Arkansas Science Learning Standards — Grade 11


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AB.19.C.1

Compare and contrast the following acid/base theories: Arrhenius Theory Bronsted-Lowry Theory Lewis Theory

AB.20.C.1

Name and write formulas for acids, bases and salts: binary acids ternary acids ionic compounds

AB.21.C.1

Compare and contrast acid and base properties

AB.21.C.2

Use acid-base equilibrium constants to develop and explain: ionization constants percent of ionization common ion effect

AB.21.C.3

Explain the role of the pH scale as applied to acids and bases

AB.22.C.1

Perform a titration to solve for the concentration of an acid or base

AB.22.C.2

Use indicators in neutralization reactions

AB.22.C.3

Investigate the role of buffers

APC.3.AP.1

Explain the structure and function of the plasma membrane

APC.3.AP.2

Compare and contrast the different ways in which substances cross the plasma membrane: diffusion and osmosis facilitated diffusion active transport filtration endocytosis exocytosis

APC.3.AP.3

Describe the structure and function of organelles and cell parts

APC.3.AP.4

Identify chemical substances produced by cells

APC.3.AP.5

Differentiate among replication, transcription, and translation

APC.3.AP.6

Differentiate between mitosis and meiosis

APC.3.AP.7

Explain the consequences of abnormal cell division

AT.1.C.1

Summarize the discoveries of the subatomic particles Rutherfords gold foil Chadwicks discovery of the neutron Thomsons cathode ray Millikans Oil Drop

AT.1.C.2

Explain the historical events that led to the development of the current atomic theory

AT.2.C.1

Analyze an atoms particle position, arrangement, and charge using: proton neutron electron

AT.2.C.2

Compare the magnitude and range of nuclear forces to magnetic forces and gravitational forces

AT.2.C.3

Draw and explain nuclear symbols and hyphen notations for isotopes: nuclear symbol: XA Z Where Hyphen notation: X ? A Where X = element symbol; A = the mass number; Z = atomic number; the number of neutrons = A ? Z

AT.2.C.4

Derive an average atomic mass

AT.2.C.5

Determine the arrangement of subatomic particles in the ion(s) of an atom

AT.3.C.1

Correlate emissions of visible light with the arrangement of electrons in atoms: quantum c = v? Where v = frequency ; ? = wavelength

AT.3.C.2

Apply the following rules or principles to model electron arrangement in atoms: Aufbau Principle (diagonal filling order) Hunds Rule Paulis Exclusion Principle

AT.3.C.3

Predict the placement of elements on the Periodic Table and their properties using electron configuration

AT.3.C.4

Demonstrate electron placement in atoms using the following notations: orbital notations electron configuration notation Lewis electron dot structures

B.10.C.1

Explain the properties of metals due to delocalized electrons: molecular orbital model

B.11.C.1

Distinguish between amorphous and crystalline solids

B.11.C.2

Compare and contrast the properties of crystalline solids: ionic covalent network covalent molecular metallic

B.8.C.1

Determine ion formation tendencies for groups on the Periodic Table: main group elements transition elements

B.8.C.2

Derive formula units based on the charges of ions

B.8.C.3

Use the electronegativitiy chart to predict the bonding type of compounds: ionic polar covalent non-polar covalent

B.9.C.1

Draw Lewis structures to show valence electrons for covalent bonding: lone pairs shared pairs hybridization resonance

B.9.C.2

Determine the properties of covalent compounds based upon double and triple bonding

B.9.C.3

Predict the polarity and geometry of a molecule based upon shared electron pairs and lone electron pairs: VSEPR Model

B.9.C.4

Identify the strengths and effects of intermolecular forces (van der Waals): hydrogen bonding dipole-dipole dipole-induced dipole dispersion forces (London)

BD.2.ES.1

Compare and contrast biomes

BD.2.ES.10

Describe the natural selection process in populations

BD.2.ES.2

Describe relationships within a community: predation competition parasitism mutualism commensalism

BD.2.ES.3

Differentiate between primary and secondary succession

BD.2.ES.4

Construct a trophic-level pyramid (energy level)

BD.2.ES.5

Construct a food chain

BD.2.ES.7

Compare and contrast food webs and food chains

BD.2.ES.8

Describe biodiversity

BD.2.ES.9

Explain how limiting factors affect populations and ecosystems

BS.10.AP.1

Identify the components of the cardiovascular system

BS.10.AP.2

Discuss the physiological mechanisms of the cardiovascular system

BS.10.AP.3

Identify the macroscopic, microscopic, and molecular structure of the cardiovascular system

BS.10.AP.4

Describe disorders associated with the cardiovascular system

BS.11.AP.1

Identify the components of the immune and lymphatic systems

BS.11.AP.2

Discuss the physiological mechanisms of the immune and lymphatic systems

BS.11.AP.3

Identify the macroscopic, microscopic, and molecular structure of the immune and lymphatic systems

BS.11.AP.4

Describe disorders associated with the immune and lymphatic systems

BS.12.AP.1

Identify the components of the respiratory system

BS.12.AP.2

Discuss the physiological mechanisms of the respiratory system

BS.12.AP.3

Identify the macroscopic, microscopic, and molecular structure of the respiratory system

BS.12.AP.4

Describe disorders associated with the respiratory system

BS.13.AP.1

Identify the components the digestive system

BS.13.AP.2

Discuss the physiological mechanisms of the digestive system

BS.13.AP.3

Identify the macroscopic, microscopic, and molecular structure of the digestive system

BS.13.AP.4

Describe disorders associated with the digestive system

BS.14.AP.1

Identify the components the urinary system

BS.14.AP.2

Discuss the physiological mechanisms of the urinary system

BS.14.AP.3

Identify the macroscopic, microscopic, and molecular structure of the urinary system

BS.14.AP.4

Describe disorders associated with the urinary system

BS.15.AP.1

Describe the components and the organization of the reproductive system

BS.15.AP.2

Discuss the physiological mechanisms of the reproductive system

BS.15.AP.3

Identify the macroscopic, microscopic, and molecular structure of the reproductive system

BS.15.AP.4

Describe disorders associated with the reproductive system

BS.5.AP.1

Identify the components of the integumentary system

BS.5.AP.2

Discuss the physiological mechanisms of the skin

BS.5.AP.3

Identify the macroscopic and microscopic structure of the integumentary system

BS.5.AP.4

Describe disorders associated with the integumentary system

BS.6.AP.1

Identify the components the skeletal system

BS.6.AP.2

Discuss the physiological mechanisms of the skeletal system

BS.6.AP.3

Identify the macroscopic and microscopic structure of bone

BS.6.AP.4

Describe disorders associated with the skeletal system

BS.7.AP.1

Identify the components the muscular system

BS.7.AP.2

Discuss the physiological mechanisms of the muscular system

BS.7.AP.3

Identify the macroscopic, microscopic, and molecular structure of muscle

BS.7.AP.4

Describe disorders associated with the muscular system

BS.8.AP.1

Identify the components the nervous system

BS.8.AP.2

Discuss the physiological mechanisms of the nervous system

BS.8.AP.3

Identify the macroscopic, microscopic, and molecular structure of the nervous system

BS.8.AP.4

Describe disorders associated with the nervous system

BS.9.AP.1

Identify the components of the endocrine system

BS.9.AP.2

Discuss the physiological mechanisms of the endocrine system

BS.9.AP.3

Identify the macroscopic, microscopic, and molecular structure of the endocrine system

BS.9.AP.4

Describe disorders associated with the endocrine system

C.1.PS.1

Compare and contrast chemical and physical properties of matter, including but not limited to flammability, reactivity, density, buoyancy, viscosity, melting point and boiling point

C.1.PS.10

Identify commonly used polyatomic ions

C.1.PS.11

Write formulas for ionic and covalent compounds

C.1.PS.12

Name ionic and covalent compounds

C.1.PS.13

Identify the mole and amu (atomic mass unit) as units of measurement in chemistry

C.1.PS.14

Calculate the molar mass of compounds based on average atomic mass.

C.1.PS.2

Compare and contrast chemical and physical changes, including but not limited to rusting, burning, evaporation, boiling and dehydration

C.1.PS.3

Discuss and model the relative size and placement of sub-atomic particles

C.1.PS.4

Illustrate the placement of electrons in the first twenty elements using energy levels and orbitals

C.1.PS.5

Distinguish among atoms, ions, and isotopes

C.1.PS.6

Model the valence electrons using electron dot structures (Lewis electron dot structures)

C.1.PS.7

Explain the role of valence electrons in determining chemical properties

C.1.PS.8

Explain the role of valence electrons in forming chemical bonds

C.1.PS.9

Model bonding: ionic covalent metallic

C.2.PS.1

Identify the kinetic theory throughout the phases of matter

C.2.PS.2

Create and label heat versus temperature graphs (heating curves): solid liquid gas triple point heat of fusion heat of vaporization

C.2.PS.3

Relate thermal expansion to the kinetic theory

C.2.PS.4

Compare and contrast Boyles law and Charles law

C.2.PS.5

Compare and contrast endothermic and exothermic reactions as energy is transferred

C.2.PS.6

Distinguish between nuclear fission and nuclear fusion

C.2.PS.7

Compare and contrast the emissions produced by radioactive decay: alpha particles beta particles gamma rays

C.3.PS.1

Identify and write balanced chemical equations: decomposition reaction synthesis reaction single displacement reaction double displacement reaction combustion reaction

C.3.PS.2

Predict the product(s) of a chemical reaction when given the reactants using chemical symbols and words

C.3.PS.3

Balance chemical equations using the Law of Conservation of Mass

C.3.PS.4

Determine mole ratio from a balanced reaction equation

C.3.PS.5

Compare and contrast the properties of reactants and products of a chemical reaction

C.3.PS.6

Model the role of activation energy in chemical reactions

C.3.PS.7

Examine factors that affect the rate of chemical reactions, including but not limited to temperature, light, concentration, catalysts, surface area, pressure

C.3.PS.8

Identify the observable evidence of a chemical reaction: formation of a precipitate production of a gas color change changes in heat and light

C.3.PS.9

Relate fire safety measures to conditions necessary for combustion

C.4.PS.1

Summarize carbon bonding: allotropes (diamond, graphite, fullerenes) carbon-carbon (single, double, triple) isomers (branched, straight-chain, ring)

C.4.PS.2

Identify organic compounds by their: formula structure properties functional groups

C.4.PS.3

Distinguish between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons

C.4.PS.4

Describe organic compounds and their functions in the human body: carbohydrates lipids proteins nucleic acids

CC.2.AP.1

Distinguish between matter and energy

CC.2.AP.10

Describe the characteristics and importance of enzymes

CC.2.AP.2

Explain the basic assumptions and conclusions of the atomic theory

CC.2.AP.3

Distinguish between compounds and mixtures

CC.2.AP.4

Explain the role of ionic, covalent, and hydrogen bonds in the human body

CC.2.AP.5

Write simple formulas and chemical word equations for the four basic types of reactions: synthesis decomposition single replacement double replacement

CC.2.AP.6

Analyze the role of water in the human body

CC.2.AP.7

Explain the relationship among acids, bases, and salts

CC.2.AP.8

Relate the concept of pH to homeostasis

CC.2.AP.9

Compare the structure and function of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids

CDL.7.B.1

Differentiate among the different domains: Bacteria Archaea Eukarya

CDL.7.B.10

Evaluate the medical and economic importance of bacteria

CDL.7.B.11

Describe the characteristics used to classify protists: ? plant-like ? animal-like ? fungal-like

CDL.7.B.12

Evaluate the medical and economic importance of protists

CDL.7.B.13

Compare and contrast fungi with other eukaryotic organisms

CDL.7.B.14

Evaluate the medical and economic importance of fungi

CDL.7.B.15

Differentiate between vascular and nonvascular plants

CDL.7.B.16

Differentiate among cycads, gymnosperms, and angiosperms

CDL.7.B.17

Describe the structure and function of the major parts of a plant: ? roots ? stems ? leaves ? flowers

CDL.7.B.18

Relate the structure of plant tissue to its function epidermal ground vascular

CDL.7.B.19

Evaluate the medical and economic importance of plants

CDL.7.B.2

Differentiate the characteristics of the six kingdoms: Eubacteria Archaea Protista Fungi Plantae Animalia

CDL.7.B.20

Identify the symmetry of organisms: ? radial ? bilateral ? asymmetrical

CDL.7.B.21

Compare and contrast the major invertebrate classes according to their nervous, respiratory, excretory, circulatory, and digestive systems

CDL.7.B.22

Compare and contrast the major vertebrate classes according to their nervous, respiratory, excretory, circulatory, digestive, reproductive and integumentary systems

CDL.7.B.3

Identify the seven major taxonomic categories: kingdom phylum class order family genus species

CDL.7.B.4

Classify and name organisms based on their similarities and differences applying taxonomic nomenclature using dichotomous keys

CDL.7.B.5

Investigate Arkansas' biodiversity using appropriate tools and technology

CDL.7.B.6

Compare and contrast the structures and characteristics of viruses (lytic and lysogenic cycles) with non-living and living things

CDL.7.B.7

Evaluate the medical and economic importance of viruses

CDL.7.B.8

Compare and contrast life cycles of familiar organisms ? sexual reproduction ? asexual reproduction ? metamorphosis ? alternation of generations

CDL.7.B.9

Classify bacteria according to their characteristics and adaptations

E.24.C.1

List and explain the factors which affect the rate of a reaction and the relationship of these factors to chemical equilibrium: reversible reactions reaction rate nature of reactants concentration temperature catalysis

E.24.C.2

Solve problems developing an equilibrium constant or the concentration of a reactant or product: mA + nB? sP + rQ mA + nB ? sP + rQ [ ] [ ] [ ] [ ]

E.24.C.3

Explain the relationship of LeChateliers Principle to equilibrium systems: temperature pressure concentration

E.24.C.4

Describe the application of equilibrium and kinetic concepts to the Haber Process: high concentration of hydrogen and nitrogen removal of ammonia precise temperature control use of a contact catalyst high pressure

EBR.8.B.1

Cite examples of abiotic and biotic factors of ecosystems

EBR.8.B.2

Compare and contrast the characteristics of biomes

EBR.8.B.3

Diagram the carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, and water cycles in an ecosystem

EBR.8.B.4

Analyze an ecosystems energy flow through food chains, food webs, and energy pyramids

EBR.8.B.5

Identify and predict the factors that control population, including predation, competition, crowding, water, nutrients, and shelter

EBR.8.B.6

Summarize the symbiotic ways in which individuals within a community interact with each other: ? commensalism ? parasitism ? mutualism

EBR.8.B.7

Compare and contrast primary succession with secondary succession

EBR.8.B.8

Identify the properties of each of the five levels of ecology: ? organism ? population ? community ? ecosystem ? biosphere

EBR.9.B.1

Analyze the effects of human population growth and technology on the environment/biosphere

EBR.9.B.2

Evaluate long range plans concerning resource use and by-product disposal in terms of their environmental, economic, and political impact

EBR.9.B.3

Assess current world issues applying scientific themes (e.g., global changes in climate, epidemics, pandemics, ozone depletion, UV radiation, natural resources, use of technology, and public policy)

EM.11.P.1

Calculate electric force using Coulombs law:

EM.11.P.2

Calculate electric field strength:

EM.11.P.3

Draw and interpret electric field lines

EM.12.P.1

Calculate electrical potential energy: PEelectric = ?qEd

EM.12.P.2

Compute the electric potential for various charge distributions:

EM.12.P.3

Calculate the capacitance of various devices:

EM.12.P.4

Construct a circuit to produce a pre-determined value of an Ohms law variable

EM.13.P.1

Determine the strength of a magnetic field

EM.13.P.2

Use the first right-hand rule to find the direction of the force on the charge moving through a magnetic field

EM.13.P.3

Determine the magnitude and direction of the force on a current-carrying wire in a magnetic field

EM.13.P.4

Describe how the change in the number of magnetic field lines through a circuit loop affects the magnitude and direction of the induced current

EM.13.P.5

Calculate the induced electromagnetic field (emf) and current using Faradays law of induction: t AB emf N ? ? = ? [ (cos? )] Where N = number of loops in the circuit

GL.16.C.1

Demonstrate the relationship of the kinetic theory as it applies to gas particles: molecular motion elastic collisions temperature pressure ideal gas

GL.16.C.2

Calculate the effects of pressure, temperature, and volume on the number of moles of gas particles in chemical reactions

GL.17.C.1

Calculate the effects of pressure, temperature, and volume to gases

GL.18.C.1

Calculate volume/mass relationships in balanced chemical reaction equations

HE.4.B.1

Summarize the outcomes of Gregor Mendels experimental procedures

HE.4.B.2

Differentiate among the laws and principles of inheritance: ? dominance ? segregation ? independent assortment

HE.4.B.3

Use the laws of probability and Punnett squares to predict genotypic and phenotypic ratios

HE.4.B.4

Examine different modes of inheritance: ? sex linkage ? codominance ? crossing over ? incomplete dominance ? multiple alleles

HE.4.B.5

Analyze the historically significant work of prominent geneticists

HE.4.B.6

Evaluate karyotypes for abnormalities: monosomy trisomy

HE.5.B.1

Model the components of a DNA nucleotide and an RNA nucleotide

HE.5.B.2

Describe the Watson-Crick double helix model of DNA, using the base-pairing rule (adenine-thymine, cytosine-guanine)

HE.5.B.3

Compare and contrast the structure and function of DNA and RNA

HE.5.B.4

Describe and model the processes of replication, transcription, and translation

HE.5.B.5

Compare and contrast the different types of mutation events, including point mutation, frameshift mutation, deletion, and inversion

HE.5.B.6

Identify effects of changes brought about by mutations: ? beneficial ? harmful ? neutral

HE.6.B.1

Compare and contrast Lamarcks explanation of evolution with Darwins theory of evolution by natural selection

HE.6.B.2

Recognize that evolution involves a change in allele frequencies in a population across successive generations

HE.6.B.3

Analyze the effects of mutations and the resulting variations within a population in terms of natural selection

HE.6.B.4

Illustrate mass extinction events using a time line

HE.6.B.5

Evaluate evolution in terms of evidence as found in the following: fossil record DNA analysis artificial selection morphology embryology viral evolution geographic distribution of related species antibiotic and pesticide resistance in various organisms

HE.6.B.6

Compare the processes of relative dating and radioactive dating to determine the age of fossils

HE.6.B.7

Interpret a Cladogram

HT.7.P.1

Perform specific heat capacity calculations:

HT.7.P.2

Perform calculations involving latent heat: Q = mL

HT.7.P.3

Interpret the various sections of a heating curve diagram

HT.7.P.4

Calculate heat energy of the different phase changes of a substance: Q = mCp?T Q = mLf Q = mLv Where L f = Latent heat of fusion; Lv = Latent heat of vaporization

HT.8.P.1

Describe how the first law of thermodynamics is a statement of energy conversion

HT.8.P.2

Calculate heat, work, and the change in internal energy by applying the first law of thermodynamics: ?U = Q ?W Where ?U = change in systems internal energy

HT.8.P.3

Calculate the efficiency of a heat engine by using the second law of thermodynamics: c h h c h net Q Q Q Q Q W Eff = ? ? = = 1 WhereQh =energy added as heat ;Qc = energy removed as heat

HT.8.P.4

Distinguish between entropy changes within systems and the entropy change for the universe as a whole

KE.23.C.1

Define enthalpy and entropy and explain the relationship to exothermic and endothermic reactions: ?H < U = exothermic reaction ?H > U = endothermic reaction

KE.23.C.2

Define free energy in terms of enthalpy and entropy: ?G = ?H ?T?S ?G < 0 = spontaneous reaction ?S > 0 = increase in disorder ?S < 0 = decrease in disorder

KE.23.C.3

Calculate entropy, enthalpy, and free energy changes in chemical reactions: ? ? ? ?H(rxn) = ?H f ( products) ? ?H f (reac tan ts) ? ? ? ?G(rxn) = ?Gf ( products) ? ?Gf (reac tan ts) ? ? ? ?S(rxn) = ?S( products) ? ?S(reac tan ts)

KE.23.C.4

Define specific heat capacity and its relationship to calorimetric measurements: q m T Cp = (? )

KE.23.C.5

Determine the heat of formation and the heat of reaction using enthalpy values and the Law of Conservation of Energy

KE.23.C.6

Explain the role of activation energy and collision theory in chemical reactions

MC.1.B.1

Describe the structure and function of the major organic molecules found in living systems: carbohydrates proteins enzymes lipids nucleic acids

MC.1.B.2

Describe the relationship between an enzyme and its substrate molecule(s)

MC.1.B.3

Investigate the properties and importance of water and its significance for life: surface tension adhesion cohesion polarity pH

MC.1.B.4

Explain the role of energy in chemical reactions of living systems: activation energy exergonic reactions endergonic reactions

MC.2.B.1

Construct a hierarchy of life from cells to ecosystems

MC.2.B.10

Analyze the meiotic maintenance of a constant chromosome number from one generation to the next

MC.2.B.11

Discuss homeostasis using thermoregulation as an example

MC.2.B.2

Compare and contrast prokaryotes and eukaryotes

MC.2.B.3

Describe the role of sub-cellular structures in the life of a cell: ? organelles ? ribosomes ? cytoskeleton

MC.2.B.4

Relate the function of the plasma (cell) membrane to its structure

MC.2.B.5

Compare and contrast the structures of an animal cell to a plant cell

MC.2.B.6

Compare and contrast the functions of autotrophs and heterotrophs

MC.2.B.7

Compare and contrast active transport and passive transport mechanisms: ? diffusion ? osmosis ? endocytosis ? exocytosis ? phagocytosis ? pinocytosis

MC.2.B.8

Describe the main events in the cell cycle, including the differences in plant and animal cell division: ? interphase ? mitosis ? cytokinesis

MC.2.B.9

List in order and describe the stages of mitosis: ? prophase ? metaphase ? anaphase ? telophase.

MC.3.B.1

Compare and contrast the structure and function of mitochondria and chloroplasts

MC.3.B.2

Describe and model the conversion of stored energy in organic molecules into usable cellular energy (ATP): ? glycolysis ? citric acid cycle ? electron transport chain

MC.3.B.3

Compare and contrast aerobic and anaerobic respiration: ? lactic acid fermentation ? alcoholic fermentation

MC.3.B.4

Describe and model the conversion of light energy to chemical energy by photosynthetic organisms: ? light dependent reactions ? light independent reactions

MC.3.B.5

Compare and contrast cellular respiration and photosynthesis as energy conversion pathways

MF.1.P.1

Compare and contrast scalar and vector quantities

MF.1.P.10

Apply Newtons second law of motion to solve motion problems that involve constant forces: F = ma

MF.1.P.11

Apply Newtons third law of motion to explain action-reaction pairs

MF.1.P.12

Calculate frictional forces (i.e., kinetic and static):

MF.1.P.13

Calculate the magnitude of the force of friction: Ff = Fn

MF.1.P.2

Solve problems involving constant and average velocity: t d v = t

MF.1.P.3

Apply kinematic equations to calculate distance, time, or velocity under conditions of constant acceleration:

MF.1.P.4

Compare graphic representations of motion: d-t v-t a-t

MF.1.P.5

Calculate the components of a free falling object at various points in motion: v v a y f = i + 2 ? 2 2 Where a = gravity (g)

MF.1.P.6

Compare and contrast contact force (e.g., friction) and field forces (e.g., gravitational force

MF.1.P.7

Draw free body diagrams of all forces acting upon an object

MF.1.P.8

Calculate the applied forces represented in a free body diagram

MF.1.P.9

Apply Newtons first law of motion to show balanced and unbalanced forces

MF.2.P.1

Calculate the resultant vector of a moving object

MF.2.P.10

Solve problems in circular motion by using centripetal acceleration:

MF.2.P.2

Resolve two-dimensional vectors into their components: dx = d cos? d y = d sin?

MF.2.P.3

Calculate the magnitude and direction of a vector from its components:

MF.2.P.4

Solve two-dimensional problems using balanced forces: W = ?sin? Where W = weight;? = tension

MF.2.P.5

Solve two-dimensional problems using the Pythagorean Theorem or the quadratic formula: 2 2 2 a + b = c a

MF.2.P.6

Describe the path of a projectile as a parabola

MF.2.P.7

Apply kinematic equations to solve problems involving projectile motion of an object launched at an angle: vx = vi cos? = constan

MF.2.P.8

Apply kinematic equations to solve problems involving projectile motion of an object launched with initial horizontal velocity

MF.2.P.9

Calculate rotational motion with a constant force directed toward the center: r mv

MF.3.P.1

Relate radians to degrees: r ?s ?? = Where ?s = arc length; r = radius

MF.3.P.2

Calculate the magnitude of torque on an object: ? = Fd(sin? ) Where ? = torque

MF.3.P.3

Calculate angular speed and angular acceleration:

MF.3.P.4

Solve problems using kinematic equations for angular motion:

MF.3.P.5

Solve problems involving tangential speed: vt = r?

MF.3.P.6

Solve problems involving tangential acceleration: at = r?

MF.3.P.7

Calculate centripetal acceleration: r v a t c 2 = 2 ac = r?

MF.3.P.8

Apply Newtons universal law of gravitation to find the gravitational force between two masses:

MF.4.P.1

Calculate net work done by a constant net force: Wnet = Fnetd cos? Where W work

MF.4.P.2

Solve problems relating kinetic energy and potential energy to the work-energy theorem: Wnet = ?KE

MF.4.P.3

Solve problems through the application of conservation of mechanical energy: MEi = MEf mvi + mghi = mv f + mghf

MF.4.P.4

Relate the concepts of time and energy to power

MF.4.P.5

Prove the relationship of time, energy and power through problem solving: t W P ? = P = Fv Where P = power; W = work; F = force; V = velocity; T = time

MF.5.P.1

Describe changes in momentum in terms of force and time

MF.5.P.2

Solve problems using the impulse-momentum theorem: F?t = ?p or mv f mvi F?t = ? Where ?p = change in momentum; F?t = impulse

MF.5.P.3

Compare total momentum of two objects before and after they interact

MF.5.P.4

Solve problems for perfectly inelastic and elastic collisions:

MF.6.P.1

Calibrate the applied buoyant force to determine if the object will sink or float: FB = Fg (displacedfluid ) = mf g

MF.6.P.2

Apply Pascals principle to an enclosed fluid system:

MF.6.P.3

Apply Bernoullis equation to solve fluid-flow problems:

MF.6.P.4

Use the ideal gas law to predict the properties of an ideal gas under different conditions

NC.30.C.1

Describe the following radiation emissions: alpha particles beta particles gamma rays positron particles

NC.30.C.2

Write and balance nuclear reactions

NC.30.C.3

Compare and contrast fission and fusion

NC.30.C.4

Apply the concept of half life to nuclear decay

NC.31.C.1

Construct models of instruments used to study, control, and utilize radioactive materials and nuclear processes

NC.31.C.2

Research the role of nuclear reactions in society: transmutation nuclear power plants Manhattan Project

NP.14.P.1

Calculate energy quanta using Plancks equation: E = hf

NP.14.P.2

Calculate the de Broglie wavelength of matter: mv h p h ?

NP.14.P.3

Distinguish between classical ideas of measurement and Heisenbergs uncertainty principle

NP.14.P.4

Research emerging theories in physics, such as string theory

NP.15.P.1

Calculate the binding energy of various nuclei

NP.15.P.2

Predict the products of nuclear decay

NP.15.P.3

Calculate the decay constant and the half-life of a radioactive substance

NS.10.B.1

Explain why science is limited to natural explanations of how the world works

NS.10.B.2

Compare and contrast hypotheses, theories, and laws

NS.10.B.3

Distinguish between a scientific theory and the term theory used in general conversation

NS.10.B.4

Summarize the guidelines of science: ? explanations are based on observations, evidence, and testing ? hypotheses must be testable ? understandings and/or conclusions may change with additional empirical data ? scientific knowledge must have peer review and verification before acceptance

NS.10.PS.1

Develop and explain the appropriate procedure, controls, and variables (dependent and independent) in scientific experimentation

NS.10.PS.2

Research and apply appropriate safety precautions (refer to ADE Guidelines) when designing and/or conducting scientific investigations

NS.10.PS.3

Identify sources of bias that could affect experimental outcome

NS.10.PS.4

Gather and analyze data using appropriate summary statistics

NS.10.PS.5

Formulate valid conclusions without bias

NS.10.PS.6

Communicate experimental results using appropriate reports, figures, and tables

NS.11.B.1

Develop and explain the appropriate procedure, controls, and variables (dependent and independent) in scientific experimentation

NS.11.B.2

Research and apply appropriate safety precautions (refer to ADE Guidelines) when designing and/or conducting scientific investigations

NS.11.B.3

Identify sources of bias that could affect experimental outcome

NS.11.B.4

Gather and analyze data using appropriate summary statistics

NS.11.B.5

Formulate valid conclusions without bias

NS.11.B.6

Communicate experimental results using appropriate reports, figures, and tables

NS.11.PS.1

Recognize the factors that constitute a scientific theory

NS.11.PS.2

Explain why scientific theories may be modified or expanded using additional empirical data, verification, and peer review

NS.11.PS.3

Summarize the development of the current atomic theory

NS.11.PS.4

Analyze the development of the periodic table

NS.11.PS.5

Research historical events in physical science

NS.11.PS.6

Research current events and topics in physical science

NS.12.B.1

Recognize that theories are scientific explanations that require empirical data, verification, and peer review

NS.12.B.2

Understand that scientific theories may be modified or expanded based on additional empirical data, verification, and peer review

NS.12.B.3

Summarize biological evolution

NS.12.B.4

Relate the development of the cell theory to current trends in cellular biology

NS.12.B.5

Describe the relationship between the germ theory of disease and our current knowledge of immunology and control of infectious diseases

NS.12.B.6

Relate the chromosome theory of heredity to recent findings in genetic research (e.g., Human Genome Project-HGP, chromosome therapy)

NS.12.B.7

Research current events and topics in biology

NS.12.PS.1

Use appropriate equipment and technology as tools for solving problems (e.g., balances, scales, calculators, probes, glassware, burners, computer software and hardware)

NS.12.PS.2

Collect and analyze scientific data using appropriate mathematical calculations, figures, and tables

NS.12.PS.3

Utilize technology to communicate research findings

NS.13.B.1

Collect and analyze scientific data using appropriate mathematical calculations, figures, and tables

NS.13.B.2

Use appropriate equipment and technology as tools for solving problems (e.g., microscopes, centrifuges, flexible arm cameras, computer software and hardware)

NS.13.B.3

Utilize technology to communicate research findings

NS.13.PS.1

Compare and contrast physical science concepts in pure science and applied science

NS.13.PS.2

Discuss why scientists should work within ethical parameters

NS.13.PS.3

Evaluate long-range plans concerning resource use and by-product disposal for environmental, economic, and political impact

NS.13.PS.4

Explain how the cyclical relationship between science and technology results in reciprocal advancements in science and technology

NS.13.PS.5

Describe in detail the methods used by scientists in their research

NS.14.B.1

Compare and contrast biological concepts in pure science and applied science

NS.14.B.2

Discuss why scientists should work within ethical parameters

NS.14.B.3

Evaluate long-range plans concerning resource use and by-product disposal for environmental, economic, and political impact

NS.14.B.4

Explain how the cyclical relationship between science and technology results in reciprocal advancements in science and technology

NS.14.PS.1

Research and evaluate physical science careers using the following criteria: educational requirements salary availability of jobs working conditions

NS.15.B.1

Research and evaluate science careers using the following criteria: ? educational requirements ? salary ? availability of jobs ? working conditions

NS.16.AP.1

Explain why science is limited to natural explanations of how the world works

NS.16.AP.2

Compare and contrast hypotheses, theories, and laws

NS.16.AP.3

Distinguish between a scientific theory and the term theory used in general conversation

NS.16.AP.4

Summarize the guidelines of science: explanations are based on observations, evidence, and testing hypotheses must be testable understandings and/or conclusions may change with additional empirical data scientific knowledge must have peer review and verification before acceptance

NS.16.P.1

Describe why science is limited to natural explanations of how the world works

NS.16.P.2

Compare and contrast the criteria for the formation of hypotheses, theories and laws

NS.16.P.3

Summarize the guidelines of science: results are based on observations, evidence, and testing hypotheses must be testable understandings and/or conclusions may change as new data are generated empirical knowledge must have peer review and verification before acceptance

NS.17.AP.1

Develop and explain the appropriate procedure, controls, and variables (dependent and independent) in scientific experimentation

NS.17.AP.2

Research and apply appropriate safety precautions (refer to ADE Guidelines) when designing and/or conducting scientific investigations

NS.17.AP.3

Identify sources of bias that could affect experimental outcome

NS.17.AP.4

Gather and analyze data using appropriate summary statistics

NS.17.AP.5

Formulate valid conclusions without bias

NS.17.AP.6

Communicate experimental results using appropriate reports, figures, and tables

NS.17.P.1

Develop the appropriate procedures using controls and variables (dependent and independent) in scientific experimentation

NS.17.P.2

Research and apply appropriate safety precautions (ADE Guidelines) when designing and/or conducting scientific investigations

NS.17.P.3

Identify sources of bias that could affect experimental outcome

NS.17.P.4

Gather and analyze data using appropriate summary statistics (e.g., percent yield, percent error)

NS.17.P.5

Formulate valid conclusions without bias

NS.18.AP.1

Understand that scientific theories may be modified or expanded based on additional empirical data, verification, and peer review

NS.18.AP.2

Relate the development of the cell theory to current trends in cellular biology

NS.18.AP.3

Describe the relationship between the germ theory of disease and our current knowledge of immunology and control of infectious diseases

NS.18.AP.4

Relate the chromosome theory of heredity to recent findings in genetic research (e.g., Human Genome Project-HGP, chromosome therapy)

NS.18.AP.5

Research current events and topics in human biology

NS.18.P.1

Recognize that theories are scientific explanations that require empirical data, verification and peer review

NS.18.P.2

Research historical and current events in physics

NS.19.AP.1

Collect and analyze scientific data using appropriate mathematical calculations, figures, and tables

NS.19.AP.2

Use appropriate equipment and technology as tools for solving problems (e.g., microscopes, centrifuges, flexible arm cameras, computer software and hardware)

NS.19.AP.3

Utilize technology to communicate research findings

NS.19.P.1

Use appropriate equipment and technology as tools for solving problems (e.g., balances, scales, calculators, probes, glassware, burners, computer software and hardware)

NS.19.P.2

Manipulate scientific data using appropriate mathematical calculations, charts, tables, and graphs

NS.19.P.3

Utilize technology to communicate research findings

NS.20.AP.1

Compare and contrast human biology concepts in pure science and applied science

NS.20.AP.2

Discuss why scientists should work within ethical parameters

NS.20.AP.3

Explain how the cyclical relationship between science and technology results in reciprocal advancements in science and technology

NS.20.P.1

Compare and contrast the connections between pure science and applied science as it relates to physics

NS.20.P.2

Give examples of scientific bias that affect outcomes of experimental results

NS.20.P.3

Discuss why scientists should work within ethical parameters

NS.20.P.4

Evaluate long-range plans concerning resource use and by-product disposal for environmental, economic, and political impact.

NS.20.P.5

Explain how the cyclical relationship between science and technology results in reciprocal advancements in science and technology

NS.21.AP.1

Research and evaluate health science careers using the following criteria: educational requirements salary availability of jobs working conditions

NS.21.P.1

Research and evaluate careers in physics using the following criteria: educational requirements salary availability of jobs working conditions

NS.32.C.1

Explain why science is limited to natural explanations of how the world works

NS.32.C.2

Compare and contrast hypotheses, theories, and laws

NS.32.C.3

Compare and contrast the criteria for the formation of scientific theory and scientific law

NS.32.C.4

Distinguish between a scientific theory and the term theory used in general conversation

NS.32.C.5

Summarize the guidelines of science: ? explanations are based on observations, evidence, and testing ? hypotheses must be testable ? understandings and/or conclusions may change with additional empirical data ? scientific knowledge must have peer review and verification before acceptance

NS.33.C.1

Develop and explain the appropriate procedure, controls, and variables (dependent and independent) in scientific experimentation

NS.33.C.2

Research and apply appropriate safety precautions (refer to Arkansas Safety Lab Guide) when designing and/or conducting scientific investigations

NS.33.C.3

Identify sources of bias that could affect experimental outcome

NS.33.C.4

Gather and analyze data using appropriate summary statistics

NS.33.C.5

Formulate valid conclusions without bias

NS.33.C.6

Communicate experimental results using appropriate reports, figures, and tables

NS.34.C.1

Recognize that theories are scientific explanations that require empirical data, verification, and peer review

NS.34.C.2

Understand that scientific theories may be modified or expanded based on additional empirical data, verification, and peer review

NS.34.C.3

Research current events and topics in chemistry

NS.35.C.1

Collect and analyze scientific data using appropriate mathematical calculations, figures, and tables

NS.35.C.2

Use appropriate equipment and technology as tools for solving problems

NS.35.C.3

Utilize technology to communicate research findings

NS.36.C.1

Compare and contrast chemistry concepts in pure science and applied science

NS.36.C.2

Discuss why scientists should work within ethical parameters

NS.36.C.3

Evaluate long-range plans concerning resource use and by-product disposal for environmental, economic, and political impact

NS.36.C.4

Explain how the cyclical relationship between science and technology results in reciprocal advancements in science and technology

NS.37.C.1

Research and evaluate science careers using the following criteria: ? educational requirements ? salary ? availability of jobs ? working conditions

NS.4.ES.1

Collect and analyze scientific data using appropriate mathematical calculations, figures and tables

NS.4.ES.2

Use appropriate equipment and technology as tools for solving problems (e.g., microscopes, centrifuges, flexible arm cameras, computer software and hardware)

NS.4.ES.3

Utilize technology to communicate research findings

NS.5.ES.1

Compare and contrast environmental concepts in pure science and applied science

NS.5.ES.2

Explain why scientists should work within ethical parameters

NS.5.ES.3

Evaluate long-range plans concerning resource use and by-product disposal for environmental, economical and political impact

NS.5.ES.4

Explain how the cyclical relationship between science and technology results in reciprocal advancements in science and technology

NS.6.ES.1

Research and evaluate science careers using the following criteria ? educational requirements ? salary ? availability of jobs ? working conditions

NS.9.PS.1

Explain why science is limited to natural explanations of how the world works

NS.9.PS.2

Compare and contrast hypotheses, theories, and laws

NS.9.PS.3

Distinguish between a scientific theory and the term theory used in general conversation

NS.9.PS.4

Summarize the guidelines of science: explanations are based on observations, evidence, and testing hypotheses must be testable understandings and/or conclusions may change with additional empirical data scientific knowledge must have peer review and verification before acceptance

OC.27.C.1

Examine the bonding and structural differences of organic compounds: alkanes CnH2n+2 alkenes CnH2n alkynes CnH2n?2 aromatic hydrocarbons cyclic hydrocarbons

OC.27.C.2

Differentiate between the role and importance of aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic hydrocarbons

OC.27.C.3

Compare and contrast isomers

OC.28.C.1

Describe the functional groups in organic chemistry: halohydrocarbons alcohols ethers aldehydes ketones carboxylic acids esters amines amides amino acids nitro compounds

OC.28.C.2

Name and write formulas for aliphatic, cyclic, and aromatic hydrocarbons

OC.29.C.1

Differentiate among the biochemical functions of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids

OC.29.C.2

Describe the manufacture of polymers derived from organic compounds: polymerization crosslinking

OHB.1.AP.1

Students shall explore the organizational structures of the body from the molecular to the organism level.

OHB.1.AP.2

Sequence the levels of organization of the human body

OHB.1.AP.3

Identify the major body systems

OHB.1.AP.4

Describe relative positions, body planes, body regions and body quadrants

OHB.1.AP.5

Identify the major body cavities and the subdivisions of each cavity

OHB.1.AP.6

Investigate homeostatic control mechanisms and their importance to health and diseases

OHB.1.AP.7

Predict the effect of positive and negative feedback mechanisms on homeostasis

OHB.1.AP.8

Identify the major characteristics of life: metabolism responsiveness movement growth reproduction differentiation

ORR.25.C.1

Identify substances that are oxidized and substances that are reduced in a chemical reaction

ORR.25.C.2

Complete and balance redox reactions: assign oxidation numbers identify the oxidizing agent and reducing agent write net ionic equations

ORR.26.C.1

Write equations for the reactions occurring at the cathode and anode in electrolytic conduction

ORR.26.C.2

Build a voltaic cell and measure cell potential: half-cells salt bridge

ORR.26.C.3

Explain the process of obtaining electricity from a chemical voltaic cell: line notation : anode (oxidation) ? cathode (reduction)

ORR.26.C.4

Calculate electric potential of a cell using redox potentials and predict product

ORR.26.C.5

Use redox potentials to predict electrolysis products and the electric potential of a cell

P.4.C.1

Compare and contrast the historical events leading to the evolution of the Periodic Table

P.4.C.2

Describe the arrangement of the Periodic Table based on electron filling orders: Groups Periods

P.4.C.3

Interpret periodic trends: atomic radius ionic radius ionization energy electron affinities electronegativities

P.5.C.1

Write formulas for binary and ternary compounds: IUPAC system Greek prefixes polyatomic ions

P.5.C.2

Name binary and ternary compounds

P.5.C.3

Predict the name and symbol for newly discovered elements using the IUPAC system

P.5.PS.1

Distinguish among thermal energy, heat, and temperature

P.5.PS.2

Calculate changes in thermal energy using: q = mc p?T Where q = heat energy, m = mass, p c = specific heat, ?T = change in temperature

P.6.C.1

Compare and contrast matter based on uniformity of particles: pure substances solutions heterogeneous mixtures

P.6.C.2

Distinguish between extensive and intensive physical properties of matter

P.6.C.3

Separate homogeneous mixtures using physical processes: chromatography

P.6.C.4

Design experiments tracing the energy involved in physical changes and chemical changes

P.6.C.5

Predict the chemical properties of substances based on their electron configuration: active inactive inert

P.6.PS.1

Analyze how force affects motion: one-dimensional (linear) two-dimensional (projectile and rotational)

P.6.PS.10

Calculate force, mass, and acceleration using Newtons second law of motion: F = ma Where F =force, m =mass, a =acceleration

P.6.PS.11

Relate the Law of Conservation of Momentum to how it affects the movement of objects

P.6.PS.12

Compare and contrast the effects of forces on fluids: Archimedes principle Pascals principle Bernoullis principle

P.6.PS.13

Design an experiment to show conversion of energy: mechanical (potential and kinetic) chemical thermal sound light nuclear

P.6.PS.14

Solve problems by using formulas for gravitational potential and kinetic energy: 2 2 KE = 1 mv PE = mgh Where KE = kinetic energy, PE = potential energy, m = mass, v = velocity

P.6.PS.2

Explain how motion is relative to a reference point

P.6.PS.3

Compare and contrast among speed, velocity and acceleration

P.6.PS.4

Solve problems using the formulas for speed and acceleration: t d v = t v a ? ? = Where a = acceleration, v = speed (velocity), ?t = change in time, ?v = change in velocity, t = time and d = distance

P.6.PS.5

Interpret graphs related to motion: distance versus time (d-t) velocity versus time (v-t) acceleration versus time (a-t)

P.6.PS.6

Compare and contrast Newtons three laws of motion

P.6.PS.7

Design and conduct investigations demonstrating Newtons first law of motion

P.6.PS.8

Conduct investigations demonstrating Newtons second law of motion

P.6.PS.9

Design and conduct investigations demonstrating Newtons third law of motion

P.7.C.1

Demonstrate an understanding of the Law of Multiple Proportions

P.7.PS.1

Compare and contrast a waves speed through various mediums

P.7.PS.10

Differentiate among the reflected images produced by concave, convex, and plane mirrors

P.7.PS.11

Differentiate between the refracted images produced by concave and convex lenses

P.7.PS.12

Research current uses of optics and sound

P.7.PS.2

Explain diffraction of waves

P.7.PS.3

Explain Doppler effect using examples

P.7.PS.4

Calculate problems relating to wave properties: ? = vt T f 1 = v = f? Where ? = wavelength, f = frequency , T = period , v = velocity

P.7.PS.5

Describe how the physical properties of sound waves affect its perception

P.7.PS.6

Define light in terms of waves and particles

P.7.PS.7

Explain the formation of color by light and by pigments

P.7.PS.8

Investigate the separation of white light into colors by diffraction

P.7.PS.9

Illustrate constructive and destructive interference of light waves

P.8.PS.1

Where V = voltage, I = current, R = resistance

P.8.PS.2

Calculate electrical power using current and voltage: P = IV Where P = power, I = current , V = voltage

P.8.PS.3

Calculate electrical energy using electrical power and time: E = Pt Where E = energy, P = power, t = time

P.8.PS.4

Explain the use of electromagnets in step-up and step-down transformers

P.8.PS.5

Research current uses of electromagnets

PD.1.ES.16

Explain heat transfer in the atmosphere and its relationship to meteorological processes: pressure winds evaporation precipitation

PD.1.ES.17

Compare and contrast meteorological processes related to air masses, weather systems, and forecasting

PD.1.ES.18

Construct and interpret weather maps

PD.1.ES.19

Describe the cycling of materials and energy: nitrogen oxygen carbon phosphorous hydrological sulfur

S.12.C.1

Balance chemical equations when all reactants and products are given

S.12.C.2

Use balanced reaction equations to obtain information about the amounts of reactants and products

S.12.C.3

Distinguish between limiting reactants and excess reactants in balanced reaction equations

S.12.C.4

Calculate stoichiometric quantities and use these to determine theoretical yields

S.13.C.1

Apply the mole concept to calculate the number of particles and the amount of substance: Avogadros constant = 23 6.02 10

S.13.C.2

Determine the empirical and molecular formulas using the molar concept: molar mass average atomic mass molecular mass formula mass

S.14.C.1

Given the reactants predict products for the following types of reactions: synthesis decomposition single displacement double displacement combustion

S.15.C.1

Distinguish between the terms solute, solvent, solution and concentration

S.15.C.2

Give examples for the nine solvent-solute pairs

S.15.C.3

Calculate the following concentration expressions involving the amount of solute and volume of solution: molarity (M) molality (m) percent composition normality (N)

S.15.C.4

Given the quantity of a solution, determine the quantity of another species in the reaction

S.15.C.5

Define heat of solution

S.15.C.6

Identify the physical state for each substance in a reaction equation

SP.3.ES.1

Explain the reciprocal relationships between Earths processes (natural disasters) and human activities

SP.3.ES.10

Predict the long-term societal impact of specific health, population, resource, and environmental iss

SP.3.ES.11

Investigate the effect of public policy decisions on health, population, resource, and environmental issues

SP.3.ES.12

Explain the impact of factors such as birth rate, death rate, and migration rate on population changes

SP.3.ES.13

Distinguish between developed and developing countries

SP.3.ES.2

Investigate the relationships between human consumption of natural resources and the stewardship responsibility for reclamations including disposal of hazardous and non-hazardous waste

SP.3.ES.3

Explain common problems related to water quality: conservation usage supply treatment pollutants (point and non-point sources)

SP.3.ES.4

Explain problems related to air quality: automobiles industry natural emissions

SP.3.ES.5

Evaluate the impact of different points of view on health, population, resource, and environmental issues: governmental economic societal

SP.3.ES.6

Research how political systems influence environmental decisions

SP.3.ES.7

Investigate which federal and state agencies have responsibility for environmental monitoring and action

SP.3.ES.8

Compare and contrast man-made environments and natural environments

SP.3.ES.9

Evaluate personal and societal benefits when examining health, population, resource, and environmental issues

T.4.AP.1

Describe the structure, location, and function of each tissue category: epithelial connective nervous muscle

WO.10.P.1

Calculate the frequency and wavelength of electromagnetic radiation

WO.10.P.10

Calculate the magnification of lenses: p q h h M = ? ? = Where M = magnification; h? = image height; h = object height; q = image distance; p = object distance

WO.10.P.2

Apply the law of reflection for flat mirrors: ? in = ? out

WO.10.P.3

Describe the images formed by flat mirrors

WO.10.P.4

Calculate distances and focal lengths for curved mirrors: p q R 1 1 2 + = Where p = object distance; q = image distance; R = radius of curvature

WO.10.P.5

Draw ray diagrams to find the image distance and magnification for curved mirrors

WO.10.P.6

Solve problems using Snells law:

WO.10.P.7

Calculate the index of refraction through various media using the following equation: v c n = Where n = index of refraction; c = speed of light in vacuum; v = speed of light in medium

WO.10.P.8

Use a ray diagram to find the position of an image produced by a lens

WO.10.P.9

Solve problems using the thin-lens equation: p q f 1 1 1 + = Where q = image distance; p = object distance; f = focal length

WO.9.P.1

Explain how force, velocity, and acceleration change as an object vibrates with simple harmonic motion

WO.9.P.2

Calculate the spring force using Hookes law: F kx elastic = ? Where ? k = spring constant

WO.9.P.3

Calculate the period and frequency of an object vibrating with a simple harmonic motion: g L T = 2? T f 1 = Where T = period

WO.9.P.4

Differentiate between pulse and periodic waves

WO.9.P.5

Relate energy and amplitude