Ontario Curriculum — Grade 5


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5-1.1.1.

Identify a range of purposes for listening in a variety of situations, formal and informal, and set goals related to specific listening tasks

5-1.1.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate listening behaviour by adapting active listening strategies to suit a range of situations, including work in groups

5-1.1.3.

Identify a variety of listening comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during, and after listening in order to understand and clarify the meaning of oral texts

5-1.1.4.

Demonstrate an understanding of the information and ideas in oral texts by summarizing important ideas and citing a variety of supporting details

5-1.1.5.

Make inferences about oral texts using stated and implied ideas in the texts as evidence

5-1.1.6.

Extend understanding of oral texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights; to other texts, including print and visual texts; and to the world around them

5-1.1.7.

Analyse oral texts and explain how specific elements in them contribute to meaning

5-1.1.8.

Identify the point of view presented in oral texts and ask questions to identify missing or possible alternative points of view

5-1.1.9.

Identify a range of presentation strategies used in oral texts and analyse their effect on the audience

5-1.2.1.

Identify a variety of purposes for speaking

5-1.2.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of appropriate speaking behaviour in a variety of situations, including paired sharing, dialogue, and small- and large-group discussions

5-1.2.3.

Communicate orally in a clear, coherent manner, presenting ideas, opinions, and information in a readily understandable form

5-1.2.5.

Identify some vocal effects, including tone, pace, pitch, volume, and a variety of sound effects, and use them appropriately and with sensitivity towards cultural differences to help communicate their meaning

5-2.1.1.

Read a variety of texts from diverse cultures, including literary texts

5-2.1.2.

Identify a variety of purposes for reading and choose reading materials appropriate for those purposes

5-2.1.3.

Identify a variety of reading comprehension strategies and use them appropriately before, during, and after reading to understand texts

5-2.1.4.

Demonstrate understanding of a variety of texts by summarizing important ideas and citing supporting details

5-2.1.5.

Use stated and implied ideas in texts to make inferences and construct meaning

5-2.1.6.

Extend understanding of texts by connecting the ideas in them to their own knowledge, experience, and insights, to other familiar texts, and to the world around them

5-2.1.7.

Analyse texts and explain how various elements in them contribute to meaning

5-2.1.8.

Make judgements and draw conclusions about the ideas and information in texts and cite stated or implied evidence from the text to support their views

5-2.1.9.

Identify the point of view presented in texts, ask questions to identify missing or possible alternative points of view, and suggest some possible alternative perspectives

5-2.2.1.

Analyse a variety of text forms and explain how their particular characteristics help communicate meaning, with a focus on literary texts such as short stories, graphic texts such as a logo, and informational texts such as a movie review

5-2.2.2.

Identify a variety of organizational patterns in a range of texts and explain how they help readers understand the texts

5-2.2.3.

Identify a variety of text features and explain how they help readers understand texts

5-2.2.4.

Identify various elements of style - including word choice and the use of similes, personification, comparative adjectives, and sentences of different types, lengths, and structures - and explain how they help communicate meaning

5-2.3.1.

Automatically read and understand most words in common use

5-2.3.2.

Predict the meaning of and rapidly solve unfamiliar words using different types of cues, including: semantic (meaning) cues; syntactic (language structure) cues; graphophonic (phonological and graphic) cues

5-2.3.3.

Read appropriate texts with expression and confidence, adjusting reading strategies and reading rate to match the form and purpose

5-2.4.1.

Identify the strategies they found most helpful before, during, and after reading and explain, in conversation with the teacher and/or peers or in a reader's notebook, how they can use these and other strategies to improve as readers

5-2.4.2.

Explain, in conversations with peers and/or the teacher or in a reader's notebook, how their skills in listening, speaking, writing, viewing, and representing help them make sense of what they read

5-3.1.1.

Identify the topic, purpose, and audience for a variety of writing forms

5-3.1.3.

Gather information to support ideas for writing, using a variety of strategies and a range of print and electronic resources

5-3.1.4.

Sort and classify ideas and information for their writing in a variety of ways

5-3.1.5.

Identify and order main ideas and supporting details and group them into units that could be used to develop several linked paragraphs, using a variety of strategies

5-3.2.1.

Write longer and more complex texts using a variety of forms

5-3.2.2.

Establish an appropriate voice in their writing, with a focus on modifying language and tone to suit different circumstances or audiences

5-3.2.3.

Use some vivid and/or figurative language and innovative expressions to add interest

5-3.2.4.

Vary sentence types and structures, with a focus on using conjunctions to connect ideas, and pronouns to make links within and between sentences

5-3.2.8.

Produce revised, draft pieces of writing to meet identified criteria based on the expectations related to content, organization, style, and use of conventions

5-3.3.1.

Spell familiar words correctly

5-3.3.2.

Spell unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies that involve understanding sound-symbol relationships, word structures, word meanings, and generalizations about spelling

5-3.3.4.

Use punctuation appropriately to help communicate their intended meaning, with a focus on the use of: a comma before and or but in compound sentences to join principal clauses; quotation marks for direct speech; and the placement of commas, question marks, and exclamation marks inside quotation marks in direct speech

5-3.3.5.

Use parts of speech correctly to communicate their intended meaning clearly, with a focus on the use of: common, proper, and abstract nouns; collective nouns; adjectives, including comparative adjectives; the helping verb have; adverbs modifying verbs; comparative adverbs

5-3.3.6.

Proofread and correct their writing using guidelines developed with peers and the teacher

5-3.3.7.

Use a range of appropriate elements of effective presentation in the finished product, including print, script, different fonts, graphics, and layout

5-3.3.8.

Produce pieces of published work to meet identified criteria based on the expectations related to content, organization, style, use of conventions, and use of presentation strategies

5-4.1.2.

Use overt and implied messages to draw inferences and construct meaning in media texts

5-4.1.3.

Express opinions about ideas, issues, and/or experiences presented in media texts, and give evidence from the texts to support their opinions

5-4.1.4.

Explain why different audiences might respond differently to the same media text

5-4.1.5.

Identify whose point of view is presented or reflected in a media text, ask questions to identify missing or alternative points of view, and, where appropriate, suggest how a more balanced view might be represented

5-4.2.2.

Identify the conventions and techniques used in some familiar media forms and explain how they help convey meaning and influence or engage the audience

5-4.4.2.

Explain, with some support and direction, how their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing help them to make sense of and produce media texts

5-A.1.1.

Represent, compare, and order whole numbers and decimal numbers from 0.01 to 100 000, using a variety of tools;

5-A.1.2.

Demonstrate an understanding of place value in whole numbers and decimal numbers from 0.01 to 100 000, using a variety of tools and strategies;

5-A.1.3.

Read and print in words whole numbers to ten thousand, using meaningful contexts;

5-A.1.4.

Round decimal numbers to the nearest tenth, in problems arising from real-life situations;

5-A.1.5.

Represent, compare, and order fractional amounts with like denominators, including proper and improper fractions and mixed numbers, using a variety of tools and using standard fractional notation;

5-A.1.6.

Demonstrate and explain the concept of equivalent fractions, using concrete materials;

5-A.1.7.

Demonstrate and explain equivalent representations of a decimal number, using concrete materials and drawings;

5-A.1.8.

Read and write money amounts to one thousand-dollars;

5-A.1.9.

Solve problems that arise from real-life situations and that relate to the magnitude of whole numbers up to 100 000.

5-A.2.1.

Count forward by hundredths from any decimal number expressed to two decimal places, using concrete materials and number lines.

5-A.2.2.

Use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to investigate changes in body systems (e.g., heart rate, breathing, body temperature) as a result of physical activity (e.g., exercise, resting, eating)

5-A.2.3.

Design and build a model to demonstrate how organs or components of body systems in the human body work and interact with other components (e.g., build a model that shows how muscles, bones, and joints in the human body work together as a system to allow movement of the arms or legs; build a model to show how the lungs and heart work as a system)

5-A.2.4.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including circulation, respiration, digestion, organs, and nutrients, in oral and written communication

5-A.2.5.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., create labelled charts or graphs to show changes in heart rate and breathing as a result of exercising)

5-A.3.1.

Solve problems involving the addition, subtraction, and multiplication of whole numbers, using a variety of mental strategies;

5-A.3.2.

Add and subtract decimal numbers to hundredths, including money amounts, using concrete materials, estimation, and algorithms;

5-A.3.3.

Multiply two-digit whole numbers by two-digit whole numbers, using estimation, student-generated algorithms, and standard algorithms;

5-A.3.4.

Divide three-digit whole numbers by one-digit whole numbers, using concrete materials, estimation, student-generated algorithms, and standard algorithms;

5-A.3.5.

Multiply decimal numbers by 10, 100, 1000, and 10 000, and divide decimal numbers by 10 and 100, using mental strategies;

5-A.4.1.

Describe multiplicative relationships between quantities by using simple fractions and decimals;

5-A.4.2.

Determine and explain, through investigation using concrete materials, drawings, and calculators, the relationship between fractions (i.e., with denominators of 2, 4, 5, 10, 20, 25, 50, and 100) and their equivalent decimal forms;

5-A.4.3.

Demonstrate an understanding of simple multiplicative relationships involving whole-number rates, through investigation using concrete materials and drawings.

5-B.1.1.

Estimate, measure (i.e., using an analogue clock), and represent time intervals to the nearest second;

5-B.1.2.

Estimate and determine elapsed time, with and without using a time line, given the durations of events expressed in minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, or years;

5-B.1.3.

Measure and record temperatures to determine and represent temperature changes over time;

5-B.1.4.

Estimate and measure the perimeter and area of regular and irregular polygons, using a variety of tools and strategies.

5-B.2.1.

Select and justify the most appropriate standard unit (i.e., millimetre, centimetre, decimetre, metre, kilometre) to measure length, height, width, and distance, and to measure the perimeter of various polygons;

5-B.2.2.

Solve problems requiring conversion from metres to centimetres and from kilometres to metres (;

5-B.2.3.

Solve problems involving the relationship between a 12-hour clock and a 24-hour clock;

5-B.2.4.

Create, through investigation using a variety of tools and strategies, two-dimensional shapes with the same perimeter or the same area;

5-B.2.5.

Determine, through investigation using a variety of tools and strategies, the relationships between the length and width of a rectangle and its area and perimeter, and generalize to develop the formulas [i.e., Area = length x width; Perimeter = (2 x length) + (2 x width)];

5-B.2.6.

Solve problems requiring the estimation and calculation of perimeters and areas of rectangles;

5-B.2.8.

Determine, through investigation using stacked congruent rectangular layers of concrete materials, the relationship between the height, the area of the base, and the volume of a rectangular prism, and generalize to develop the formula (i.e., Volume = area of base x height);

5-B.2.9.

Select and justify the most appropriate standard unit to measure mass (i.e., milligram, gram, kilogram, tonne).

5-B.3.1.

Identify internal forces acting on a structure (e.g., compression [squeezing], tension [stretching]), and describe their effects on the structure

5-B.3.2.

Identify external forces acting on a structure (e.g., the weight of people and furniture in a house, wind blowing on a tent, the movement caused by a passing train), and describe their effects on the structure, using diagrams

5-B.3.3.

Explain the advantages and disadvantages of different types of mechanical systems (e.g., a hoist in a lifting system that comprises four pulleys will decrease the amount of force needed by four times, but the force will have to move four times as fast)

5-B.3.4.

Describe forces resulting from natural phenomena that can have severe consequences for structures in the environment (e.g., a house loses its roof in a wind storm), and identify structural features that help overcome some of these forces (e.g., cross supports for roofs, steel beams in bridges)

5-B.3.5.

Describe how protective sports equipment protects the body from the impact of forces (e.g., helmets reduce the intensity of the force of the impact, spreading the impact over a larger area and preventing direct impact to the skull; knee and shin pads spread the impact over a larger area and protect against cuts and scrapes)

5-C.1.1.

Distinguish among polygons, regular polygons, and other two-dimensional shapes;

5-C.1.2.

Distinguish among prisms, right prisms, pyramids, and other three-dimensional figures;

5-C.1.3.

Identify and classify acute, right, obtuse, and straight angles;

5-C.1.4.

Measure and construct angles up to 90 degrees, using a protractor;

5-C.1.5.

Identify triangles (i.e., acute, right, obtuse, scalene, isosceles, equilateral), and classify them according to angle and side properties;

5-C.1.6.

Construct triangles, using a variety of tools, given acute or right angles and side measurements.

5-C.2.1.

Identify prisms and pyramids from their nets;

5-C.2.2.

Construct nets of prisms and pyramids, using a variety of tools.

5-C.2.3.

Use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to investigate changes of state and changes in matter

5-C.2.4.

Use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to determine how the physical properties of materials make them useful for particular tasks (e.g., when cleaning up a liquid spill in the kitchen, which material is best suited to do the job: a piece of sponge, a piece of terry cloth, a paper towel?)

5-C.2.5.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including mass, volume, properties, matter, physical/reversible changes, and chemical/irreversible changes, in oral and written communication

5-C.2.6.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., create a labelled chart or graph to show the time required for an ice cube to melt completely)

5-C.3.1.

Locate an object using the cardinal directions (i.e., north, south, east, west) and a coordinate system;

5-C.3.2.

Compare grid systems commonly used on maps (i.e., the use of numbers and letters to identify an area; the use of a coordinate system based on the cardinal directions to describe a specific location);

5-C.3.3.

Identify, perform, and describe translations, using a variety of tools;

5-C.3.4.

Create and analyse designs by translating and/or reflecting a shape, or shapes, using a variety of tools.

5-C.3.5.

Describe chemical changes in matter as changes that are irreversible (e.g., when the chrome on a bicycle rusts, it can never go back to being chrome; when an egg is boiled it can never go back to being a raw egg)

5-C.3.6.

Explain how changes of state involve the release of heat (e.g., when water freezes it releases heat) or the absorption of heat (e.g., when an ice cube melts, it absorbs heat)

5-C.3.8.

Distinguish between a physical change and a chemical change (e.g., a physical change can be reversed [ice to water to ice], whereas a chemical change creates new substance[s] [wood to smoke and ash])

5-D.1.1.

Create, identify, and extend numeric and geometric patterns, using a variety of tools;

5-D.1.2.

Build a model to represent a number pattern presented in a table of values that shows the term number and the term;

5-D.1.3.

Make a table of values for a pattern that is generated by adding or subtracting a number (i.e., a constant) to get the next term, or by multiplying or dividing by a constant to get the next term, given either the sequence or the pattern rule in words;

5-D.1.4.

Make predictions related to growing and shrinking geometric and numeric patterns;

5-D.1.5.

Extend and create repeating patterns that result from translations, through investigation using a variety of tools.

5-D.2.1.

Demonstrate, through investigation, an understanding of variables as changing quantities, given equations with letters or other symbols that describe relationships involving simple rates;

5-D.2.2.

Demonstrate, through investigation, an understanding of variables as unknown quantities represented by a letter or other symbol;

5-D.2.3.

Determine the missing number in equations involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division and one- or two-digit numbers, using a variety of tools and strategies

5-D.2.4.

Use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including energy, heat, light, sound, electrical, mechanical, and chemical, in oral and written communication

5-D.2.5.

Use a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g., in a small group, discuss ways in which technological innovations increase and/or decrease our ability to conserve energy)

5-D.3.1.

Identify a variety of forms of energy (e.g., electrical, chemical, mechanical, heat, light, kinetic) and give examples from everyday life of how that energy is used (e.g., electrical energy for cooking; chemical/electrical energy to run our cars; mechanical energy to hit a baseball; light energy for managing traffic on the roads; heat energy to warm homes and schools)

5-D.3.2.

Identify renewable and non-renewable sources of energy (e.g., renewable: sun, wind, ocean waves and tides, wood; non-renewable: fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas)

5-D.3.3.

Describe how energy is stored and transformed in a given device or system (e.g., in a portable electric device, chemical energy stored in a battery is transformed into electrical energy and then into other forms of energy such as mechanical, sound, and/or light energy)

5-E.1.3.

Collect and organize discrete or continuous primary data and secondary data and display the data in charts, tables, and graphs (including broken-line graphs) that have appropriate titles, labels, and scales that suit the range and distribution of the data, using a variety of tools;

5-E.1.4.

Demonstrate an understanding that sets of data can be samples of larger populations;

5-E.1.5.

Describe, through investigation, how a set of data is collected and explain whether the collection method is appropriate.

5-E.2.1.

Read, interpret, and draw conclusions from primary data and from secondary data;

5-E.2.2.

Calculate the mean for a small set of data and use it to describe the shape of the data set across its range of values, using charts, tables, and graphs;

5-E.2.3.

Compare similarities and differences between two related sets of data, using a variety of strategies.

5-E.3.1.

Determine and represent all the possible outcomes in a simple probability experiment, using systematic lists and area models;

5-E.3.2.

Represent, using a common fraction, the probability that an event will occur in simple games and probability experiments;

5-E.3.3.

Pose and solve simple probability problems, and solve them by conducting probability experiments and selecting appropriate methods of recording the results.