Quebec Education Program Progression of Learning — Grade 1


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1-1.A.1.

Counts or recites counting rhymes involving natural numbers

1-1.A.1.a.

Counts forward from a given number

1-1.A.1.b.

Counts forward or backward

1-1.A.1.b.i.

In simple sentences by using subject, verb, modifier

1-1.A.1.b.iii.

In compound sentences by using prepositions, conjunctions, interjections

1-1.A.1.c.

Skip counts (e.g. by twos)

1-1.A.10.

Locates natural numbers using different visual aids (e.g. hundreds chart, number strip, number line)

1-1.A.11.

Identifies properties of natural numbers

1-1.A.12.

Classifies natural numbers in various ways, based on their properties (e.g. even numbers, composite numbers)

1-1.A.2.

Counts collections (using objects or drawings)

1-1.A.2.a.

Matches the gesture to the corresponding number word; recognizes the cardinal aspect of a number and the conservation of number in various combinations

1-1.A.2.b.

Counts from a given number

1-1.A.2.c.

Counts a collection by grouping or regrouping

1-1.A.3.

Reads and writes any natural number

1-1.A.3.a.i.

Applies capitalization rules: the first word in a sentence, proper nouns

1-1.A.3.b.i.

Applies end punctuation rules: period, question mark, exclamation point

1-1.A.3.b.ii.

Applies rules for commas: items in a series, greetings

1-1.A.3.b.iii.

Uses apostrophes to punctuate contractions and singular possessive

1-1.A.3.b.iv.

Uses quotation marks to punctuate dialogue

1-1.A.3.c.iv.

Applies common spelling patterns/generalizations including: word families, regular plurals, prefixes, suffixes, irregular plurals, words ending in "y, doubling final consonant

1-1.A.3.d.

Determines the state of various objects and substances in his/her environment (e.g. glass, air, milk, plastic)

1-1.A.4.

Represents natural numbers in different ways or associates a number with a set of objects or drawings

1-1.A.4.a.

Emphasis on apparent, accessible groupings using objects, drawings or unstructured materials (e.g. tokens, nesting cubes, groups of ten objects placed inside a bag and ten of these bags placed inside another container)

1-1.A.5.

Composes and decomposes a natural number in a variety of ways (e.g. 123 = 100 + 23; 123 = 100 + 20 + 3; 123 = 50 + 50 + 20 + 3; 123 = 2 X 50 + 30 - 7; 123 = 2X60 + 3)

1-1.A.6.

Identifies equivalent expressions (e.g. 52 = 40 + 12, 25 + 27 = 40 + 12, 52 = 104 / 2)

1-1.A.6.a.

Associates the uses of certain household products with their properties (e.g. cleaning products remove grease, vinegar and lemon juice help preserve certain foods)

1-1.A.7.

Compares natural numbers

1-1.A.8.

Arranges natural numbers in increasing or decreasing order

1-1.A.9.

Describes number patterns, using his/her own words and appropriate mathematical vocabulary (e.g. even numbers, odd numbers, square numbers, triangular numbers, prime numbers, composite numbers)

1-1.B.1.

Identifies fractions related to everyday items (using objects or drawings)

1-1.B.1.a.

Uses and interprets the visual element of color (e.g. dark reds and blacks in a picture book to show anger or fear)

1-1.B.2.

Represents a fraction in a variety of ways, based on a whole or a collection of objects

1-1.C.2.a.

Recognizes the effects of magnetism on magnets (attraction and repulsion)

1-1.C.2.b.

Identifies situations in which magnets are used

1-1.C.6.a.

Identifies situations involving the force of friction (pushing on an object, sliding an object, rolling an object)

1-1.D.1.a.

Describes the parts and mechanisms that make up an object

1-1.D.1.b.

Identifies the needs that an object was originally designed to meet

1-1.F.1.a.

Appropriately uses terminology related to the material world

1-1.F.1.b.

Distinguishes between the meaning of a term used in a scientific or technological context and its meaning in everyday language (e.g. source, matter, body, energy, machine)

1-2.A.1.a.

Understands the purpose for reading, listening to and/or viewing (e.g. for enjoyment, to learn something, to escape to new places, for instructions).

1-2.A.1.b.

Uses prior knowledge (e.g. what s/he already knows about the topic, author, genre/text type)

1-2.A.1.c.

Previews the text (e.g. attends to the cover, dedication, title page and author's notes for clues that will add to understanding or enjoyment of the text)

1-2.A.1.d.

Uses knowledge of the genre/text type to be viewed/read: immersion into models of the text type to determine important structures and features of the text type, and how these contribute to meaning in the text (e.g. understands the structure and features of familiar text types such as main character, sequence of events in narratives [stories]; visual features in information-based texts)

1-2.A.1.e.

Builds needed background knowledge and experiences (e.g. of content, setting and/or author, in a variety of ways such as watching a documentary on a related topic, reading a picture book on a similar theme before reading a chapter book, using the Internet)

1-2.A.2.

Uses objects, diagrams or equations to represent a situation and conversely, describes a situation represented by objects, diagrams or equations (use of different meanings of addition and subtraction)

1-2.A.2.a.

Transformation (adding, taking away), uniting, comparing

1-2.A.2.b.

Applies knowledge of cueing systems to construct meaning

1-2.A.2.c.

Uses a variety of reading strategies to make meaning of different text types

1-2.A.2.d.

Relies on common structures and features of literary, popular and information-based texts to construct meaning (e.g. narrative structure: beginning, middle, end; or a feature such as dialogue)

1-2.A.2.e.

Relies on common structures and features of media texts to construct meaning

1-2.A.2.f.

Recognizes the most common rhetorical conventions of information-based texts to build meaning, namely:

1-2.A.2.f.i.

Description of ideas and concepts

1-2.A.2.g.

Uses the purpose for reading and clues in the text to determine important aspects of a text (e.g. nonfiction features that signal importance such as boldface print, italics)

1-2.A.3.

Uses objects, diagrams or equations to represent a situation and conversely, describes a situation represented by objects, diagrams or equations (use of different meanings of multiplication and division)

1-2.A.3.a.

Rectangular arrays, repeated addition, Cartesian product, sharing, and number of times x goes into y(using objects and diagrams)

1-2.A.3.b.

Uses details and evidence in the text to infer meaning(s)

1-2.A.3.c.

Integrates new information with what is already known to construct meaning

1-2.A.3.d.

Uses evidence to distinguish between own thinking, values and beliefs and those presented in the text (e.g. figures out what values are important to a character)

1-2.A.3.e.

Uses other readers' interpretations to clarify and extend own ideas (e.g. discusses information, ideas and new insights with peers)

1-2.A.4.

n numerical expressions (e.g. 3 + 2 = 6 -1)

1-2.B.1.a.

Understands the purpose for the writing (e.g., to entertain, to inform, to communicate)

1-2.B.1.c.

Examines models of text type through immersion into the text (e.g. features of text, strategies author used to craft the text)

1-2.C.1.c.

Examines models of text type to be produced through immersion into the type (e.g. unique features of a text, target audience, how message/meaning is communicated)

1-2.D.2.a.

Associates the sun with the idea of a star, the Earth with the idea of a planet and the moon with the idea a natural satellite

1-2.D.4.a.

Describes the changes to the environment throughout the seasons (temperature, amount of daylight, type of precipitation)

1-2.D.4.b.

Explains the sensations experienced (hot, cold, comfortable) with regard to temperature measurements

1-2.F.1.a.

Appropriately uses terminology related to an understanding of the Earth and the universe

1-2.F.1.b.

Distinguishes between the meaning of a term used in a scientific or technological context and its meaning in everyday language (e.g. space, revolution)

1-3.A.1.

Approximates the result of

1-3.A.1.a.

An addition or subtraction involving natural numbers

1-3.A.1.a.i.

Formal and informal thank-yous, expressions of appreciation and support

1-3.A.1.b.

Reading, Listening, Writing & Media Production

1-3.A.1.b.v.

Poetry of different kinds written by and for children (e.g. free verse, list poems, rap, shape poems, free verse)

1-3.A.13.

Using his/her own words and mathematical language that is at an appropriate level for the cycle, describes

1-3.A.13.a.

Non-numerical patterns (e.g. series of colours, shapes, sounds, gestures)

1-3.A.13.b.

Numerical patterns (e.g. number rhymes, tables and charts)

1-3.A.13.c.

Series of numbers and family of operations

1-3.A.14.

Adds new terms to a series when the first three terms or more are given

1-3.A.15.

Uses a calculator and

1-3.A.15.a.

Becomes familiar with its basic functions (+, -, =, 0 to 9 number keys, all clear, clear)

1-3.A.2.

Builds a repertoire of memorized addition and subtraction facts

1-3.A.2.a.

Builds a memory of addition facts (0 + 0 to 10 + 10) and the corresponding subtraction facts, using objects, drawings, charts or tables

1-3.A.2.a.ii.

Relevant details such as time, place and location in an invitation

1-3.A.2.a.iv.

Images (photo or drawing) to respond to the reader's expectations and/or needs (e.g. the illustration on a thank-you note or invitation)

1-3.A.2.a.v.

Self expressive language to relate ideas, feelings, experiences (e.g. in own poetry)

1-3.A.2.a.vi.

Self-expressive language in poetry: line breaks or stanzas, images, figurative language to create vivid pictures

1-3.A.2.b.

Develops various strategies that promote mastery of number facts and relates them to the properties of addition

1-3.A.2.c.

Masters all addition facts (0 + 0 to 10 + 10) and the corresponding subtraction facts

1-3.A.3.

Develops processes for mental computation

1-3.A.3.a.

Uses his/her own processes to determine the sum or difference of two natural numbers

1-3.A.4.

Develops processes for written computation (addition and subtraction)

1-3.A.4.a.

Uses his/her own processes as well as objects and drawings to determine the sum or difference of two natural numbers less than 1000

1-3.B.1.a.

Compares the nutrition of domestic animals with that of wild animals

1-3.D.1.a.

Describes the physical characteristics that demonstrate how animals adapt to their environment

1-3.D.1.b.

Describes the behaviours of familiar animals that enable them to adapt to their environment

1-3.D.2.a.

Provides examples of how living things are used (e.g. meat, vegetable, wood, leather)

1-3.F.1.a.

Appropriately uses terminology related to an understanding of living things

1-3.F.1.b.

Distinguishes between the meaning of a term used in a scientific or technological context and its meaning in everyday language (e.g. habitat, metamorphosis)

1-4.A.1.

Gets his/her bearings and locates objects in space (spatial relationships)

1-4.A.1.a.

Speaking: The student produces own stories, as well as dramatizations of others' stories, through:

1-4.A.1.a.i.

Role-play involving character from own stories, from literature and from nonfiction

1-4.A.1.b.

Reading and Listening (written and media texts)

1-4.A.1.b.i.1.

Children's literature: Nursery rhymes

1-4.A.1.b.i.2.

Children's literature: Illustrated wordless and picture books written for younger children

1-4.A.1.b.i.4.

Children's literature: Poetry

1-4.A.1.b.i.5.

Children's literature: Classic and modern fairy tales

1-4.A.1.b.iii.2.

Media texts: Stories in children's magazines, illustrated picture books, online talking books (i.e. that combine spoken word and print)

1-4.A.1.b.iii.3.

Media texts: Age appropriate films, video clips, animation

1-4.A.1.b.iv.1.

Nonfiction (written and media): Biographical picture books of increasing sophistication

1-4.A.1.b.iv.2.

Nonfiction (written and media): Articles in children's magazines or online Web page (e.g. about a sport star, civil rights activist)

1-4.A.1.c.

Writing and Media Production

1-4.A.1.c.i.

Stories based on ideas, experiences and events

1-4.A.1.c.ii.

Illustrated narrative in comic strip using own drawings, images or photos

1-4.A.1.c.iii.

Illustrated picture books using drawings and/or images and/or photos

1-4.A.1.c.iv.

Photo stories (e.g. sequencing photos and/or images to create a scene from a story)

1-4.A.2.

Locates objects in a plane

1-4.A.2.a.

Spoken and Written Texts

1-4.A.2.a.i.1.

Plot structures and features: Predictable story patterns

1-4.A.2.a.i.2.

Plot structures and features: Sequence of events

1-4.A.2.a.i.3.

Plot structures and features: Incidents (e.g. actions that take place in the story usually related to the main conflict)

1-4.A.2.a.ii.1.

Characterization: Main character in a story

1-4.A.2.a.iv.1.

Other features of narrative: Literary conventions (e.g. "Once upon a time" in a fairy tale, moral in a fable)

1-4.A.2.b.

Media texts: All of the structures and features of written narrative (above) also apply to narratives in the media. In addition, the student understands the purpose of the following structures and features and uses this knowledge to construct meaning when viewing and producing media texts.

1-4.A.2.b.i.1.

Plot structure and features: Use of images (photos or drawings) to extend the story and to provide story details

1-4.A.2.b.i.2.

Plot structure and features: Use of music and/or sound to create suspense, mood, humor, conflict, etc. (Viewing only)

1-4.A.2.b.ii.1.

Characterization: Surface appearance of a character (e.g. clothing, physical attributes)

1-4.A.2.b.ii.2.

Characterization: Use of details to convey an imaginary character (e.g. wings, exaggerated or invented facial features)

1-4.A.2.b.ii.3.

Characterization: Use of explanation marks and speech bubbles to show thought and dialogue, e.g. in comic books or some animation films

1-4.A.4.

Locates points in a Cartesian plane

1-4.B.1.

Compares objects or parts of objects in the environment with solids (e.g. spheres, cones, cubes, cylinders, prisms, pyramids)

1-4.B.3.

Identifies the main solids (e.g. spheres, cones, cubes, cylinders, prisms, pyramids)

1-4.B.4.

Identifies and represents the different faces of a prism or pyramid

1-4.C.1.

Compares and constructs figures made with closed curved lines or closed straight lines

1-4.C.2.

Identifies plane figures (square, rectangle, triangle, rhombus and circle)

1-4.C.3.

Describes plane figures (square, rectangle, triangle and rhombus)

1-4.D.2.

Observes and produces patterns using geometric figures

1-5.A.3.

Estimates and measures the dimensions of an object using unconventional units

1-5.A.4.

Estimates and measures the dimensions of an object using conventional units

1-5.A.4.a.

Metre, decimetre and centimeter

1-5.B.1.b.

Reading, Listening, Writing and Media Production

1-5.B.1.b.ii.

Illustrated and multimedia how-to books

1-5.B.1.b.iii.

Texts that explain how or why something happens using a narrative structure (e.g. picture books such as The Magic School Bus, magazine articles)

1-5.C.1.a.

Speaking: The student produces:

1-5.C.1.a.i.

Spoken reports based on family, community or school experiences (e.g. field trips, favourite toys, special holidays)

1-5.C.1.b.

Reading, Viewing and Listening (spoken, written and media texts)

1-5.C.1.b.i.

Nonfiction that describes and reports details about a topic (e.g. simple science trade books written for children)

1-5.C.1.c.

Writing and Media Production

1-5.C.1.c.ii.

Reports on topics/subjects of personal interest (e.g. short nonfiction texts, magazine articles)

1-5.D.1.b.

Reading and Listening (written and media texts): The student reads/views persuasive texts that encourage people to purchase something, partake in a special activity or adopt a particular viewpoint, specifically:

1-5.D.1.b.i.

Popular signs and symbols, such as logos of popular food chains, clothing

1-5.G.1.

Estimates and measures time using conventional units

1-5.H.1.

Estimates and measures temperature using conventional units

1-6.3.a.

A table, a bar graph and a pictograph

1-6.4.a.

A table, a bar graph and a pictograph

1-7.5.a.

Certain, possible or impossible outcome

1.A.1.

Location in space and time

1.A.1.a.

Orients himself/herself in space, a simple drawing, an illustration or a scale model (e.g. my bicycle is in front of the garage, my swing is to the left of the tree, the post office is north of the playground)

1.A.1.b.

Orients himself/herself in space using the points of the compass (e.g. my house is south of the lake, my swing is west of the tree)

1.A.1.c.

Orients himself/herself in time: calendar, day, month, year

1.A.1.e.

Indicates physical traits characteristic of different ages (e.g. a baby has no teeth, grandparents sometimes have white hair)

1.A.1.f.

Indicates activities associated with different ages (e.g. children go to school, adults can drive)

1.A.2.1.

Demographic situation

1.A.2.1.a.

Names groups he/she belongs to (e.g. family, friends, sports teams, class)

1.A.2.1.b.

Describes the composition of the groups he/she belongs to (e.g. my soccer team is made up of boys and girls and an adult: the coach; my class is made up of boys and girls and an adult: the teacher)

1.A.2.1.c.

Indicates the number of members in the groups he/she belongs to (e.g. there are 10 players on my soccer team, there are 24 students in my class)

1.A.2.2.a.

Names the language(s) spoken in his/her environment (e.g. French, English, Italian)

1.A.2.2.c.

Names artistic expressions (e.g. painting, sculpture)

1.A.2.2.d.

Names everyday objects (e.g. toys, CDs, iron, computer, bicycle, car)

1.A.2.3.a.

Names elements of the landscape related to economic activities (e.g. farm, factory, bank, port)

1.A.2.3.b.

Names needs satisfied by economic activities (e.g. food, entertainment)

1.A.2.3.c.

Names means of transportation and transportation routes (e.g. car, train, airplane; highway, road, railway)

1.A.2.4.a.

Names institutions (e.g. city hall, municipal council)

1.A.2.4.b.

Indicates rules of order for groups he/she belongs to (e.g. in class students must raise their hand before they speak)

1.A.3.a.

Names types of relief (e.g. plain, valley, plateau, hill, mountain chain)

1.A.3.b.

Names elements of climate (e.g. precipitation, temperature)

1.A.3.c.

Names bodies of water (e.g. river, lake)

1.A.3.d.

Names natural resources (e.g. forest, water, fertile soil, minerals)

1.A.4.

People, groups and events

1.A.4.a.

Names people in his/her environment (e.g. father, friend, teacher, coach)

1.A.4.b.

Describes the roles of different members of the groups he/she belongs to (e.g. the teacher transmits knowledge, the captain of my team encourages us)

2.A.c.

Names changes in means of transportation and transportation routes (e.g. car, train, airplane, roads, highways)

3.A.1.

Indicates differences between his/her environment and an unfamiliar environment: everyday objects (e.g. toys, furniture, clothing)

3.A.1.a.

Means of transportation and transportation routes (e.g. car, train, airplane, roads, highways)

3.A.1.b.

Economic activity (e.g. development and processing of resources, services)

3.A.1.c.

Characteristics of the territory (e.g. relief, climate, bodies of water, resources)

4.1.b.

Draws on previous learning

4.2.a.

Spontaneously frames questions

4.5.e.

Uses supporting documents

5.1.d.

Uses the points of the compass

5.1.e.

Uses spatial reference points

5.3.b.

Decodes the chronological scale

5.3.c.

Uses chronological reference points

5.3.d.

Finds information: places, actors, circumstances

5.4.a.

Determines the nature of the document

5.4.e.

Determines places, actors, circumstances

5.5.d.

Identifies the nature of the information