate and relevant supporting details, examples or illustrations.

10-2.f.4.3.

Develop content appropriate to audience and situation [for example, use descriptive details to capture events in a narrative, and craft rich visual images to develop a video that will engage an audience].

10-2.f.4.8.

Detect and correct common sentence faults - run - on sentence and unintended sentence fragment.

10-2.g.2.2.

Identify visual elements [such as photographs, lists, tables, graphs, charts and other displays] and aural elements [such as sound effects, music and rhythm] that add meaning to texts.

10-2.g.2.6.

Identify persuasive techniques used in a variety of print and nonprint texts [for example, appealing to emotion and citing experts].

10-2.g.4.3.

Incorporate appropriate examples from personal experience into created texts, when appropriate.

10-2.g.4.8.

Identify and be able to use common sentence structures correctly - simple, compound, complex and compound - complex.

10-2.h.2.2.

Differentiate between audience response to the content of a presentation and audience response to the performance of the presenter.

10-2.h.4.8.

Pay particular attention to punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage and sentence construction when using unfamiliar vocabulary, complex syntax and sophisticated rhetorical devices.

10-2.j.4.8.

Explain why certain communication situations demand particular attention to correctness of punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage and sentence construction.

10-3.1.

Develop spatial sense through direct and indirect measurement.

10-3.2.

Develop spatial sense.

10-3.3.

Develop number sense and critical thinking skills.

10-3.4.

Develop algebraic reasoning.

10-4.1.

Number (Number Concepts and Number Operations): Students will estimate and solve problems using numbers, money, decimals, percents, fractions, ratios and proportion in everyday home, workplace and community contexts, using technology as appropriate; develop and demonstrate number sense to describe quantities, represent numbers in multiple ways and apply appropriate arithmetic operations; assess the reasonableness of calculations and problem-solving strategies; communicate mathematically and investigate the application of number concepts and operations in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as a member of a team.

10-4.1.1.

Develop and demonstrate a number sense for whole numbers, common fractions, decimals, percents and integers and apply arithmetic operations to solve everyday problems.

10-4.1.1.1.

Use estimation strategies to estimate and round numbers to the nearest unit, tenth and hundredth to solve problems in everyday contexts [E, PS, R]

10-4.1.1.10.

Recognize and explain numbers in scientific notation form [C, CN, R, V]

10-4.1.1.2.

Represent and describe the relationships between proper/improper fractions, equivalent fractions and mixed numbers concretely, pictorially and symbolically [C, CN, R, V]

10-4.1.1.3.

Convert among fractions, decimals and percents concretely, pictorially and symbolically to facilitate the solving of problems [C, CN, R, V]

10-4.1.1.4.

Represent and explain the meaning of integers in everyday contexts concretely, pictorially and symbolically [C, CN, R, V]

10-4.1.1.5.

Estimate and apply arithmetic operations to solve everyday problems, using: whole numbers, decimals, fractions, mixed numbers, percents [CN, E, PS]

10-4.1.1.6.

Estimate, add and subtract integers concretely, pictorially and symbolically in everyday contexts [CN, E, PS]

10-4.1.1.7.

Assess the reasonableness of applied calculations and problem-solving strategies, using a variety of tools and/or strategies, e.g., estimation, charts, graphs, calculators and/or computers [E, R, T, V]

10-4.1.1.8.

Calculate and compare rates and unit prices by writing ratios that involve numbers with different units [CN, PS, R]

10-4.1.1.9.

Determine the value of a power, using a whole number base with exponents of 2 and 3 [CN, R, V]

10-4.2.

Patterns and Relations (Patterns and Relationships): Students will recognize that patterns and relationships exist in nature and everyday living; use patterns and relationships to develop a better understanding of their environments and to solve everyday problems at home, in the workplace and in the community, using technology as appropriate; assess the reasonableness of calculations and problem-solving strategies; communicate mathematically and investigate the application of patterns and relationships in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as a member of a team.

10-4.2.1.

Express and use patterns, variables and expressions, including those used in business and industry, with graphs to solve problems at home, in the community and in the workplace.

10-4.2.1.1.

Identify, describe and draw conclusions about patterns and relationships, in oral and written form, in nature and everyday contexts [C, CN, R, V]

10-4.2.1.2.

Create expressions, make predictions and develop rules to describe, complete and extend patterns and relationships in everyday contexts [C, CN, PS, R]

10-4.2.1.3.

Distinguish between the use of variables and constants in everyday situations [CN, R]

10-4.2.1.4.

Graph relationships using everyday home, community and workplace contexts and draw conclusions using patterns and relationships [CN, R, V]

10-4.3.

Patterns and Relations (Variables and Equations): Students will represent algebraic expressions in multiple ways to solve problems, using technology as appropriate; communicate mathematically and investigate the application of variables and equations in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as a member of a team.

10-4.3.1.

Use variables and equations to express, summarize and apply relationships as problem-solving tools in a restricted range of contexts.

10-4.3.1.5.

Use variables, formulas and/or substitutions to solve problems in practical situations [CN, PS, R]

10-4.3.1.6.

Substitute numbers for variables in expressions and graph and examine the relationship [C, PS, R, V]

10-4.4.

Shape and Space (Measurement): Students will estimate and take accurate measurements using everyday metric (SI) and Imperial units of measure; solve problems using appropriate measuring devices, i.e., metric (SI) and Imperial, strategies and technology in home, workplace and community contexts; communicate mathematically and investigate the application of measurement knowledge and skills in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as members of a team; assess the reasonableness of calculations and problem-solving strategies.

10-4.4.1.

Estimate, measure and compare using whole numbers, decimals, fractions and metric (SI) and Imperial units of measure to solve everyday problems.

10-4.4.1.1.

Select and use appropriate metric (SI) and Imperial measuring devices and units to take measurements in home and work-related contexts, including: length, mass (weight), volume (capacity) [CN, PS, R, T]

10-4.4.1.10.

Estimate and calculate the area of a circle to solve problems in everyday contexts [E, PS]

10-4.4.1.12.

Estimate and measure temperature and calculate changes in temperature [E, PS]

10-4.4.1.2.

Measure within acceptable degrees of accuracy [CN, R]

10-4.4.1.3.

Compare, convert and apply metric (SI) and Imperial units of measure, as appropriate in everyday contexts [CN, R, T]

10-4.4.1.4.

Solve problems involving perimeter, area, mass (weight) and volume (capacity) [CN, PS, R, T]

10-4.4.1.5.

Use conversion charts, calculators and/or other tools to compare and convert common metric (SI) and Imperial units of measure, as required in everyday contexts [CN, PS, R, T]

10-4.4.1.6.

Estimate the measurements of angles in a diagram and in various environments [E]

10-4.4.1.7.

Measure and draw angles using a straight edge, protractor and other technology [CN, R]

10-4.4.1.8.

Estimate, measure and calculate the area of a circle [E, PS]

10-4.4.1.9.

Calculate the unknown when given the circumference, diameter and/or radii of a circle to solve everyday problems [PS, T]

10-4.5.

Shape and Space (3-D Objects and 2-D Shapes and Transformations): Students will create, examine and manipulate 3-D objects and 2-D shapes using transformations and technology, and other tools as appropriate, to better understand shapes and objects at home, in the workplace and in the community; communicate mathematically and investigate the application of shape and space in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as members of a team.

10-4.5.1.

Use visualization and symmetry to: Extend their awareness of objects and shapes; Create and examine patterns and designs using congruence, symmetry, translation, rotation and reflection.

10-4.5.1.13.

Measure and classify pairs of angles as either complementary or supplementary [CN, E, R]

10-4.5.1.14.

Represent, examine and describe enlargements and reductions [CN, R]

10-4.5.1.15.

Interpret scale models and identify the geometric properties associated with figures and shapes used in representations [CN, R, T]

10-4.6.

Statistics and Probability (Collecting and Analyzing Information): Students will collect, generate, interpret, examine and maintain data, charts, graphs and other records for personal use at home, in the workplace and in the community, using technology as appropriate; use probability, chance and predictions when planning and making everyday decisions; assess the reasonableness of calculators and problem-solving strategies; communicate mathematically and investigate, collect and examine information in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as members of a team.

10-4.6.1.

Develop and implement a plan for the collection, display and examination of data and information, using technology and other strategies as required.

10-4.6.1.1.

Predict, interpret, make comparisons and communicate information from graphs, tables, charts and other sources at home and in the workplace [CN, R]

10-4.6.1.2.

Recognize the uses of data and data collection and display tools in life- and work-related situations [CN, R]

10-4.6.1.3.

Record information and organize files and directories, using computers and/or other tools [CN, PS, R, T]

10-4.6.1.4.

Examine a plan for collecting and processing information and modify as appropriate for everyday situations [CN, PS, R]

10C.1.

Develop spatial sense and proportional reasoning.

10C.1.2.

Apply proportional reasoning to problems that involve conversions between SI and imperial units of measure. [C, ME, PS]

10C.1.3.

Solve problems, using SI and imperial units, that involve the surface area and volume of 3-D objects, including: right cones, right cylinders, right prisms, right pyramids, spheres. [CN, PS, R, V]

10C.1.4.

Develop and apply the primary trigonometric ratios (sine, cosine, tangent) to solve problems that involve right triangles. [C, CN, PS, R, T, V]

10C.2.

Develop algebraic reasoning and number sense.

10C.2.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of factors of whole numbers by determining the: prime factors, greatest common factor, least common multiple, square root, cube root. [CN, ME, R]

10C.2.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of irrational numbers by: representing, identifying and simplifying irrational numbers, ordering irrational numbers. [CN, ME, R, V] [ICT: C6-2.3]

10C.2.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of powers with integral and rational exponents. [C, CN, PS, R]

10C.2.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of the multiplication of polynomial expressions (limited to monomials, binomials and trinomials), concretely, pictorially and symbolically. [CN, R, V]

10C.2.5.

Demonstrate an understanding of common factors and trinomial factoring, concretely, pictorially and symbolically. [C, CN, R, V]

10C.3.

Develop algebraic and graphical reasoning through the study of relations.

10C.3.1.

Interpret and explain the relationships among data, graphs and situations. [C, CN, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.3, C7-4.2]

10C.3.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of relations and functions. [C, R, V]

10C.3.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of slope with respect to: rise and run, line segments and lines, rate of change, parallel lines, perpendicular lines. [PS, R, V]

10C.3.4.

Describe and represent linear relations, using: words, ordered pairs, tables of values, graphs, equations. [C, CN, R, V]

10C.3.5.

Determine the characteristics of the graphs of linear relations, including the: intercepts, slope, domain, range. [CN, PS, R, V]

10C.3.6.

Relate linear relations expressed in: slope-intercept form (y = mx + b), general form (Ax + By + C = 0), slope-point form (y - y1 = m(x - x1)) to their graphs. [CN, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.3]

10C.3.7.

Determine the equation of a linear relation, given: a graph, a point and the slope, two points, a point and the equation of a parallel or perpendicular line to solve problems. [CN, PS, R, V]

10C.3.8.

Represent a linear function, using function notation. [CN, ME, V]

10C.3.9.

Solve problems that involve systems of linear equations in two variables, graphically and algebraically. [CN, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1]

2.10.

Solve problems that involve exponential and logarithmic equations. [C, CN, PS, R]

2.11.

Demonstrate an understanding of factoring polynomials of degree greater than 2 (limited to polynomials of degree less that or equal to 5 with integral coefficients). [C, CN, ME]

2.12.

Graph and analyze polynomial functions (limited to polynomial functions of degree greater that or equal to 5). C, CN, T, V [ ] [ICT: C6-4.3, C6-4.4]

2.13.

Graph and analyze radical functions (limited to functions involving one radical). [CN, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3]

2.14.

Graph and analyze rational functions (limited to numerators and denominators that are monomials, binomials or trinomials). [CN, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3, C6-4.4]

2.7.

Demonstrate an understanding of logarithms. [CN, ME, R]

2.8.

Demonstrate an understanding of the product, quotient and power laws of logarithms. [C, CN, ME, R, T] [ICT: C6-4.1]

2.9.

Graph and analyze exponential and logarithmic functions. [C, CN, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.3, C6-4.4, F1-4.2]

20-1.1.

Develop algebraic reasoning and number sense.

20-1.1.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of the absolute value of real numbers. [R, V]

20-1.1.2.

Solve problems that involve operations on radicals and radical expressions with numerical and variable radicands. [CN, ME, PS, R]

20-1.1.3.

Solve problems that involve radical equations (limited to square roots). [C, PS, R]

20-1.1.4.

Determine equivalent forms of rational expressions (limited to numerators and denominators that are monomials, binomials or trinomials). [C, ME, R]

20-1.1.5.

Perform operations on rational expressions (limited to numerators and denominators that are monomials, binomials or trinomials). [CN, ME, R]

20-1.1.6.

Solve problems that involve rational equations (limited to numerators and denominators that are monomials, binomials or trinomials). [C, PS, R]

20-1.2.

Develop trigonometric reasoning.

20-1.2.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of angles in standard position [0 degrees to 360 degrees]. [R, V]

20-1.2.2.

Solve problems, using the three primary trigonometric ratios for angles from 0 degrees to 360 degrees in standard position. [C, ME, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1]

20-1.3.

Develop algebraic and graphical reasoning through the study of relations.

20-1.3.1.

Factor polynomial expressions of the form: a(x^2) + bx + c, a is not equal to zero; (a^2)(x^2) - (b^2)(y^2), a and b are not equal to zero; a(f(x))^2 + b(f(x)) + c, a is not equal to zero; (a^2)(f(x))^2 - (b^2)(g(y))^2 + c, a and b are not equal to zero where a, b, and c are rational numbers. [CN, ME, R]

20-1.3.2.

Graph and analyze absolute value functions (limited to linear and quadratic functions) to solve problems. [C, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3]

20-1.3.3.

Analyze quadratic functions of the form y = a(x - p)^2 + q and determine the: vertex, domain and range , direction of opening, axis of symmetry, x- and y-intercepts. [CN, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.3, C7-4.2]

20-1.3.4.

Analyze quadratic functions of the form y = a(x^2) + bx + c to identify characteristics of the corresponding graph, including: vertex, domain and range , direction of opening, axis of symmetry, x- and y-intercepts and to solve problems. [CN, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3]

20-1.3.5.

Solve problems that involve quadratic equations. [C, CN, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1]

20-1.3.6.

Solve, algebraically and graphically, problems that involve systems of linear-quadratic and quadratic-quadratic equations in two variables. [CN, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.4]

20-1.3.7.

Solve problems that involve linear and quadratic inequalities in two variables. [C, PS, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3]

20-1.3.8.

Solve problems that involve quadratic inequalities in one variable. [CN, PS, V]

20-1.3.9.

Analyze arithmetic sequences and series to solve problems. [CN, PS, R]

20-1.a.1.1.

Generate and experiment with strategies that contribute to forming tentative understandings, interpretations and positions [for example, posing questions, suspending prejudgement as appropriate, recognizing that initial interpretations and positions may be inaccurate and incomplete, and recognizing that texts may be inaccurate, misleading or ambiguous].

20-1.a.1.2.

Experiment with language, image and structure to create different effects in particular situations and for particular purposes and audiences [for example, present the same information to two different audiences, and make appropriate changes to the content to suit the audiences].

20-1.a.1.3.

Select appropriate strategies to extend awareness and understanding of new perspectives, monitor their effectiveness, and modify them as needed [for example, record new understandings in a learning log; develop new group perspectives using a fish bowl organization].

20-1.a.1.4.

Reflect on personal text preferences, identify influences that have contributed to the formation of these preferences, and select strategies that may be used to expand interests in texts and text creators [for example, complete and share reading inventories, and examine the role marketing plays in shaping popular culture].

20-1.a.1.5.

Appraise own strengths and weaknesses as a language user and language learner; select appropriate strategies to increase strengths and address weaknesses; monitor the effectiveness of selected strategies; and modify selected strategies as needed to optimize growth [for example, assess growth in writing by using a writing portfolio and portfolio reflections].

20-1.a.2.1.

Describe the text creator's purpose, and analyze the target audience.

20-1.a.2.2.

Use a variety of strategies to comprehend literature and other texts [for example, reading passages out loud, forming questions, making predictions, using context to determine the connotative meanings of words, using graphic organizers and making annotations], and develop strategies for close reading of literature in order to understand contextual elements [for example, understanding subtext].

20-1.a.2.3.

Reflect on and describe strategies used to engage prior knowledge as a means of assisting comprehension of new texts; and select, monitor and modify strategies as needed.

20-1.a.2.4.

Use a variety of appropriate reference strategies and reference technologies to aid understanding [for example, formulating and refining questions, exploring works cited in other references, taking notes, and using library catalogues and Internet search engines].

20-1.a.2.5.

Identify a variety of text forms, including communications forms and literary forms [for example, letters, memoranda, poems, narratives and dramatizations]; and describe the relationships of form to purpose and content.

20-1.a.2.6.

Explain how rhetorical devices and stylistic techniques used in print and nonprint texts create clarity, coherence and emphasis.

20-1.a.2.7.

Identify and consider personal, moral, ethical and cultural perspectives when studying literature and other texts; and reflect on and monitor how perspectives change as a result of interpretation and discussion.

20-1.a.2.8.

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

20-1.a.2.9.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

20-1.a.3.1.

Select and monitor the effectiveness of strategies to determine the depth and breadth of inquiry or research and to identify the purpose, audience and form of presentation.

20-1.a.3.2.

Reflect on and describe strategies for developing an inquiry or research plan that will foster understanding, select and monitor appropriate strategies, and modify strategies as needed to plan inquiry or research effectively [for example, use a research journal to keep and record reflections on the research process, clarify thinking, revisit initial perceptions and ask questions that lead to new research].

20-1.a.3.3.

Reflect on and describe strategies that may be used to select, record and organize information; select and monitor appropriate strategies; and modify selected strategies as needed.

20-1.a.3.4.

Reflect on and describe strategies to evaluate information sources for credibility and bias and for quality; and select, monitor and modify strategies as needed to evaluate sources and detect bias.

20-1.a.3.5.

Form generalizations by integrating new information with prior knowledge.

20-1.a.3.6.

Reflect on and assess the effectiveness of strategies used to guide inquiry or research [such as the effective use of time and the division of labour when involved in group research].

20-1.a.4.1.

Reflect on the purposes for text creation [for example, to inform, explain, persuade, entertain or inspire] and on own motives for selecting strategies to engage an audience [for example, to communicate information, promote action or build relationships]; and consider potential consequences of choices regarding text creation [for example, follow - up action may be required to clarify information, a position may need to be defended and opposing viewpoints addressed, and tone and style must be appropriate for intended audience].

20-1.a.4.2.

Take ownership of text creation, by selecting or crafting a topic, concept or idea that is personally meaningful and engaging.

20-1.a.4.3.

Meet particular production, publication and display requirements for print texts [for example, adhere to a particular manuscript style when creating a research paper]; and explain requirements in light of purpose, audience and situation.

20-1.a.4.4.

Assess the effectiveness of the controlling idea or desired unifying effect of a text in progress, and refine the controlling idea or desired unifying effect as appropriate to meet the intended purpose.

20-1.a.4.5.

Assess the beginning of a text in progress, and revise it as needed to establish purpose and engage audience [for example, the thesis statement of an essay, the initial monologue of a script, or the statement of purpose of a proposal].

20-1.a.4.6.

Reflect on personal vocabulary and repertoire of stylistic choices and on their effectiveness; and expand vocabulary and repertoire of stylistic choices.

20-1.a.4.7.

Use handbooks and other tools, including electronic tools, as resources to assist with text creation [for example, dictionaries, thesauri, spell checkers and handbooks].

20-1.a.5.1.

Monitor own use of verbal and nonverbal communication in order to convey respect and consideration, as appropriate [for example, use euphemism and body language appropriately and sensitively.

20-1.a.5.2.

Appreciate diversity of thought and expression, select and monitor appropriate strategies for appreciating diversity, and modify selected strategies as needed.

20-1.a.5.3.

Use language and image to honour own and others' accomplishments [for example, celebrate together when classmates have accomplished a particular task or produced, published or presented a particular text; or celebrate the completion of a portfolio with family and friends by holding a 'portfolio launch'].

20-1.a.5.4.

Set appropriate personal goals for participation in a group; respect, be open to, and be supportive of the thoughts, opinions and contributions of others in a group; and share personal knowledge, expertise and perspectives with others, as appropriate.

20-1.a.5.5.

Develop and use criteria to monitor and assess group processes [such as division of labour and time management].

20-1.b.1.1.

Assess the potential of understandings, interpretations and positions on ideas and issues communicated by literature and other texts by connecting own and others' explorations, and by exploring additional aspects of these texts.

20-1.b.1.2.

Experiment with a variety of strategies, activities and resources to explore ideas, observations, opinions, experiences and emotions [for example, stream - of - consciousness writing, free verse poetry, exploratory talk and improvisation].

20-1.b.1.3.

Compare own ideas, perspectives and interpretations with those of others, through a variety of means, to expand perceptions and understandings when exploring and responding to texts [for example, pro - con charts, alternative Internet search engines, comparison tables and think - pair - share charts].

20-1.b.1.4.

Expand interests in a range of genres and in a variety of texts and text creators, and explain how the content and style of various texts appeal to audiences with particular interests and preferences [for example, various versions of the same text].

20-1.b.1.5.

Set goals and employ strategies for language growth in relation to formal and informal personal communications and community involvement [for example, auditioning for a play or applying to be a volunteer].

20-1.b.2.1.

Describe how societal forces can influence the production of texts [for example, current issues and trends].

20-1.b.2.2.

Describe how supporting ideas and supporting details strengthen a text's controlling idea.

20-1.b.2.3.

Assess personal expectations for texts to be studied in light of prior experiences with and observations about similar contexts, content and text forms.

20-1.b.2.4.

Create and use own reference materials to aid understanding [for example, a personalized dictionary/glossary and a personalized World Wide Web/URL address list].

20-1.b.2.5.

Describe audience factors that may have influenced a text creator's choice of form and medium [for example, age, gender and culture of the audience].

20-1.b.2.6.

Explain how various textual elements and stylistic techniques contribute to the creation of atmosphere, tone and voice [for example, qualification and interrupted movement].

20-1.b.2.7.

Respond personally and analytically to ideas developed in works of literature and other texts; and analyze the ways in which ideas are reflected in personal and cultural opinions, values, beliefs and perspectives.

20-1.b.2.8.

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

20-1.b.2.9.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

20-1.b.3.1.

Describe the purpose of inquiry or research and the scope of the inquiry or research topic; identify the target audience; and identify the potential form for the presentation of inquiry or research findings, when applicable [such as a narrative, report, diary entry or biography].

20-1.b.3.2.

Select from a repertoire of effective strategies to develop appropriate inquiry or research plans that will address the topic and satisfy contextual and presentation requirements [for example, questions within questions, inquiry charts, preliminary interviews, and consultations with the teacher and/or librarian].

20-1.b.3.3.

Select information and other material appropriate to purpose from a variety of print and nonprint sources [for example, from museums, archives, government agencies, periodicals, microfiche, Internet, CD - ROMs, films, television and radio broadcasts, interviews, surveys, and print and online encyclopedias].

20-1.b.3.4.

Assess information sources for appropriateness to purpose, audience and presentation form.

20-1.b.3.6.

Identify strategies to improve future inquiry or research, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies.

20-1.b.4.1.

Describe the purpose and target audience, and select from a repertoire of strategies to accomplish the purpose and engage the audience [for example, one purpose of a job application letter may be to persuade the employer to reade the resume; address the letter to the potential employer, using the correct name and title, and explain in the letter that you have the required skills and talents for the job.

20-1.b.4.2.

Recognize and assess personal variables [such as personal experience and prior knowledge] and contextual variables [such as availability of time and resources] that influence the selection of a topic, concept or idea; and address these variables to increase the likelihood of successful text creation.

20-1.b.4.3.

Adapt presentation materials, strategies and technologies to suit purpose, audience and situation [for example, increase audience participation in a lecture by providing a notetaking frame].

20-1.b.4.4.

Review the accuracy, specificity, precision, vividness and relevance of details, events, images, facts or other data intended to support a controlling idea or to develop a unifying effect; and add to, modify or delete details, events, images, facts or other data as needed to provide complete and effective support or development.

20-1.b.4.5.

Assess the organizational components of a text in progress, and revise them as needed to strengthen their effectiveness as units of thought or experience or to strengthen their contribution to other intended effects [such as emphasis or transition].

20-1.b.4.7.

Know and be able to apply capitalization and punctuation conventions correctly, including end punctuation, commas, semicolons, colons, apostrophes, quotation marks, hyphens, dashes, ellipses, parentheses, underlining and italics.

20-1.b.5.1.

Analyze and describe language and images used in literature and other texts to convey respectful and considerate, or disrespectful and inconsiderate, perspectives and attitudes [for example, stereotyping that contributes to negative portrayals of characters in literature and persons in life].

20-1.b.5.2.

Explain how selected works of literature and other print and nonprint texts convey, shape and, at times, challenge individual and group values and behaviours.

20-1.b.5.4.

Reflect on and describe strategies used to negotiate, coordinate and cooperate with others; select appropriate strategies for negotiating, coordinating and cooperating with others; monitor selected strategies; and modify selected strategies as needed to accomplish group goals.

20-1.b.5.5.

Understand the various potential roles and responsibilities of group members [such as researcher and presenter; director and participant; and chairperson, recorder and timekeeper; or roles of Aboriginal Elders in teaching about the medicine wheel and about respect, humility, kindness, sharing, honesty, faith and perseverance], and appreciate the contribution that these roles make to group processes.

20-1.c.1.5.

Identify and access learning sources and opportunities; assess, weigh and manage risk; and demonstrate a willingness to continuously learn and grow.

20-1.c.2.1.

Explain the relationship between text and context in terms of how elements in an environment can affect the way in which a text is created [for example, the historical context in which the text is written; gender - biased language can provide information about the context in which a text was created in terms of dominant culture].

20-1.c.2.2.

Describe the relationships among plot, setting, character, atmosphere and theme when studying a narrative.

20-1.c.2.3.

Use metacognitive strategies to understand how knowledge of rhetorical devices, textual elements and structures used in previously studied texts contributes to understanding new texts.

20-1.c.2.5.

Explain how a variety of organizational patterns and structural features contribute to purpose and content.

20-1.c.2.6.

Analyze the use of irony and satire to create effects in print and nonprint texts [for example, dramatic irony to create suspense, verbal irony to create humour, and satire to evoke response].

20-1.c.2.7.

Explain how the choices and motives of characters and people presented in texts may provide insight into the choices and motives of self and others.

20-1.c.2.8.

Analyze and assess settings and plots in terms of created reality and plausibility [for example, determine the authenticity of the setting of a work of historical fiction].

20-1.c.3.1.

Refine the purpose of inquiry or research by limiting or expanding the topic as appropriate.

20-1.c.3.2.

Determine the breadth and depth of prior knowledge, and formulate questions to determine and categorize information needs and to guide the collection of required information [for example, a chart to demonstrate what is already known and what needs to be learned].

20-1.c.3.3.

Record information accurately and completely; and document and reference sources, as appropriate [for example, document direct quotations, others' ideas and arguments, maps, charts, statistics, pictures and diagrams from books, magazines, bibliographies, newspapers, audiovisual materials, electronic sources, interviews and films to avoid plagiarism].

20-1.c.3.4.

Assess the accuracy, completeness, currency and relevance of information selected from sources; and assess the appropriateness of the information for purpose.

20-1.c.3.5.

Distinguish between support and generalization, and provide support for generalizations and conclusions.

20-1.c.3.6.

Review the appropriateness, accuracy and significance of findings, conclusions and generalizations drawn from gathered data and information; prepare a detailed record of references; determine how best to share the information; and determine next steps, if any.

20-1.c.4.1.

Address audience factors that affect text creation [for example, reread parts of a text and refine work, when creating the good copy of a personal response to literature, in order to address suggestions made at a peer conference about areas that were overlooked].

20-1.c.4.2.

Establish a focus for text creation, and communicate scope by framing an effective controlling idea or describing a strong unifying effect.

20-1.c.4.3.

Develop and deliver oral, visual and multimedia presentations, using voice production factors [such as volume, tone and stress], nonverbal factors [such as gestures, posture, distance and eye contact] and visual production factors [such as colour and contrast] appropriate to purpose, audience and situation.

20-1.c.4.4.

Assess reasoning for logic and evidence for consistency, completeness and relevance; and strengthen reasoning as needed by adding to, modifying or deleting details to provide significant evidence and make effective and convincing arguments [for example, work with a small group to use a revision strategy like Workshop Advice, where each person in the group provides one suggestion for a sentence change].

20-1.c.4.5.

Assess the closing of a text in progress; and revise it as needed to ensure that it is related to purpose, that it establishes a sense of developed understanding and that it will have an appropriate effect on audience.

20-1.c.4.6.

Assess syntax for appropriateness and effectiveness, and revise sentence structures as needed to create intended effects.

20-1.c.4.7.

Know and be able to apply spelling conventions consistently and independently.

20-1.c.5.1.

Analyze and describe positive or negative portrayals of characters in literature and persons in life, and be sensitive to the feelings of others.

20-1.c.5.2.

Analyze the relationship between a text creator's ideas and opinions and his or her underlying assumptions [such as those deriving from ideology or social status].

20-1.c.5.4.

Ensure that a team's purpose and objectives are clear .

20-1.c.5.5.

Identify and use various means to facilitate completion of group projects [for example, establish clear purposes and procedures for solving problems, monitor progress, and make modifications to meet stated objectives].

20-1.d.2.1.

Identify the impact that personal context - experience, prior knowledge - has on constructing meaning from a text.

20-1.d.2.2.

Compare the personality traits, roles, relationships, motivations, attitudes, values and archetypal qualities, when appropriate, of characters developed/persons presented in literature and other texts.

20-1.d.2.3.

Classify the genre/form of new texts according to attributes of genres/forms previously studied.

20-1.d.2.5.

Analyze the effect of medium on message.

20-1.d.2.6.

Describe the effects of musical devices, figures of speech and sensory details in print and nonprint texts [for example, alliteration used to create emphasis, metaphor used to evoke images, and sensory details used to evoke pathos].

20-1.d.2.7.

Identify and examine ways in which cultural and societal influences are reflected in a variety of Canadian and international texts.

20-1.d.2.8.

Analyze and assess character and characterization in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility, and in terms of contribution to theme [for example, determine the meanings suggested by a change in a character's behaviour or values].

20-1.d.3.2.

Identify and predict the usefulness of information sources intended to fill gaps between prior knowledge and required information [for example, whether or not a survey or interview will be useful].

20-1.d.3.4.

Identify and describe possible biases of sources, and describe the possible effects of such biases on the credibility of information [for example, examine the credibility of the author or organization, the proportion of verifiable facts to generalizations, or the sponsor/ author/purpose/date of a Web site].

20-1.d.4.1.

Analyze expectations and constraints of a communication situation, and select preferred strategies to address expectations and constraints [for example, when making a presentation, watch audience cues to determine background knowledge of the subject area, and provide additional information as required; request extra time in advance if time is a constraint].

20-1.d.4.2.

Develop supporting details, by using developmental aids appropriate to form and purpose [for example, use charts to collect and assemble details in creating character comparisons when developing a comparison and contrast essay, or use a think - aloud reading strategy to make notes from informational text when writing a summary].

20-1.d.4.3.

Develop a repertoire of effective strategies that can be used to create rapport with an audience [for example, use personal anecdotes and examples].

20-1.d.4.4.

Assess the plausibility and appropriateness of literary interpretations and the precision, completeness and relevance of evidence when reviewing and revising critical/analytical responses to literature.

20-1.d.4.5.

Assess relationships among controlling idea, supporting ideas and supporting details; and strengthen relationships as needed to enhance the unity of texts.

20-1.d.4.6.

Apply understanding of stylistic techniques and rhetorical devices when creating print and nonprint texts [for example, use imagery to create pathos, use parallel structure to create emphasis, and use sound in multimedia texts to create humour].

20-1.d.4.7.

Understand the importance of grammatical agreement; and assess and revise texts in progress to ensure correctness of grammatical agreement, including correct pronoun reference and pronoun - antecedent agreement, and correct use of modifiers and other parts of speech.

20-1.d.5.1.

Analyze behavioural expectations of a communication situation, explain how verbal and nonverbal communication contributes to the inclusion or exclusion of individuals involved in a communication situation, and use verbal and nonverbal communication that is inclusive of other individuals [for example, use empathetic listening skills when working in groups, and be aware of body language].

20-1.d.5.5.

Understand and appreciate the function of teamwork tools, assess how to work effectively and collaboratively as a team to accomplish a task, understand the role of conflict in a group to reach solutions, and manage and resolve conflict when appropriate.

20-1.e.2.2.

Describe a text creator's tone and register; and identify the moral and ethical stance communicated by a text.

20-1.e.2.6.

Explain the contribution of motif and symbol to controlling idea and theme.

20-1.e.2.8.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

20-1.e.3.2.

Identify and select potential strategies and technologies for gathering, generating and recording information [for example, outlining, webbing, taking notes in point form, recording sources accurately during information gathering, writing direct quotations correctly and bookmarking Internet sites].

20-1.e.3.3.

Observe guidelines for Internet use [for example, keep passwords, telephone numbers and addresses confidential; visit appropriate sites; respect copyright; and observe rules for citing Internet sources, following correct procedures to avoid plagiarism].

20-1.e.4.2.

Develop content to support a controlling idea or to produce a unifying effect [for example, condense information, summarize content and define a thesis statement to construct a precis of a magazine article].

20-1.e.4.5.

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

20-1.e.4.7.

Assess and revise texts in progress to ensure correct subject - verb agreement, correct pronoun case and appropriate consistency of verb tense.

20-1.e.5.1.

Accept, offer and appreciate the value of constructive criticism [for example, use writing to respond to constructive criticism, and accept and provide feedback in a constructive and considerate manner].

20-1.e.5.5.

Identify and analyze the communications needs of, and assess the working relationships among, individuals and groups involved in a variety of communications careers [such as advertising, public relations and broadcast journalism].

20-1.f.2.2.

Interpret figurative language, symbol and allusions; recognize imagery; and explain how imagery contributes to atmosphere, characterization and theme in a text.

20-1.f.2.6.

Differentiate between effective and ineffective presentations, and analyze the differences.

20-1.f.2.8.

Assess the significance of a text's theme or controlling idea, and the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of its supporting details, examples or illustrations, and content in general.

20-1.f.4.2.

Develop content appropriate to form and context [for example, provide grounds and evidence to construct an argument, and use chronological order in an informal essay to write a factual narrative account of a personal experience].

20-1.f.5.1.

Analyze the parameters of public tolerance regarding the use of language and images in a specific text, and use appropriate language and images in communication situations.

20-1.g.2.2.

Analyze visual and aural elements, and explain how they contribute to the meaning of texts.

20-1.g.2.6.

Analyze persuasive techniques used in a variety of print and nonprint texts.

20-1.g.4.2.

Incorporate effective examples from personal experience, concepts and ideas from exploration, and findings from inquiry and research into created texts, when appropriate [for example, incorporate visual aids in a prepared speech and taped sound effects in a dramatization of a scene from a play].

20-1.g.4.7.

Assess and revise texts in progress to ensure the correct use of clauses and phrases, including verbal phrases (participle, gerund and infinitive), and to ensure the correct use of structural features [such as appositives and parallel structure].

20-1.h.2.2.

Describe the relationship between audience response to the content of a presentation and audience response to the performance of the presenter.

20-1.h.4.7.

Pay particular attention to punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage and sentence construction when using unfamiliar vocabulary, complex syntax and sophisticated rhetorical devices.

20-2-b.2.4.

Create and use own reference materials to aid understanding [for example, a personalized dictionary/glossary and a personalized World Wide Web/URL address list].

20-2.1.

Develop spatial sense and proportional reasoning.

20-2.1.1.

Solve problems that involve the application of rates. [CN, PS, R]

20-2.1.2.

Solve problems that involve scale diagrams, using proportional reasoning. [CN, PS, R, V]

20-2.1.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of the relationships among scale factors, areas, surface areas and volumes of similar 2-D shapes and 3-D objects. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

20-2.2.

Develop spatial sense.

20-2.2.1.

Derive proofs that involve the properties of angles and triangles. [CN, R, V]

20-2.2.2.

Solve problems that involve properties of angles and triangles. [CN, PS, V]

20-2.3.

Develop number sense and logical reasoning.

20-2.3.1.

Analyze and prove conjectures, using inductive and deductive reasoning, to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, R]

20-2.3.3.

Solve problems that involve operations on radicals and radical expressions with numerical and variable radicands (limited to square roots). [CN, ME, PS, R]

20-2.3.4.

Solve problems that involve radical equations (limited to square roots or cube roots). [C, PS, R]

20-2.4.

Develop statistical reasoning.

20-2.4.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of normal distribution, including: standard deviation, z-scores. [CN, PS, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C7-4.2]

20-2.4.2.

Interpret statistical data, using: confidence intervals, confidence levels, margin of error. [C, CN, R] [ICT: C1-4.2, C2-4.2, C7-4.2]

20-2.5.

Develop algebraic and graphical reasoning through the study of relations.

20-2.5.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of quadratic functions, including: vertex, intercepts, domain and range, axis of symmetry. [CN, PS, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3]

20-2.5.2.

Solve problems that involve quadratic equations. [C, CN, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3]

20-2.6.

Develop an appreciation of the role of mathematics in society.

20-2.6.1.

Research and give a presentation on a historical event or an area of interest that involves mathematics. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C1-4.2, C1-4.4, C2-4.1, C3-4.1, C3-4.2, C7-4.2, F2-4.7]

20-2.a.2.1.

Paraphrase key messages in a specific text and identify elements present in the communication situation, in order to describe the text creator's purpose and target audience [for example, understand the subtext in a television commercial to know the intended audience].

20-2.a.2.2.

Use a variety of strategies to comprehend literature and other texts [for example, reading passages out loud, forming questions, making predictions, using context to determine the connotative meanings of words, using graphic organizers, making annotations, inferring, rereading, seeking assistance, using context clues, summarizing and visualizing], develop a daily practice of reading [for example, paired reading, reading log, nightly reading, taped reading], and develop strategies for close reading.

20-2.a.2.3.

Reflect on and describe strategies used to engage prior knowledge as a means of assisting comprehension of new texts; and select, monitor and modify strategies as needed.

20-2.a.2.4.

Use a variety of appropriate reference strategies and reference technologies to aid understanding [for example, formulating and refining questions, exploring works cited in other references, taking notes, and using library catalogues and Internet search engines].

20-2.a.2.5.

Identify a variety of text forms, including communications forms and literary forms [for example, letters, memoranda, poems, narratives and dramatizations]; and describe the relationship of form to purpose.

20-2.a.2.6.

Identify rhetorical devices [such as repetition] and stylistic techniques [such as straightforward sentence structures] that create clarity, coherence and emphasis in print and nonprint texts.

20-2.a.2.7.

Identify and consider personal moral and ethical perspectives, as well as cultural perspectives, when studying literature and other texts; and reflect on and monitor how perspectives change as a result of interpretation and discussion.

20-2.a.2.8.

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

20-2.a.2.9.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

20-2.a.4.1.

Reflect on the purposes for text creation [for example, to inform, explain, persuade, entertain or inspire] and on own motives for selecting strategies to engage an audience [for example, to communicate information, promote action or build relationships]; and consider potential consequences of choices regarding text creation [for example, follow - up action may be required to clarify information, a position may need to be defended and opposing viewpoints addressed, and tone and style must be appropriate for intended audience].

20-2.a.4.2.

Select a text form appropriate to the purpose for text creation and consistent with the content to be presented in the text [for example, select a photo essay for the purpose of creating a persuasive or informative text when the content to be presented is well suited to the creation of a visual text].

20-2.a.4.3.

Take ownership of text creation, by selecting or crafting a topic, concept or idea that is personally meaningful and engaging.

20-2.a.4.4.

Meet production, publication and display requirements for print texts as appropriate to purpose, audience and situation [for example, consider layout, font and visuals, costs and timelines when publishing a brochure].

20-2.a.4.5.

Review the controlling idea or desired unifying effect of a text in progress for clarity and focus; and modify the controlling idea or desired unifying effect as appropriate to meet the requirements of purpose, audience and situation [for example, use a read - aloud strategy to read a draft in progress to a partner, and incorporate feedback from the partner in creating the next draft].

20-2.a.4.6.

Assess the beginning of a text in progress, and revise it as needed to establish purpose and engage audience [for example, the thesis statement of an essay, the initial monologue of a script, or the statement of purpose of a proposal].

20-2.a.4.7.

Use handbooks and other tools, including electronic tools, as resources to assist with text creation [for example, dictionaries, thesauri, spell checkers and handbooks].

20-2.b.2.1.

Explain how a text can be studied to understand the context - or aspects of the communication situation within which the text was created [for example, recognize that specialized terminology in a text may represent a particular occupational group and provide insight in understanding the text; understand current issues to recognize satire in a political cartoon].

20-2.b.2.2.

Paraphrase a text's controlling idea, and relate supporting ideas and supporting details to the controlling idea.

20-2.b.2.3.

Assess personal expectations for texts to be studied in light of prior experiences with and observations about similar contexts, content and text forms.

20-2.b.2.5.

Describe audience factors that may have influenced a text creator's choice of form and medium [for example, age, gender and culture of the audience].

20-2.b.2.6.

Describe how textual elements that are effective in the creation of atmosphere are also effective in terms of tone and voice [for example, setting, music, lighting, diction, syntax and image].

20-2.b.2.7.

Respond personally and analytically to ideas developed in literature and other texts.

20-2.b.2.8.

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

20-2.b.2.9.

Describe the effectiveness of various texts, including media texts, for presenting feelings, ideas and information, and for evoking response.

20-2.b.4.1.

Describe the purpose and target audience, and select from a repertoire of strategies to accomplish the purpose and engage the audience [for example, one purpose of a job application letter may be to persuade the employer to read the resume; address the letter to the potential employer, using the correct name and title, and explain in the letter that you have the required skills and talents for the job].

20-2.b.4.2.

Explore a variety of structures consistent with form, content and purpose when creating texts [for example, explore the use of background information, examples, anecdotes and other structures when creating personal essays].

20-2.b.4.3.

Recognize and assess personal variables [such as personal experience and prior knowledge] and contextual variables [such as availability of time and resources] that influence the selection of a topic, concept or idea; and address these variables to increase the likelihood of successful text creation.

20-2.b.4.4.

Develop presentation materials; and select strategies and technologies appropriate to purpose, audience and situation [for example, use technologies such as presentation software, videos, CD ROMs, DVDs, audiotaped interviews and handouts].

20-2.b.4.5.

Review the accuracy, specificity and precision of details, events, images, facts or other data intended to support a controlling idea or to develop a unifying effect; and add to details, events, images, facts or other data as needed to provide sufficient support or development [for example, use a revision strategy such as the Five R's to read, react, rework, reflect and refine work].

20-2.b.4.6.

Review the organizational components of a text in progress [such as paragraphs, scenes or steps in a process], and revise them as needed to strengthen their effectiveness as units of thought or experience.

20-2.b.4.7.

Know and be able to apply capitalization and punctuation conventions correctly, including end punctuation, commas, semicolons, colons, apostrophes, quotation marks, hyphens, dashes, ellipses, parentheses, underlining and italics [for example, keep a personal editing checklist as a style guide for writing].

20-2.c.2.1.

Use strategies to gain background knowledge about history and society when studying a particular text [for example, use references, including the personal experiences and understandings of teachers and elders, to help develop background knowledge of the historical period of a particular text].

20-2.c.2.2.

Develop an understanding of the relationships among plot, setting and character when studying a narrative text, by relating the text to personal experiences.

20-2.c.2.3.

Use metacognitive strategies to relate prior understandings of textual elements used in previously studied texts to understandings of new texts.

20-2.c.2.5.

Explain how organizational patterns and structural features contribute to purpose and content.

20-2.c.2.6.

Recognize irony and humour in print and nonprint texts, and identify language and ideas used to create irony and humour.

20-2.c.2.7.

Explain how the choices and motives of characters and people presented in texts may provide insight into the choices and motives of self and others.

20-2.c.2.8.

Analyze and assess settings and plots in terms of created reality and plausibility [for example, determine the authenticity of the setting of a work of historical fiction].

20-2.c.4.1.

Address audience factors that affect text creation [for example, address comments made by peers about the lack of healthy food served in the school cafeteria while creating a photograph and paragraph to communicate own response to the issue].

20-2.c.4.2.

Select an effective medium appropriate to content and context, and explain its use [for example, select a medium such as print advertisements in magazines, and explain the use of this medium to sell merchandise; explore the content of the advertisements in terms of the messages and values communicated; and explain the context, including audience and purpose].

20-2.c.4.3.

Establish a focus for text creation, and communicate scope by framing an effective controlling idea or describing a strong unifying effect.

20-2.c.4.4.

Develop and deliver oral, visual and multimedia presentations, using voice production factors [such as volume, tone and stress], nonverbal factors [such as gestures, posture, distance and eye contact] and visual production factors [such as colour and contrast] appropriate to purpose, audience and situation.

20-2.c.4.5.

Assess own critical/analytical responses for consistency, completeness and relevance of evidence; and strengthen reasoning as needed by adding to, modifying or deleting details to provide reliable and pertinent evidence and make effective arguments [for example, work with a small group to use a revision strategy like Workshop Advice, where each person in the group provides one suggestion for a sentence change].

20-2.c.4.7.

Know and be able to apply spelling conventions independently or with the use of a handbook or other tools, such as a list of spelling strategies or rules.

20-2.d.2.1.

Identify the impact that personal context - experience, prior knowledge - has on constructing meaning from a text.

20-2.d.2.2.

Compare the personality traits, relationships, motivations and attitudes of characters developed/persons presented in works of literature and other texts.

20-2.d.2.5.

Analyze the effect of medium on message.

20-2.d.2.6.

Describe the effects of musical devices and figures of speech in print and nonprint texts [for example, personification, hyperbole, alliteration, onomatopoeia and imitative harmony].

20-2.d.2.7.

Respond personally and critically to cultural and societal influences presented in Canadian and international texts.

20-2.d.2.8.

Analyze and assess character and characterization in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility, and in terms of contribution to theme [for example, determine the meanings suggested by a change in a character's behaviour or values].

20-2.d.4.1.

Analyze expectations and constraints of a communication situation, and select strategies to address expectations and constraints [for example, when making a presentation, request extra time in advance if time is a constraint].

20-2.d.4.2.

Understand the concept of convention; and apply it to oral, print, visual and multimedia text forms when appropriate [for example, understand the common conventions of a modern play script; and include dialogue, stage directions, and directions for lighting and sound effects when creating a script, as appropriate].

20-2.d.4.3.

Develop supporting details, by using developmental aids appropriate to form and purpose [for example, use thought webs/mind maps to collect ideas and make connections when writing a personal response to literature, or use a think - aloud reading strategy to make notes from informational text when writing a summary].

20-2.d.4.4.

Experiment with various strategies to create rapport between the presenter and the audience [for example, use personal anecdotes and examples, ask questions to involve the audience, and use engaging body language].

20-2.d.4.6.

Assess relationships among controlling idea, supporting ideas and supporting details; and strengthen relationships as needed to enhance the unity of texts [for example, to analyze these relationships write an outline for another student's completed essay and review the outline for own completed essay created by the other student].

20-2.d.4.7.

Know and be able to identify parts of speech in own and others' texts, including prepositions, definite and indefinite articles, and coordinating and subordinating conjunctions; and review and revise texts in progress to ensure correct use of parts of speech, including correctness of pronoun reference and pronoun - antecedent agreement.

20-2.e.2.2.

Describe a text creator's tone, relate tone to purpose and audience, and identify the point of view communicated by a text.

20-2.e.2.6.

Explain the contribution of symbol to theme.

20-2.e.2.8.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

20-2.e.4.3.

Develop content to support a controlling idea or to produce a unifying effect [for example, use a graphic organizer such as an inverted pyramid to analyze a television broadcast of a newsworthy event, to understand the structure of news stories and to identify a media theme to explore].

20-2.e.4.6.

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

20-2.e.4.7.

Know and be able to identify parts of the sentence in own and others' texts, including subject, verb, direct object and indirect object.

20-2.f.2.2.

Identify figurative language [such as metaphor], symbol and familiar allusions in texts; interpret figurative language in terms of its contribution to the meaning of a text; and explain how imagery contributes to the creation of atmosphere, theme and characterization in a text.

20-2.f.2.6.

Differentiate between effective and ineffective presentations, identify the differences, and analyze the reasons for the differences.

20-2.f.2.8.

Assess the significance of a text's theme or controlling idea, and the effectiveness of the content in terms of adequate and relevant supporting details, examples or illustrations.

20-2.f.4.3.

Develop content appropriate to form and context [for example, provide grounds and evidence to construct an argument, and use chronological order in an autobiography to write a factual narrative account of a personal experience].

20-2.f.4.7.

Detect and correct common sentence faults - run - on sentence and unintended sentence fragment.

20-2.g.2.2.

Recognize visual and aural elements in texts, and explain how these elements add meaning to texts.

20-2.g.2.6.

Analyze persuasive techniques used in a variety of print and nonprint texts.

20-2.g.4.3.

Incorporate effective examples from personal experience, concepts and ideas from exploration, and findings from inquiry and research into created texts, when appropriate [for example, incorporate visual aids in a prepared speech and taped sound effects in a dramatization of a scene from a play].

20-2.g.4.7.

Develop the use of common sentence structures - simple, compound, complex and compound - complex.

20-2.h.2.2.

Respond to the content of a presentation; and describe the relationship, in general, between audience response to content and audience response to the performance of a presenter.

20-2.h.4.7.

Pay particular attention to punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage and sentence construction when using unfamiliar vocabulary, complex syntax and sophisticated rhetorical devices.

20-2.j.4.7.

Explain why certain communication situations demand particular attention to correctness of punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage and sentence construction.

20-3.1.

Develop spatial sense through direct and indirect measurement.

20-3.1.1.

Solve problems that involve SI and imperial units in surface area measurements and verify the solutions. [C, CN, ME, PS, V]

20-3.1.2.

Solve problems that involve SI and imperial units in volume and capacity measurements. [C, CN, ME, PS, V]

20-3.2.

Develop spatial sense.

20-3.2.1.

Solve problems that involve two and three right triangles. [CN, PS, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1]

20-3.2.2.

Solve problems that involve scale. [PS, R, V]

20-3.2.3.

Model and draw 3-D objects and their views. [CN, R, V]

20-3.3.

Develop number sense and critical thinking skills.

20-3.3.1.

Analyze puzzles and games that involve numerical reasoning, using problem-solving strategies. [C, CN, PS, R]

20-3.3.2.

Solve problems that involve personal budgets. [CN, PS, R, T] [ICT: C6-4.2, C6-4.4]

20-3.3.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of compound interest. [CN, ME, PS, T] [ICT: C6-4.1]

20-3.3.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of financial institution services used to access and manage finances. [C, CN, R, T] [ICT: F2-4.6]

20-3.3.5.

Demonstrate an understanding of credit options, including: credit cards, loans. [CN, ME, PS, R] [ICT: F2-4.7]

20-3.4.

Develop algebraic reasoning.

20-3.4.1.

Solve problems that require the manipulation and application of formulas related to: volume and capacity, surface area, slope and rate of change, simple interest, finance charges. [CN, PS, R]

20-3.4.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of slope: as rise over run, as rate of change, by solving problems. [C, CN, PS, V]

20-3.5.

Develop statistical reasoning.

20-3.5.1.

Solve problems that involve creating and interpreting graphs, including: bar graphs, histograms, line graphs, circle graphs. [C, CN, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.2, C6-4.3, P2-4.1]

20-4.1.

Number (Number Concepts and Number Operations): Students will estimate and solve problems using numbers, money, decimals, percents, fractions, ratios and proportion in everyday home, workplace and community contexts, using technology as appropriate; develop and demonstrate number sense to describe quantities, represent numbers in multiple ways and apply appropriate arithmetic operations; assess the reasonableness of calculations and problem-solving strategies; communicate mathematically and investigate the application of number concepts and operations in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as a member of a team.

20-4.1.1.

Solve everyday home, community and workplace problems by applying arithmetic operations to whole numbers, decimals, common fractions, percents and integers.

20-4.1.1.1.

Use estimation strategies to estimate and apply arithmetic operations to solve everyday problems, using: whole numbers, integers (add/subtract only), decimals, fractions, mixed numbers, percents [CN, E, PS, R]

20-4.1.1.2.

Estimate and round numbers and decimals, e.g., money, to the nearest unit, tenth and hundredth to solve problems in everyday contexts [E, PS, R]

20-4.1.1.3.

Assess the reasonableness of applied calculations and problem-solving strategies, using a variety of tools and/or strategies; e.g., estimation, charts, graphs, calculators and/or computers [E, R, T, V]

20-4.1.1.4.

Identify and use appropriate tools, e.g., tables, charts, spreadsheets and calculators, to increase accuracy in everyday and/or work-related problem-solving situations [CN, PS, R, T]

20-4.1.1.5.

Create, use and modify a spreadsheet template for a variety of everyday contexts, including the determining of interest rates, vehicle payments, investments or budgets [CN, PS, R, T]

20-4.1.1.6.

Use a variety of methods and tools to convert fractional percents to decimal forms [CN, PS, R]

20-4.1.1.8.

Estimate unit costs and compare costs of everyday purchases [CN, E, PS, R]

20-4.2.

Patterns and Relations (Patterns and Relationships): Students will recognize that patterns and relationships exist in nature and everyday living; use patterns and relationships to develop a better understanding of their environments and to solve everyday problems at home, in the workplace and in the community, using technology as appropriate; assess the reasonableness of calculations and problem-solving strategies; communicate mathematically and investigate the application of patterns and relationships in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as a member of a team.

20-4.2.1.

Express and use patterns, variables and expressions, including those used in business and industry, with graphs to solve problems at home, in the community and in the workplace.

20-4.2.1.1.

Use relationships and patterns to summarize, generalize and predict when problem solving and decision making in life- and work-related contexts [CN, PS, R]

20-4.2.1.2.

Generalize patterns arising from everyday problem-solving contexts, using mathematical expressions and equations and/or verifying by substitution [CN, PS, R]

20-4.3.

Patterns and Relations (Variables and Equations): Students will represent algebraic expressions in multiple ways to solve problems, using technology as appropriate; communicate mathematically and investigate the application of variables and equations in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as a member of a team.

20-4.3.1.

Use variables and equations to express, summarize and apply relationships as problem-solving tools in a restricted range of contexts.

20-4.3.1.3.

Interpret formulas related to practical situations and solve everyday problems using common arithmetic expressions and relationships; e.g., perimeter and area [CN, PS, R, V]

20-4.4.

Shape and Space (Measurement): Students will estimate and take accurate measurements using everyday metric (SI) and Imperial units of measure; solve problems using appropriate measuring devices, i.e., metric (SI) and Imperial, strategies and technology in home, workplace and community contexts; communicate mathematically and investigate the application of measurement knowledge and skills in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as members of a team; assess the reasonableness of calculations and problem-solving strategies.

20-4.4.1.

Estimate, measure and compare using whole numbers, decimals, fractions and metric (SI) and Imperial units of measure to solve everyday problems.

20-4.4.1.1.

Use appropriate metric (SI) and Imperial measuring strategies, tools and units to measure: length, volume (capacity), mass (weight), angles, time and temperature

20-4.4.1.2.

Measure within acceptable degrees of accuracy as required in life- and work-related situations [CN, PS, R, T]

20-4.4.1.4.

Use conversion charts, calculators and/or other tools to compare and convert common metric (SI) and Imperial units of measure, as required in everyday contexts [R, T]

20-4.4.1.5.

Investigate the types and uses of measuring tools and units within the community and workplace [C, V]

20-4.5.

Shape and Space (3-D Objects and 2-D Shapes and Transformations): Students will create, examine and manipulate 3-D objects and 2-D shapes using transformations and technology, and other tools as appropriate, to better understand shapes and objects at home, in the workplace and in the community; communicate mathematically and investigate the application of shape and space in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as members of a team.

20-4.5.1.

Use visualization and symmetry to: Extend their awareness of objects and shapes, Create and examine patterns and designs using congruence, symmetry, translation, rotation and reflection.

20-4.5.1.5.

Read and interpret scale drawings and models in workplace and community situations [C, R, T]

20-4.5.1.6.

Use scale diagrams, including enlargements and reductions, to solve construction, renovation and other related problems [CN, PS, R, T]

20-4.5.1.8.

Read and interpret maps to locate specific sites, determine distances, give directions or use public transportation [C, CN, R, V]

20-4.6.

Statistics and Probability (Collecting and Analyzing Information): Students will collect, generate, interpret, examine and maintain data, charts, graphs and other records for personal use at home, in the workplace and in the community, using technology as appropriate; use probability, chance and predictions when planning and making everyday decisions; assess the reasonableness of calculators and problem-solving strategies; communicate mathematically and investigate, collect and examine information in a variety of career and workplace situations, working individually or as members of a team.

20-4.6.1.

Develop and implement a plan for the collection, display and examination of data and information, using technology and other strategies as required.

20-4.6.1.1.

Use information and data from a variety of sources to make comparisons, predictions, inferences, conclusions and/or decisions in everyday situations [CN, E, PS, R]

20-4.6.1.2.

Record and organize information and data as appropriate in life- and work-related situations [CN, R]

20-4.6.1.3.

Use probability and statistics to predict upcoming events and to make decisions in everyday life[CN, E, R]

3.10.

Analyze geometric sequences and series to solve problems. [PS, R]

30-1.1.

Develop trigonometric reasoning.

30-1.1.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of angles in standard position, expressed in degrees and radians. [CN, ME, R, V]

30-1.1.2.

Develop and apply the equation of the unit circle. [CN, R, V]

30-1.1.3.

Solve problems, using the six trigonometric ratios for angles expressed in radians and degrees. [ME, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1]

30-1.1.4.

Graph and analyze the trigonometric functions sine, cosine and tangent to solve problems. [CN, PS, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3]

30-1.1.5.

Solve, algebraically and graphically, first and second degree trigonometric equations with the domain expressed in degrees and radians. [CN, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.4]

30-1.1.6.

Prove trigonometric identities, using: reciprocal identities, quotient identities, Pythagorean identities, sum or difference identities (restricted to sine, cosine and tangent), double-angle identities (restricted to sine, cosine and tangent). [R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.4]

30-1.2.

Develop algebraic and graphical reasoning through the study of relations.

30-1.2.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of operations on, and compositions of, functions. [CN, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1]

30-1.2.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of the effects of horizontal and vertical translations on the graphs of functions and their related equations. [C, CN, R, V]

30-1.2.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of the effects of horizontal and vertical stretches on the graphs of functions and their related equations. [C, CN, R, V]

30-1.2.4.

Apply translations and stretches to the graphs and equations of functions. [C, CN, R, V]

30-1.2.5.

Demonstrate an understanding of the effects of reflections on the graphs of functions and their related equations, including reflections through the: x-axis, y-axis, line y = x. [C, CN, R, V]

30-1.2.6.

Demonstrate an understanding of inverses of relations. [C, CN, R, V]

30-1.3.

Develop algebraic and numeric reasoning that involves combinatorics.

30-1.3.1.

Apply the fundamental counting principle to solve problems. [C, PS, R, V] [ICT: C6-2.3]

30-1.3.2.

Determine the number of permutations of n elements taken r at a time to solve problems. [C, PS, R, V]

30-1.3.4.

Expand powers of a binomial in a variety of ways, including using the binomial theorem (restricted to exponents that are natural numbers). [CN, R, V]

30-1.a.1.1.

Draw from a repertoire of effective strategies to form tentative understandings, interpretations and positions [for example, record initial thoughts, feelings and observations about a novel in a dialogue journal].

30-1.a.1.2.

Explain how experiments with language, image and structure improve personal craft and increase effectiveness as a text creator [for example, use a writer's journal or idea folder on a computer to collect ideas, newspaper articles and first writing attempts; rework this information into stories, poems or articles; and share with teachers and peers to receive feedback].

30-1.a.1.3.

Select appropriate strategies to extend awareness and understanding of new perspectives, monitor their effectiveness, and modify them as needed [for example, record new understandings in a learning log; develop new group perspectives using a fish bowl organization].

30-1.a.1.4.

Reflect on personal text preferences, identify influences that have contributed to the formation of these preferences, and select strategies that may be used to expand interests in texts and text creators [for example, complete and share reading inventories, and examine the role marketing plays in shaping popular culture].

30-1.a.1.5.

Appraise own strengths and weaknesses as a language user and language learner; select appropriate strategies to increase strengths and address weaknesses; monitor the effectiveness of selected strategies; and modify selected strategies as needed to optimize growth [for example, assess growth in writing by using a writing portfolio and portfolio reflections].

30-1.a.2.1.

Explain the text creator's purpose, including implicit purpose when applicable; describe whether or not the purpose was achieved [for example, describe an author's use of juxtaposition to develop a contradictory impression of a character]; and assess the suitability of a text to the target audience.

30-1.a.2.2.

Use a variety of strategies to comprehend literature and other texts [for example, reading passages out loud, forming questions, making predictions, using context to determine the connotative meanings of words, using graphic organizers and making annotations], and develop strategies for close reading of literature in order to understand contextual elements [for example, understanding subtext].

30-1.a.2.3.

Reflect on and describe strategies used to engage prior knowledge as a means of assisting comprehension of new texts; and select, monitor and modify strategies as needed.

30-1.a.2.4.

Use a variety of appropriate reference strategies and reference technologies to aid understanding [for example, formulating and refining questions, exploring works cited in other references, taking notes, and using library catalogues and Internet search engines].

30-1.a.2.5.

Analyze a variety of text forms, explain the relationships of form to purpose and content, and assess the effects of these relationships on audience.

30-1.a.2.6.

Assess the contributions of rhetorical devices and stylistic techniques to the clarity and coherence of print and nonprint texts, and assess the various means by which devices and techniques are used to emphasize aspects or portions of a text.

30-1.a.2.7.

Identify and consider personal, moral, ethical and cultural perspectives when studying literature and other texts; and reflect on and monitor how perspectives change as a result of interpretation and discussion.

30-1.a.2.8.

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

30-1.a.2.9.

Use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of text forms.

30-1.a.3.1.

Modify selected strategies as needed to refine the depth and breadth of inquiry or research and to identify the purpose, audience and form of presentation.

30-1.a.3.2.

Reflect on and describe strategies for developing an inquiry or research plan that will foster understanding, select and monitor appropriate strategies, and modify strategies as needed to plan inquiry or research effectively [for example, use a research journal to keep and record reflections on the research process, clarify thinking, revisit initial perceptions and ask questions that lead to new research].

30-1.a.3.3.

Reflect on and describe strategies that may be used to select, record and organize information; select and monitor appropriate strategies; and modify selected strategies as needed.

30-1.a.3.4.

Reflect on and describe strategies to evaluate information sources for credibility and bias and for quality; and select, monitor and modify strategies as needed to evaluate sources and detect bias.

30-1.a.3.5.

Form generalizations and synthesize new ideas by integrating new information with prior knowledge.

30-1.a.3.6.

Reflect on and assess the effectiveness of strategies used to guide inquiry or research [such as the effective use of time and the division of labour when involved in group research].

30-1.a.4.1.

Reflect on the purposes for text creation [for example, to inform, explain, persuade, entertain or inspire] and on own motives for selecting strategies to engage an audience [for example, to communicate information, promote action or build relationships]; and consider potential consequences of choices regarding text creation [for example, follow - up action may be required to clarify information, a position may need to be defended and opposing viewpoints addressed, and tone and style must be appropriate for intended audience].

30-1.a.4.2.

Select a text form appropriate to the purpose for text creation and consistent with the content to be presented in the text [for example, select a photo essay to demonstrate a personal or critical/analytical response to poetry or other literature when the content to be presented is well suited to the creation of a visual text].

30-1.a.4.3.

Take ownership of text creation, by selecting or crafting a topic, concept or idea that is personally meaningful and engaging.

30-1.a.4.4.

Meet particular production, publication and display requirements for print texts [for example, adhere to a particular manuscript style when creating a research paper]; and explain requirements in light of purpose, audience and situation.

30-1.a.4.5.

Assess the effectiveness of the controlling idea or desired unifying effect of a text in progress, and refine the controlling idea or desired unifying effect as appropriate to meet the intended purpose.

30-1.a.4.6.

Make revisions as needed to ensure that the beginning of a text in progress establishes purpose and engages audience [for example, the rhetorical question or anecdote used to begin a speech, or the establishing shot of a video].

30-1.a.4.7.

Reflect on personal vocabulary and repertoire of stylistic choices and on their effectiveness; and expand vocabulary and repertoire of stylistic choices.

30-1.a.4.8.

Use handbooks and other tools, including electronic tools, as resources to assist with text creation [for example, dictionaries, thesauri, spell checkers and handbooks].

30-1.a.5.1.

Monitor own use of verbal and nonverbal communication in order to convey respect and consideration, as appropriate [for example, use euphemism and body language appropriately and sensitively.

30-1.a.5.2.

Appreciate diversity of thought and expression, select and monitor appropriate strategies for appreciating diversity, and modify selected strategies as needed.

30-1.a.5.3.

Use language and image to honour own and others' accomplishments [for example, celebrate together when classmates have accomplished a particular task or produced, published or presented a particular text; or celebrate the completion of a portfolio with family and friends by holding a 'portfolio launch'].

30-1.a.5.4.

Set appropriate personal goals for participation in a group; respect, be open to, and be supportive of the thoughts, opinions and contributions of others in a group; and share personal knowledge, expertise and perspectives with others, as appropriate.

30-1.a.5.5.

Develop and use criteria to monitor and assess group processes [such as division of labour and time management].

30-1.b.1.1.

Modify tentative interpretations and tentative positions by weighing and assessing the validity of own and others' ideas, observations and opinions; and identify areas for further inquiry or research.

30-1.b.1.2.

Experiment with a variety of strategies, activities and resources to explore ideas, observations, opinions, experiences and emotions [for example, stream - of - consciousness writing, free verse poetry, exploratory talk and improvisation].

30-1.b.1.3.

Recognize and assess the strengths and limitations of various perspectives on a theme, issue or topic, and identify aspects for further consideration when exploring and responding to texts.

30-1.b.1.4.

Cultivate appreciation for a variety of genres, texts, text creators and texts in translation from other countries [for example, providing specific examples, choose a universal theme; create a list of works of literature, movies, songs, videos and art; and discuss why some works are timeless].

30-1.b.1.5.

Set goals and draw from a repertoire of effective strategies for language growth in relation to aspirations for the future [such as post - secondary learning and potential careers].

30-1.b.2.1.

Analyze elements or causes present in the communication situation surrounding a text that contribute to the creation of the text [for example, whether a text creator is communicating as an individual or as a member of a particular group].

30-1.b.2.2.

Analyze the relationships among controlling ideas, supporting ideas and supporting details in a variety of texts.

30-1.b.2.3.

Assess prior knowledge of contexts, content and text forms; and explain how it contributes to new understandings.

30-1.b.2.4.

Create and use own reference materials to aid understanding [for example, a personalized dictionary/glossary and a personalized World Wide Web/URL address list].

30-1.b.2.5.

Assess the potential influence of various audience factors on a text creator's choice of form and medium.

30-1.b.2.6.

Assess the contributions of textual elements and stylistic techniques to the creation of atmosphere, tone and voice.

30-1.b.2.7.

Form positions on issues that arise from text study; and assess the ideas, information, arguments, emotions, experiences, values and beliefs expressed in works of literature and other texts in light of issues that are personally meaningful and culturally significant.

30-1.b.2.8.

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

30-1.b.2.9.

Appreciate the craft of the text creator and the shape and substance of literature and other texts.

30-1.b.3.1.

Describe the purpose of inquiry or research and the scope of the inquiry or research topic; identify the target audience; and identify the potential form for the presentation of inquiry or research findings, when applicable [such as a narrative, report, diary entry or biography].

30-1.b.3.2.

Select from a repertoire of effective strategies to develop appropriate inquiry or research plans that will address the topic and satisfy contextual and presentation requirements [for example, questions within questions, inquiry charts, preliminary interviews, and consultations with the teacher and/or librarian].

30-1.b.3.3.

Select information and other material appropriate to purpose from a variety of print and nonprint sources [for example, from museums, archives, government agencies, periodicals, microfiche, Internet, CD - ROMs, films, television and radio broadcasts, interviews, surveys, and print and online encyclopedias].

30-1.b.3.4.

Assess information sources for appropriateness to purpose, audience and presentation form.

30-1.b.3.6.

Identify strategies to improve future inquiry or research, and monitor the effectiveness of these strategies.

30-1.b.4.1.

Assess the results of text creation in terms of the intended purpose and whether or not the target audience was engaged [for example, assess the effectiveness of a job application letter in terms of whether or not the potential employer read the resume].

30-1.b.4.2.

Use a variety of complex structures consistent with form, content and purpose when creating texts; and explain reasons for choices [for example, use frames in a storyboard, including dialogue as appropriate to review organization, and explain why these complex structures are an effective way to create a video text].

30-1.b.4.3.

Recognize and assess personal variables [such as personal experience and prior knowledge] and contextual variables [such as availability of time and resources] that influence the selection of a topic, concept or idea; and address these variables to increase the likelihood of successful text creation.

30-1.b.4.4.

Adapt presentation strategies to suit changes in purpose, audience and situation [for example, use close physical proximity, eye contact and other body language strategies effectively to regain audience attention following an interruption].

30-1.b.4.5.

Review the accuracy, specificity, precision, vividness and relevance of details, events, images, facts or other data intended to support a controlling idea or to develop a unifying effect; and add to, modify or delete details, events, images, facts or other data as needed to provide complete and effective support or development.

30-1.b.4.6.

Assess the organizational components of a text in progress, and revise them as needed to strengthen their effectiveness as units of thought or experience or to strengthen their contribution to other intended effects [such as emphasis or transition].

30-1.b.4.8.

Know and be able to apply capitalization and punctuation conventions correctly, including end punctuation, commas, semicolons, colons, apostrophes, quotation marks, hyphens, dashes, ellipses, parentheses, underlining and italics.

30-1.b.5.1.

Explain how language and images are used in literature and other texts to convey respectful and considerate, or disrespectful and inconsiderate, perspectives and attitudes [for example, parody or journalistic bias in print, visual and multimedia texts].

30-1.b.5.2.

Explain how selected works of literature and other print and nonprint texts convey, shape and, at times, challenge individual and group values and behaviours.

30-1.b.5.4.

Reflect on and describe strategies used to negotiate, coordinate and cooperate with others; select appropriate strategies for negotiating, coordinating and cooperating with others; monitor selected strategies; and modify selected strategies as needed to accomplish group goals.

30-1.b.5.5.

Analyze and explain the interplay among the roles adopted by group members; and lead or support, when appropriate, motivating a group for high performance.

30-1.c.1.5.

Identify and access learning sources and opportunities; assess, weigh and manage risk; and demonstrate a willingness to continuously learn and grow.

30-1.c.2.1.

Explain how understanding the interplay between text and context can influence an audience to appreciate a text from multiple perspectives [for example, an audience can appreciate how historical and societal forces present in the context in which a text is set can affect the style, diction and point of view chosen by the text creator].

30-1.c.2.2.

Assess the contributions of setting, plot, character and atmosphere to the development of theme when studying a narrative.

30-1.c.2.3.

Identify variations and departures from the conventional use of rhetorical devices, textual elements and structures in texts; and describe the purpose and effect of such variations and departures.

30-1.c.2.5.

Apply knowledge of organizational patterns and structural features to understand purpose and content, and assess the effectiveness of a text's organizational structure.

30-1.c.2.6.

Analyze the use of irony and satire to create effects in print and nonprint texts [for example, dramatic irony to create suspense, verbal irony to create humour, and satire to evoke response].

30-1.c.2.7.

Assess the choices and motives of characters and people portrayed in texts in light of the choices and motives of self and others.

30-1.c.2.8.

Analyze and assess settings and plots in terms of created reality and plausibility [for example, determine the authenticity of the setting of a work of historical fiction].

30-1.c.3.1.

Refine the purpose of inquiry or research by limiting or expanding the topic as appropriate. .

30-1.c.3.2.

Assess the breadth and depth of prior knowledge, and refine questions to further satisfy information needs and to guide the collection of new information.

30-1.c.3.3.

Record information accurately and completely; and document and reference sources, as appropriate [for example, document direct quotations, others' ideas and arguments, maps, charts, statistics, pictures and diagrams from books, magazines, bibliographies, newspapers, audiovisual materials, electronic sources, interviews and films to avoid plagiarism].

30-1.c.3.4.

Assess the accuracy, completeness, currency and relevance of information selected from sources; and assess the appropriateness of the information for purpose.

30-1.c.3.5.

Support generalizations and conclusions sufficiently with relevant and consistent detail.

30-1.c.3.6.

Review the appropriateness, accuracy and significance of findings, conclusions and generalizations drawn from gathered data and information; prepare a detailed record of references; determine how best to share the information; and determine next steps, if any.

30-1.c.4.1.

Analyze audience factors that affect text creation, and explain how consideration of audience factors has affected choices made while creating a text.

30-1.c.4.2.

Select an effective medium appropriate to content and context; and explain the interplay of medium, context and content [for example, select a medium like television, and assess the interplay of medium, context and content by examining the role that investigative reporters play in reporting world events in a timely and interesting manner].

30-1.c.4.3.

Establish a focus for text creation, and communicate scope by framing an effective controlling idea or describing a strong unifying effect.

30-1.c.4.4.

Develop and deliver oral, visual and multimedia presentations, using voice production factors [such as volume, tone and stress], nonverbal factors [such as gestures, posture, distance and eye contact] and visual production factors [such as colour and contrast] appropriate to purpose, audience and situation.

30-1.c.4.5.

Assess reasoning for logic and evidence for consistency, completeness and relevance; and strengthen reasoning as needed by adding to, modifying or deleting details to provide significant evidence and make effective and convincing arguments [for example, work with a small group to use a revision strategy like Workshop Advice, where each person in the group provides one suggestion for a sentence change].

30-1.c.4.6.

Assess the closing of a text in progress; and revise it as needed to ensure that it is related to purpose, that it establishes a sense of developed understanding and that it will have an appropriate effect on audience.

30-1.c.4.7.

Assess syntax for appropriateness and effectiveness, and revise sentence structures as needed to create intended effects.

30-1.c.4.8.

Know and be able to apply spelling conventions consistently and independently.

30-1.c.5.1.

Analyze and describe positive or negative portrayals of characters in literature and persons in life, and be sensitive to the feelings of others.

30-1.c.5.2.

Explain how a text creator's underlying assumptions influence his or her ideas, opinions and selection of supporting details.

30-1.c.5.4.

Ensure that a team's purpose and objectives are clear .

30-1.c.5.5.

Use and appreciate various means to facilitate completion of group projects.

30-1.d.2.1.

Identify the impact that personal context - experience, prior knowledge - has on constructing meaning from a text.

30-1.d.2.2.

Analyze the personality traits, roles, relationships, motivations, attitudes and values of characters developed/persons presented in literature and other texts; and explain how the use of archetypes can contribute to the development of other textual elements, such as theme.

30-1.d.2.3.

Classify the genre/form of new texts according to attributes of genres/forms previously studied.

30-1.d.2.5.

Assess the medium of a presentation in terms of its appropriateness to purpose and content and its effect on audience [for example, the use of unamplified voice, printed handouts and computer generated slides].

30-1.d.2.6.

Assess the use of musical devices, figures of speech and sensory details to create effects in a variety of print and nonprint texts recognize the use of motif and symbol in print and nonprint texts.

30-1.d.2.7.

Respond personally and critically to the ways in which cultural and societal influences are reflected in a variety of Canadian and international texts.

30-1.d.2.8.

Analyze and assess character and characterization in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility, and in terms of contribution to theme [for example, determine the meanings suggested by a change in a character's behaviour or values].

30-1.d.3.2.

Identify and predict the usefulness of information sources intended to fill gaps between prior knowledge and required information [for example, whether or not a survey or interview will be useful].

30-1.d.3.4.

Identify and describe possible biases and vested interests of sources; and explain how underlying assumptions, biases, and positive or negative spin affect the credibility of sources.

30-1.d.4.1.

Assess whether or not the strategies used to deal with the expectations and constraints of a communication situation were effective [for example, distribute a formal evaluation form to the audience at the end of a meeting, to assess whether or not the strategy of providing time in small - group discussions resolved the issue of lack of time for all audience members to ask questions and express opinions].

30-1.d.4.2.

Understand the concept of convention; and apply it to oral, print, visual and multimedia text forms when appropriate [for example, understand the common conventions of a modern play script; and include dialogue, stage directions, and directions for lighting and sound effects when creating a script, as appropriate].

30-1.d.4.3.

Develop supporting details, by using developmental aids appropriate to form and purpose [for example, use charts to collect and assemble details in creating character comparisons when developing a comparison and contrast essay, or use a think - aloud reading strategy to make notes from informational text when writing a summary].

30-1.d.4.4.

Create rapport with an audience, by selecting from a repertoire of effective strategies [for example, use humour to open a presentation and set a positive tone with the audience].

30-1.d.4.5.

Assess the plausibility and appropriateness of literary interpretations and the precision, completeness and relevance of evidence when reviewing and revising critical/analytical responses to literature.

30-1.d.4.6.

Apply the concepts of unity and coherence to ensure the effective organization of oral, print, visual and multimedia texts.

30-1.d.4.8.

Understand the importance of grammatical agreement; and assess and revise texts in progress to ensure correctness of grammatical agreement, including correct pronoun reference and pronoun - antecedent agreement, and correct use of modifiers and other parts of speech.

30-1.d.5.1.

Analyze behavioural expectations of a communication situation, explain how verbal and nonverbal communication contributes to the inclusion or exclusion of individuals involved in a communication situation, and use verbal and nonverbal communication that is inclusive of other individuals [for example, use empathetic listening skills when working in groups, and be aware of body language].

30-1.d.5.5.

Understand and appreciate the function of teamwork tools, assess how to work effectively and collaboratively as a team to accomplish a task, understand the role of conflict in a group to reach solutions, and manage and resolve conflict when appropriate.

30-1.e.2.2.

Relate a text creator's tone and register to the moral and ethical stance explicitly or implicitly communicated by a text.

30-1.e.2.6.

Explain the contribution of motif and symbol to controlling idea and theme.

30-1.e.2.8.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

30-1.e.3.2.

Develop and draw from a repertoire of effective strategies and technologies for gathering, generating and recording information.

30-1.e.3.3.

Observe guidelines for Internet use [for example, keep passwords, telephone numbers and addresses confidential; visit appropriate sites; respect copyright; and observe rules for citing Internet sources, following correct procedures to avoid plagiarism].

30-1.e.4.2.

Depart from the conventions of oral, print, visual and multimedia texts, as appropriate to purpose, audience and situation [for example, employ the conventions of fiction when creating factual narrative to fulfill purpose and create audience effects]; and assess the impact on text creation.

30-1.e.4.3.

Develop appropriate, relevant and sufficient content to support a controlling idea or unifying effect [for example, relate supporting details, examples and illustrations to a controlling idea when creating a critical/ analytical response to literature].

30-1.e.4.6.

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

30-1.e.4.7.

Develop a repertoire of stylistic choices that contribute to personal voice.

30-1.e.4.8.

Assess and revise texts in progress to ensure correct subject - verb agreement, correct pronoun case and appropriate consistency of verb tense.

30-1.e.5.1.

Accept, offer and appreciate the value of constructive criticism [for example, use writing to respond to constructive criticism, and accept and provide feedback in a constructive and considerate manner].

30-1.e.5.5.

Identify, analyze and assess the collaborative processes used by individuals whose careers involve the development and production of literary texts [such as the collaborative relationships of author, illustrator, editor and publisher and of playwright, actor, producer and director].

30-1.f.2.2.

Assess the contributions of figurative language, symbol, imagery and allusion to the meaning and significance of texts; and appreciate the text creator's craft.

30-1.f.2.6.

Analyze the various elements of effective presentation, and assess the effects created [for example, colour to create symbolism or mood, and gestures to enhance clarity].

30-1.f.2.8.

Assess the significance of a text's theme or controlling idea, and the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of its supporting details, examples or illustrations, and content in general.

30-1.f.4.3.

Develop content consistent with form and appropriate to context [for example, link questions and answers when reporting the results of an interview].

30-1.f.5.1.

Explain, when applicable, how a specific text demonstrates that the parameters of public tolerance regarding the use of language and image have changed over time.

30-1.g.2.2.

Assess the contributions that visual and aural elements make to the meaning of texts.

30-1.g.2.6.

Assess the use of persuasive techniques and their effects on audience [for example, assess the use of commercial endorsements and negative advertisement campaigns, which may convince or offend].

30-1.g.4.3.

Incorporate effective examples from personal experience, concepts and ideas from exploration, and findings from inquiry and research into created texts, when appropriate [for example, incorporate visual aids in a prepared speech and taped sound effects in a dramatization of a scene from a play].

30-1.g.4.8.

Assess and revise texts in progress to ensure the correct use of clauses and phrases, including verbal phrases (participle, gerund and infinitive), and to ensure the correct use of structural features [such as appositives and parallel structure].

30-1.h.2.2.

Assess the relationship between the content of a presentation and the performance of the presenter, and explain how the quality of the performance affects the credibility and audience acceptance of the content and message.

30-1.h.4.8.

Pay particular attention to punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage and sentence construction when using unfamiliar vocabulary, complex syntax and sophisticated rhetorical devices.

30-2-b.2.4.

Create and use own reference materials to aid understanding [for example, a personalized dictionary/glossary and a personalized World Wide Web/URL address list].

30-2.1.

Develop logical reasoning.

30-2.1.1.

Analyze puzzles and games that involve numerical and logical reasoning, using problem-solving strategies. [CN, ME, PS, R]

30-2.1.2.

Solve problems that involve the application of set theory. [CN, PS, R, V] [ICT: C6-2.3]

30-2.2.

Develop critical thinking skills related to uncertainty.

30-2.2.1.

Interpret and assess the validity of odds and probability statements. [C, CN, ME]

30-2.2.2.

Solve problems that involve the probability of mutually exclusive and non-mutually exclusive events. [CN, PS, R, V] [ICT: C6-2.3]

30-2.2.3.

Solve problems that involve the probability of two events. [CN, PS, R]

30-2.2.4.

Solve problems that involve the fundamental counting principle. [PS, R, V] [ICT: C6-2.3]

30-2.2.5.

Solve problems that involve permutations. [ME, PS, R, T, V]

30-2.3.

Develop algebraic and graphical reasoning through the study of relations.

30-2.3.1.

Determine equivalent forms of rational expressions (limited to numerators and denominators that are monomials and binomials). [C, ME, R]

30-2.3.2.

Perform operations on rational expressions (limited to numerators and denominators that are monomials and binomials). [CN, ME, R]

30-2.3.3.

Solve problems that involve rational equations (limited to numerators and denominators that are monomials and binomials). [C, CN, PS, R]

30-2.3.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of logarithms and the laws of logarithms. [C, CN, ME, R] [ICT: C6-4.1]

30-2.3.5.

Solve problems that involve exponential equations. [C, CN, PS, R, T] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3]

30-2.3.6.

Represent data, using exponential and logarithmic functions, to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3, C6-4.4]

30-2.3.7.

Represent data, using polynomial functions (of degree less than or equal to 3), to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3, C6-4.4]

30-2.3.8.

Represent data, using sinusoidal functions, to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3, C6-4.4]

30-2.4.

Develop an appreciation of the role of mathematics in society.

30-2.4.1.

Research and give a presentation on a current event or an area of interest that involves mathematics. [C, CN, ME, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C1-4.2, C1-4.4, C2-4.1, C3-4.1, C3-4.2, C7-4.2, F2-4.7, P2-4.1]

30-2.a.2.1.

Explain the text creator's purpose, and assess the suitability of the text to the target audience in terms of the text creator's purpose [for example, assess the suitability of a feature film targeted to a young adult audience in terms of appropriateness of content].

30-2.a.2.2.

Use a variety of strategies to comprehend literature and other texts [for example, reading passages out loud, forming questions, making predictions, using context to determine the connotative meanings of words, using graphic organizers, making annotations, inferring, rereading, seeking assistance, using context clues, summarizing and visualizing], develop a daily practice of reading [for example, paired reading, reading log, nightly reading, taped reading], and develop strategies for close reading.

30-2.a.2.3.

Reflect on and describe strategies used to engage prior knowledge as a means of assisting comprehension of new texts; and select, monitor and modify strategies as needed.

30-2.a.2.4.

Use a variety of appropriate reference strategies and reference technologies to aid understanding [for example, formulating and refining questions, exploring works cited in other references, taking notes, and using library catalogues and Internet search engines].

30-2.a.2.5.

Describe how some forms are more appropriate than others to achieve a particular purpose with an intended audience.

30-2.a.2.6.

Demonstrate that the use of rhetorical devices and stylistic techniques in print and nonprint texts can create clarity, coherence and emphasis [for example, parallel structure, precise language].

30-2.a.2.7.

Identify and consider personal moral and ethical perspectives, as well as cultural perspectives, when studying literature and other texts; and reflect on and monitor how perspectives change as a result of interpretation and discussion.

30-2.a.2.8.

Identify criteria to evaluate the effectiveness of texts, monitor the effectiveness of the criteria, and modify the criteria as needed [for example, use criteria to assess the adequacy, relevance and effectiveness of content and to assess the text creator's voice and style].

30-2.a.2.9.

Recognize that texts can be effective and artistic, and use terminology appropriate to the forms studied for discussing and appreciating the effectiveness and artistry of a variety of texts.

30-2.a.4.1.

Reflect on the purposes for text creation [for example, to inform, explain, persuade, entertain or inspire] and on own motives for selecting strategies to engage an audience [for example, to communicate information, promote action or build relationships]; and consider potential consequences of choices regarding text creation [for example, follow - up action may be required to clarify information, a position may need to be defended and opposing viewpoints addressed, and tone and style must be appropriate for intended audience].

30-2.a.4.2.

Select a text form appropriate to the purpose for text creation and consistent with the content to be presented in the text [for example, select a photo essay for the purpose of creating a persuasive or informative text when the content to be presented is well suited to the creation of a visual text].

30-2.a.4.3.

Take ownership of text creation, by selecting or crafting a topic, concept or idea that is personally meaningful and engaging.

30-2.a.4.4.

Meet production, publication and display requirements for print texts as appropriate to purpose, audience and situation [for example, consider layout, font and visuals, costs and timelines when publishing a brochure].

30-2.a.4.5.

Assess the appropriateness and significance of the controlling idea or desired unifying effect of a text in progress; and modify the controlling idea or desired unifying effect as appropriate to meet the requirements of purpose, audience and situation.

30-2.a.4.6.

Make revisions as needed to ensure that the beginning of a text in progress establishes purpose and engages audience [for example, the rhetorical question or anecdote used to begin a speech, or the establishing shot of a video].

30-2.a.4.8.

Use handbooks and other tools, including electronic tools, as resources to assist with text creation [for example, dictionaries, thesauri, spell checkers and handbooks].

30-2.b.2.1.

Analyze elements present in the communication situation surrounding a text that contribute to the creation of the text [for example, whether a text creator is communicating as an individual or as a member of a particular group].

30-2.b.2.2.

Describe the relationships between a text's controlling idea and its supporting ideas and supporting details.

30-2.b.2.3.

Explain how prior knowledge of contexts, content and text forms contributes to new understandings.

30-2.b.2.5.

Explain how various audience factors may have influenced a text creator's choice of form and medium.

30-2.b.2.7.

Form positions on issues that arise from text study; and relate the ideas, information, arguments, emotions, experiences, values and beliefs expressed in works of literature and other texts to issues that are personally meaningful and culturally significant.

30-2.b.2.8.

Assess the appropriateness of own and others' understandings and interpretations of works of literature and other texts, by referring to the works and texts for supporting or contradictory evidence.

30-2.b.2.9.

Appreciate the craft of the text creator and the shape and substance of works of literature and other texts.

30-2.b.4.1.

Describe the purpose and target audience, and select from a repertoire of strategies to accomplish the purpose and engage the audience [for example, one purpose of a job application letter may be to persuade the employer to read the resume; address the letter to the potential employer, using the correct name and title, and explain in the letter that you have the required skills and talents for the job].

30-2.b.4.2.

Use a variety of complex structures consistent with form, content and purpose when creating texts [for example, use frames in a storyboard, including dialogue as appropriate, to review organization when creating a video].

30-2.b.4.3.

Recognize and assess personal variables [such as personal experience and prior knowledge] and contextual variables [such as availability of time and resources] that influence the selection of a topic, concept or idea; and address these variables to increase the likelihood of successful text creation.

30-2.b.4.4.

Develop presentation materials; and select strategies and technologies appropriate to purpose, audience and situation [for example, use technologies such as presentation software, videos, CD ROMs, DVDs, audiotaped interviews and handouts].

30-2.b.4.5.

Review the accuracy, specificity, precision, vividness and relevance of details, events, images, facts or other data intended to support a controlling idea or to develop a unifying effect; and add to, modify or delete details, events, images, facts or other data as needed to provide complete and effective support or development.

30-2.b.4.6.

Assess the organizational components of a text in progress, and revise them as needed to strengthen their effectiveness as units of thought or experience or to strengthen their contribution to other intended effects [such as emphasis or transition].

30-2.b.4.8.

Know and be able to apply capitalization and punctuation conventions correctly, including end punctuation, commas, semicolons, colons, apostrophes, quotation marks, hyphens, dashes, ellipses, parentheses, underlining and italics [for example, keep a personal editing checklist as a style guide for writing].

30-2.c.2.1.

Explain the relationship between text and context in terms of how elements in an environment can affect the way in which a text is created.

30-2.c.2.2.

Explain how plot, character and setting contribute to the development of theme, when studying a narrative.

30-2.c.2.3.

Explain how prior understanding of textual elements, like theme, in previously studied texts can assist in understanding new texts.

30-2.c.2.5.

Apply knowledge of organizational patterns and structural features to understand purpose and content, and assess the effectiveness of a text's organizational structure.

30-2.c.2.6.

Explain how irony is used in print and nonprint texts to create audience effects [for example, dramatic irony to create suspense and verbal irony to create humour].

30-2.c.2.7.

Explain how the choices and motives of characters and people presented in texts may provide insight into the choices and motives of self and others.

30-2.c.2.8.

Analyze and assess settings and plots in terms of created reality and plausibility [for example, determine the authenticity of the setting of a work of historical fiction].

30-2.c.4.1.

Analyze audience factors that affect text creation, and explain how consideration of audience factors has affected choices made while creating a text.

30-2.c.4.2.

Select an effective medium appropriate to content and context, and explain its use [for example, select a medium such as print advertisements in magazines, and explain the use of this medium to sell merchandise; explore the content of the advertisements in terms of the messages and values communicated; and explain the context, including audience and purpose].

30-2.c.4.3.

Establish a focus for text creation, and communicate scope by framing an effective controlling idea or describing a strong unifying effect.

30-2.c.4.4.

Develop and deliver oral, visual and multimedia presentations, using voice production factors [such as volume, tone and stress], nonverbal factors [such as gestures, posture, distance and eye contact] and visual production factors [such as colour and contrast] appropriate to purpose, audience and situation.

30-2.c.4.5.

Assess own critical/analytical responses for consistency, completeness and relevance of evidence; and strengthen reasoning as needed by adding to, modifying or deleting details to provide reliable and pertinent evidence and make effective arguments [for example, work with a small group to use a revision strategy like Workshop Advice, where each person in the group provides one suggestion for a sentence change].

30-2.c.4.6.

Assess the closing of a text in progress, and revise it as needed to strengthen its relationship to purpose and to strengthen its intended effect on audience.

30-2.c.4.7.

Assess syntax for appropriateness and effectiveness, and revise sentence structures as needed to create intended effects.

30-2.c.4.8.

Know and be able to apply spelling conventions independently or with the use of a handbook or other tools, such as a list of spelling strategies or rules.

30-2.d.2.1.

Identify the impact that personal context - experience, prior knowledge - has on constructing meaning from a text.

30-2.d.2.2.

Explain the personality traits, roles, relationships, motivations, attitudes and values of characters developed/persons presented in works of literature and other texts.

30-2.d.2.5.

Assess whether or not the medium chosen for a presentation is appropriate for the intended purpose, content and audience [for example, the use of unamplified voice, printed handouts and computer generated slides].

30-2.d.2.6.

Explain how figures of speech, sensory details and musical devices are used to create effects in a variety of print and nonprint texts.

30-2.d.2.7.

Respond personally and critically to cultural and societal influences presented in Canadian and international texts.

30-2.d.2.8.

Analyze and assess character and characterization in terms of consistency of behaviour, motivation and plausibility, and in terms of contribution to theme [for example, determine the meanings suggested by a change in a character's behaviour or values].

30-2.d.4.1.

Explain how strategies were used to address the expectations and constraints of a communication situation [for example, explain how strategies like limiting note taking to include only key words and meeting with a classmate to share notes and fill in ideas together after a lecture may address the expectations and constraints of a learning situation requiring strong listening and note - taking skills].

30-2.d.4.2.

Understand the concept of convention; and apply it to oral, print, visual and multimedia text forms when appropriate [for example, understand the common conventions of a modern play script; and include dialogue, stage directions, and directions for lighting and sound effects when creating a script, as appropriate].

30-2.d.4.3.

Develop supporting details, by using developmental aids appropriate to form and purpose [for example, use thought webs/mind maps to collect ideas and make connections when writing a personal response to literature, or use a think - aloud reading strategy to make notes from informational text when writing a summary].

30-2.d.4.4.

Develop a repertoire of appropriate strategies that can be used to create rapport with an audience [for example, use humour to open a presentation].

30-2.d.4.6.

Apply the concepts of unity and coherence to ensure the effective organization of oral, print, visual and multimedia texts.

30-2.d.4.7.

Apply understanding of stylistic techniques and rhetorical devices when creating and revising print and nonprint texts [for example, use imagery to create pathos, empathy and humour].

30-2.d.4.8.

Know and be able to identify parts of speech in own and others' texts, including prepositions, definite and indefinite articles, and coordinating and subordinating conjunctions; and review and revise texts in progress to ensure correct use of parts of speech, including correctness of pronoun reference and pronoun - antecedent agreement.

30-2.e.2.2.

Relate a text creator's tone to the moral and ethical stance communicated by a text, when appropriate.

30-2.e.2.6.

Explain the contribution of symbol to theme.

30-2.e.2.8.

Analyze and assess images in print and nonprint texts in terms of created reality and appropriateness to purpose and audience.

30-2.e.4.3.

Develop appropriate and relevant content sufficient to support a controlling idea or unifying effect [for example, relate sufficient supporting details, examples and illustrations to a thesis statement or controlling idea when creating a critical/ analytical response to a text].

30-2.e.4.6.

Assess transitions and transitional devices, and revise them as needed to strengthen coherence [for example, assess the use of repetition and balance in an essay, or fade - outs and dissolves in a video production, to create smooth transitions between elements in a text].

30-2.e.4.7.

Develop a repertoire of stylistic choices that contribute to personal voice.

30-2.e.4.8.

Review and revise texts in progress to ensure correct subject - verb agreement, correct pronoun case and appropriate consistency of verb tense.

30-2.f.2.2.

Identify figurative language, symbol, imagery and allusions in a text; interpret these devices in terms of the meaning of a text; assess the contributions made to the meaning of texts by using these devices; and appreciate the text creator's craft.

30-2.f.2.6.

Analyze the various elements of effective presentations, and assess the effects created.

30-2.f.2.8.

Assess the significance of a text's theme or controlling idea, and the effectiveness of the content in terms of adequate and relevant supporting details, examples or illustrations.

30-2.f.4.3.

Develop content consistent with form and appropriate to context [for example, link questions and answers when reporting the results of an interview].

30-2.f.4.8.

Detect and correct common sentence faults - run - on sentence and unintended sentence fragment.

30-2.g.2.2.

Recognize visual and aural elements in texts, and explain how these elements add meaning to texts.

30-2.g.2.6.

Assess the effects of persuasive techniques on audience [for example, assess advertisement campaigns like those found in teen magazines that may encourage unhealthy body images in teens].

30-2.g.4.3.

Incorporate effective examples from personal experience, concepts and ideas from exploration, and findings from inquiry and research into created texts, when appropriate [for example, incorporate visual aids in a prepared speech and taped sound effects in a dramatization of a scene from a play].

30-2.g.4.8.

Review and revise texts in progress to ensure that parallel structure, prepositional phrases, and dependent and independent clauses are used correctly and appropriately.

30-2.h.2.2.

Assess the relationship between the content of a presentation and the performance of the presenter, and explain how the quality of the performance affects the credibility and audience acceptance of the content and message.

30-2.h.4.8.

Pay particular attention to punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage and sentence construction when using unfamiliar vocabulary, complex syntax and sophisticated rhetorical devices.

30-2.j.4.8.

Explain why certain communication situations demand particular attention to correctness of punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage and sentence construction.

30-3.1.

Develop spatial sense through direct and indirect measurement.

30-3.1.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of the limitations of measuring instruments, including: precision, accuracy, uncertainty, tolerance and solve problems. [C, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.4, C6-4.5]

30-3.2.

Develop spatial sense.

30-3.2.2.

Solve problems that involve: triangles, quadrilaterals, regular polygons. [C, CN, PS, V]

30-3.2.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of transformations on a 2-D shape or a 3-D object, including: translations, rotations, reflections, dilations. [C, CN, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-3.4]

30-3.3.

Develop number sense and critical thinking skills.

30-3.3.1.

Analyze puzzles and games that involve logical reasoning, using problem-solving strategies. [C, CN, PS, R]

30-3.3.2.

Solve problems that involve the acquisition of a vehicle by: buying, leasing, leasing to buy. [C, CN, PS, R, T]

30-3.3.3.

Critique the viability of small business options by considering: expenses, sales, profit or loss. [C, CN, R] [ICT: F2-4.7]

30-3.4.

Develop algebraic reasoning.

30-3.4.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of linear relations by: recognizing patterns and trends, graphing, creating tables of values, writing equations, interpolating and extrapolating, solving problems. [CN, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.3, C7-4.2]

30-3.5.

Develop statistical reasoning.

30-3.5.1.

Solve problems that involve measures of central tendency, including: mean, median, mode, weighted mean, trimmed mean. [C, CN, PS, R]

30-3.5.2.

Analyze and describe percentiles. [C, CN, PS, R]

30-3.6.

Develop critical thinking skills related to uncertainty.

30-3.6.1.

Analyze and interpret problems that involve probability. [C, CN, PS, R]

4.3.

Solve problems by applying proportional reasoning and unit analysis. [C, CN, PS, R]

43011.1.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of the Systeme International (SI) by: describing the relationships of the units for length, area, volume, capacity, mass and temperature, applying strategies to convert SI units to imperial units. [C, CN, ME, V]

43011.1.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of the imperial system by: describing the relationships of the units for length, area, volume, capacity, mass and temperature, comparing the American and British imperial units for capacity, applying strategies to convert imperial units to SI units. [C, CN, ME, V]

43011.1.3.

Solve and verify problems that involve SI and imperial linear measurements, including decimal and fractional measurements. [CN, ME, PS, V]

43011.1.4.

Solve problems that involve SI and imperial area measurements of regular, composite and irregular 2-D shapes and 3-D objects, including decimal and fractional measurements, and verify the solutions. [ME, PS, R, V]

43011.2.1.

Analyze puzzles and games that involve spatial reasoning, using problem-solving strategies. [C, CN, PS, R]

43011.2.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of the Pythagorean theorem by: identifying situations that involve right triangles, verifying the formula, applying the formula, solving problems. [C, CN, PS, V]

43011.2.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of similarity of convex polygons, including regular and irregular polygons. [C, CN, PS, V]

43011.2.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of primary trigonometric ratios (sine, cosine, tangent) by: applying similarity to right triangles, generalizing patterns from similar right triangles, applying the primary trigonometric ratios, solving problems. [CN, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1]

43011.2.5.

Solve problems that involve parallel, perpendicular and transversal lines, and pairs of angles formed between them. [C, CN, PS, V]

43011.2.6.

Demonstrate an understanding of angles, including acute, right, obtuse, straight and reflex, by: drawing, replicating and constructing, bisecting, solving problems. [C, ME, PS, T, V] [ICT: C6-4.1]

43011.3.1.

Solve problems that involve unit pricing and currency exchange, using proportional reasoning. [CN, ME, PS, R] [ICT: F2-4.7]

43011.3.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of income, including: wages, salary, contracts, commissions, piecework to calculate gross pay and net pay. [C, CN, R, T] [ICT: C6-4.1, C6-4.2, C7-4.2, F2-4.7]

43011.4.1.

Solve problems that require the manipulation and application of formulas related to: perimeter, area, the Pythagorean theorem, primary trigonometric ratios, income. [C, CN, ME, PS, R]

9-1.1.1.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Talk with others and experience a variety of oral, print and other media texts to explore, develop and justify own opinions and points of view.

9-1.1.2.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Explore and explain how interactions with others and with oral, print and other media texts affect personal understandings.

9-1.1.3.

Express ideas and develop understanding: Extend understanding by taking different points of view when rereading and reflecting on oral, print and other media texts.

9-1.1.4.

Experiment with language and forms: Develop and extend understanding by expressing and responding to ideas on the same topic, in a variety of forms of oral, print and other media texts.

9-1.1.6.

Experiment with language and forms: Students write about a topic; e.g., a skiing accident, in such diverse forms as a news article; a part of a letter; a journal entry; and a dialogue with a friend, doctor or parent.

9-1.1.7.

Express preferences: Explain preferences for texts and genres by particular writers, artists, storytellers and filmmakers.

9-1.1.8.

Set goals: Reflect on own growth in language learning and use, by considering progress over time and the attainment of personal goals.

9-1.2.1.

Consider others' ideas: Integrate own perspectives and interpretations with new understandings developed through discussing and through experiencing a variety of oral, print and other media texts.

9-1.2.2.

Combine ideas: Examine and reexamine ideas, information and experiences from different points of view to find patterns and see relationships.

9-1.2.3.

Extend understanding: Assess whether new information extends understanding by considering diverse opinions and exploring ambiguities.

9-2.1.1.

Use prior knowledge: Discuss how interpretations of the same text might vary, according to the prior knowledge and experience of various readers.

9-2.1.2.

Use prior knowledge: Use previous reading experiences, personal experiences and prior knowledge as a basis for reflecting on and interpreting ideas encountered in texts.

9-2.1.3.

Use comprehension strategies: Identify explicit and implicit ideas and information in texts; listen and respond to various interpretations of the same text.

9-2.1.4.

Use comprehension strategies: Select appropriate reading rate and strategies for comprehending texts less closely connected to prior knowledge and personal experiences.

9-2.1.5.

Use comprehension strategies: Preview complex texts as to their intent, content and structure, and use this information to set a purpose and select strategies for reading.

9-2.1.6.

Use textual cues: Use knowledge of visual and textual cues and structural features when skimming and scanning various print and other media texts to locate relevant information effectively and efficiently.

9-2.1.7.

Use textual cues: Analyze and discuss how the structural features of informational materials, such as textbooks, bibliographies, databases, catalogues, web sites, commercials and newscasts, enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of communication.

9-2.1.8.

Use phonics and structural analysis: Apply and explain effective procedures for identifying and comprehending words in context; adjust procedures according to the purpose for reading and the complexity of the texts.

9-2.1.9.

Use references: Use reference materials, including a writer's handbook, to verify correct usage, address uncertainties and solve problems that arise.

9-2.2.1.

Experience various texts: Experience oral, print and other media texts from a variety of cultural traditions and genres, such as essays, broadcast advertisements, novels, poetry, documentaries, films, electronic magazines and realistic fiction.

9-2.2.10.

Construct meaning from texts: Relate the themes, emotions and experiences portrayed in oral, print and other media texts to issues of personal interest or significance.

9-2.2.11.

Appreciate the artistry of texts: Discuss how techniques, such as irony, symbolism, perspective and proportion, communicate meaning and enhance effect in oral, print and other media texts.

9-2.2.12.

Appreciate the artistry of texts: Discuss character development in terms of consistency of behaviour and plausibility of change.

9-2.2.13.

Appreciate the artistry of texts: Describe how theme, dominant impression and mood are developed and sustained through choices in language use and the interrelationship of plot, setting and character.

9-2.2.14.

Appreciate the artistry of texts: Identify features that define particular oral, print and other media texts; discuss differences in style and their effects on content and audience impression.

9-2.2.2.

Experience various texts: Identify and discuss how timeless themes are developed in a variety of oral, print and other media texts.

9-2.2.3.

Experience various texts: Consider historical context when developing own points of view or interpretations of oral, print and other media texts.

9-2.2.4.

Experience various texts: Compare and contrast own life situation with themes of oral, print and other media texts.

9-2.2.5.

Experience various texts: Express the themes of oral, print or other media texts in different forms or genres.

9-2.2.6.

Experience various texts: Consider peers' interpretations of oral, print and other media texts, referring to the texts for supporting or contradicting evidence.

9-2.2.7.

Construct meaning from texts: Analyze how the choices and motives of characters portrayed in oral, print and other media texts provide insight into those of self and others.

9-2.2.8.

Construct meaning from texts: Identify and discuss theme and point of view in oral, print and other media texts.

9-2.2.9.

Construct meaning from texts: Discuss and explain various interpretations of the same oral, print or other media text.

9-2.3.1.

Understand forms and genres: Explain the relationship between purposes and characteristics of various forms and genres of oral, print and other media texts.

9-2.3.2.

Understand forms and genres: Evaluate the effectiveness of different types of media texts for presenting ideas and information.

9-2.3.3.

Understand techniques and elements: Compare the development of character, plot and theme in two oral, print or other media texts.

9-2.3.4.

Understand techniques and elements: Evaluate the effectiveness of oral, print and other media texts, considering the believability of plot and setting, the credibility of characters, and the development and resolution of conflict.

9-2.3.5.

Understand techniques and elements: Compare a main character in one text to the main character in another text from a different era, genre or medium.

9-2.3.6.

Understand techniques and elements: Identify ways that a change in narrator might affect the overall meaning of oral, print and other media texts.

9-2.3.7.

Understand techniques and elements: Summarize the content of media texts, and suggest alternative treatments.

9-2.3.8.

Experiment with language: Analyze creative uses of language and visuals in popular culture, such as advertisements, electronic magazines and the Internet; recognize how imagery and figurative language, such as metaphor, create a dominant impression, mood and tone.

9-2.4.1.

Generate ideas: Generalize from own experience to create oral, print and other media texts on a theme.

9-2.4.2.

Elaborate on the expression of ideas: Create oral, print and other media texts on common literary themes.

9-2.4.3.

Structure texts: Create oral, print and other media texts that interrelate plot, setting and character, and reveal the significance of the action.

9-2.4.4.

Structure texts: Create oral, print and other media texts that include main and minor characters, and show how the main character develops and changes as a result of the action and events.

9-3.1.2.

Focus attention: Assess adequacy, accuracy, detail and appropriateness of oral, print and other media texts to support or further develop arguments, opinions or points of view.

9-3.1.3.

Determine information needs: Select types and sources of information to achieve an effective balance between researched information and own ideas.

9-3.1.4.

Plan to gather information: Select information sources that will provide effective support, convincing argument or unique perspectives.

9-3.1.5.

Use a variety of sources: Obtain information reflecting multiple perspectives from a variety of sources, such as expository essays, graphs, diagrams, online catalogues, periodical indices, film libraries, electronic databases and the Internet, when conducting research.

9-3.2.1.

Access information: Expand and use a variety of tools and text features, such as organizational patterns of texts, page layouts, font styles and sizes, colour and voice-overs, to access information.

9-3.2.2.

Access information: Distinguish between primary and secondary sources, and determine the usefulness of each for research purposes.

9-3.2.3.

Access information: Follow up on cited references to locate additional information.

9-3.2.4.

Evaluate sources: Evaluate sources for currency, reliability and possible bias of information for a particular research project.

9-3.3.1.

Organize information: Organize ideas and information by developing and selecting appropriate categories and organizational structures.

9-3.3.2.

Organize information: Balance all sections of oral, print and other media texts and ensure sentences, paragraphs and key ideas are linked throughout.

9-3.3.3.

Organize information: Develop coherence by relating all key ideas to the overall purpose of the oral, print or other media text.

9-3.3.4.

Record information: Use own words to summarize and record information in a variety of forms; paraphrase and/or quote relevant facts and opinions; reference sources.

9-3.3.5.

Record information: Select and record ideas and information that will support an opinion or point of view, appeal to the audience, and suit the tone and length of the chosen form of oral, print or other media text.

9-3.3.6.

Record information: Choose specific vocabulary, and use conventions accurately and effectively to enhance credibility.

9-3.4.1.

Share ideas and information: Communicate ideas and information in a variety of oral, print and other media texts, such as media scripts, multimedia presentations, panel discussions and articles.

9-3.4.2.

Share ideas and information: Integrate appropriate visual, print and/or other media to reinforce overall impression or point of view and engage the audience.

9-3.4.3.

Review research process: Reflect on the research process, identifying areas of strength and ways to improve further research activities.

9-4.1.10.

Enhance artistry: Experiment with the language and components of particular forms to communicate themes or represent the perspectives of a variety of people or characters.

9-4.1.2.

Appraise own and others' work: Work collaboratively to make appropriate revisions based on feedback provided by peers.

9-4.1.3.

Revise and edit: Revise to ensure effective introductions, consistent points of view, effective transitions between ideas and appropriate conclusions.

9-4.1.4.

Revise and edit: Revise to enhance effective transitions between ideas and maintain a consistent organizational pattern.

9-4.1.5.

Revise and edit: Revise to combine narration, description and exposition effectively.

9-4.1.6.

Enhance legibility: Develop personal handwriting styles appropriate for a variety of purposes.

9-4.1.7.

Enhance legibility: Identify and experiment with some principles of design that enhance the presentation of texts.

9-4.1.8.

Expand knowledge of language: Distinguish between the denotative and connotative meaning of words and discuss effectiveness for achieving purpose and affecting audience.

9-4.1.9.

Expand knowledge of language: Explore the derivation and use of words, phrases and jargon, including variations in language, accent and dialect in Canadian communities and regions.

9-4.2.1.

Attend to grammar and usage: Identify and use parallel structure in own writing.

9-4.2.2.

Attend to grammar and usage: Identify and use coordination, subordination and apposition to enhance communication.

9-4.2.3.

Attend to grammar and usage: Use a variety of strategies to make effective transitions between sentences and paragraphs in own writing.

9-4.2.4.

Attend to spelling: Demonstrate the deliberate, conscientious and independent application of a variety of editing and proofreading strategies to confirm spellings in own writing.

9-4.2.5.

Attend to spelling: Identify situations in which careful attention to correct spelling is especially important.

9-4.2.6.

Attend to spelling: Identify and use variant spellings for particular effects, depending on audience, purpose, content and context.

9-4.2.7.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Use quotation marks to distinguish words being discussed in own writing.

9-4.2.8.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Use dashes to show sentence breaks or interrupted speech, where appropriate in own writing.

9-4.2.9.

Attend to capitalization and punctuation: Know that rules for punctuation can vary, and adjust punctuation use for effect in own writing.

9-4.3.1.

Present information: Select, organize and present information to appeal to the interests and background knowledge of various readers or audiences.

9-4.3.2.

Enhance presentation: Choose appropriate types of evidence and strategies to clarify ideas and information, and to convince various readers and audiences.

9-4.3.3.

Use effective oral and visual communication: Integrate a variety of media and display techniques, as appropriate, to enhance the appeal, accuracy and persuasiveness of presentations.

9-4.3.4.

Demonstrate attentive listening and viewing: Follow the train of thought, and evaluate the credibility of the presenter and the evidence provided.

9-4.3.5.

Demonstrate attentive listening and viewing: Provide feedback that encourages the presenter and audience to consider other ideas and additional information.

9-5.1.1.

Appreciate diversity: Examine how personal experiences, cultural traditions and Canadian perspectives are presented in oral, print and other media texts.

9-5.1.2.

Appreciate diversity: Take responsibility for developing and sharing oral, print and other media texts and for responding respectfully to the texts of others.

9-5.1.3.

Relate texts to culture: Analyze how oral, print and other media texts reflect the traditions, beliefs and technologies of different cultures, communities or periods in history.

9-5.1.4.

Celebrate accomplishments and events: Explore and experiment with various ways in which the language arts are used across cultures, age groups and genders to honour and celebrate people and events.

9-5.1.5.

Use language to show respect: Create or use oral, print and other media texts in ways that are respectful of people, opinions, communities and cultures.

9-5.2.1.

Cooperate with others: Contribute to group efforts to reach consensus or conclusions, by engaging in dialogue to understand the ideas and viewpoints of others.

9-5.2.2.

Cooperate with others: Discuss and choose ways to coordinate the abilities and interests of individual group members to achieve group goals.

9-5.2.3.

Work in groups: Generate and access ideas in a group, and use a variety of methods to focus and clarify topics for research or investigations.

9-5.2.4.

Work in groups: Share responsibility for the completion of team projects by establishing clear purpose and procedures for solving problems, monitoring progress and making modifications to meet stated objectives.

9-5.2.5.

Evaluate group process: Establish and use criteria to evaluate group process and personal contributions; set goals and make plans for improvement.

9.[C]

Communication: Students are expected to communicate in order to learn and express their understanding

9.[CN]

Connections: Students are expected to connect mathematical ideas to other concepts in mathematics, to everyday experiences and to other disciplines

9.[ME]

Mental Mathematics and Estimation: Students are expected to demonstrate fluency with mental mathematics and estimation

9.[PS]

Problem Solving: Students are expected to develop and apply new mathematical knowledge through problem solving

9.[R]

Reasoning: Students are expected to develop mathematical reasoning

9.[T]

Technology: Students are expected to select and use technologies as tools for learning and for solving problems

9.[V]

Visualization: Students are expected to develop visualization skills to assist in processing information, making connections and solving problems.

9.1.1.

Demonstrate an understanding of powers with integral bases (excluding base 0) and whole number exponents by: representing repeated multiplication, using powers; using patterns to show that a power with an exponent of zero is equal to one; solving problems involving powers. [C, CN, PS, R]

9.1.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of operations on powers with integral bases (excluding base 0) and whole number exponents: (a^m)(a^n) = a^m+n; a^m a^n = a^m-n, m > n; (a^m)^n = a^mn; (ab)^m = (a^m)(b^m); (a/b)^n = a^n/b^n, b 0. [C, CN, PS, R, T] [ICT: P2-3.4]

9.1.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of rational numbers by: comparing and ordering rational numbers; solving problems that involve arithmetic operations on rational numbers. [C, CN, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: P2-3.4]

9.1.4.

Explain and apply the order of operations, including exponents, with and without technology. [PS, T] [ICT: P2-3.4]

9.1.4.1.

How are laws passed in the federal political system? (PADM)

9.1.4.6.

What is the role of the media in relation to political issues? (PADM, C)

9.1.4.7.

How do lobby groups impact government decision making? (PADM, C)

9.1.5.

Determine the square root of positive rational numbers that are perfect squares. [C, CN, PS, R, T] [ICT: P2-3.4]

9.1.5.1.

How do citizens and organizations participate in Canada's justice system (i.e., jury duty, knowing the law, advocacy, John Howard Society, Elizabeth Fry Society)? (C, PADM)

9.1.5.2.

What are citizens' legal roles and their responsibilities? (C, PADM)

9.1.5.3.

What is the intention of the Youth Criminal Justice Act? (C, PADM)

9.1.6.

Determine an approximate square root of positive rational numbers that are non-perfect squares. [C, CN, PS, R, T] [ICT: P2-3.4]

9.1.7.

Students will assess, critically, how the increased demand for recognition of collective rights has impacted the legislative process in Canada by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

9.1.7.5.

How does the Indian Act recognize the status and identity of Aboriginal peoples? (PADM, I, C)

9.1.7.6.

How does legislation such as Treaty 6, Treaty 7 and Treaty 8 recognize the status and identity of Aboriginal peoples? (I, PADM, LPP)

9.1.7.7.

How do governments recognize Mtis cultures and rights through legislation (i.e., treaties, governance, land claims, Mtis Settlements in Alberta)? (PADM, I, CC, LPP)

9.1.8.

Students will assess, critically, how legislative processes attempt to address emerging issues of immigration by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

9.1.8.1.

What factors influence immigration policies in Canada (i.e., economic, political, health, security)? (C, ER, PADM)

9.1.8.2.

How are changes to Canadian policies on immigration and refugees a reflection of world issues? (PADM, GC, C, I)

9.1.8.3.

What impact does increasing immigration have on Aboriginal peoples and communities? (C, I, GC, PADM)

9.1.8.4.

How are provincial governments able to influence and implement immigration policies? (PADM, GC)

9.1.8.5.

How is the implementation of immigration policies in Qubec an attempt to strengthen the French language in North America? (PADM, GC, C, I)

9.1.8.6.

What is the relationship between immigration policies in Canada and the rights guaranteed in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms? (I, PADM)

9.1.8.7.

To what extent does Canada benefit from immigration? (GC, PADM)

9.2.1.

Generalize a pattern arising from a problem-solving context, using a linear equation, and verify by substitution. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

9.2.2.

Graph a linear relation, analyze the graph, and interpolate or extrapolate to solve problems. [C, CN, PS, R, T, V] [ICT: C7-3.1, P2-3.3]

9.2.3.

Model and solve problems, using linear equations of the form: ax = b; x/a = b, a 0; ax + b = c; x/a + b = c, a 0; ax = b + cx; a(x + b) = c; ax + b = cx + d; a(bx + c) = d(ex + f); a/x = b , x 0 where a, b, c, d, e and f are rational numbers. [C, CN, PS, V]

9.2.4.

Explain and illustrate strategies to solve single variable linear inequalities with rational coefficients within a problem-solving context. [C, CN, PS, R, V]

9.2.4.1.

What are the principles of a market economy? (ER)

9.2.4.2.

Why do governments intervene in a market economy? (ER, PADM)

9.2.4.3.

Why is Canada viewed as having a mixed economy? (ER, PADM)

9.2.4.4.

What is the role of the consumer in market and mixed economies? (ER)

9.2.4.5.

To what extent do consumer actions reflect individual and collective identity? (ER, I)

9.2.4.6.

How has the emergence of labour unions impacted market and mixed economies? (ER)

9.2.4.7.

What are some similarities and differences in the way governments in Canada and the United States intervene in the market economies? (ER, PADM, GC)

9.2.4.8.

How do the economic systems of Canada and the United States differ in answering the basic economic question of scarcity? (ER, PADM, GC)

9.2.5.

Demonstrate an understanding of polynomials (limited to polynomials of degree less than or equal to 2). [C, CN, R, V]

9.2.5.1.

What are the indicators of quality of life? (PADM, ER)

9.2.5.2.

How does individual consumer behaviour impact quality of life (e.g., environmental issues)? (PADM, ER)

9.2.5.3.

How does marketing impact consumerism? (ER)

9.2.5.4.

How does consumerism provide opportunities for and limitations on impacting quality of life? (PADM, ER)

9.2.5.5.

How is consumerism used as a power of a collective (e.g., boycotts)? (ER, PADM, C)

9.2.5.6.

To what extent do perspectives regarding consumerism, economic growth and quality of life differ regionally in North America? (PADM, ER, GC, I)

9.2.5.7.

What societal values underlie social programs in Canada and the United States? (PADM, ER, GC, I)

9.2.6.

Model, record and explain the operations of addition and subtraction of polynomial expressions, concretely, pictorially and symbolically (limited to polynomials of degree less than or equal to 2). [C, CN, PS, R, V]