Ontario Curriculum — Grade 4


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4-1.1.1.

Identify purposes for listening in a variety of situations, formal and informal, and set goals related to specific listening tasks

4-1.1.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate listening behaviour by adapting active listening strategies to suit a variety of situations, including work in groups

4-1.1.3.

Identify a variety of listening comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during, and after listening in order to understand and clarify the meaning of oral texts

4-1.1.5.

Make inferences using stated and implied ideas in oral texts (e.g., listen ''between the lines'' to detect bias in an oral text)

4-1.1.6.

Extend understanding of oral texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights; to other texts, including print and visual texts; and to the world around them

4-1.1.8.

Identify the point of view presented in oral texts and ask questions about possible bias

4-1.1.9.

Identify the presentation strategies used in oral texts and analyse their effect on the audience

4-1.2.1.

Identify a variety of purposes for speaking

4-1.2.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate speaking behaviour in a variety of situations, including paired sharing and small- and large-group discussions

4-1.2.5.

Identify some vocal effects, including tone, pace, pitch, volume, and a range of sound effects, and use them appropriately and with sensitivity towards cultural differences to help communicate their meaning

4-1.3.2.

Identify, in conversation with the teacher and peers, how their skills as viewers, representers, readers, and writers help them improve their oral communication skills

4-2.1.1.

Read a variety of texts from diverse cultures, including literary texts, graphic texts, and informational texts

4-2.1.2.

Identify a variety of purposes for reading and choose reading materials appropriate for those purposes

4-2.1.3.

Identify a variety of reading comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during, and after reading to understand texts

4-2.1.4.

Demonstrate understanding of a variety of texts by summarizing important ideas and citing supporting details

4-2.1.5.

Make inferences about texts using stated and implied ideas from the texts as evidence

4-2.1.6.

Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them

4-2.1.7.

Analyse texts and explain how specific elements in them contribute to meaning

4-2.1.8.

Express opinions about the ideas and information in texts and cite evidence from the text to support their opinions

4-2.1.9.

Identify the point of view presented in a text, citing supporting evidence from the text, and suggest some possible alternative perspectives

4-2.2.1.

Explain how the particular characteristics of various text forms help communicate meaning, with a focus on literary texts such as a diary or journal, graphic texts such as a brochure, and informational texts such as an encyclopedia

4-2.2.2.

Recognize a variety of organizational patterns in texts of different types and explain how the patterns help readers understand the texts

4-2.2.4.

Identify various elements of style - including alliteration, descriptive adjectives and adverbs, and sentences of different types, lengths, and structures - and explain how they help communicate meaning

4-2.3.2.

Predict the meaning of and rapidly solve unfamiliar words using different types of cues, including: semantic (meaning) cues; syntactic (language structure) cues; graphophonic (phonological and graphic) cues

4-2.3.3.

Read appropriate texts at a sufficient rate and with sufficient expression to convey the sense of the text readily to the reader and an audience

4-2.4.1.

Identify, in conversations with the teacher and peers or in a reader's notebook, what strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading and how they can use these and other strategies to improve as readers

4-2.4.2.

Explain, in conversations with the teacher and peers or in a reader's notebook, how their skills in listening, speaking, writing, viewing, and representing help them make sense of what they read

4-3.1.1.

Identify the topic, purpose, and audience for a variety of writing forms

4-3.1.2.

Generate ideas about a potential topic using a variety of strategies and resources

4-3.1.3.

Gather information to support ideas for writing using a variety of strategies and oral, print, and electronic sources

4-3.1.5.

Identify and order main ideas and supporting details and group them into units that could be used to develop a summary, using a variety of graphic organizers

4-3.2.2.

Establish a personal voice in their writing, with a focus on using words and stylistic elements that convey a specific mood such as amusement

4-3.2.3.

Use specific words and phrases to create an intended impression

4-3.2.8.

Produce revised, draft pieces of writing to meet identified criteria based on the expectations related to content, organization, style, and use of conventions

4-3.3.1.

Spell familiar words correctly

4-3.3.2.

Spell unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies that involve understanding sound-symbol relationships, word structures, word meanings, and generalizations about spelling

4-3.3.3.

Confirm spellings and word meanings or word choice using different types of resources appropriate for the purpose

4-3.3.4.

Use punctuation appropriately to help communicate their intended meaning, with a focus on the use of: the apostrophe to indicate possession, and quotation marks to indicate direct speech

4-3.3.5.

Use parts of speech appropriately to communicate their meaning clearly, with a focus on the use of: common and proper nouns; verbs in the simple present, past, and future tenses; adjectives and adverbs; subject/verb agreement; prepositions; and conjunctions

4-3.3.6.

Proofread and correct their writing using guidelines developed with peers and the teacher

4-4.1.2.

Use overt and implied messages to draw inferences and construct meaning in media texts

4-4.1.3.

Express opinions about ideas, issues, and/or experiences presented in media texts, and give evidence from the texts to support their opinions

4-4.1.4.

Explain why different audiences might respond differently to specific media texts

4-4.2.2.

Identify the conventions and techniques used in some familiar media forms and explain how they help convey meaning

4-4.4.2.

Explain, initially with support and direction, how their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing help them to make sense of and produce media texts

4-A.1.1.

Represent, compare, and order whole numbers to 10 000, using a variety of tools;

4-A.1.10.

Read and represent money amounts to one hundred dollars;

4-A.1.11.

Solve problems that arise from real-life situations and that relate to the magnitude of whole numbers up to 10 000.

4-A.1.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of place value in whole numbers and decimal numbers from 0.1 to 10 000, using a variety of tools and strategies;

4-A.1.3.

Read and print in words whole numbers to one thousand, using meaningful contexts;

4-A.1.4.

Round four-digit whole numbers to the nearest ten, hundred, and thousand, in problems arising from real-life situations;

4-A.1.5.

Represent, compare, and order decimal numbers to tenths, using a variety of tools and using standard decimal notation;

4-A.1.6.

Represent fractions using concrete materials, words, and standard fractional notation, and explain the meaning of the denominator as the number of the fractional parts of a whole or a set, and the numerator as the number of fractional parts being considered;

4-A.1.7.

Compare and order fractions (i.e., halves, thirds, fourths, fifths, tenths) by considering the size and the number of fractional parts

4-A.1.8.

Compare fractions to the benchmarks of 0, 1/2, and 1;

4-A.1.9.

Demonstrate and explain the relationship between equivalent fractions, using concrete materials and drawings;

4-A.2.1.

Count forward by halves, thirds, fourths, and tenths to beyond one whole, using concrete materials and number lines;

4-A.2.2.

Count forward by tenths from any decimal number expressed to one decimal place, using concrete materials and number lines.

4-A.2.3.

Use scientific inquiry/research skills to investigate ways in which plants and animals in a community depend on features of their habitat to meet important needs (e.g., beavers use water for shelter [they build their lodges so the entrance is under water], food [cattails, water lilies, and other aquatic plants], and protection [they slap their tails on the water to warn of danger])

4-A.2.4.

Use scientific inquiry/research skills to create a living habitat containing a community, and describe and record changes in the community over time

4-A.2.5.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including habitat, population, community, adaptation, and food chain, in oral and written communication

4-A.2.6.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., use presentation software to show the steps one might follow to set up and maintain a terrarium)

4-A.3.1.

Add and subtract two-digit numbers, using a variety of mental strategies;

4-A.3.10.

Describe ways in which humans are dependent on natural habitats and communities (e.g., for water, medicine, flood control in wetlands, leisure activities)

4-A.3.2.

Solve problems involving the addition and subtraction of four-digit numbers, using student-generated algorithms and standard algorithms;

4-A.3.3.

Add and subtract decimal numbers to tenths, using concrete materials and student-generated algorithms;

4-A.3.4.

Add and subtract money amounts by making simulated purchases and providing change for amounts up to one hundred dollars, using a variety of tools;

4-A.3.5.

Multiply to 9 x 9 and divide to 81 / 9, using a variety of mental strategies;

4-A.3.6.

Solve problems involving the multiplication of one-digit whole numbers, using a variety of mental strategies;

4-A.3.7.

Multiply whole numbers by 10, 100, and 1000, and divide whole numbers by 10 and 100, using mental strategies;

4-A.3.8.

Multiply two-digit whole numbers by one-digit whole numbers, using a variety of tools, student-generated algorithms, and standard algorithms;

4-A.3.9.

Divide two-digit whole numbers by one digit whole numbers, using a variety of tools and student-generated algorithms;

4-A.4.1.

Describe relationships that involve simple whole-number multiplication;

4-A.4.2.

Determine and explain, through investigation, the relationship between fractions (i.e., halves, fifths, tenths) and decimals to tenths, using a variety of tools and strategies;

4-A.4.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of simple multiplicative relationships involving unit rates, through investigation using concrete materials and drawings.

4-B.1.1.

Estimate, measure, and record length, height, and distance, using standard units (i.e., millimetre, centimetre, metre, kilometre);

4-B.1.2.

Draw items using a ruler, given specific lengths in millimetres or centimetres;

4-B.1.3.

Estimate, measure (i.e., using an analogue clock), and represent time intervals to the nearest minute;

4-B.1.4.

Estimate and determine elapsed time, with and without using a time line, given the durations of events expressed in five-minute intervals, hours, days, weeks, months, or years;

4-B.1.5.

Estimate, measure using a variety of tools and strategies, and record the perimeter and area of polygons;

4-B.1.6.

Estimate, measure, and record the mass of objects, using the standard units of the kilogram and the gram;

4-B.1.7.

Estimate, measure, and record the capacity of containers, using the standard units of the litre and the millilitre;

4-B.1.8.

Estimate, measure using concrete materials, and record volume, and relate volume to the space taken up by an object.

4-B.2.1.

Describe, through investigation, the relationship between various units of length (i.e., millimetre, centimetre, decimetre, metre, kilometre);

4-B.2.10.

Compare, using a variety of tools, two-dimensional shapes that have the same perimeter or the same area.

4-B.2.2.

Select and justify the most appropriate standard unit (i.e., millimetre, centimetre, decimetre, metre, kilometre) to measure the side lengths and perimeters of various polygons;

4-B.2.3.

Determine, through investigation, the relationship between the side lengths of a rectangle and its perimeter and area;

4-B.2.4.

Pose and solve meaningful problems that require the ability to distinguish perimeter and area;

4-B.2.5.

Compare and order a collection of objects, using standard units of mass (i.e., gram, kilogram) and/or capacity (i.e., millilitre, litre);

4-B.2.6.

Determine, through investigation, the relationship between grams and kilograms;

4-B.2.7.

Determine, through investigation, the relationship between millilitres and litres;

4-B.2.8.

Select and justify the most appropriate standard unit to measure mass (i.e., milligram, gram, kilogram) and the most appropriate standard unit to measure the capacity of a container (i.e., millilitre, litre);

4-B.2.9.

Solve problems involving the relationship between years and decades, and between decades and centuries;

4-B.3.1.

Describe the purposes of pulley systems and gear systems (e.g., to facilitate changes in direction, speed, or force)

4-B.3.2.

Describe how rotary motion in one system or its components (e.g., a system of pulleys of different sizes) is transferred to another system or component (e.g., a system of various gears) in the same structure

4-B.3.3.

Describe how one type of motion can be transformed into another type of motion using pulleys or gears (e.g., rotary to linear in a rack and pinion system, rotary to oscillating in a clock pendulum)

4-B.3.4.

Describe, using their observations, how gears operate in one plane (e.g., spur gears, idler gears) and in two planes (e.g., crown, bevel, or worm gears)

4-B.3.5.

Distinguish between pulley systems and gear systems that increase force and those that increase speed

4-B.3.6.

Identify pulley systems (e.g., clotheslines, flagpoles, cranes, elevators, farm machinery) and gear systems (e.g., bicycles, hand drills, can openers) that are used in daily life, and explain the purpose and basic operation of each

4-B.3.7.

Explain how the gear system on a bicycle works (e.g., by using the largest gear on the front chain ring and the smallest gear on the rear wheel, we can move quickly along a flat surface)

4-B.3.8.

Identify the input components that drive a mechanism and the output components that are driven by it (e.g., the pedals on a bike are the input component; the rear wheel is the output component)

4-C.1.1.

Draw the lines of symmetry of two-dimensional shapes, through investigation using a variety of tools;

4-C.1.2.

Identify and compare different types of quadrilaterals (i.e., rectangle, square, trapezoid, parallelogram, rhombus) and sort and classify them by their geometric properties;

4-C.1.3.

Identify benchmark angles (i.e., straight angle, right angle, half a right angle), using a reference tool, and compare other angles to these benchmarks;

4-C.1.4.

Relate the names of the benchmark angles to their measures in degrees;

4-C.1.5.

Identify and describe prisms and pyramids, and classify them by their geometric properties (i.e., shape of faces, number of edges, number of vertices), using concrete materials.

4-C.2.2.

Investigate the basic properties of light (e.g., conduct experiments to show that light travels in a straight path, that light reflects off of shiny surfaces, that light refracts [bends] when passing from one medium to another, that white light is made up of many colours, that light diffracts [bends and spreads out] when passing through an opening)

4-C.2.3.

Draw and describe nets of rectangular and triangular prisms;

4-C.2.4.

Construct prisms and pyramids from given nets;

4-C.2.5.

Use scientific inquiry/research skills to investigate applications of the properties of light or sound (e.g., careers where knowledge of the properties of light and/or sound play an important role [photography, audio engineering]; ways in which light and/or sound are used at home, at school, and in the community; ways in which animals use sound)

4-C.2.6.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including natural, artificial, beam of light, pitch, loudness, and vibration, in oral and written communication

4-C.2.7.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., create a song or short drama presentation for younger students that will alert them to the dangers of exposure to intense light and sound)

4-C.3.1.

Identify and describe the general location of an object using a grid system;

4-C.3.2.

Identify, perform, and describe reflections using a variety of tools;

4-C.3.3.

Create and analyse symmetrical designs by reflecting a shape, or shapes, using a variety of tools, and identify the congruent shapes in the designs.

4-C.3.4.

Describe properties of sound, including the following: sound travels; sound can be absorbed or reflected and can be modified (e.g., pitch, loudness)

4-C.3.5.

Explain how vibrations cause sound

4-C.3.6.

Describe how different objects and materials interact with light and sound energy (e.g., prisms separate light into colours; voices echo off mountains; some light penetrates through wax paper; sound travels further in water than air)

4-C.3.7.

Distinguish between sources of light that give off both light and heat (e.g., the sun, a candle, an incandescent light bulb) and those that give off light but little or no heat (e.g., an LED, a firefly, a compact fluorescent bulb, a glow stick)

4-C.3.8.

Identify devices that make use of the properties of light and sound (e.g., a telescope, a microscope, and a motion detector make use of the properties of light; a microphone, a hearing aid, and a telephone handset make use of the properties of sound)

4-D.1.1.

Extend, describe, and create repeating, growing, and shrinking number patterns;

4-D.1.2.

Connect each term in a growing or shrinking pattern with its term number, and record the patterns in a table of values that shows the term number and the term;

4-D.1.3.

Create a number pattern involving addition, subtraction, or multiplication, given a pattern rule expressed in words;

4-D.1.4.

Make predictions related to repeating geometric and numeric patterns;

4-D.1.5.

Extend and create repeating patterns that result from reflections, through investigation using a variety of tools.

4-D.2.1.

Determine, through investigation, the inverse relationship between multiplication and division;

4-D.2.2.

Determine the missing number in equations involving multiplication of one- and two-digit numbers, using a variety of tools and strategies;

4-D.2.3.

Identify, through investigation, and use the commutative property of multiplication to facilitate computation with whole numbers;

4-D.2.4.

Identify, through investigation, and use the distributive property of multiplication over addition to facilitate computation with whole numbers.

4-D.2.5.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including hardness, colour, lustre, and texture, in oral and written communication

4-D.2.6.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., use a graphic organizer to show how rocks and minerals are used in daily life)

4-D.3.1.

Describe the difference between rocks (composed of two or more minerals) and minerals (composed of the same substance throughout), and explain how these differences determine how they are used

4-D.3.2.

Describe the properties (e.g., colour, lustre, streak, transparency, hardness) that are used to identify minerals

4-D.3.3.

Describe how igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks are formed (e.g., Igneous rocks form when hot, liquid rock from deep below the earth's surface rises towards the surface, cools, and solidifies, for instance, after a volcanic eruption. Sedimentary rocks form when small pieces of the earth that have been worn away by wind and water accumulate at the bottom of rivers, lakes, and oceans and are eventually compacted and consolidated into rock; they can also be formed when sea water evaporates and the dissolved minerals are deposited on the sea floor. Metamorphic rocks form when pre-existing rocks are changed by heat and pressure.)

4-D.3.4.

Describe the characteristics of the three classes of rocks (e.g., Sedimentary rocks often have flat layers, are composed of pieces that are roughly the same size with pores between these pieces that are commonly filled with smaller grains, and sometimes contain fossils. Igneous rocks generally have no layers, have variable textures, and do not contain fossils. Metamorphic rocks may have alternating bands of light and dark minerals, or may be composed predominantly of only one mineral, such as marble or quartzite, and rarely contain fossils.), and explain how their characteristics are related to their origin

4-E.1.2.

Collect and organize discrete primary data and display the data in charts, tables, and graphs (including stem-and-leaf plots and double bar graphs) that have appropriate titles, labels, and scales that suit the range and distribution of the data, using a variety of tools.

4-E.2.1.

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions from primary data and from secondary data, presented in charts, tables, and graphs (including stem-and-leaf plots and double bar graphs);

4-E.2.2.

Demonstrate, through investigation, an understanding of median, and determine the median of a set of data;

4-E.2.3.

Describe the shape of a set of data across its range of values, using charts, tables, and graphs;

4-E.2.4.

Compare similarities and differences between two related sets of data, using a variety of strategies.

4-E.3.2.

Determine, through investigation, how the number of repetitions of a probability experiment can affect the conclusions drawn.