Quebec Education Program Progression of Learning — Grade 7


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1.A.1.

Properties and characteristics of matter

1.A.1.a.

Locates the metropolis studied in the appropriate continent and country

1.A.1.b.

Locates major metropolises on a map of the world (e.g. Lagos, Cairo, Mexico City, Montral, Moscow, Mumbai, New York City, Paris, So Paulo, Sydney, Tokyo)

1.A.2.

Characteristics of a metropolis

1.A.2.a.

Describes site of the metropolis studied (e.g. Montral is located in the St. Lawrence Plain, on an island surrounded by the St. Lawrence River and the Rivire des Prairies)

1.A.2.b.

Lists characteristics of the metropolis studied (e.g. high population density, high land occupancy and concentration of services in New York City)

1.A.2.c.

Lists characteristics of the population of the metropolis studied (e.g. large population size and high population density in Mexico City; multiethnicity and urban sprawl in Sydney)

1.A.2.d.

Establishes the relative size of the population of the metropolis studied as a proportion of the country, province, state or district as a whole (e.g. the population of Montral and its suburbs accounts for approximately 50% of the population of Qubec)

1.A.2.e.

Indicates places where power is concentrated in the metropolis studied (e.g. The United Nations headquarters is in New York City)

1.A.2.f.

Indicates places where economic and financial power is concentrated in the metropolis studied (e.g. headquarters of large corporations in Sydney)

1.A.2.g.

Explains the concentration of services in the metropolis studied (e.g. the size of the population in the metropolitan area explains why there are several hospitals and universities in Montral)

1.A.3.

Planning and development of a metropolis

1.A.3.a.

Describes different neighbourhoods of the metropolis studied (e.g. concentration of high-rise office buildings and convergence of public transit networks in Montrals downtown core)

1.A.3.b.

Explains the presence of disadvantaged neighbourhoods or slums in the metropolis studied (e.g. a metropolis attracts people who do not always have the resources necessary for adequate housing and who therefore settle in disadvantaged neighbourhoods in New York City, or in slums in Cairo)

1.A.3.c.

Describes the suburbs around the metropolis studied (e.g. the northern and southern suburbs of Montral include several dozen municipalities, which are primarily residential in nature and have a lower population density than the metropolis)

1.A.3.d.

Indicates types of infrastructure that stem from particular features of the metropolis studied (e.g. because of its harsh winter conditions, Montral has developed a network of underground passageways that are connected by metro and link numerous apartment buildings to office buildings and service centres)

1.A.3.e.

Explains the concentration of transportation networks in the metropolis studied (e.g. because of its large population, New York City has several international airports, an extensive highway system, one of the largest train stations in the world and an international port)

1.A.3.f.

Indicates development constraints associated with urban sprawl in the metropolis studied (e.g. highway expansion and extension of mass transit lines in Cairo)

1.A.4.

Issues affecting a metropolis or metropolises

1.A.4.a.

Describes housing-related problems in the metropolis studied (e.g. in New York City, housing is scarce, expensive and, in certain cases, unsanitary)

1.A.4.b.

Explains why the population of the metropolis studied may be moving to the suburbs (e.g. in Sydney, some residents move to the suburbs in search of more affordable housing, while others seek a better quality of life)

1.A.4.c.

Indicates measures taken to solve housing problems in the metropolis studied (e.g. construction of satellite cities on the outskirts of Cairo; social housing units in Montral)

1.A.4.d.

Explains some consequences of urban sprawl in the metropolis studied (e.g. as the city of Montral expands, agricultural land decreases and road congestion increases as suburbanites commute to and from the metropolis)

1.A.4.e.

Identifies problems associated with transportation in metropolises (e.g. air pollution, traffic congestion)

1.A.4.f.

Indicates measures taken to reduce transportation problems in the metropolis studied (e.g. implementation of alternate-day driving restrictions to reduce the number of vehicles on the roads in Mexico City; improved public transit networks in Sydney; implementation of a bicycle rental program in Montral)

1.A.4.g.

Explains some of the repercussions of developing public transit networks in the metropolis studied (e.g. in Sydney, reducing the number of cars on the road cuts down on pollution and improves the quality of life of residents)

1.A.4.h.

Identifies problems associated with waste management in the metropolis studied (e.g. garbage collection and disposal problems in Cairo; exporting waste to increasingly distant landfill sites in New York City)

1.A.4.i.

Indicates measures taken to reduce waste management problems in the metropolis studied (e.g. in New York City, installation of incinerators, development of recycling and waste recovery programs)

1.A.4.j.

Identifies problems associated with water supply in metropolises (e.g. uneven access to drinking water, depending on the level of development of the countries where metropolises are located)

1.A.4.k.

Indicates measures taken to reduce problems related to the supply of drinking water in metropolises (e.g. installation of water meters, improved water systems)

1.A.4.l.

Explains some effects of population density on the health of residents in metropolises (e.g. high population density increases the risk of the spread of diseases)

1.B.1.

Location of a city subject to natural hazards

1.B.1.a.

Locates the city studied in the appropriate continent and country

1.B.1.b.

Locates cities subject to natural hazards on a map of the world (e.g. Honolulu, Manila, Naples, Phuket, Port-au-Prince, Quito, San Francisco, Tokyo)

1.B.2.

Characteristics of a city subject to natural hazards

1.B.2.a.

Indicates the type(s) of natural hazards to which the city studied is subject (e.g. San Francisco: earthquakes; Quito: eruption of the Pichincha Volcano and earthquakes)

1.B.2.b.

Indicates the relationship between the location of the city studied and the hazard(s) to which it is subject (e.g. San Francisco is built along a series of fault lines, the best known being the San Andreas Fault; Manila is located on an island in a volcanic archipelago and is exposed to several natural hazards: typhoons that cause floods and landslides, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and tsunamis)

1.B.2.c.

Explains why the population is attracted to the city studied despite the instability associated with the hazards (e.g. the fertile volcanic soils of the valley of the Andes attract the population around Quito; the Mediterranean climate and quality of life in California attract people to San Francisco)

1.B.2.d.

Establishes the level of development of the country in which the city studied is located (e.g. San Francisco is located in a developed country)

1.B.2.e.

Establishes the size of the population of the city studied as a proportion of the population of the country (e.g. in 2008, Manila accounts for 14% of the population of the Philippines; San Francisco Bay accounts for 20% of the population of California)

1.B.3.

Planning and development of a city subject to natural hazards

1.B.3.a.

Indicates means used to protect the residents from natural hazards in the city studied (e.g. earthquake-resistant buildings in San Francisco; stilt houses and dikes to prevent mudslides in Manila)

1.B.3.b.

Explains the location of neighbourhoods in the city studied in terms of their exposure to natural hazards (e.g. in Quito, the financial district and affluent neighbourhoods are located north of the valley, far from the Pichincha Volcano; low-income neighbourhoods and slums are located on the slopes of the volcano where land is cheaper and the risk of landslides caused by erosion and mudslides or lahars is greater)

1.B.3.c.

Indicates safety measures that the city studied can take to deal with a disaster (e.g. in San Francisco, officials have prepared evacuation plans and planned disaster shelters for displaced residents)

1.B.4.

Issues affecting a city or cities subject to natural hazards

1.B.4.a.

Indicates preventive measures taken to deal with hazards (e.g. designing systems to detect earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, cyclones and tsunamis)

1.B.4.b.

Indicates consequences of a natural disaster for the city studied (e.g. in 1989, part of the Bay Bridge collapsed in San Francisco, killing 42 people; the earthquake caused numerous gas leaks and fires in dozens of buildings)

1.B.4.c.

Explains the relationship between urbanization and the consequences of natural disasters for city populations (e.g. the more densely populated an area is, the greater the number of people affected by a natural disaster)

1.B.4.d.

Explains the relationship between the level of economic development of the country where the city is located and its ability to protect residents from hazards (e.g. cities in developing countries lack resources; few measures are therefore taken to deal with natural disasters, which is less likely to be the case in developed countries)

1.C.1.

Location of a heritage city

1.C.1.a.

Locates the heritage city studied in the appropriate continent and country

1.C.1.b.

Locates, on a map of the world, heritage cities recognized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (e.g. Algiers, Athens, Beijing, Brasilia, Cologne, Istanbul, Havana, Reims, Venice, Zabid)

1.C.2.

Characteristics of a heritage city

1.C.2.a.

Indicates selection criteria used to recognize world heritage sites (e.g. a site must bear exceptional testimony to an existing or former civilization)

1.C.2.b.

Indicates what characterizes the cities that are part of the Organization of World Heritage Cities (OWHC) (e.g. Qubec City, Paris and Rome are part of OWHC because the heritage sites are inhabited; Beijing and Athens are not because the heritage sites are not)

1.C.2.c.

Names organizations that recognize the value of a heritage site in a city (e.g. UNESCO at a global level; Commission des biens culturels in Qubec)

1.C.2.d.

Describes the heritage site in the city studied (e.g. in Beijing, the site is not inhabited; it includes three sets of buildings: the Forbidden City and the Temple of the Sky in the centre of the city and the Summer Palace outside the city)

1.C.2.e.

Names elements recognized for their heritage value in the city studied (e.g. the Ursuline Chapel and the ramparts of the walled city of Qubec; the Acropolis in Athens)

1.C.2.f.

Names cities of the world deemed to have heritage character (e.g. Agra, Brasilia, Bruges, Istanbul, Jerusalem, Prague, Timbuktu)

1.C.3.

Planning and development of a heritage city

1.C.3.a.

Indicates development constraints that the heritage city studied must deal with (e.g. use of small buses in order not to widen the streets inside the walled city of Qubec)

1.C.3.b.

Indicates infrastructure put in place to facilitate access to the heritage site in the city studied (e.g. parking, pedestrian streets, access roads in Paris; adequate number of tourist information centres to guide visitors in Rome)

1.C.3.c.

Indicates measures taken to meet the needs of the residents of the heritage city studied (e.g. creation of parking areas outside the heritage site to limit buses inside the walled city of Qubec)

1.C.4.

Issues affecting a heritage city or cities

1.C.4.a.

Indicates actions to take to ensure the protection of heritage cities (e.g. limiting the number of vehicles around the heritage site to protect monuments from pollution; building underground parking lots; providing electric bus service; changing the function of certain buildings)

1.C.4.b.

Indicates constraints that the heritage city studied must deal with (e.g. in Qubec City, ensuring the peace and tranquility of residents, restoring old buildings in keeping with their style and period)

1.C.4.c.

Lists actions that contribute to the degradation of the heritage site of the city studied (e.g. graffiti on monuments in Paris; stealing stones in Rome or Athens)

1.C.4.d.

Explains disadvantages of having a large influx of tourists in the heritage city studied (e.g. vehicles create congestion in the narrow streets and cause transportation problems for residents in the walled city of Qubec)

1.C.4.e.

Indicates constraints imposed by UNESCO on heritage cities (e.g. obligation to conduct an archaeological investigation prior to building on a site; preserving the historical character of the city when transforming or constructing buildings)

1.C.4.f.

Indicates limits of heritage protection by UNESCO (e.g. the fact that a city is included on UNESCOs World Heritage List attracts worldwide attention but does not guarantee that all the necessary measures will be taken to protect the heritage value of the site)

10.1.c.

Names religious rituals that mark the lives of many people (e.g. holidays, celebrations of faith)

10.2.1.

Location in space and time

10.2.1.a.

Locates on a map the main Christian and Muslim territories around the year 1000

10.2.1.b.

Locates on a map pilgrimage routes of the Middle Ages (e.g. to Santiago de Compostela, to Jerusalem)

10.2.1.c.

Locates on a time line the Middle Ages and facts related to Christianization

10.2.2.

Institutions of the Western Christian Church

10.2.2.a.

Describes events that marked relations between Christians and Romans (e.g. persecution of Christians, conversion of Constantine, recognition of Christianity as the official religion of the state)

10.2.2.b.

Indicates elements of continuity between the Western Roman Empire and the beginning of the Middle Ages (e.g. presence of Christianity, use of Latin in the Church, divided territory)

10.2.2.c.

Names institutions that promoted the spread of Christianity in the Middle Ages (e.g. papacy, monastic orders)

10.2.2.d.

Indicates roles of certain Church members in the Middle Ages (e.g. the pope was the leader of the Catholic Church; bishops acted as heads of dioceses; priests were in charge of parishes)

10.2.3.

Social, political and economic organization

10.2.3.a.

Indicates the relationships of dependence that existed among individuals in feudal society (e.g. a lord would grant a fief to an individual who would become his vassal and pledge allegiance to him)

10.2.3.b.

Indicates the role of each social group: peasants and artisans worked; nobles fought; the clergy prayed

10.2.3.d.

Names sources of revenue for the Church and clergy (e.g. feudal dues, tithe)

10.2.3.e.

Indicates the function of a castle in the Middle Ages (e.g. served as the lords residence, protected villagers in an attack)

10.2.4.a.

Indicates the function of a monastery in the Middle Ages (e.g. served as library, a place of prayer, a shelter for pilgrims, a residence for regular orders)

10.2.4.b.

Indicates the function of a cathedral in the Middle Ages (e.g. served as a place of prayer, a gathering place, a place for ceremonies, a university)

10.2.4.c.

Gives examples of architectural innovation associated with the construction of cathedrals (e.g. cross-ribbed vault, arch buttress)

10.2.4.d.

Indicates the objective of the Crusades called by the Pope: to free Jerusalem from the Muslims

10.2.4.e.

Indicates why people went on pilgrimages (e.g. to venerate relics, to do penance, to obtain a favour)

10.2.4.f.

Indicates the effects of the Crusades (e.g. commercial trade, cultural influences)

10.2.4.g.

Indicates factors that united different peoples in the West during the Middle Ages (e.g. Christian faith, religious institutions, feudalism)

10.3.a.

Indicates characteristics of identity in societies (e.g. language, culture, religion, territory)

10.3.b.

Indicates elements of religious life in one society (e.g. buildings, place names)

11.1.a.

Indicates the purpose of trade in societies: the survival of individuals depends on goods they obtain through trade

11.1.b.

Indicates the impact of trade on urbanization (e.g. neighbourhood zoning, concentration of services, encroachment on agricultural land, development of road networks)

11.1.c.

Names imported consumer goods (e.g. food products, electronic goods, clothing)

11.1.d.

Names import restrictions (e.g. customs tariffs, quotas)

11.2.1.

Location in space and time

11.2.1.a.

Locates on a map commercial cities at the end of the Middle Ages

11.2.1.b.

Locates on a map major trading routes at the end of the Middle Ages

11.2.2.

Organization of towns and trade

11.2.2.a.

Describes the organization of a medieval town (e.g. castle surrounded by walls, residential and commercial areas called burgs (or boroughs) where artisans and merchants were concentrated)

11.2.2.b.

Names the institution responsible for the towns administration: the commune

11.2.2.c.

Describes the organization of local craft trade (e.g. artisans made and sold the goods needed by the towns inhabitants)

11.2.2.d.

Indicates the function of craft guilds (e.g. to control entry into trades, to protect members)

11.2.2.e.

Names craft guilds of the Middle Ages (e.g. butchers, masons, goldsmiths, weavers)

11.2.2.f.

Indicates factors that promoted the development of large-scale commerce in the Middle Ages (e.g. increased agricultural production, the iron wheel, the Crusades, the bill of exchange)

11.2.2.g.

Names institutions that regulated large-scale commerce (e.g. Hanseatic League, guilds)

11.2.2.h.

Names products traded in large-scale commerce (e.g. cloth, spices, metals)

11.2.2.i.

Indicates the role of fairs in the Middle Ages: places to sell goods obtained through large-scale European commerce

11.2.3.a.

Names activities associated with the development of cities: crafts, trade

11.2.3.b.

Indicates privileges of the bourgeoisie in feudal systems (e.g. charters granting exemption from certain feudal obligations, possibility of forming communes)

11.2.3.c.

Explains the source of the merchant bourgeoisies wealth (e.g. the bourgeoisie made a profit from buying and selling products, which allowed them to accumulate capital)

11.3.a.

Names associations responsible for defending collective interests (e.g. unions, professional corporations, employers organizations)

11.3.c.

Indicates issues that could become subjects for debate between citizens and public institutions (e.g. labour standards, social housing, income tax, goods and services tax)

11.3.d.

Indicates ways in which social groups can express their concerns (e.g. presentation of briefs to parliamentary commissions, petitions, letters of opinion in newspapers)

11.3.e.

Names public institutions that monitor the application of laws (e.g. ombudsperson, Office de la protection du consommateur, Office des personnes handicapes)

12.1.a.

Indicates different concepts of human beings in society (e.g. environmentalism views human beings as one of many elements in the natural balance; liberalism views human beings as competing individuals guided by personal interests)

12.1.b.

Names scientific theories that may influence our concept of human beings and their place in the universe (e.g. theory of evolution, theory of relativity)

12.2.1.

Location in space and time

12.2.1.a.

Locates on a map the major European states and cities of the Renaissance

12.2.1.b.

Locates on a map the territories where the various Protestant churches prevailed

12.2.1.c.

Locates on a time line the Renaissance and facts related to it

12.2.2.b.

Indicates sources of the changes in thinking and the arts in the 15th and16th centuries (e.g. texts and works from Antiquity)

12.2.2.c.

Names some of the great humanists of the Renaissance (e.g. Erasmus, Leonardo da Vinci, Montaigne)

12.2.2.e.

Indicates innovations that characterize Renaissance art (e.g. realism through use of perspective)

12.2.2.f.

Indicates subjects often depicted by Renaissance painters and sculptors (e.g. human beings, nature)

12.2.2.g.

Indicates elements that characterize Renaissance architecture (e.g. domes, triangular pediments, revival of architectural features from Antiquity)

12.2.2.j.

Indicates the impact of the printing press (e.g. decrease in the cost of books, spreading of knowledge and humanist ideas, publication of the Bible in many languages)

12.2.3.

Reformation and Counter-Reformation

12.2.3.a.

Indicates factors that led individuals to challenge the authority of the Pope and the Catholic Church in the Renaissance (e.g. selling of indulgences, refusal of the Pope to annul the marriage of King Henry VIII of England)

12.2.3.b.

Names Protestant churches: Anglican, Calvinist, Lutheran

12.2.3.c.

Indicates actions taken by the Catholic Church to fight against the Reformation (e.g. refounding of the Inquisition, foundation of the Society of Jesus)

12.2.3.d.

Lists characteristics shared by different Protestant churches (e.g. repudiation of the popes authority, importance of individual interpretation of the gospel)

12.3.b.

Indicates some of the values of humanitarian organizations (e.g. Red Cross promotes tolerance; Doctors Without Borders, which promotes the right to humanitarian aid, provides urgent medical care to populations in need and to victims of war and natural disaster)

13.1.a.

Names major economic powers (e.g. The United States, China, Japan, the European Union, India, Brazil)

13.1.b.

Indicates some effects of the globalized economy (e.g. consumption of goods from many different countries, relocation of companies)

13.2.1.

Location in space and time

13.2.1.a.

Locates on a map the major European exploration routes

13.2.1.b.

Locates on a map the colonial empires

13.2.1.c.

Locates on a time line the great European explorations

13.2.2.a.

Names the territories that were known to Europeans at the end of the 14th century: North Africa, the Near East and Europe

13.2.2.b.

Indicates some motivations for the great European explorations of the Renaissance (e.g. to find new trade routes to circumvent Constantinople; to look for spices, exotic products and precious metals)

13.2.2.d.

Indicates a consequence of the Treaty of Tordesillas between Spain and Portugal in the 15th century (e.g. the line of demarcation established by the treaty gave Spain all of America except Brazil)

13.2.3.a.

Names the three legs of the triangular trade established by European colonial powers: Europe, Africa, American colonies

13.2.3.b.

Indicates the main goods traded in the triangular trade: manufactured products, slaves, raw materials

13.2.3.c.

Explains the consequences of the triangular trade for the colonies (e.g. it slowed the colonies economic development because their role was limited to exporting unprocessed resources)

13.2.4.a.

Names Native populations living in America at the time of the first contact with the Europeans (e.g. the Incas, Aztecs, Iroquois, Algonquians)

13.2.4.b.

Indicates resources or products imported by Europeans (e.g. gold, tobacco, fur, plants)

13.2.4.c.

Describes the consequences of European expansion in America for Native populations (e.g. certain nations were exterminated by war and disease; the culture and way of life of Native populations were profoundly changed)

13.3.a.

Names a country on each continent that has a European language as its official language (e.g. French in Senegal; English in India; Portuguese in Brazil)

14.1.a.

Names charters associated with the affirmation of human rights (e.g. Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Qubec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms, Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Convention on the Rights of the Child)

14.1.b.

States some of the human rights set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights of the United Nations (e.g. equality before the law; right to life, liberty and security)

14.2.1.

Location in space and time

14.2.1.b.

Locates on a time line the American or French revolution and related facts

14.2.2.

Age of Enlightenment

14.2.2.a.

Names Enlightenment philosophers who inspired revolutionary movements

14.2.3.a.

Indicates elements of the economic, political and social context on the eve of the revolution

14.2.3.b.

Indicates the mode of political organization on the eve of the revolution

14.2.3.c.

Names actors in the revolution

14.2.3.d.

Indicates consequences of the revolution

14.2.3.e.

Names values promoted during the revolution

14.3.a.

Names international organizations dedicated to the protection of rights and freedoms (e.g. United Nations, International Criminal Court)

14.3.b.

Indicates methods used by the international community to support the application of rights recognized by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (e.g. economic pressure, United Nations Peacekeepers or Blue Helmets)

15.1.a.

Names countries that are industrializing (e.g. Brazil, China, India)

15.1.b.

Indicates factors that enable countries to industrialize (e.g. capital, workforce, resources)

15.1.c.

Indicates consequences of industrialization for society (e.g. urbanization, trade, consumer society)

15.2.1.

Location in space and time

15.2.1.a.

Locates on a map the first industrial territories and large cities of the 18th century (e.g. Liverpool, London, Manchester)

15.2.1.b.

Locates on a time line the industrial revolution and related facts (e.g. enclosure laws; Watts steam engine; the steam locomotive The Rocket)

15.2.2.a.

Indicates some of the causes of industrialization in 18th-century Britain (e.g. abundance of capital, technological innovation, increased agricultural production, available workforce, abundance of coal)

15.2.2.b.

Lists some characteristics of industrial production (e.g. mechanization of production, division of labour)

15.2.2.c.

Names the sectors of production that were the first to industrialize: textile, metallurgy

15.2.2.d.

Indicates effects of industrialization on migration flows (e.g. rural exodus, urbanization)

15.2.3.a.

Indicates factors that led to the formation of new social classes in industrializing societies (e.g. capital, employment)

15.2.3.b.

Explains what differentiated the bourgeoisie from the working class, in terms of means of production (e.g. the bourgeoisie owned the means production; the workers owned labour power, which they sold for a wage or salary)

15.2.3.c.

Lists characteristics of working-class neighbourhoods during the Industrial Revolution (e.g. proximity to factories; air pollution from coal burning; cramped, unsanitary housing)

15.2.4.

Economic organization

15.2.4.a.

Lists some of the political principles of liberalism espoused by the bourgeoisie (e.g. free enterprise, few government restrictions, recognition of individual rights)

15.2.4.b.

Names economic institutions associated with the development of capitalism (e.g. banks, stock exchange)

15.2.4.c.

Indicates the source of income of the bourgeoisie: profit

15.2.4.d.

Explains some repercussions of profit seeking (e.g. to increase profits, the bourgeoisie tries to lower workers wages and raise the prices of goods sold)

15.2.4.e.

Indicates advantages of new means of transportation developed during the Industrial Revolution (e.g. steam locomotives and steam boats could maintain a steady speed and carry heavy loads, which facilitated the transportation of raw materials)

15.2.5.a.

Describes some working conditions at the start of industrialization in Britain (e.g. long working hours, no rights or security, women and child labour)

15.2.5.b.

Indicates actions taken by workers to improve their social and economic situation (e.g. demands for the right to organize, demands for better working conditions, strikes)

15.2.5.c.

Indicates advantages that unions provided for workers (e.g. power to negotiate with employers)

15.2.5.d.

Lists principles shared by socialist and communist movements (e.g. common ownership of means of production, search for justice and social equality)

15.2.5.e.

Indicates actions taken by governments to deal with workers demands and demonstrations (e.g. repression, refusal to grant the right to organize, laissez-faire policy)

15.3.a.

Names organizations that work to improve living conditions (e.g. UNICEF, Oxfam)

15.3.b.

Indicates some of the goals of organizations working to improve living conditions in society (e.g. to eradicate poverty, to eliminate child labour)

15.3.c.

Names measures that can help improve living conditions in a society (e.g. education, labour standards)

15.3.d.

Names individuals who have helped improve living conditions (e.g. Mother Teresa, Lucille Teasdale)

16.1.a.

Lists characteristics of a sovereign state (e.g. recognized international borders, member of the United Nations General Assembly)

16.1.b.

Names areas that are outside national jurisdiction (e.g. Antarctica, areas of the ocean beyond exclusive economic zones)

16.1.c.

Names a few socioeconomic indicators that are used to illustrate global wealth disparity (e.g. life expectancy, gross domestic product per capita)

16.2.1.

Location in space and time

16.2.1.a.

Locates on a map the colonial empires of Britain and France at the beginning of the 20th century

16.2.1.b.

Locates on a map a few pre-colonial African societies or civilizations (e.g. Arab societies in North Africa; nomad societies of the Sahara; the Ghana and Mali empires)

16.2.1.c.

Locates on a time line facts related to imperialism and colonization

16.2.2.

Reasons for colonization

16.2.2.a.

Indicates conditions required for a country to industrialize (e.g. access to capital, access to raw materials, access to a market for manufactured goods)

16.2.2.b.

Indicates the types of products traded between colonizers and their colonies (e.g. the colonies exported resources and raw materials; the colonizers exported finished products)

16.2.2.c.

Indicates factors that motivated imperialism (e.g. search for power and supremacy in Europe)

16.2.2.d.

Explains how colonizers justified their dominance in Africa (e.g. Europeans were convinced that they were civilizing populations that were inferior to them)

16.2.3.

Impact of colonization

16.2.3.a.

Explains some effects of the migration of millions of Europeans on the colonies original populations (e.g. by settling in the colonies, Europeans occupied the land of local populations and imposed their way of life on them)

16.2.3.b.

Explains the main outcome of the Berlin Conference: agreement between 13 countries that established the rules for the colonization of Africa

16.2.3.c.

Indicates sociopolitical consequences of the colonial division of Africa (e.g. since colonial borders did not always correspond to ethnic boundaries of African populations; the colonizing country could exacerbate ethnic tensions)

16.2.3.d.

Indicates the role of African populations in the colonial exploitation of territories (e.g. Africans were a source of cheap labour for the exploitation of agricultural and mineral resources)

16.2.3.e.

Indicates the role of education in the transformation of African cultures (e.g. the language of education was often the language of the colonizer; teaching was based on the norms and values of the colonizer)

16.2.3.f.

Indicates how colonized populations reacted to European dominance (e.g. some Africans profited from their collaboration with the colonizer; some colonized populations organized uprisings and rebellions)

16.3.b.

Names international economic associations (e.g. European Union, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries)

16.3.c.

States the purpose of the North American Free Trade Agreement: to promote trade between Canada, the United States and Mexico by limiting tariffs

16.3.d.

Explains the social and economic relationships between former colonies and colonial powers (e.g. important ties remain as decolonized countries often trade with former mother countries; Europe receives an important influx of immigrants from its former colonies)

17.1.a.

Lists civil rights and freedoms (e.g. the right to vote, the right to justice, equality before the law, freedom of expression, freedom of religion)

17.1.b.

Indicates situations in which governments may limit or suspend civil rights and freedoms (e.g. government decision in case of war, a crisis or a perceived threat to national security)

17.1.c.

Indicates current situations in which civil rights and freedoms are ignored (e.g. exploitation of children, sex trafficking, countries under dictatorship)

17.2.1.

Location in space and time

17.2.1.a.

Locates on a time line events related to the feminist movement (e.g. winning the right to vote in several countries; publication of The Second Sex, by Simone de Beauvoir; the founding of the National Organization for Women)

17.2.2.a.

States some of the rights in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on which feminist movements are based (e.g. principle that there must be no discrimination based on sex in the application of rights)

17.2.2.b.

Indicates wrongs suffered by women in the West in the first half of the 20th century (e.g. discrimination, segregation, limited powers)

17.2.2.c.

Names figures associated with the feminist movement (e.g. Simone de Beauvoir, Betty Friedan, suffragettes)

17.2.2.d.

Indicates actions taken by feminists or womens groups in the 20th century (e.g. demonstrations, publication of books and manifestos)

17.2.2.e.

Indicates reactions to the feminist movement (e.g. repression, creation of associations opposed to the recognition of civil rights for women)

17.2.2.f.

Indicates gains made by feminist movements in the West (e.g. right to vote, access to higher education)

17.3.a.

Names organizations that fight for civil rights and freedoms (e.g. Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, SOS Racisme)

17.3.b.

Indicates actions that illustrate the exercise of fundamental rights (e.g. demonstrations, elections, petitions, open letters)

17.3.c.

Gives examples of actions taken by organizations to promote the recognition of civil rights and freedoms (e.g. denunciations, boycotts, publications)

2.A.1.

Location of a tourist region

2.A.1.a.

Locates the tourist region studied in the appropriate continent and country

2.A.1.b.

Locates tourist regions on a map of the world (e.g. Mediterranean coast in Spain, Phuket region in Thailand, the coasts of Florida and the Islands of Hawaii in the United States, the Atlantic coast of Senegal, the Tokyo region in Japan)

2.A.1.c.

Indicates, on a map of the world, the major tourist flow patterns: between Western Europe and the United States, Western Europe and South-East Asia, and the United States and the Caribbean

2.A.2.

Characteristics of a tourist region

2.A.2.a.

Lists natural tourist attractions of the region studied (e.g. the Canadian Shield landscape in the Charlevoix region along the St. Lawrence River; the lagoons of the volcanic islands of Tahiti; the fauna of the African Great Lakes region)

2.A.2.b.

Names tourist attractions that reflect the history of the region studied (e.g. the Lido of Venice; the Palace of Versailles in the le-de-France)

2.A.2.c.

Explains the relationship between the types of tourism in the region studied and the regions attractions (e.g. the exotic fauna of the African Great Lakes has given rise to photo safaris, a type of adventure tourism)

2.A.2.d.

Establishes the size of the tourist flow in relation to the population of the region studied (e.g. in 2009, the les-de-la-Madeleine has four times more tourists than inhabitants; the Lagoon of Venice has seven times more tourists than inhabitants)

2.A.3.

Planning and development of a tourist region

2.A.3.a.

Indicates the infrastructure in place in the tourist region studied (e.g. campgrounds in the Gaspsie; parking lots on the outskirts of the Lagoon of Venice; national parks in the African Great Lakes region; Disneyland Paris in le-de-France)

2.A.3.b.

Names means used to transport tourists in the tourist region studied (e.g. gondolas or vaporetti in the canals of Venice; photo-safari vans in the African Great Lakes region; sightseeing buses in le-de-France)

2.A.3.c.

Indicates infrastructure that may contribute to the deterioration of natural sites in the tourist region studied (e.g. construction of visitor accommodations along the beaches of the African Great Lakes region; funiculars that provide access to ski resorts in Savoie)

2.A.4.

Issue affecting a tourist region or regions

2.A.4.a.

Indicates behaviours that can contribute to the degradation of a tourist region (e.g. writing graffiti on monuments; using motor vehicles outside authorized trails; dumping oily wastes along a coastline)

2.A.4.b.

Explains changes brought about by tourism in the region studied (e.g. job creation and infrastructure improvement to meet tourist demand in the Gaspsie; changes in the lifestyle of the Masai in the African Great Lakes region stemming from contact with visitors that may result in a type of acculturation)

2.A.4.c.

Explains some reactions to tourism development of residents in the region studied (e.g. residents of Lac du Bourget in Savoie oppose boating activities in order to slow down the degradation of the natural environment; Tahitians oppose new developments on coral atolls to preserve these fragile environments)

2.A.4.d.

Indicates measures taken to protect a tourist region (e.g. restricting the number of visitors on the dunes in the les-de-la-Madeleine; constructing an underground funicular in Savoie)

2.B.1.

Location of a forest region

2.B.1.a.

Locates the forest region studied in the appropriate continent and country

2.B.1.c.

Locates, on a map of the world, the main countries in which forests constitute an important resource (e.g. Brazil, Canada, China, India, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Russia, Sweden)

2.B.2.

Characteristics of a forest region

2.B.2.a.

Describes the types of forests exploited in the region studied (e.g. the boreal forest in Abitibi-Tmiscamingue consists mainly of black spruce, jack pine and balsam fir; the tropical rainforest in the Amazon contains a wide variety of hardwoods, including precious woods)

2.B.2.b.

Explains the relationship between characteristics of the climate and the type of forest of the region studied (e.g. the growth of giant trees in British Columbia is mainly due to heavy annual precipitation)

2.B.2.c.

Indicates the role of the various stakeholders involved in managing the forest region studied (e.g. the governments who grant cutting rights to logging companies; environmentalists who try to ensure the sustainable development of forests in Abitibi-Tmiscamingue)

2.B.2.d.

Lists methods used to exploit the forest region studied (e.g. selective cutting, thinning, clear-cutting in British Columbia)

2.B.2.e.

Lists wood processing industries associated with the forest region studied (e.g. paper industry, furniture industry, paperboard mills in British Columbia)

2.B.2.f.

Lists activities, other than forest practices, carried out in the forest region studied (e.g. vacationing and recreational tourism in Mauricie, mining in the Amazon)

2.B.3.

Planning and development of a forest region

2.B.3.a.

Indicates, for the forest region studied, the steps involved in commercializing the resource (e.g. in Mauricie, logging is carried out north of La Tuque, the logs then are transported by truck to the paper mills in Trois-Rivires; after which the manufactured products are shipped to customers by truck, train or ship)

2.B.3.b.

Indicates types of industries associated with the forest region studied (e.g. paper and saw mills in the Outaouais; saw mills in Manaus, in the Amazon)

2.B.3.c.

Indicates the transportation infrastructure used in the commercialization of forest products in the region studied (e.g. logging roads in Mauricie, Trans-Amazonian Highway, port facilities in British Columbia)

2.B.3.d.

Indicates the infrastructure in place in the forest region studied (e.g. logging roads to access logging sites in the Charlevoix region; construction of check stations, lodging facilities and docks in an outfitting operation in the Mauricie)

2.B.4.

Issue affecting a forest region or regions

2.B.4.a.

Lists threats to forests in various regions of the world (e.g. tree diseases, pests, forest fires)

2.B.4.b.

Indicates practices that contribute to the depletion of forest resources in the region studied (e.g. excessive logging in Abitibi-Tmiscamingue; development of agricultural land to the detriment of forests in the Amazon)

2.B.4.c.

Explains consequences of excessive logging for the environment (e.g. once trees are cut down, surface runoff increases, leading to soil erosion and soil nutrient depletion)

2.B.4.d.

Indicates practices that help renew forest resources (e.g. reforestation using fast-growing tree species; thinning; selective cutting)

2.B.4.e.

Indicates means used to reconcile the interests of different stakeholders in the forest region studied (e.g. private forest landowners in British Columbia grant access rights to recreational tourist organizations; the Brazilian government sets aside reserves in the Amazon forest for the exclusive use of the Native population)

2.C.1.

Location of an energy-producing region

2.C.1.a.

Locates the energy-producing region studied in the appropriate continent and country

2.C.1.b.

Locates oil - and gas-producing countries on a map of the world (e.g. Saudi Arabia, Brazil, Canada, China, United Arab Emirates, Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Nigeria, Russia, Venezuela)

2.C.1.c.

Locates, on a world map, the countries that consume the most energy per capita (e.g. in 2010: Australia, Canada, United States, Finland, Norway, New Zealand, Sweden)

2.C.2.

Characteristics of an energy-producing region

2.C.2.a.

Names the form of energy developed in the energy-producing region studied (e.g. hydroelectric power in Jamsie; oil and natural gas in the Persian Gulf)

2.C.2.b.

Indicates uses for the form of energy developed in the region studied (e.g. in Alberta, hydrocarbons are used as a source of fuel for vehicles, heating and power plants)

2.C.2.c.

Explains the relationship between certain characteristics of the natural environment and the form of energy developed in the region studied (e.g. the steep slope and strong flow of the La Grande River and the Great Whale River in Jamsie are conducive to the production of hydroelectric power; the accumulation of decayed plant and animal life on ancient seafloors helped create oil and natural gas deposits in Alberta and around the Persian Gulf)

2.C.2.d.

Indicates energy sources developed in the region studied (e.g. hydroelectric energy produced in the Cte-Nord region is a renewable energy source; hydrocarbons extracted in Alberta are a nonrenewable energy source; wind energy in Jamsie is an inexhaustible energy source)

2.C.3.

Planning and development of an energy-producing region

2.C.3.a.

Indicates infrastructure used to exploit the energy source in the region studied (e.g. derricks are used to extract oil in the Persian Gulf; open pit mines, to extract oil from tar sands in Alberta; oil rigs, to drill oil in the Persian Gulf; reservoirs and dams, to generate hydroelectric power in Jamsie)

2.C.3.b.

Indicates infrastructure used to process energy resources in the region studied (e.g. oil refinery in Alberta; hydroelectric power plants, wind farms in Qubec)

2.C.3.c.

Names organizations associated with the development of the energy source exploited in the region studied (e.g. Hydro-Qubec for hydroelectric power in Jamsie and the Cte-Nord; multinationals for oil production in the Persian Gulf; Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries [OPEC] for oil production in the Persian Gulf)

2.C.3.d.

Indicates means used to transport energy resources in the region studied (e.g. high-voltage power lines connect hydroelectric dams to power stations and transmission and distribution substations in Qubec; oil and gas pipelines transport hydrocarbons from extraction sites to refineries in Alberta)

2.C.4.

Issue affecting an energy-producing region or regions

2.C.4.a.

Indicates measures taken to improve energy supply and reduce energy dependence in the region studied (e.g. search for renewable resources in Jamsie; creation of OPEC in the Persian Gulf)

2.C.4.b.

Indicates measures taken to help reduce energy consumption and increase self-reliance (e.g. dual energy, hybrid vehicles, improved public transit, development of energy-efficient appliances)

2.C.4.c.

Indicates the consequences of energy resource development for the region studied (e.g. flooding of vast areas of land in Jamsie; degradation of the environment and depletion of groundwater caused by tar sands oil extraction in Alberta)

2.C.4.d.

Explains the impact of the development of alternative energy sources (e.g. biofuel production requires large quantities of grain and thus contributes to the worlds food crisis)

2.C.4.e.

Explains the impact of growing energy consumption on the environment (e.g. growing energy consumption worldwide contributes to global warming and environmental degradation)

2.C.4.f.

Indicates some of the most energy-intensive industries (e.g. aluminum, steel, petrochemical plants)

2.D.1.

Location of an industrial region

2.D.1.a.

Locates the industrial region studied in the appropriate continent and country

3.A.1.

Location of an agricultural territory in a national space

3.A.1.a.

Locates the agricultural territory studied in the appropriate continent and country

3.A.1.b.

Locates the main agricultural territories on a map of the world (e.g. the Great Plains of North America, the Pampas of Argentina, the Great Russian Plain, the basins of Western Europe, Southeast Asia, Western Australia)

3.A.2.

Characteristics of an agricultural territory in a national space

3.A.2.a.

Explains the location of the main agricultural areas in the territory studied (e.g. in Japan, the agricultural territory of each island is located mainly on narrow coastal plains and along mountainsides because of the countrys hilly topography)

3.A.2.b.

Establishes the relative size of the territory devoted to agriculture in the territory studied (e.g. in 2005, the agricultural territory of Qubec accounted for 2% of the national territory and that of Japan, for approximately 13% of the national territory)

3.A.2.c.

Indicates the natural factors that influence the location of the agricultural territory studied (e.g. soil fertility, length of growing season, precipitation regime, latitude and altitude in Qubec)

3.A.2.d.

Lists the main agricultural products (crops) of the territory studied (e.g. rice, potatoes, fruit in Japan; vegetables, fruit, nuts, cotton, vines in California)

3.A.2.e.

Establishes the proportion of the labour force employed in agriculture in the territory studied (e.g. in 2009, 5% of the population in Japan; 2% of the population in California)

3.A.2.f.

Identifies problems that affect farmers in the territory studied (e.g. finding workers, attracting potential successors, obtaining a fair price for agricultural products in Qubec)

3.A.3.

Planning and development of an agricultural territory in a national space

3.A.3.a.

Names the main type of farming practices used in the agricultural territory studied (e.g. intensive farming practices used on small farms in Japan)

3.A.3.b.

Establishes a connection between certain characteristics of the climate and the infrastructure of the agricultural territory studied (e.g. the desert climate of central California makes it necessary to construct dams and develop irrigation systems; Qubecs harsh winter conditions make it necessary to build greenhouses to ensure year-round supply of certain vegetables)

3.A.3.c.

Indicates infrastructure used to increase the productivity of the agricultural territory studied (e.g. irrigation canals in California; dams to control water levels in rice paddies in Japan)

3.A.4.

Issues affecting an agricultural territory or territories in a national space

3.A.4.a.

Explains consequences of certain farming practices for the environment (e.g. intensive fruit tree cultivation requires the use of strong fertilizers, which contributes to soil nutrient depletion; annual irrigation of vegetable crops requires large amounts of water, which reduces groundwater levels)

3.A.4.b.

Indicates infrastructure in place in agricultural areas of the territory studied (e.g. highway extension, industrial warehouses, sports centres and urban sprawl in California)

3.A.4.c.

Names laws adopted to protect farming and restrict the development of non-agricultural activities in rural areas in the territory studied (e.g. Act respecting the Preservation of agricultural land and agricultural activities in Qubec; Farm Land Protection Policy Act in California)

3.A.4.d.

Indicates measures taken to limit the environmental impact of farming practices (e.g. passing laws to regulate farming practices; defining riparian strips; reforesting shorelines)

3.A.4.e.

Indicates solutions to problems affecting farmers in the territory studied (e.g. to compensate for the shortage of agricultural workers in Qubec, employment programs have been established to allow farmers to hire seasonal workers from Mexico)

3.A.4.f.

Explains how certain agricultural practices affect the global food equilibrium (e.g. the use of corn and wheat in biofuel production has caused food crises and raised the price of flour worldwide)

3.B.1.

Location of an agricultural territory subject to natural hazards

3.B.1.a.

Locates the agricultural territory studied in the appropriate continent and country

3.B.1.b.

Locates, on a map of the world, agricultural territories subject to natural hazards (e.g. Northeast India; the Sahel; the Canadian prairies; areas around the Mediterranean; Bangladesh; the Mekong Basin)

3.B.2.

Characteristics of an agricultural territory subject to natural hazards

3.B.2.a.

Explains the relationship between the latitudinal position of the agricultural territory studied and elements of its climate (e.g. the Sahels aridity is due to its location in sub-Saharan Africa; the heavy rains in Bangladesh are due to its location in the tropics)

3.B.2.b.

Lists the natural phenomenon or phenomena to which the agricultural territory studied is subject (e.g. floods, cyclones and tsunamis in Bangladesh; desertification in the Sahel; drought in the Canadian prairies)

3.B.2.c.

Explains consequences of certain natural phenomena for the agricultural territory studied (e.g. in Bangladesh, floods during monsoon season erode farm land and destroy crops)

3.B.2.d.

Indicates farming or breeding practices in the agricultural territory studied (e.g. intensive rice cultivation with several harvests per year in Bangladesh; movement of livestock in search of grazing land and water in the northern part of the Sahel)

3.B.2.e.

Indicates how a natural hazard can turn into a natural disaster in the agricultural territory studied (e.g. in Bangladesh, farmers looking for fertile land settle in the Ganges delta despite risks from floods and cyclones that regularly cause heavy material and human losses)

3.B.3.

Planning and development of an agricultural territory subject to natural hazards

3.B.3.a.

In Indicates types of farming installations in the territory studied (e.g. in Bangladesh, stilt houses surrounded by dikes minimize flood damage; in the Canadian prairies, wells and reservoirs for livestock are installed in case of droughts)

3.B.3.b.

Indicates the role of transportation networks in the agricultural territory studied (e.g. in the Canadian prairies, trucks transport products to trains, which are used to ship exports)

3.B.3.c.

Explains how certain practices can increase natural hazards in the agricultural territory studied (e.g. in Bangladesh, cutting mangrove trees to create shrimp basins increases the risk of flooding; in the Sahel, frequent seasonal movements of livestock to grazing lands intensify the desertification of the territory)

3.B.3.d.

Indicates methods used to protect the agricultural territory studied from a natural hazard (e.g. in Bangladesh, dikes and dams help control flood levels; in the Canadian prairies, planting trees, irrigation and new technologies help mitigate the effects of drought)

3.B.4.

Issues affecting an agricultural territory or territories subject to natural hazards

3.B.4.a.

Explains how human actions can intensify a natural risk in the agricultural territory studied (e.g. deforestation accelerates erosion during floods; monoculture, i.e. the repeated planting of one crop in the same area, destabilizes soils)

3.B.4.b.

Explains the relationship between human actions and the creation of an artificial risk in the agricultural territory studied (e.g. in the Canadian prairies, pesticides and fertilizers can pollute waterways; in the Sahel, digging wells for herds combined with overgrazing can deplete groundwater resources; in Bangladesh, cutting mangroves has destabilized the shorelines of the territory, making river banks more vulnerable to cyclones)

3.B.4.c.

Lists problems associated with water management in the agricultural territory studied (e.g. erosion caused by poor irrigation techniques in the Canadian prairies; falling water tables caused by excessive water use in the Sahel)

3.B.4.d.

Indicates measures taken to reduce problems associated with water management in the agricultural territory studied (e.g. in Bangladesh, dikes are built to prevent floods)

3.B.4.e.

Names environmental problems associated with farming practices in territories subject to natural hazards (e.g. fertilizers and pesticides can pollute waterways; monoculture can deplete the soil of nutrients and contribute to its degradation)

3.B.4.f.

Indicates solutions adopted to reduce environmental problems associated with farming practices (e.g. regulations to protect agricultural territories; decreased use of pesticides and fertilizers)

4.A.1.

Location of a Native territory

4.A.1.a.

Locates the Native territory studied in the appropriate continent and country

4.A.1.b.

Locates Native territories on a map of the world (e.g. Aboriginal territory in Australia; Cree, Naskapi and Inuit territories in Canada; Chiapas in Mexico)

4.A.2.

Characteristics of a Native territory

4.A.2.a.

Indicates criteria used by the United Nations for the recognition of Native peoples (e.g. they must be existing descendants of peoples who inhabited a territory long before it was colonized)

4.A.2.b.

Names elements of the culture of the Native people inhabiting the territory studied (e.g. Inuktitut language, inukshuk, parka in Nunavut)

4.A.2.c.

Names recognized ancestral rights of the Native people in the territory studied (e.g. Crees right to hunt, fish and exploit resources)

4.A.2.d.

Names the agreements signed between Native peoples and the government of Qubec: Northeastern Qubec Agreement (for the Naskapi); James Bay and Northern Qubec Agreement (for the Cree)

4.A.2.e.

Names different institutions that regulate the Native territory studied (e.g. band council, chief, councillors among the Naskapi)

4.A.2.f.

Lists activities associated with traditional life in the Native territory studied (e.g. hunting, fishing, trapping in Nunavut)

4.A.2.g.

Names activities associated with modern life in the Native territory studied (e.g. hydroelectric, logging and mining sites; tourism and transportation among the Cree)

4.A.3.

Planning and development of a Native territory

4.A.3.a.

Lists characteristics of how the Native territory studied is organized (e.g. wide dispersal of villages and airport installations in Nunavut)

4.A.3.b.

Indicates transportation infrastructure in the Native territory studied (e.g. rail system among the Naskapi; ports and airports in Nunavut)

4.A.3.c.

Indicates infrastructure put in place by Native peoples in the territory studied (e.g. creation of recreational and tourist facilities and sites among the Cree)

4.A.4.

Issue affecting a Native territory or territories

4.A.4.a.

Names partners with whom Native peoples share their territory (e.g. federal or provincial governments, resource companies)

4.A.4.b.

Indicates human actions that have affected the Native territory studied (e.g. creation of retention lakes have disrupted the environment, flora and fauna among the Cree)

4.A.4.c.

Explains some of the repercussions of measures taken to protect Native territories studied (e.g. since signing the James Bay and Northern Qubec Agreement in 1975, the Cree have had decisional power over their territory, particularly in matters associated with resources and protection of their way of life)

4.A.4.d.

Names claims of Native peoples who have still not concluded government agreements (e.g. land, economic, cultural claims)

4.A.4.e.

Names organizations that address the claims of Native peoples (e.g. national governments, the United Nations)

5.A.1.

Location of a natural park

5.A.1.a.

Locates the natural park studied in the appropriate continent and country

5.A.1.b.

Locates protected natural parks on a map of the world (e.g. Forillon and Banff national parks in Canada; the Galapagos National Park and Marine Reserve in Ecuador; the whale sanctuary of El Vizcaino in Mexico; Sagarmatha National Park in Nepal; Serengeti National Park in Tanzania; the Giants Causeway in Ireland; Yellowstone National Park in the United States)

5.A.2.

Characteristics of a natural park

5.A.2.a.

Lists natural heritage elements in the park studied (e.g. fauna, flora, wetlands, glaciers in Banff National Park)

5.A.2.b.

Indicates why the natural park studied has been created (e.g. to protect endangered species in the Galapagos National Park and Marine Reserve; to protect natural phenomena such as glaciers in Banff National Park; to protect nesting sites in the Parc national de lle-Bonaventure-et-du-Rocher-Perc)

5.A.2.c.

Lists recreational activities authorized in the natural park studied (e.g. hiking, ecotourism, animal watching in Forillon National Park)

5.A.2.d.

Indicates rules to follow to protect the natural park studied (e.g. respecting marked trails, flora, restricted areas in Banff National Park)

5.A.2.e.

Explains the economic benefits for the region surrounding the natural park studied (e.g. opening Banff National Park to the public creates a demand for workers, who in turn create a demand for services, which generates new jobs)

5.A.3.

Planning and development of a natural park

5.A.3.a.

Names different zones of the natural park studied (e.g. conservation zones, wildlife and natural land zones, recreational activity zones at the Galapagos National Park and Marine Reserve)

5.A.3.b.

Indicates measures taken to protect the natural park studied (e.g. restricted access to certain areas, use of marked trails, restricted number of visitors at Mingan Archipelago National Park Reserve)

5.A.3.c.

Indicates some of the infrastructure in place in the natural park studied (e.g. reception centres, marked trails and wharfs at the Parc national de lle-Bonaventure-et-du-Rocher-Perc)

5.A.4.

Issue affecting a natural park or parks

5.A.4.a.

Explains why protecting the natural environment must be reconciled with recreational activities in natural parks (e.g. the ecosystems protected by natural parks are fragile and recreational activities of visitors must be controlled to avoid disrupting these environments)

5.A.4.b.

Explains some of the impacts associated with visiting the natural park studied (e.g. in the Saguenay St. Lawrence Marine Park, visitors who do not follow the regulations may disturb the balance of the flora and fauna)

5.A.4.c.

Indicates natural hazards that may threaten a protected park (e.g. forest fires, erosion, flooding)

5.A.4.d.

Indicates human actions that may threaten a protected park (e.g. road construction, exploitation of natural resources, poaching)

5.A.4.e.

Indicates criteria established by UNESCO to include natural parks on the World Heritage List (e.g. the park must be an outstanding example of the Earths history or of biological processes)

6.1.a.

Indicates the type of relationships that exist among individuals in a society (e.g. family, professional, commercial)

6.1.b.

Explains a consequence of interdependence on society (e.g. since individuals depend on the work of others for survival, they establish networks to trade goods and services)

6.2.1.

Location in space and time

6.2.1.a.

Locates on a world map the Fertile Crescent and other areas of early sedentarization sites

6.2.1.b.

Locates on a time line the Neolithic period and facts related to it

6.2.2.

Lifestyle and social relationships

6.2.2.a.

Lists traces of preliterate societies that are used to study these societies (e.g. rock paintings, megaliths, burial sites)

6.2.2.b.

Indicates subsistence activities of Neolithic societies (e.g. hunting, gathering, domestication of animals, agriculture)

6.2.2.c.

Names natural factors that promoted sedentarization in the period before the common era (e.g. warmer climate, improved productivity of wild grain crops)

6.2.2.d.

Lists characteristics of sedentary societies (e.g. formation of villages and construction of permanent dwellings; groups that could include several thousand individuals)

6.2.2.e.

Explains the impact of agriculture on Neolithic societies (e.g. agriculture provided more food than foraging activities and promoted demographic growth)

6.2.3.

Economic activities associated with sedentarization

6.2.3.a.

Lists crafts that developed during the Neolithic period (e.g. pottery, metalwork)

6.2.3.b.

Indicates the purpose of ceramic pottery in the Neolithic period (e.g. storage, cooking)

6.2.3.c.

Indicates the factor that led to a division of labour in Neolithic societies: appearance of crop surpluses

6.2.3.d.

Explains the appearance of trade and commerce in Neolithic societies (e.g. artisans who were no longer involved in food production traded their products for food to ensure their survival)

6.3.a.

Names the three major sectors of the economy associated with the division of labour: primary sector (extraction of resources, agriculture), secondary sector (manufacturing), tertiary sector (services)

6.3.b.

Indicates elements of change and continuity with respect to the sedentary way of life of Neolithic societies (e.g. agriculture still provided society with food; however, it no longer employed the majority of the population)

7-1.1.a.

Reads and writes any natural number

7-1.1.c.

Composes and decomposes a natural number in a variety of ways and identifies equivalent expressions

7-1.1.d.

Approximates a natural number

7-1.1.e.

Compares natural numbers or arranges natural numbers in increasing or decreasing order

7-1.1.f.

Classifies natural numbers in various ways, based on their properties (e.g. even numbers, composite numbers)

7-1.11.b.

Squares and square roots

7-1.11.c.

Numbers in exponential notation (integral exponent)

7-1.15.a.

Numbers written in fractional or decimal notation

7-1.15.b.

Numbers expressed in different ways (fractional, decimal, exponential [integral exponent], percentage, square root, scientific notation)

7-1.2.a.

Represents a fraction in a variety of ways (using objects or drawings)

7-1.2.b.

Identifies the different meanings of fractions: part of a whole, division, ratio, operator, measurement

7-1.2.c.

Verifies whether two fractions are equivalent

7-1.2.d.

Compares a fraction to 0, 1/2 or 1

7-1.2.e.

Orders fractions with the same denominator or where one denominator is a multiple of the other or with the same numerator

7-1.3.a.

Represents decimals in a variety of ways (using objects or drawings) and identifies equivalent representations

7-1.3.b.

Reads and writes numbers written in decimal notation

7-1.3.d.

Composes and decomposes a number written in decimal notation and recognizes equivalent expressions

7-1.3.e.

Compares numbers written in decimal notation or arranges them in increasing or decreasing order

7-1.4.a.

Represents integers in a variety of ways (using objects or drawings)

7-1.4.b.

Reads and writes integers

7-1.4.c.

Compares integers or arranges integers in increasing or decreasing order

7-1.A.1.a.

Considers the social function(s) of the text and the context in which it was produced, as well as his/her own reading context, to determine appropriate reading stance

7-1.A.1.a.i.

Defines the concept of mass

7-1.A.1.a.ii.

Compares the mass of different substances with the same volume

7-1.A.1.b.

Adjusts reading stance(s) and strategies to determine possible meaning(s) or message(s) in spoken, written, media, multimodal and multigenre texts

7-1.A.1.b.i.

Defines the concept of volume

7-1.A.1.b.ii.

Chooses the appropriate unit of measurement to express volume (e.g. 120 mL or 0.12 L or 120 cm3)

7-1.A.1.b.iii.

Compares the volume of different substances with the same mass

7-1.A.1.c.

Uses cues conveyed by the structure, features, codes and conventions of spoken, written and media genres to determine significance in a text while listening/reading/viewing (e.g. recognizes the conventions of television news that are associated with credibility; recognizes the structural devices used in an editorial that strengthen an argument)

7-1.A.1.c.i.

Describes the effect of heat on the degree of agitation of particles

7-1.A.1.c.ii.

Defines temperature as a measurement of the degree of agitation of particles

7-1.A.1.c.iii.

Explains the thermal expansion of bodies

7-1.A.1.d.

Draws on needed background knowledge and experiences related to the social and/or cultural and/or historical context in which the text was produced in order to read critically (e.g. consults other texts written at the same time)

7-1.A.1.d.i.

Names the different phase changes of matter (vaporization, condensation, freezing, melting, deposition, sublimation)

7-1.A.1.e.

Produces a coherent first reading/initial response to a text. See below for what constitutes a first reading/initial response to a text.

7-1.A.1.e.ii.

Determines the acidity or alkalinity of common substances (e.g. water, lemon juice, vinegar, soft drinks, milk of magnesia, cleaners)

7-1.A.1.f.

Characteristic properties

7-1.A.1.f.i.

Defines a characteristic property as a property that aids in the identification of a substance or group of substances

7-1.A.1.f.ii.

Identifies groups of substances based on their common characteristic properties (e.g. acids turn litmus red)

7-1.A.1.f.iii.

Associates a characteristic property of a substance or material with its use (e.g. metal is used to make pots because it is a good conductor of heat)

7-1.A.2.

First reading/initial response

7-1.A.2.a.

Extends/supports/scaffolds first reading/initial response by examining details in the text (e.g. draws on own reading profile; uses information gained through rereading, immersion into texts and exchanges with other readers and teacher)

7-1.A.2.d.

Demonstrates understanding of how information is interpreted and communicated in different information-based (spoken, written, media) genres:

7-1.A.2.d.iii.

Locates evidence in the text of how the writer/producer creates a relationship between the text and its reader (e.g. identifies aspects that appeal more to women than to men in a magazine ad)

7-1.A.2.d.iv.

Identifies characteristics of writer/producer and how this influences the purpose of the text, its meaning(s)/message(s) and other aspects of the context in which it is produced and read (e.g. inherent values and how these are represented; influence of a social/cultural/historical context on their sensibility and/or central argument)

7-1.A.3.

Interpretation of the text

7-1.A.3.a.

Interrelates aspects of his/her reading profile, the structure, features and content of the text, and its social/cultural/historical context

7-1.A.3.a.i.

Describes the properties of an aqueous solution (e.g. only one visible phase, translucent)

7-1.A.3.b.

Determines own working hypothesis, theory, controlling idea, or thesis statement

7-1.A.3.d.

Selects a mode and genre that conveys own interpretation to advantage in light of situation/context (e.g. interprets the conflict faced by a central character through a journal that includes illustrations and print)

7-1.A.3.e.

Selects relevant evidence to illustrate and justify own interpretation:

7-1.A.3.e.iii.

Analyzes dominant features of the text, such as its point of view, use of persuasive language, connotation and denotation, etc.

7-1.A.3.e.v.

Explains how fact and opinion are represented by the writer/producer and to what effect

7-1.A.3.e.vi.

Analyzes how the text attempts to attract and hold the reader's attention (e.g. how continuity is established in an argument; how humour, sound or music is employed to special effect in film; how structural irony or vivid details are used to create suspense in a narrative)

7-1.A.3.g.

Uses vocabulary and terminology that apply to a specific topic and/or genre (e.g. scientific terms in a feature article; literary terms proper to an Elizabethan sonnet)

7-1.B.1.a.

Examines model texts to guide production decisions, specifically:

7-1.B.1.a.i.

Unique structure(s), features, codes and conventions of a specific text type. See also the Required Genres section of this document for specific structures, features, codes and conventions.

7-1.B.1.a.ii.

Purpose and context in which the text was produced that influence features such as its style, rhetorical devices, textual conventions and content (e.g. an advertisement for sports equipment in a popular sports magazine; an airline safety pamphlet; a film review on a newspaper Web site)

7-1.B.1.a.iii.

How characteristics of the intended/target audience are represented such as their needs, expectations, age group, social status, etc.

7-1.B.1.a.iv.

How the meaning/message is represented and communicated

7-1.B.1.a.v.

Level of formality of the discourse (i.e. its register)

7-1.B.1.a.vi.

Aspects of the writer's/producer's stance and how these influence readers (e.g. intent, ideology, values, beliefs)

7-1.B.1.b.

Plans and drafts the text:

7-1.B.1.b.i.

(Media only) Uses collaborative strategies as part of a production team (e.g. adopts different roles, shares expertise, sets and meets deadlines, accepts different points of view, reaches consensus)

7-1.B.1.b.ii.

Selects a text in light of context, including purpose, meaning(s)/message(s) and intended/target audience

7-1.B.1.b.iii.

Determines criteria to judge the quality of the text in light of the production context, including purpose and intended/target audience

7-1.B.1.b.iv.1.

Characterizes needs and expectations of intended/target audience to make some decisions regarding content: Familiar audience (e.g. provides additional details or information; sequences events or information to enhance reader's comprehension)

7-1.B.1.b.v.1.

Uses a range of stances derived from: Personal experience(s) and knowledge

7-1.B.1.b.vi.

Uses appropriate organizational devices in light of text, purpose, intended/target audience, meaning(s)/message(s) and context (e.g. outline, storyboard)

7-1.B.1.b.vii.

Researches to locate material, resources and/or expertise

7-1.B.1.b.viii.

Manages resources (e.g. makes appointments to administer surveys or conduct an interview; books AV equipment in advance)

7-1.B.1.d.

Separation of mixtures

7-1.B.1.d.i.

Associates a separation technique with the type of mixture to be separated

7-1.B.1.d.ii.

Describes the steps involved in separating a complex mixture (e.g. sedimentation, decantation and evaporation to separate salt water and sand)

7-1.B.2.a.

Uses relevant technology resources throughout the production process (e.g. uses a still or video camera in a Public Service Announcement (PSA); downloads digital images for a multimedia project)

7-1.B.2.a.i.

Describes the characteristics of a physical change (e.g. substance retains its properties, molecules remain intact)

7-1.B.2.a.ii.

Recognizes different physical changes (e.g. phase changes, preparation or separation of a mixture)

7-1.B.2.b.

Uses structures, features, codes and conventions of a specific text to communicate clearly and enhance meaning(s)/message(s)

7-1.B.2.c.

Uses knowledge about spoken and/or written and/or media modes and genres to make production decisions that enhance the impact of the text on its intended/target audience (e.g. decides to place a dramatic photograph with a feature news story to move the audience)

7-1.B.2.d.

Uses rhetorical strategies and different registers in context (e.g. uses an active voice to project a sense of immediacy)

7-1.B.3.a.

Evaluates draft/version critically, and makes relevant adjustments to enhance:

7-1.B.3.a.i.

Clarity and development of ideas, meaning(s)/message(s)

7-1.B.3.a.ii.

Internal organization of the content (e.g. changes order of images in a photo essay)

7-1.B.3.a.iii.

Precision in the use of details and/or information

7-1.B.3.a.iv.

Coherence in light of the production context, purpose, intended/target audience and production criteria

7-1.B.3.a.v.

Accuracy in the use of structure, features, codes and conventions of the text, including respect for media constraints (i.e. applies text grammars correctly)

7-1.B.3.a.vi.

Effectiveness of technology used (e.g. rerecording narration to fill in gaps and/or for audibility in a radio spot; slowing down transitions between images in a digital photo essay so the reader can process them)

7-1.B.3.a.vii.

Use of stylistic conventions for specific effect (e.g. sound effects to create mood; use of exaggerated gory details in a crime scene description)

7-1.B.3.b.

Proofreads draft/version for:

7-1.B.3.b.i.

Surface errors in written language (i.e. spelling and usage conventions, grammar and syntax)

7-1.B.3.b.ii.

Clarity regarding the layout and presentation of the final draft/version of the text (e.g. arranges the placement of charts, diagrams or images)

7-1.B.3.b.iii.

Continuity (e.g. ensures coherent visual style in a comic re: colour, character depiction; checks that formatting is consistent in a written text)

7-1.B.3.c.

Prepares for presentation:

7-1.B.3.c.i.

Selects the most effective way to present the text to intended/target audience

7-1.B.3.c.ii.

Uses the appropriate codes and conventions to present the text (e.g. uses a formal register when presenting a poster to the class)

7-1.B.3.c.iii.

Manages resources in a presentation (e.g. checks that software is compatible, CDs are cued up)

7-1.B.3.c.iv.

Transforms the information from one mode or medium to another (e.g. prepares a slideshow that synthesizes the data from an action research project)

7-1.B.3.d.

Self-evaluates production process:

7-1.B.3.d.i.

Makes effective use of specific feedback throughout all stages of the production process, including rehearsal/dry run

7-1.B.3.d.ii.

Uses teacher- peer- and self-evaluation as a resource to consolidate and reinvest new knowledge, understanding and information (e.g. records peer responses in own Integrated Profile for reference in subsequent production tasks)

7-1.B.3.d.iii.

Uses a meta-language to explain production decisions (e.g. explains the symbolism of the colour red and the mood that patriotic music creates in a book trailer about war)

7-1.C.1.a.

Uses problem solving to interpret data and information critically

7-1.C.1.a.i.

Describes Dalton's atomic model

7-1.C.1.a.ii.

Defines the atom as the basic unit of the molecule

7-1.C.1.b.

Uses action research to effect social change

7-1.C.1.b.i.

Describes a molecule using Dalton's atomic model (combination of atoms linked by chemical bonds)

7-1.C.1.b.ii.

Represents the formation of a molecule using Dalton's atomic model

7-1.C.1.c.i.

Defines an element as a pure substance made of a single type of atom (e.g. Fe, N2)

7-1.C.1.d.i.

Describes the periodic table as a structured classification of elements

7-1.C.2.a.

Distinguishes between primary and secondary sources, both print and non-print

7-1.C.2.c.

Selects a research protocol depending on purpose, context and inquiry process chosen (i.e. quantitative or qualitative method)

7-1.C.2.e.

Uses a number of research tools to gather data/information:

7-1.C.2.e.i.

Primary sources (e.g. artefacts, interviews, autobiography, journals/diaries)

7-1.C.2.e.ii.

Secondary sources (e.g. reference texts, newspaper articles, books)

7-1.C.2.f.

Interprets data/findings:

7-1.C.2.f.ii.

Makes generalizations (e.g. determines statistical significance; chooses relevant evidence to support thesis; summarizes or gives a prcis to highlight key points)

7-10.A.2.

Estimates and measures mass using unconventional units: grams, kilograms

7-10.A.3.

Establishes relationships between units of mass

7-10.B.1.

Chooses the appropriate unit of time for the context

7-10.B.2.

Estimates and measures time using conventional units

7-10.B.3.

Establishes relationships between units of time: second, minute, hour, day, daily cycle, weekly cycle, yearly cycle

7-10.B.4.

Distinguishes between duration and position in time

7-10.C.1.

Compares angles: acute angle, right angle, obtuse angle

7-10.C.2.

Estimates and determines the degree measure of angles

7-10.C.3.

Describes the characteristics of different types of angles: complementary, supplementary, adjacent, vertically opposite, alternate interior, alternate exterior and corresponding

7-10.C.4.

Determines measures of angles using the properties of the following angles: complementary, supplementary, vertically opposite, alternate interior, alternate exterior and corresponding

7-10.C.5.

Finds unknown measurements using the properties of figures and relations

7-10.C.5.a.

Measures of angles in a triangle

7-10.C.5.b.

Degree measures of central angles and arcs

7-10.C.8.

Justifies statements using definitions or properties associated with angles and their measures

7-10.D.2.

Estimates and measures the dimensions of an object using conventional units: millimetre, centimetre, decimetre, metre and kilometre

7-10.D.4.

Constructs relations that can be used to calculate the perimeter or circumference of figures

7-10.D.5.

Finds the following unknown measurements, using properties of figures and relations

7-10.D.5.a.

Perimeter of plane figures

7-10.D.5.b.

A segment in a plane figure, circumference, radius, diameter, length of an arc, a segment resulting from an isometry or a similarity transformation

7-10.D.6.

Justifies statements concerning measures of length

7-10.E.1.

Chooses the appropriate unit of area for the context

7-10.E.2.

Estimates and measures surface areas using conventional units: square centimetre, square decimetre, square metre

7-10.E.4.

Constructs relations that can be used to calculate the area of plane figures: quadrilateral, triangle, circle (sectors)

7-10.E.6.

Finds unknown measurements, using properties of figures and relations

7-10.E.6.a.

Area of circles and sectors

7-10.E.6.b.

Area of figures that can be split into circles (sectors), triangles or quadrilaterals

7-10.E.6.c.

Lateral or total area of right prisms, right cylinders and right pyramids

7-10.E.6.d.

Lateral or total area of solids that can be split into right prisms, right cylinders or right pyramids

7-10.E.6.e.

Area of figures resulting from an isometry

7-10.E.7.

Justifies statements concerning measures of area

7-10.F.2.

Estimates and measures volume or capacity using conventional units: cubic centimetre, cubic decimetre, cubic metre, millilitre, litre

7-10.F.4.

Establishes relationships between

7-10.F.4.a.

Capacity units: millilitre, litre

7-10.G.1.

Determines, through exploration or deduction, different metric relations associated with plane figures

7-11.A.1.

Locates objects/numbers on an axis, based on the types of numbers studied

7-11.A.2.

Locates points in a Cartesian plane, based on the types of numbers studied (x- and y-coordinates of a point)

7-2.1.b.

Uses objects, diagrams or equations to represent a situation and, conversely, describes a situation represented by objects, diagrams or equations (use of different meanings of the four operations)

7-2.1.d.

Determines numerical equivalencies using relationships between operations, the commutative and associative properties of addition and multiplication, the distributive property of multiplication over addition or subtraction

7-2.1.e.

Translates a situation using a sequence of operations in accordance with the order of operations

7-2.2.a.

Uses objects, diagrams or an operation to represent a situation and, conversely, describes a situation represented by objects, diagrams or an operation (use of different meanings of addition, subtraction and multiplication by a natural number)

7-2.2.b.

Uses an operation to represent a situation (use of different meanings of operations)

7-2.3.a.

Uses objects, diagrams or equations to represent a situation and, conversely, describes a situation represented by objects, diagrams or equations (use of different meanings of the four operations)

7-2.3.b.

Determines numerical equivalencies using relationships between operations (inverse operations), the commutative and associative properties of addition and multiplication, the distributive property of multiplication over addition or subtraction

7-2.3.c.

Translates a situation using a sequence of operations in accordance with the order of operations

7-2.A.1.

Required Planning Texts: The student reads and produces the following texts:

7-2.A.1.a.

Reading (spoken, written and media):

7-2.A.1.a.i.

Names the characteristics that define a habitat (e.g. geographic location, climate, flora, fauna, proximity of man-made constructions)

7-2.A.1.a.ii.

Self-monitoring texts such as rubrics, checklists, project instructions and timelines

7-2.A.1.a.iii.

Models of planning texts (i.e. outlines for research, storyboards, action plans, proposals)

7-2.A.1.b.i.

Discussions in media production groups (i.e. to establish roles, make decisions, etc.)

7-2.A.1.b.ii.

Conferences with peers and teacher (e.g. regarding action plan, outline, getting the "green light")

7-2.A.1.c.

Production (written, media and multimodal):

7-2.A.1.c.i.

Notes and informal transcripts based on sources read and/or consulted, including class/instructional notes, and the results of individual and group brainstorming activities (i.e. field notes, minutes)

7-2.A.1.c.ii.

Graphic organizers such as mind maps, clusters, lists

7-2.A.1.c.iv.

Outlines and storyboards (i.e. for research, written essays and media productions)

7-2.A.1.c.v.

Action plans and proposals for projects (i.e. for action research and independent units of study)

7-2.A.1.d.i.

Distinguishes between a population and a species

7-2.A.1.d.ii.

Calculates the number of individuals of a species in a given territory

7-2.A.2.

Structures, Features, Codes and Conventions of Planning Texts: The student understands the purpose of the following and uses this knowledge to construct meaning when reading and producing spoken, written, media, multigenre and multimodal texts:

7-2.A.2.a.

Physical and behavioural adaptation

7-2.A.2.a.i.

Describes physical adaptations that enable animals and plants to improve their chances of survival (e.g. coat colour matched to the environment, shape of leaves)

7-2.A.2.a.ii.

Describes behavioural adaptations that enable animals and plants to improve their chances of survival (e.g. movement in groups, phototropism)

7-2.A.2.b.

Organization, categorization, collation and sequencing of ideas/information

7-2.A.2.b.i.

Describes the stages in the evolution of living organisms

7-2.A.2.b.ii.

Explains the natural selection process

7-2.A.2.c.

Conventions associated with thinking something through, such as informal/tentative language, pauses and hesitations, point form, use of capital letters and or other forms of annotation to differentiate ideas

7-2.A.2.c.i.

Defines taxonomy as a system for classifying living organisms based for the most part on their anatomical and genetic characteristics

7-2.A.2.c.ii.

Identifies a species using a taxonomic key

7-2.A.2.d.

Visual conventions to articulate the hierarchy and relationships among ideas/actions (e.g. webbing, arrows, colour coding, layout)

7-2.A.2.d.i.

Locates chromosomes in the cell

7-2.A.2.d.ii.

Defines a gene as part of a chromosome

7-2.A.2.d.iii.

Describes the role of genes (transmission of hereditary characteristics)

7-2.A.2.e.

Genre-specific conventions (e.g. quotations from the text in an outline for a literary essay; proposed research resources in an action plan; selection of artefacts to present in a conference)

7-2.B.1.

Required Reflective Texts: The student reads and produces the following texts:

7-2.B.1.a.

Reading (spoken, written and media):

7-2.B.1.a.ii.

Self-evaluations and reflections, including peer/teacher feedback conferences

7-2.B.1.a.iii.

Texts reflecting on values, experiences, ideas, opinions, state of society today (e.g. personal essay, magazine commentary, op-ed piece)

7-2.B.1.b.i.

Class and small group discussions, including first readings/initial responses to texts (e.g. group plenaries)

7-2.B.1.b.ii.

Self-evaluation conferences (i.e. presenting contents of the Integrated Profile and peer/teacher feedback)

7-2.B.1.b.iii.

Postproduction discussions (e.g. in small groups, for peer evaluation)

7-2.B.2.

Structures, Features, Codes and Conventions of Reflective Texts: The student understands the purpose of the following and uses this knowledge to construct meaning when reading and producing spoken, written, media, multigenre and multimodal texts:

7-2.B.2.c.

Evidence from own experience including personal, global and/or textual examples

7-2.B.2.e.

Rhetorical strategies to build rapport, create a sense of intimacy and closeness, and diminish boundaries between reader and producer (e.g. use of first person (I or we), use of anecdotes, analogies, questions, and metaphors)

7-2.B.2.f.

Tone and register to suit the genre and engage the intended/target audience, including self (e.g. distant and contemplative about a social issue; personal and sombre about something sad that happened; reminiscent or lamenting about a loss/memory)

7-2.B.2.g.

Genre-specific conventions (e.g. use of anecdotes, flashback and humour in a personal essay; questions, sarcasm, examples from other texts in a response; figurative language and doodles in a journal)

7-2.B.2.h.

Multigenre conventions (e.g. poems in a journal; recount in a self-evaluation conference)

7-2.B.2.i.

Multimodal conventions (e.g. tentative language, gestures in a conference; decoupage/collage and/or personal photos in a journal)

7-2.B.a.i.

Describes certain characteristics common to all living things (nutrition, relationships, adaptation, reproduction)

7-2.B.b.i.

Defines the cell as the structural unit of life

7-2.B.b.ii.

Names vital functions carried out by cells

7-2.B.b.iii.

Distinguishes between animal and plant cells

7-2.B.c.i.

Identifies the main cellular components visible under a microscope (cell membrane, cytoplasm, nucleus, vacuoles)

7-2.B.c.ii.

Describes the role of the main cellular components visible under a microscope

7-2.B.e.i.

Distinguishes between osmosis and diffusion

7-2.B.f.i.

Names the inputs and outputs involved in photosynthesis

7-2.B.f.iii.

Names the inputs and outputs involved in respiration

7-2.C.1.

Required Narrative Texts: The student reads and produces the following texts:

7-2.C.1.a.

Reading (spoken, written and media):

7-2.C.1.a.i.

Young Adult Literature (YAL) in a range of genres including novels, graphic novels, memoirs and poetry

7-2.C.1.a.ii.

Popular mass-produced texts such as magazines, graphic novels, films and songs

7-2.C.1.a.iii.1.

Classic, modern and contemporary literature: Written for children and young adolescents and reflecting the variety of texts in the literary tradition, including myths, fairy tales, legends, children's literature, ballads and other poems

7-2.C.1.b.i.

Personal stories (e.g. anecdotes, accounts of family life and autobiographical incidents)

7-2.C.1.b.ii.

Dramatizations of plays and other narrative texts (e.g. read-alouds, choral reading, scene selections)

7-2.C.1.b.iii.

Spoken performances (e.g. poetry reading, spoken word, storytelling, dialogues)

7-2.C.1.b.iv.

Improvisations (i.e. for problem solving, experimenting with different points of view, specifically Forum Theatre2and role-play)

7-2.C.1.c.

Production (written, media and multimodal):

7-2.C.1.c.i.1.

Narratives in prose form: Derived from personal experiences (own or others') such as memoir, photo story, historical recount

7-2.C.1.c.i.2.

Narratives in prose form: Fictional narratives such as short story, script for a radio play

7-2.C.1.c.ii..

Narratives in poetic form (e.g. lyric poetry, free verse, ballad, poetry of social commentary/conscience)

7-2.C.2.

Structures, Features, Codes and Conventions of Narrative Texts: The student understands the purpose of the following and uses this knowledge to construct meaning when reading and producing spoken, written, media, multigenre and multimodal texts:

7-2.C.2.a.

Setting: the physical landscape and social context in which the action of story occurs (i.e. its time and place, and the descriptive details that construct the world of the story)

7-2.C.2.b.i.

Major and minor characters (e.g. protagonist, antagonist, anti-hero, foil)

7-2.C.2.b.ii.

Stock and/or flat characters (i.e. characters with only one or two qualities or traits, often stereotypes of individuals and/or groups)

7-2.C.2.b.iii.

Archetypes (e.g. hero, maiden, arch nemesis)

7-2.C.2.c.

Conflict and resolution of conflict (i.e. central problem around which a story is typically organized) such as man against man, man against nature, issues involving what is right or wrong

7-2.C.2.d.i.

Basic plot structure: rising action, climax, denouement and resolution

7-2.C.2.d.ii.

Features that move the story forward (i.e. incidents, scenes, episodes, and subplots)

7-2.C.2.d.iv.

Features to structure the plot (e.g. series of dramatic monologues in a script; flashbacks throughout a televised crime serial; interchapters in novels such as Grapes of Wrath)

7-2.C.2.e.i.

Overt or implied theme(s)

7-2.C.2.f.

Techniques/devices derived from literature:

7-2.C.2.f.ii.

Character development (e.g. dialogue, dialect, pathos)

7-2.C.2.f.iii.

Figurative language: metaphor, simile, imagery, personification

7-2.C.2.f.iv.

Aesthetic qualities of language (e.g. alliteration, rhyme, rhythm, onomatopoeia)

7-2.C.2.f.vi.

Point of view (i.e. first person, second person, third person limited and/or omniscient narrator)

7-2.C.2.f.viii.

Humour (e.g. verbal irony, comic relief, caricature, hyperbole and understatement)

7-2.C.2.f.x.

Irony (e.g. situational, dramatic)

7-2.C.2.g.

Conventions of specific literary genres (e.g. use of mythical characters in an allegory; scene gathering all the suspects in a mystery; quest plot structure in a fantasy; plot twist in a tragedy)

7-2.C.2.h.

Conventions of specific text types (e.g. use of gutters and panel shape/size in a comic; use of asides, soliloquy, stage directions in a play; use of stanzaic structure and enjambment in a poem)

7-2.D.1.

Required Explanatory Texts: The student reads and produces the following texts:

7-2.D.1.a.

Reading (spoken, written and media):

7-2.D.1.a.i.

"How to" booklets/manuals/videos

7-2.D.1.a.ii.

Photo-essays with text (e.g. pamphlet)

7-2.D.1.a.iii.

Explanations of a process (e.g. presentation of a lesson by teacher and/or peers)

7-2.D.1.a.iv.

Reference texts (i.e. for research purposes)

7-2.D.1.b.i.

Explanations of a process (e.g. teaching something to peers/class, sharing expertise with others)

7-2.D.1.c.

Production (written, media and multimodal):

7-2.D.1.c.i.

Photo-essay with text (e.g. pamphlet)

7-2.D.2.

Structures, Features, Codes and Conventions of Explanatory Texts: The student understands the purpose of the following and uses this knowledge to construct meaning when reading and producing spoken, written, media, multigenre and multimodal texts:

7-2.D.2.d.

Conventions which indicate cause and effect (e.g. clear and precise diction/word choice; causal conjunctions such as because, consequently and therefore; temporal conjunctions such as first, second, when and then; transitional phrases such as for example, in other words, as a result)

7-2.D.2.e.

Visuals to focus reader's attention on what is most important (e.g. headings, captions, labels, graphics, table of contents)

7-2.D.2.f.

Rhetorical strategies to engage the intended/target audience and assure their comprehension (e.g. expert to non-expert register, demonstration, checking for understanding, analogy, referents to audience knowledge and experience)

7-2.E.1.

Required Reports: The student reads and produces the following texts:

7-2.E.1.a.

Reading (spoken, written and media):

7-2.E.1.a.i.

Distinguishes between asexual and sexual reproduction (e.g. sexual reproduction involves gametes)

7-2.E.1.a.ii.

News reports in different media (e.g. television, radio, Internet, graphic reportage/journalism such as 9/11 Report)

7-2.E.1.a.iii.

Research reports on areas of student interest and expertise (e.g. the media, environmental issues, health and well-being)

7-2.E.1.b.i.

Descriptive reports delivered in small groups or to whole class (e.g. plenaries)

7-2.E.1.b.ii.

Interviews, including written and/or audio and/or video transcriptions

7-2.E.1.c.

Production (written, media and multimodal):

7-2.E.1.c.i.

Describes the roles of the male and female in the reproduction of certain types of animals (e.g. birds, fish, mammals)

7-2.E.1.c.i.1.

News reports: Short breaking news stories on topics of personal and/or local interest, such as for an online newspaper or blog

7-2.E.1.c.ii.1.

Research reports: on areas of student interest and/or expertise

7-2.E.1.d.i.

Names the main male and female reproductive organs (penis, testicles, vagina, ovaries, Fallopian tubes, uterus)

7-2.E.1.e.i.

Names the male and female gametes

7-2.E.1.e.ii.

Describes the role of gametes in reproduction

7-2.E.1.f.i.

Describes fertilization in humans

7-2.E.1.g.i.

Names the stages of human development during pregnancy (zygote, embryo, fetus)

7-2.E.1.h.

Stages of human development

7-2.E.1.h.i.

Describes the stages of human development (childhood, adolescence, adulthood)

7-2.E.1.i.i.

Describes contraceptive methods (e.g. condom, ovulation suppression agents)

7-2.E.1.i.ii.

Describes the advantages and disadvantages of different contraceptive methods

7-2.E.1.j.

Methods of preventing the implantation of the zygote in the uterus

7-2.E.1.j.i.

Names methods of preventing the implantation of the zygote in the uterus (intrauterine device, day-after pill)

7-2.E.1.k.

Sexually transmitted and blood-borne diseases

7-2.E.1.k.i.

Names sexually transmitted and blood-borne diseases

7-2.E.1.k.ii.

Describes behaviours to prevent contracting sexually transmitted and blood-borne diseases (e.g. wearing a condom)

7-2.E.1.k.iii.

Describes responsible behaviours to adopt after being diagnosed with a sexually transmitted or blood-borne disease (e.g. informing one's partner)

7-2.E.2.

Structures, Features, Codes and Conventions of Reports: The student understands the purpose of the following and uses this knowledge to construct meaning when reading and producing spoken, written, media, multigenre and multimodal texts:

7-2.E.2.b.

Layout which visually cues the reader (e.g. subheadings, call-outs, paragraphs, arrows, headline, by-line, composition of photos/images related to print)

7-2.E.2.c.

Information selected and synthesized to reflect the bias/stance of writer/producer

7-2.E.2.d.

Evidence to support details, ideas, concepts (e.g. via a variety of primary sources such as field notes, interviews, artefacts; and, secondary sources such as facts, statistics, contextual information)

7-2.E.2.h.

Genre-specific conventions:

7-2.E.2.h.i.2.

News reports: Features that give a sense of immediacy and prescience in a breaking news report: active voice, simple syntax and diction, eye-witness quotations and photo w/caption

7-2.E.2.h.i.6.

News reports: Media conventions for specific effect (e.g. using camera angle and graphics to convey credibility; using on-site correspondent and hand held camera to create a sense of embeddedness)

7-2.E.2.h.ii.3.

Research reports: Features that elucidate/develop the content: paraphrasing, using examples, description, quotations, definitions

7-2.F(1).1.

Required Persuasive Texts: The student reads and produces the following texts:

7-2.F(1).1.a.

Reading (spoken, written and media):

7-2.F(1).1.a.i.

Advertisements, including public service announcements (PSAs), publicity campaigns, popular slogans, posters, book and film trailers

7-2.F(1).1.a.ii.

Reviews (e.g. of books, television programs, films, music)

7-2.F(1).1.a.iii.

Texts dealing with personal and social concerns (i.e. Internet sites, documentary films, speeches)

7-2.F(1).1.b.i.

Speeches (e.g. pitch an ad campaign, book talk)

7-2.F(1).1.c.

Production (written, media and multimodal):

7-2.F(1).1.c.ii.

Reviews (i.e. book and film reviews)

7-2.F(1).2.

Structures, Features, Codes and Conventions of Persuasive Texts: The student understands the purpose of the following and uses this knowledge to construct meaning when reading and producing spoken, written, media, multigenre and multimodal texts:

7-2.F(1).2.a.

Techniques/devices derived from literature:

7-2.F(1).2.a.iii.

Figurative language (e.g. imagery, metaphor, simile, personification)

7-2.F(1).2.b.

Persuasive language such as connotation, loaded words, modals (should, would, must), polarizing rhetoric, judging/quantifying/qualifying words

7-2.F(1).2.c.

Respect for production constraints that influence the content of a newspaper/magazine/show (e.g. word limit, time restrictions, readership tastes and expectations, layout)

7-2.F(1).2.g.

Genre-specific conventions:

7-2.F(1).2.g.i.1.

Advertisements (including PSAs): Persuasive techniques such as appeals to basic needs (e.g. "fitting in" "luxury and style" "doing good"; emotional appeals such as use of testimonials and sad music)

7-2.F(1).2.g.i.2.

Advertisements (including PSAs): Media conventions such as camera language, layout, colour, sound (jingle, repetition, rhyme, voiceover)

7-2.F(1).2.g.ii.2.

Reviews: Content which includes: background on author and context; comparison with other texts in same genre; critique of producer's decisions (e.g. particular aspects of the plot, characters, setting, conflicts, theme(s), and/or various literary techniques)

7-2.F(1).2.g.ii.3.

Reviews: Organizational structure that supports the reviewer's opinion/critique (e.g. compare/contrast, respecting narrative chronology)

7-2.F(1).2.g.ii.5.

Reviews: Conventions to establish credibility (e.g. informal but expert tone and diction, 1st person point of view)

7-3.1.b.

Using personal processes, mentally computes operations

7-3.1.c.

Determines in writing

7-3.1.c.i.

The sum of two natural numbers of up to 4 digits

7-3.1.c.ii.

The difference between two natural numbers of up to 4 digits whose result is greater than 0

7-3.1.c.iii.

The product of a three-digit number by a two-digit number

7-3.1.c.iv.

The quotient of a four-digit number and a two-digit number and expresses the remainder of a division as a decimal that does not go beyond the second decimal place

7-3.1.c.v.

The result of a sequence of operations in accordance with the order of operations

7-3.2.a.

Generates a set of equivalent fractions

7-3.2.b.

Reduces a fraction to its simplest form

7-3.2.c.

Adds and subtracts fractions when the denominator of one fraction is a multiple of the other fraction

7-3.2.d.

Multiplies a natural number by a fraction and a fraction by a natural number

7-3.3.a.

Approximates the result of an operation

7-3.3.b.i.

Operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division by a natural number)

7-3.3.b.ii.

Multiplications by 10, 100, 1000

7-3.3.c.i.

Additions and subtractions of numbers whose result does not go beyond the second decimal place

7-3.3.c.ii.

Multiplications of numbers whose product does not go beyond the second decimal place

7-3.4.a.

Determines the divisibility of a number by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10

7-3.4.b.

Uses, in different contexts, the properties of divisibility: 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10

7-3.7.a.

Numbers written in decimal notation, using rules of signs

7-3.7.b.

Positive numbers written in fractional notation, with or without the use of objects or diagrams

7-3.A.1.

Rhetorical strategies

7-3.A.1.a.

Makes effective use of visual aids to support spoken language, such as handouts or photographs

7-3.A.1.a.i.

Describes the main characteristics of the three parts of the internal structure of the Earth (crust, mantle, core)

7-3.A.1.b.

Adapts the rhetorical aspects of spoken language to purpose, intended/target audience and genre (e.g. uses a register that is appropriate in a formal context; uses intonation for dramatic effect in a poetry reading; links own ideas to previous speaker in an informal plenary)

7-3.A.1.c.

Adapts the rethorical aspects of nonverbal language to achieve a particular effect, such as maintaining eye contact and using gestures for emphasis in a debate

7-3.A.2.a.

Exploits the possibilities of spoken language as a system in the context of learning (e.g. constructs or negotiates knowledge by searching for answers, practices active listening by paraphrasing)

7-3.A.2.a.i.

Defines the lithosphere as the outer shell of the Earth comprising the crust and the upper mantle

7-3.A.2.a.ii.

Describes the main relationships between the lithosphere and human activity (e.g. survival, agriculture, mining, land-use planning)

7-3.A.2.b.

Uses the aesthetic qualities of spoken language to give added meaning and depth to specific spoken genres (e.g. rhythm, repetition, pacing, rhyme, alliteration, assonance)

7-3.A.2.b.i.

Describes relationships between relief (topology) and geological and geophysical phenomena1 (e.g. the retreat of a glacier causes the formation of a plain)

7-3.A.2.b.ii.

Describes the effect of relief on human activities (e.g. transportation, construction, sports, agriculture)

7-3.A.2.h.i.

Describes the formation of three types of rock: igneous, metamorphic, sedimentary

7-3.A.2.h.ii.

Classifies rocks by method of formation (e.g. granite is an igneous rock, lime is a sedimentary rock, slate is a metamorphic rock)

7-3.A.2.h.iii.

Distinguishes between rocks and minerals

7-3.A.2.i.i.

Names basic minerals based on their properties (e.g. colour, hardness, magnetism)

7-3.A.2.j.i.

Classifies soils based on their composition (e.g. sand, clay, organic material)

7-3.A.3.a.

General characteristics of the hydrosphere

7-3.A.3.a.i.

Describes the distribution of fresh water and salt water on the Earth's surface (e.g. glaciers contain inaccessible fresh water)

7-3.A.3.a.ii.

Describes the main interactions between the hydrosphere and the atmosphere (e.g. heat exchanges, climate regulation, meteorological phenomena)

7-3.A.4.a.

General characteristics of the atmosphere

7-3.A.4.a.i.

Locates the main layers of the atmosphere (troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, thermosphere)

7-3.A.4.a.ii.

Describes the composition of pure air at sea level (nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapour)

7-3.A.4.a.iii.

Describes the relationships between the atmosphere and certain human activities (e.g. recreation, transportation, energy consumption)

7-3.B.1.a.

Uses a structure that fits the genre (e.g. letter format, narrative, play, essay)

7-3.B.1.e.

Uses relevant details and elaborates on these to support the main idea

7-3.B.1.g.

Uses smooth, effective transitions to maintain unity and coherence

7-3.B.2.a.

Uses the following parts of speech correctly: nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, prepositions, conjunctions and interjections

7-3.B.2.b.

Uses different kinds of sentences (e.g. declarative, conditional, exclamatory)

7-3.B.2.c.

Uses a variety of phrases and clauses to add detail and depth (e.g. appositive phrase, adverbial clause)

7-3.B.2.d.

Uses a variety of sentence structures (simple, compound, complex and compound-complex) and transitional words or phrases to reinforce relationships among ideas and to enhance the flow of the writing

7-3.B.2.e.

Demonstrates consistent variation in sentence beginnings, lengths and patterns (i.e. sentence arrangement)

7-3.B.2.f.

Respects subject/verb agreement, including verb tense, point of view, pronouns, etc.

7-3.B.2.g.

Uses active and passive voice to good effect (e.g. uses a passive voice in a research report to create a sense of authenticity)

7-3.B.2.h.

Uses syntax to suit the genre (e.g. compound-complex in an argument; compound in a descriptive narrative)

7-3.B.3.a.

Applies capitalization rules, including proper nouns, abbreviations and acronyms, literary titles and other titles in modern usage such as official titles, song titles, etc.

7-3.B.3.b.i.

Applies spelling rules, including exceptions such as: i before e except after c; dropping silent e and/or doubling the final consonant before adding a suffix beginning with a vowel; changing end y to i before adding any suffix except those beginning with I; and, numbers/statistics/dates, etc.

7-3.B.3.b.ii.

Applies spelling patterns/generalizations correctly, including exceptions such as: word families; prefixes and suffixes; regular and irregular plurals; homonyms and homophones

7-3.B.3.b.iii.

Uses resources to correct own spelling (e.g. word lists, dictionaries, peers, spell check)

7-3.B.3.c.i.

Applies end punctuation rules: period, question mark, exclamation point

7-3.B.3.c.ii.

Uses apostrophes to punctuate contractions, singular and plural possessives

7-3.B.3.c.iii.

Applies rules for commas: items in a series, greetings, introductory words, direct address, compound sentences, phrases and clauses

7-3.B.3.c.iv.

Uses quotation marks to punctuate dialogue, title short works, cite excerpts from different sources

7-3.B.3.c.v.

Uses colons and semicolons correctly

7-3.B.3.c.vi.

Uses hyphens, dashes, parentheses, ellipses and brackets correctly

7-3.B.3.c.vii.

Uses punctuation to suit the genre (e.g. parentheses to indicate asides in plays; brackets and ellipses points for citations in an essay; ellipses points or asterisks to indicate passage of time in a novel)

7-3.B.4.a.

Uses words that consistently support style, intended meaning and the organizational structure of the genre

7-3.B.4.c.

Demonstrates an extensive, varied vocabulary (i.e. derived from experiences with a range of texts and contexts)

7-3.B.a.i.

Describes the main elements of the theory of tectonic plates (e.g. plate, subduction zone, mid-oceanic ridge)

7-3.B.b.i.

Describes the formation of mountains, folding and breaks (tectonic plate movements)

7-3.B.c.i.

Describes a volcanic eruption

7-3.B.c.ii.

Describes the geographical distribution of volcanoes

7-3.B.d.i.

Describes the processes that cause earthquakes (e.g. tectonic plate movements, slides)

7-3.B.e.i.

Describes different types of erosion (e.g. soils dried by the wind, fragmentation of rocks caused by water freezing and thawing)

7-3.B.f.i.

Names the main factors responsible for wind (e.g. convection movements, movement of air masses)

7-3.B.g.i.

Explains the water cycle (phase changes, energy exchanges)

7-3.B.h.i.

Describes the role of solar energy as a natural energy source (e.g. wind, tornadoes, hurricanes, storms)

7-3.B.i.i.

Distinguishes between renewable and nonrenewable energy resources (e.g. Sun, molten rock, moving water, oil)

7-3.C.1.a.

Identifies and analyzes the codes used in a media text to convey the producer's intentions (e.g. a popular logo in advertising; music to convey suspense in a movie; the colour red to signify embarrassment in a graphic novel). See also SELA, p. 105 and SELA2, p. 62.

7-3.C.1.a.i.

Defines gravitation as a force of mutual attraction between bodies

7-3.C.1.b.

Identifies and analyzes how the codes of media language can be adapted to different purposes, texts and audiences:

7-3.C.1.b.i.

Depiction of products in advertising (e.g. magazine, television, web)

7-3.C.1.b.ii.

Adaptation of a genre in different media (e.g. a novel and its adaptation to film)

7-3.C.1.b.iii.

Coverage of same action or event by a single medium (e.g. two different radio stations reporting the same story)

7-3.C.1.b.iv.

Coverage of same action or event by different media (e.g. a baseball game that airs on radio and television)

7-3.C.1.c.

Demonstrates how specific codes and conventions combine to:

7-3.C.1.c.i.

Position an intended/target audience (e.g. prime-time programming is aimed at delivering the target audience to advertisers; appeals in a PSA position the reader to consider making a donation to a charity)

7-3.C.1.c.ii.

Communicate a producer's stance (e.g. an anti-whaling stance taken by National Geographic in a documentary on whaling)

7-3.C.1.c.iii.

Explains different phenomena using the properties of light (cycles of day and night, seasons, phases of the Moon, eclipses)

7-3.C.2.a.

Explains how layout cues the reader to the social function of a text (e.g. posters highlight visual elements rather than print to catch a viewer's attention; captions are used in televised news reports to establish credibility, as in providing the personal credentials of an expert on the topic or issue)

7-3.C.2.a.i.

Compares some of the characteristics of the planets in our solar system (e.g. distances, relative size, composition)

7-3.C.2.b.

Explains how the conventions of sound:

7-3.C.2.b.i.

Create a sense of tone, mood, emotion, pacing (e.g. quick tempo to create a sense of urgency in a drama)

7-3.C.2.b.ii.

Situate viewer/listener in a context (e.g. canned laughter in a comedy, sound effects in a car chase scene)

7-3.C.2.b.iii.

Add depth and/or dimension to a text (e.g. voiceover in a narrative sequence depicting a hazardous voyage by sea in another century)

7-3.C.2.c.

Explains how the conventions of image:

7-3.C.2.c.i.

Capture and maintain a viewer's attention (e.g. camera shots and angles)

7-3.C.2.c.ii.

Create atmosphere (e.g. dark lighting)

7-3.C.2.c.iii.

Move action forward (e.g. camera movement and transitions, editing)

7-3.C.2.c.iv.

Establish continuity (e.g. repetitive use of the colour blue in a graphic novel to characterize a protagonist)

7-3.C.2.c.v.

Add depth and/or dimension to a text (e.g. camera shot and/or angle that makes a subject appear powerful or threatening; use of the colour pink to suggest a cancer survivor in a photo essay)

7-3.C.2.d.i.

Explains a lunar or solar eclipse

7-3.C.2.e.

(Reading only) Analyzes how specific codes and conventions combine to convey concepts, message(s) and meaning(s):

7-3.C.2.e.ii.

Promotion of a product, idea or action

7-3.C.2.e.iv.

Individuals, groups and cultures (e.g. gendered images in advertising campaigns; the use of camera shots/angles to create a sense that homeless people are powerless)

7-3.C.2.e.v.

Values, beliefs, ideologies (e.g. a close-up of a sleeping baby is associated with a new beginning; the manipulation of images and events in a political message reinforces the opinion that an opponent leans too much to the Left)

7-3.C.2.f.i.

Describes the main parts of a comet (core of ice and rock, tail of gas, and tail of dust)

7-3.C.2.g.

Aurora borealis (northern lights)

7-3.C.2.g.i.

Locates the geographic regions where the aurora borealis occurs (polar regions)

7-3.C.2.g.ii.

Identifies the atmospheric layer in which the aurora borealis occurs

7-3.C.2.h.i.

Identifies traces left by meteoroid impacts in Qubec (e.g. craters, astroblemes)

7-4.1.a.

A certain percentage of a number

7-4.1.b.

The value corresponding to 100 per cent

7-4.5.a.

Ratios and rates qualitatively (equivalent rates and ratios, unit rate)

7-4.5.b.

Ratios and rates quantitatively (equivalent rates and ratios, unit rate)

7-4.A.a.i.

Defines a diagram of principles as a representation used to effectively explain the operation of a technical object

7-4.A.a.ii.

Associates the functional elements of a technical object with the appropriate diagram of principles

7-4.A.a.iii.

Explains the operation of a simple technical object by drawing a diagram illustrating the active forces and the resulting motion

7-4.A.a.iv.

Names the subassemblies and parts essential to the operation of a technical object

7-4.A.a.v.

Indicates certain principles of simple machines illustrated in a technical object (e.g. a lever in a wheelbarrow, a wedge in an axe)

7-4.A.b.i.

Defines a construction diagram as a representation used to effectively explain the construction and assembly of a technical object

7-4.A.b.ii.

Associates the shape and arrangement of parts of technical objects with the appropriate construction diagram

7-4.A.b.iii.

Explains the construction of a simple technical object by drawing a diagram illustrating the assembly and arrangement of parts

7-4.A.b.iv.

Names the components of a simple technical object

7-4.A.b.v.

Indicates the links and guiding controls on a construction diagram

7-4.B.1.a.i.

Identifies parts that move in a specific way in a technical object (rectilinear translation, rotation, helical)

7-4.B.1.b.i.

Explains the effects of a force in a technical object (change in the motion of an object, distortion of a material)

7-4.B.1.c.i.

Identifies wheels, inclined planes and levers in simple technical objects (e.g. a wheelbarrow is made up of a second-class lever and a wheel)

7-4.B.1.c.ii.

Describes qualitatively the mechanical advantages of different types of levers (first-class, second-class, third-class) in different applications

7-4.B.2.a.i.

Identifies a system (set of connected elements that interact with each other) in a technical object or technological application

7-4.B.2.a.ii.

Describes the overall function of a technological system

7-4.B.2.a.iii.

Names the inputs and outputs of a technological system

7-4.B.2.a.iv.

Names the processes and control elements of a technological system

7-4.B.2.b.

Components of a system

7-4.B.2.b.i.

Describes the role of the components of a technological system (e.g. explains the role of the parts of a lighting system)

7-4.B.2.c.

Energy transformations

7-4.B.2.c.i.

Associates energy with radiation, heat or motion

7-4.B.2.c.ii.

Defines energy transformations

7-4.B.2.c.iii.

Identifies energy transformations in a technical object or technological system

7-4.B.3.a.

Basic mechanical functions (links, guiding control)

7-4.B.3.a.i.

Describes the role of links and guiding controls in a technical object

7-4.B.3.a.ii.

Identifies a guiding control in a technical object, as well as the related links (e.g. a pizza wheel is guided by a pivot, which links it to the handle)

7-4.B.3.h.

Motion transmission systems

7-4.B.3.h.i.

Identifies motion transmission systems in technical objects

7-4.B.3.k.

Motion transformation systems

7-4.B.3.k.i.

Identifies motion transformation systems in technical objects

7-4.D.1.a.i.

Associates raw materials with the unprocessed materials used in an industry (e.g. bauxite is the raw material used in aluminum smelters)

7-4.D.1.b.i.

Names the materials present in a technical object (e.g. a cooking pot is composed of two materials: a metal used to make the container and plastic used to coat the handle)

7-4.D.1.b.ii.

Determines the origins of the materials present in a technical object (animal, plant, mineral, wood)

7-4.D.1.c.i.

Defines tools and equipment as the elements needed to manufacture an object (machining, control, assembly)

7-4.E.a.i.

Defines specifications as a set of constraints associated with the design of a technical object

7-4.E.a.ii.

Evaluates a prototype or technical object based on the environments described in the specifications (human, technical, industrial, economic, physical, environmental)

7-4.E.b.i.

Defines a manufacturing process sheet as a set of steps to follow to machine the parts that make up a technical object

7-4.E.b.ii.

Follows a process and assembly sheet to construct an object consisting of few components or to construct part of that object

7-5.A.1.

Describes, using his/her own words and mathematical language, numerical patterns

7-5.A.1.a.

Doing a technical drawing

7-5.A.1.a.i.

Chooses the best view for an elevation drawing of a technical object

7-5.A.1.a.ii.

Represents the visible edges using solid lines

7-5.A.1.a.iii.

Represents the hidden edges using dotted lines

7-5.A.1.a.iv.

Indicates the overall external dimensions of an object on a drawing

7-5.A.1.b.i.

Associates views with the sides of a technical object

7-5.A.1.b.ii.

Associates lines with the edges of a technical object

7-5.A.1.c.i.

Chooses the best view to describe a technical object

7-5.A.1.c.ii.

Uses different colours for each part of a technical object

7-5.A.1.c.iii.

Indicates all the information needed to explain the operation or construction of an object

7-5.A.1.d.i.

Associates real measurements with each of the dimensions in a drawing

7-5.A.1.d.ii.

Reduces or multiplies the dimensions of a technical object based on the scale

7-5.A.1.e.

Using drawing instruments

7-5.A.1.e.i.

Uses drawing instruments (e.g. ruler, square) to make diagrams

7-5.A.2.

Describes, using his/her own words and mathematical language, series of numbers and family of operations

7-5.A.2.a.

Safely using machines and tools

7-5.A.2.a.i.

Uses tools safely (e.g. retractable utility knife, hammer, screwdriver, pliers)

7-5.A.2.b.

Measuring and laying out

7-5.A.2.b.i.

Identifies the unit of measurement on the instrument

7-5.A.2.b.ii.

Positions the measuring instrument to obtain reliable reference points

7-5.A.2.b.iii.

Adopts the appropriate position for reading an instrument

7-5.A.2.b.iv.

Marks the materials to be shaped using a pencil or punch

7-5.A.2.c.i.

Chooses the appropriate materials, tools, techniques and processes

7-5.A.2.c.ii.

Draws the necessary reference lines

7-5.A.2.c.iii.

Immobilizes the part to be formed

7-5.A.2.c.iv.

Forms the part in accordance with the steps in the following machining processes: sawing, drilling, sanding, filing

7-5.A.2.d.i.

Sands the sides or deburrs the edges of each part after forming

7-5.A.2.d.ii.

Uses the appropriate finish (stain, paint)

7-5.A.2.e.i.

Marks the references (holes, points or guidelines)

7-5.A.2.e.ii.

Immobilizes parts during gluing

7-5.A.2.e.iii.

Drills to the diameter of the screws, nails or rivets used

7-5.A.2.e.iv.

Countersinks the openings for countersunk screws

7-5.A.2.f.

Assembling and disassembling

7-5.A.2.f.i.

Identifies and gathers the parts and hardware

7-5.A.2.f.ii.

Chooses the appropriate tools

7-5.A.2.f.iii.

For disassembly, numbers and records the location of the parts

7-5.A.3.

Adds new terms to a series when the first three terms or more are given

7-5.A.4.

Describes the role of components of algebraic expressions:

7-5.A.4.d.

Coefficient, degree, term, constant term, like terms

7-5.A.5.

Constructs an algebraic expression using a register (type) of representation

7-5.A.6.

Interprets an algebraic expression in light of the context

7-5.A.7.

Recognizes or constructs equivalent algebraic expressions

7-5.A.8.

Recognizes or constructs

7-5.A.8.a.

Equalities and equations

7-5.B.1.

Calculates the numeric value of an algebraic expression

7-5.B.2.

Performs the following operations on algebraic expressions, with or without objects or diagrams: addition and subtraction, multiplication and division by a constant, multiplication of first-degree monomials

7-5.B.3.

Factors out the common factor in numerical expressions (distributive property of multiplication over addition or subtraction)

7-5.B.a.i.

Uses laboratory materials and equipment safely (e.g. allows hotplate to cool, uses beaker tongs)

7-5.B.a.ii.

Handles chemicals safely (e.g. uses a spatula and pipette filler)

7-5.B.b.i.

Separates heterogeneous mixtures using sedimentation and decantation

7-5.B.b.ii.

Separates heterogeneous mixtures using filtration

7-5.B.b.iii.

Separates different aqueous solutions using evaporation or distillation

7-5.B.c.i.

Uses environmental design and construction techniques that respect the characteristics of the habitat (e.g. terrarium, aquarium, composting medium)

7-5.B.d.i.

Adopts the appropriate position for reading an instrument

7-5.B.d.ii.

Measures the mass of a substance using a balance

7-5.B.d.iii.

Measures the volume of a liquid using the appropriate graduated cylinder

7-5.B.d.v.

Measures temperature using a graduated thermometer

7-5.B.e.i.

Uses observational instruments appropriately (e.g. magnifying glass, stereomicroscope, binoculars, microscope)

7-5.C.1.

Recognizes whether a situation can be translated by

7-5.C.13.

Validates a solution, with or without technological tools, by substitution

7-5.C.15.

Interprets solutions or makes decisions, if necessary, depending on the context

7-5.C.2.

Recognizes or constructs

7-5.C.3.

Manipulates relations or formulas (e.g. isolates an element)

7-5.C.4.

Represents a situation using

7-5.C.4.a.

A first-degree equation with one unknown

7-5.C.5.a.

An equation using another register (type) of representation, if necessary

7-5.C.6.

Determines the missing term in an equation (relations between operations) :1 a + b = , a + = c, + b = c, a b = , a = c, b = c, a b = , a = c, b = c, a b = , a = c, b = c

7-5.C.7.

Transforms arithmetic equalities and equations to maintain equivalence (properties and rules for transforming equalities) and justifies the steps followed, if necessary

7-5.C.9.

Uses different methods to solve first-degree equations with one unknown of the form ax + b = cx + d : trial and error, drawings, arithmetic methods (inverse or equivalent operations), algebraic methods (balancing equations or hidden terms)