Arizona Social Studies Standards — Grade 3


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SS03-S1C1.

Historical research is a process in which students examine topics or questions related to historical studies and/or current issues. By using primary and secondary sources effectively students obtain accurate and relevant information.

SS03-S1C1.a

Use timelines to identify the time sequence of historical data.

SS03-S1C1.b

Recognize how archaeological research adds to our understanding of the past.

SS03-S1C1.c

Use primary source materials (e.g., photos, artifacts, interviews, documents, maps) and secondary source materials (e.g., encyclopedias, biographies) to study people and events from the past.

SS03-S1C1.d

Retell stories to describe past events, people and places.

SS03-S1C10

Current events and issues continue to shape our nation and our involvement in the global community.

SS03-S1C10.a

Describe current events using information from class discussions and various resources (e.g., newspapers, magazines, television, Internet, books, maps).

SS03-S1C10.b

Discuss the connections between current events and historical events and issues from content studied in Strand 1 using information from class discussions and various resources (e.g., newspapers, magazines, television, Internet, books, maps).

SS03-S1C3.

The varied causes and effects of exploration, settlement, and colonization shaped regional and national development of the U.S.

SS03-S1C3.a

Discuss technological advances (e.g., compass, printing press) that facilitated exploration of the New World.

SS03-S1C3.b

Recognize that European countries explored the New World for economic and political reasons.

SS03-S1C3.c

Discuss European explorers (e.g., Samuel Champlain, Henry Hudson, John Cabot, Jacques Cartier, Ponce de Leon, Hernan de Soto) and their discoveries in the New World.

SS03-S1C3.d

Recognize how European exploration affected Native Americans in the Eastern regions (e.g., way of life, loss of land).

SS03-S1C6.

Regional conflicts led to the Civil War and resulted in significant changes to American social, economic, and political structures.

SS03-S1C6.a

Recognize that there were issues (e.g., slavery, states' rights, South seceded from the Union) associated with the Civil War.

SS03-S1C6.b

Discuss contributions of people (e.g., Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant, Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, Frederick Douglass) during the Civil War era.

SS03-S1C7.

Economic, social, and cultural changes transformed the U.S. into a world power.

SS03-S1C7.a

Discuss reasons (e.g., famine, political discord, religious persecution, economic opportunity) why people left their home country to start a new life in the United States.

SS03-S1C7.b

Describe the experiences (e.g., new language, customs, opportunities, hardships) in immigrants' lives after settling in the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

SS03-S1C9.

Postwar tensions led to social change in the U.S. and to a heightened focus on foreign policy.

SS03-S1C9.a

Recognize that individuals (e.g., Susan B. Anthony, Jackie Robinson, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Cesar Chavez) worked for and supported the rights and freedoms of others.

SS03-S2C1.

Historical research is a process in which students examine topics or questions related to historical studies and/or current issues.

SS03-S2C1.a

Use timelines to identify the time sequence of historical data.

SS03-S2C1.b

Recognize how archaeological research adds to our understanding of the past.

SS03-S2C1.c

Use primary source materials (e.g., photos, artifacts, interviews, documents, maps) and secondary source materials (e.g., encyclopedias, biographies) to study people and events from the past.

SS03-S2C1.d

Retell stories to describe past events, people and places.

SS03-S2C2

The geographic, political, economic and cultural characteristics of early civilizations significantly influenced the development of later civilizations.

SS03-S2C2.a

Recognize how government (beginnings of democracy), mythology, art, architecture, and the Olympics in Ancient Greece contributed to the development of their own and later civilizations.

SS03-S2C2.b

Discuss the contributions of Ancient Greek teachers/philosophers (e.g., Socrates, Plato, Aristotle) whose thinking contributed to the development of their own and later civilizations.

SS03-S2C2.c

Recognize how representative government, mythology, architecture (e.g., aqueducts), and language (e.g., Latin) in Ancient Rome contributed to the development of their own and later civilizations.

SS03-S2C2.d

Discuss the contributions of political and military leaders of Ancient Rome (e.g., Julius Caesar, Augustus, Constantine) whose actions influenced their own and later civilizations.

SS03-S2C5.

Innovations, discoveries, exploration, and colonization accelerated contact, conflict, and interconnection among societies world wide, transforming and creating nations.

SS03-S2C5.a

Describe how the search for a Northwest Passage to Asia led to the exploration and settlement of Canada.

SS03-S2C5.b

Discuss European global explorations (e.g., Columbus, Magellan, Henry Hudson, Vasco da Gama, Balboa).

SS03-S2C9.

The nations of the contemporary world are shaped by their cultural and political past. Current events, developments and issues continue to shape the global community.

SS03-S2C9.a

Describe current events using information from class discussions and various resources (e.g., newspapers, magazines, television, Internet, books, maps).

SS03-S3C1.

The United States democracy is based on principles and ideals that are embodied by symbols, people and documents.

SS03-S3C1.a

a) Statue of Liberty; b) Ellis Island; c) Lincoln Memorial; d) the U. S. Capitol.

SS03-S3C1.b

Recognize that people in the United States have varied backgrounds but may share principles, goals, customs and traditions.

SS03-S3C1.c

Describe how people in the community and state work together to achieve common goals.

SS03-S3C1.d

a) Presidents' Day; b) Martin Luther King, Jr. Day; c) Veterans' Day; d) Memorial Day; e) Constitution Day; f) Labor Day.

SS03-S3C2.

The United States structure of government is characterized by the separation and balance of powers.

SS03-S3C2.a

a) Executive; b) Legislative; c) Judicial.

SS03-S3C2.b

Recognize that there are different levels of government (e.g., local, tribal, county, state, national).

SS03-S3C3

Laws and policies are developed to govern, protect, and promote the well-being of the people.

SS03-S3C3.a

Identify the basic concept of how laws are made (e.g., law proposed, discussed, amended, voted on).

SS03-S3C4.

The rights, responsibilities and practices of United States citizenship are founded in the Constitution and the nation's history.

SS03-S3C4.a

a) good sportsmanship; b) participation and cooperation; c) rules and consequences; d) voting.

SS03-S3C4.b

Describe the importance of students contributing to a community (e.g., service projects, cooperating, volunteering).

SS03-S3C4.c

Identify traits of character (e.g., honesty, courage, cooperation, respect, trustworthiness, responsibility, citizenship) that are important to the preservation and improvement of democracy.

SS03-S4C1.

The spatial perspective and associated geographic tools are used to organize and interpret information about people, places and environments.

SS03-S4C1.a

Discuss that different types of maps (e.g., political, physical, thematic) serve various purposes.

SS03-S4C1.b

a) alpha-numeric grids; b) title; c) compass rose -cardinal and intermediate directions; d) symbols; e) legend; f) scale.

SS03-S4C1.c

Construct a map of a familiar place (e.g., school, home, neighborhood, fictional place) that includes a title, compass rose, symbols, and legend.

SS03-S4C1.d

Construct maps using symbols to represent human and physical features.

SS03-S4C1.e

Construct charts and graphs to display geographic information.

SS03-S4C1.f

a) physical (i.e., ocean continent, river, lake, mountain range, coast, sea, desert, gulf, bay, strait, plain, valley, volcano, peninsula); b) human (i.e., equator, Northern and Southern Hemispheres, North and South Poles, city).

SS03-S4C1.g

a) physical (i.e., seven continents, four oceans, river, lake, mountain range, coast, sea, desert, gulf, bay, strait, peninsula); b) human (i.e., equator, Northern and Southern Hemispheres, North and South Poles, city, state, country, roads, railroads).

SS03-S4C2.

Places and regions have distinct physical and cultural characteristics.

SS03-S4C2.a

Locate major physical and human features from content studied (e.g., Greece, Canada, Spain, United States) on maps and globes.

SS03-S4C2.b

Describe how physical and human characteristics of places change from past to present.

SS03-S4C3.

Physical processes shape the Earth and interact with plant and animal life to create, sustain, and modify ecosystems. These processes affect the distribution of resources and economic development.

SS03-S4C3.a

Describe major factors that impact human populations and the environment.

SS03-S4C3.b

Explain the relationships among plants and animals in different environments.

SS03-S4C3.c

Describe ways species adapt to environments and what happens if they cannot adapt.

SS03-S4C3.d

Identify the basic properties of earth materials (rocks, fossils, layers of the earth).

SS03-S4C4.

Human cultures, their nature, and distribution affect societies and the Earth.

SS03-S4C4.a

Describe changes over time in transportation (e.g., animal, boat, train, motorized vehicle, aircraft).

SS03-S4C4.b

Describe changes over time in communication networks (e.g., telegraph, telephone, postal, internet).

SS03-S4C4.c

Recognize there are differences in political units and hierarchies (i.e., community, city, county, state, country, continent).

SS03-S4C4.d

Describe elements of culture of a community or nation (e.g., food, clothing, housing, sports, customs, beliefs) in areas studied.

SS03-S4C4.e

Discuss that Ancient Civilizations have changed from past to present.

SS03-S4C4.f

Discuss the major economic activities and land use (e.g., harvesting natural resources, agricultural, industrial, residential, commercial, recreational) of areas studied.

SS03-S4C5.

Human and environmental interactions are interdependent upon one another. Humans interact with the environment- they depend upon it, they modify it; and they adapt to it. The health and well-being of all humans depends upon an understanding of the interconnections and interdependence of human and physical systems.

SS03-S4C5.a

Identify ways (e.g., farming, building structures and dams, creating transportation routes, overgrazing, mining, logging) in which humans depend upon, adapt to, and impact the earth.

SS03-S4C5.b

Describe ways of protecting natural resources.

SS03-S4C5.c

Identify resources that are renewable, recyclable, and non-renewable.

SS03-S4C6.

Geographic thinking (asking and answering geographic questions) is used to understand spatial patterns of the past, the present, and to plan for the future.

SS03-S4C6.a

Discuss geographic concepts related to current events.

SS03-S4C6.b

Use geography concepts and skills (e.g., recognizing patterns, mapping, graphing) to find solutions for local, state or national problems (e.g., shortage or abundance of natural resources).

SS03-S5C1.

The foundations of economics are the application of basic economic concepts and decision-making skills. This includes scarcity and the different methods of allocation of goods and services.

SS03-S5C1.a

Identify how scarcity requires people to make choices due to their unlimited wants and needs.

SS03-S5C1.b

Identify opportunity costs in personal decision-making situations.

SS03-S5C1.c

Identify goods and services (e.g., fire and police protection, immunizations, library) provided by local government.

SS03-S5C1.d

Give examples of trade in the local community (e.g., farmers supply the grocer).

SS03-S5C1.e

Discuss reasons (e.g., labor, raw materials, energy resources) why some goods are made locally and some are made in other parts of the United States and world.

SS03-S5C1.f

Discuss how producers use natural, human, and capital resources to create goods and services.

SS03-S5C2.

Microeconomics examines the costs and benefits of economic choices relating to individuals, markets and industries, and governmental policies.

SS03-S5C2.a

Discuss different ways individuals can earn money.

SS03-S5C5.

Decision-making skills foster a person's individual standard of living. Using information wisely leads to better informed decisions as consumers, workers, investors and effective participants in society.

SS03-S5C5.a

Discuss costs and benefits of personal spending and saving choices.